History Buzz: December 2005

December 26, 2005

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Condoleezza Rice: “I’m a historian I tend to see things in the big sweep of history and hope that at some point somebody is going to look back and say, oh, something that she did then mattered.” – AP, 12-25-05
  • “The economy and the budget were in much worse shape than today…” Joshua Freeman on New York Transit Strike, Then and Now – ABC News, 12-20-05
  • Camilla Townsend on ‘The New World': “It is extraordinary that they (film-makers) worked so hard to get the scenes and the costumes correct yet continue to ignore the facts…” Star Pulse, 12-19-05
SPOTTED:
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #3 (8 weeks on list) – 12-18-05
  • David McCullough: 1776, #6 (30 weeks on list) – 12-18-05
BEST OF THE YEAR:
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • John Lewis Gaddis: The Cold War: A New History, December 27, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • Amanda Mackenzie Stuart: Consuelo and Alva Vanderbilt: The Story of a Daughter and a Mother in the Gilded Age, January 3, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Taylor Branch: At Canaan’s Edge : America in the King Years, 1965-68, January 10, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Leanda de Lisle: After Elizabeth : The Rise of James of Scotland and the Struggle For the Throne of England, January 31, 2006 – Amazon.com
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, December 25, 2005 at 6:56 PM

December 19, 2005

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Don Ritchie on Tom Daschle: “Many former senators… remain in the nation’s capital to work as lobbyists or public policy advocates.” – Argus Leader, 12-14-05
  • Robert Dallek on Kennedy Statue: “Getting these (statues) erected is not a simple business, politics linger on.” – Associated Press, 12-9-05
SPOTTED:
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #3 (7 weeks on list) – 12-25-05
  • David McCullough: 1776, #6 (29 weeks on list) – 12-25-05
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Richard Reeves: President Reagan : The Triumph of Imagination, December 20, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • Aharon J. Klein: Striking Back: The Munich Olympics Massacre and Israel’s Deadly Response, December 20, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • John Lewis Gaddis: The Cold War: A New History, December 27, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • Amanda Mackenzie Stuart: Consuelo and Alva Vanderbilt: The Story of a Daughter and a Mother in the Gilded Age, January 3, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Taylor Branch: At Canaan’s Edge : America in the King Years, 1965-68, January 10, 2006 – Amazon.com
BEST OF THE YEAR:
HONORED:
DONATED:
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, December 18, 2005 at 5:56 PM

December 12, 2005

IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
OP-ED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
SPOTTED:
  • John Hope Franklin holding a ‘Mirror to America’ @ University of Chicago – People’s Weekly World, 12-8-05
  • Alexander Nikishin presents $5-mln Russian vodka collection – RIA Novosti, 12-8-05
  • David McCullough on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show on Comedy Central, 12-7-05
  • James Loewen discussing Sundown Town at the U of Minnesota, 12-6-05
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin Interviewed by Don Imus this past week – MSNBC, Newsweek
  • The Charlie Rose Show: A Discussion With Professor John Hope Franklin, 12-1-05 (Transcript available through eduke@duke.edu)
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin on Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show on Comedy Central, 10-26-2005
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearn Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #3 (6 weeks on list) – 12-18-05
  • David McCullough: 1776, #8 (28 weeks on list) – 12-18-05
ON TV
  • Michael Beschloss on Imus in the Morning: Monday, December 12th 8:29am eastern on MSNBC
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Richard Reeves: President Reagan : The Triumph of Imagination, December 20, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • John Lewis Gaddis: The Cold War: A New History, December 27, 2005 – Amazon.com
  • Taylor Branch: At Canaan’s Edge : America in the King Years, 1965-68, January 10, 2006 – Amazon.com
CAMPAIGNING:
HONORED:
BEST OF THE YEAR:
  • David McCullough, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Garry Wills & Sean Wilentz Make Best of 2005 – The Boston Globe, 12-4-05
  • History books of 2005: Understanding American Democracy and Executive Power – DCMilitary.com, 12-8-05
  • James Loewen’s SUNDOWN TOWNS: the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Tolerance 12-8-05
  • James Loewen’s SUNDOWN TOWNS (“The often shocking history of whites-only communities”): The Washington Post Book World
LEAVING:
RETIRING:
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, December 11, 2005 at 2:51 PM

December 5, 2005

IMPRISONED:
REVIEWED:
OP-ED:
IN THE NEWS:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Julian Zelizer on ABC NEWS : “…The fact is that if you’re the party in power, it falls on you.”
  • “First Man” is not so much reported and written as vacuumed up and dumped out. — About James R. Hansen’s First Man The Life of Neil A. ArmstrongLos Angeles Times, 11-27-05
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearn Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #3 (5 weeks on list) – 12-11-05
  • David McCullough: 1776, #10 (27 weeks on list) – 12-11-05
  • John Hope Franklin’s Mirror to America, #30
  • - (12-04-05)

ON TV:
  • SAVE OUR HISTORY FBI STINGS: Recovering Stolen History on The History Channel(R) Saturday, December 10 at 8pm ET/PT – The History Channel
DONATED:
HONORED:
APPOINTED:
BEST OF THE YEAR:
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, December 4, 2005 at 5:57 PM

Top Young Historians: 8 – Thomas J. Brown

Thomas J. Brown, 45

Top Young Historians: Index

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History and Associate Director of the Institute for Southern Studies, University of South Carolina.
Areas of Research: U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction
Education: Ph.D., Harvard University, 1995
Major Publications: Dorothea Dix, New England Reformer (Harvard University Press, 1998); co-editor of Hope and Glory: Essays on the Legacy of the 54th Massachusetts Regiment (University of Massachusetts Press, 2001); editor of The Public Art of Civil War Commemoration: A Brief History with Documents Thomas J. Brown JPG (Bedford/Saint Martin’s, 2004) and Reconstructions: New Perspectives on the Postbellum United States (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2006).
Brown is currently working on a book about Civil War monuments tentatively titled The Reconstruction of American Memory: Civic Monuments of the Civil War.
Awards: In May 2005 undergraduates at the University of South Carolina gave Brown the Richard A. Rempel Award, presented annually to a faculty member who has shown exemplary concern for students.
Additional Info: Brown worked as a federal judicial clerk for two years and as an attorney for three years after graduating from Harvard Law School in 1984. He is completing for publication a book about the permanent residents of Magnolia Cemetery in Charleston, South Carolina, by his longtime friend Ted Ashton Phillips, Jr., the last of the great Charleston antiquarians, who moved in with the subjects of the book much too soon in January 2005.

Personal Anecdote:

My interest in history builds on an upbringing in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., as part of a large family in which my father would take the children into town every Sunday afternoon to give my mother a rest and entertain us at the museums and other historic sites. These excursions fostered stronger attachments to the American procession than he intended. It is not surprising that my research has come to focus on civic monuments as attempts to unify past and present on public stages for everyday life.

I have so far enjoyed little success in reproducing those childhood experiences and their gratifications with my son and daughter, though they have generously indulged my reminiscences. My son did see a prospect of physical adventure in my accounts of climbing the stairs to the top of the Washington Monument, and I was delighted when he said that he would like to make the ascent while we were visiting his grandparents a couple years ago. Lucian was at that point twelve years old, edging daily across the precipice of childhood into the abyss of adolescence. The Washington Monument rose up before me as a parenting opportunity as grand if as solitary as its appearance on the Mall. I prepared to improve our exercise with casual observations about the dream of Revolution that suffused the decorations on the staircase wall or the fear of alien change that prompted Know-Nothings to seize the uncompleted monument in the 1850s.

I am wary of sliding into a classroom mode with my children and was particularly cautious about dampening a readiness that was powerful enough to help Lucian awaken at the early hour necessary for us to come into town and pick up tickets for admission to the monument much later in the day. We wandered over to the Lincoln Memorial, which is close to the heart of my research specialty, but I spared him my lectures on the memorial or on Lincoln himself. We spent most of the morning in Lucian’s favorite part of Washington, its small Chinatown, where we bought a soft drink in a Chinese- labeled bottle that he kept in his room long afterwards. For my gateway to the empyrean of history I planned to bank on the Washington Monument, as the early republic did.

When we returned in the afternoon and fell into the line, I saw that we were being funneled toward an elevator. I flagged a National Park Service ranger and explained that we wanted to walk up the monument. He laughed, not entirely in a kind way, and informed me that climbing up the stairs had not been permitted since the 1976 Bicentennial. I could see that the ranger had not been alive then.

Lucian was disappointed to miss the challenge of the ascent but positively disgusted to be identified with someone who was so cluelessly old to a twenty-five-year-old whom he considered unfathomably old. The doorway of the past as a medium of communication had never been more firmly slammed in my face. I hope for more success with my students and readers. As for Lucian, I look forward to learning from him about contemporary Asia and hiking up hills together.

Quotes

By Thomas J. Brown

  • Although many historians would later describe her wartime work as a reluctant interruption of her crusade for the insane, Dix hurried to volunteer precisely because she recognized that the Civil War presented a chance to bring her antebellum mission to a climax. As the commander of ‘an army of nurses,’ she could be-as she had always sought to become-the link between the regeneration of individuals and the reform of American society. Saving the lives of the wounded and guiding the souls of the dying, she would personify the force of exemplary moral character in the ordeal of suffering she had long anticipated. She would not merely tend to soldiers; she would help to heal the nation. — Thomas J. Brown, in Dorothea Dix, New England Reformer
  • About Thomas J. Brown

  • This well written and copiously researched work presents a sympathetic and intimate portrait of one of the best-known reformers in antebellum America…What Brown presents is a surprisingly intimate portrait that still acknowledges Dix’s many shortcomings–her limited view of women’s rights, her blindness on the issue of slavery, and her lingering nativism. Despite Dix’s personal limitations, however, Brown recognizes her many successes in convincing parsimonious legislatures to build asylums and putting the plight of the mentally ill on a national stage. Brown tells a story that is closely focused on Dix, but also manages to reveal valuable information about education, religion, medical professionalism, women’s history and the political quagmire of antebellum America. — Stephan D. Andrews, Journal of the Early Republic
  • “The strengths of Brown’s biography are obvious: it is impressively researched and well written; it provides insights into Dix’s career; and it offers a window into the complex cultural world of that era. The most original part of the book lies in the detailed analysis of Dix’s failure to secure federal land grants to endow state mental hospitals and her abortive role as superintendent of nurses during the Civil War; both episodes illuminate the sources of her career and the fragility of her moral ideology. Brown’s biography will appeal most to scholars seeking the define the character and ideology of mid-nineteenth-century social activism…It is clear that Brown has made in important contribution, and future scholars will profit from his insights.” — Gerald N. Grob, Journal of American History
  • Professor Thomas J. Brown, Department of History, University of South Carolina. Tom is a brilliant historian (also a lawyer), who has published an important biography of Dorothea Dix, is a key figure in Southern Studies at his university, and and is a specialist on Civil War memorials and monuments. He is brilliant. — David Herbert Donald, Charles Warren Professor of American History and of American Civilization Emeritus at Harvard University
  • “I thought Brown was excellent. He’s absolutely brilliant and conveys his knowledge effectively.” — Anonymous student
  • Posted on Sunday, December 25, 2005 at 12:10 AM

    Top Young Historians: 7 – Jonathan Earle

    Jonathan Earle, 37

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, University of Kansas, Department of History; Also Associate Director for Programming, Robert J. Dole Institute of Politics.
    Areas of Research: 19th Century U.S. antislavery and democratic movements, and U.S. political history.
    Education: Ph.D., Princeton University, 1996
    Jonathan Earle JPG Major Publications: Jacksonian Antislavery and the Politics of Free Soil, 1824-1854 (UNC Press, 2004); The Routledge Atlas of African American History (Routledge, 2000)
    Earle is currently working on a book on John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry for Bedford/St. Martin’s Press.
    Awards: Winner of the 2005 SHEAR First Book Prize, Society for Historians of the Early American Republic. Co-winner, 2005 Byron Caldwell Smith Book Prize, Hall Center for the Humanities, University of Kansas.
    Celebration of Teaching Honoree, Center for Teaching Excellence, University of Kansas, 2002
    National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 2000; American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship, 1999-2000; Huntington Library Research Fellowship, 1999-2000 (San Marino, California).

    Personal Anecdote:

    I was already almost a year into research on a dissertation about the New York Anti-Rent Wars of the 1840s when I found out someone else was working on the same topic. This is exactly the type of horrific fantasy that keeps graduate students up in the middle of the night. The place I found out was more than a little ignominious – in the men’s room of the Library Company of Philadelphia, where a senior scholar one urinal over remarked “I think there’s someone at Yale working on that very topic.” Well, I told myself, maybe this person had a peculiar or different take on the uprising from me. Maybe he or she had stalled and would never finish. Or perhaps the topic was meaty enough to support two dissertations.

    A very long phone conversation with that particular graduate student convinced me that I should back off. He had a five-year head start on me, was working with David Davis, and was interested in the same political and cultural ramifications that I was among landless tenants in the Hudson Valley in the decades before the Civil War. I decided to take some of my preliminary conclusions about democracy, land, and antislavery politics from that project and broaden the study to look at the entire antebellum North. After that initial trauma, I couldn’t be happier with my decision. Not only do we have an important study of the Anti-renters from Prof. Reeve Huston, but my own book on the origins of the free soil movement has begun to garner good reviews and even some praise from prize committees.

    If there is any moral to this story, it’s that oftentimes conflicts over shared topics can have positive outcomes for all parties. I may have added to my time in graduate school, but I think my dissertation and book benefited from my year with the Anti-Renters. They’re still in there – it’s just a little harder to find them. And they’re part of a larger story about how the politics of land and slavery collided in North the 1840s and 50s.

    Quotes

    By Jonathan Earle

  • Free Soil Democrats’ opposition to slavery did not imply the abandonment of other established ideas or positions. Indeed, this particular antislavery impulse grew straight from the roots of the Democracy’s long-standing commitment to egalitarianism or, put in opposite terms, the rank and file’s ingrained hostility to centralized power and its perceived tendency to promote social and economic inequality. As Marvin Meyers noted in the 1950s, radical, hard-money Democrats developed a shorthand description for this interlocking set of powerful individuals and institutions they called the Money Power. Vaguely defined and characterized in pictures and prose as a multi-tentacled monster, the Money Power exerted its majesty through privileged access to the nation’s banking system…By the mid-1830s, however, Democratic dissidents, reasonably satisfied that Jackson and his administration had the Money Power on the run, discovered that another enemy – slavery – had arisen in its place. To make matters worse, this Slave Power was allied with the New England textile barons to ensure a profitable future for cotton, market capitalism, and slavery. — Jonathan Earle, in Jacksonian Antislavery and the Politics of Free Soil, 1824-1854
  • About Jonathan Earle

  • “Jonathan Earle revises the revisionists in this lucid and well-argued demonstration of the vital Jacksonian contribution to the abolition of slavery. Jacksonian Antislavery enriches the literature of the age of Jackson.” — Arthur Schlesinger Jr.
  • “In this first-rate, path-breaking book, Jonathan Earle engages familiar literature and, much to his credit, takes our understanding of political antislavery into unexplored terrain. He shows persuasively that Free Soil Democrats stood apart from other antislavery activists whose reformist agenda was both broader and infused with evangelical uplift. He illuminates a largely ignored dimension of the Free Soil and Republican parties and, in the process, enriches our understanding of the sectional crisis.” — Michael A. Morrison, Purdue University
  • Loved it, Loved the man, great class, very funny.”…”I loved this class, it was my favorite at KU.”…”Awesome Professor!!!” — Anonymous former students
  • Posted on Saturday, December 17, 2005 at 11:49 PM

    Top Young Historians: 6 – Joanne Freeman

    Joanne Freeman, 43

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Professor of History, Director of Graduate Studies, Yale University
    Area of Research: The political history and culture of revolutionary and early national America.
    Education: Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1998
    Major Publications: Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic (2001); the editor of Alexander Hamilton: Writings (2001). Joanne Freeman  JPG Freeman is currently working on a book about political violence and the culture of Congress in antebellum America.
    Awards: Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic. (2001), won the best book award from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic.
    Additional Info: After a brief career in advertising, Freeman worked as a public historian for seven years, during which she curated museum exhibits, coordinated educational programs, and gave public lectures for institutions such as the Smithsonian Institution, the Library of Congress, the United States Department of Treasury, South Street Seaport Museum, and the Museum of American Financial History.
    Freeman has lectured at such venues as Colonial Williamsburg, the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of American History, the United States Capitol Historical Society, Monticello, and the Hamilton Grange National Park Site.
    Freeman has also advised and appeared on numerous television documentaries and educational programs, including ‘The Duel’ (The American Experience, PBS), ‘Founding Brothers’ (History Channel), ‘Dueling in the New World’ (Discovery Channel); and ‘This Week in History’ (History Channel).
    Freeman also is a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians, and serves on the Advisory Board of the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic and the International Center for Jefferson Studies.

    Personal Anecdote:

    I’ve always thought of myself as an “archive rat.” I love exploring manuscript collections, pouring over letters and random bits of paper, and – occasionally – discovering something new, revealing or exciting. Granted, sometimes one simply finds something odd, like the wad of New York Republican George Clinton’s hair that I found carefully wrapped up in a paper packet, or the small folded bit of eighteenth-century paper labeled “Grass” and containing, logically enough, little bits of eighteenth-century grass. Other times, one gets the feeling that a particular manuscript collection has been moldering in the dust of centuries until saved from oblivion by your call slip; one such occasion produced a collection of papers from an eighteenth-century Virginian that (honestly) reeked of leather and dirt – perhaps a whiff of eighteenth-century Virginia, though its main impact was to inspire a desperate desire to wash my hands.

    In the course of my research, I’ve discovered a related historical passion which I’ve dubbed “Indiana Jones history” – historical research that calls for a real spirit of adventure. For example, when researching Alexander Hamilton (many years ago, long before graduate school), I decided to go to the island of Nevis where he was supposedly born, and live there for a few weeks. Admittedly, my arm didn’t need twisting at the idea of spending a month in the Caribbean. But at the time, Nevis was not exactly tourist (or research) friendly, leading to a continuing series of adventures. For example, to get to the island’s legal record, I had to pay a stamp tax – which required finding the stamp man – who worked only certain hours of certain days, known only to him. My sotto voce complaints about the cursed stamps – Why do I need a stamp anyway? And who does this stamp man think he is? – eventually led to the realization that I was experiencing my own little echo of the American Revolution.

    Along similar lines, while revising the dueling chapter in Affairs of Honor, I asked a friend who knew about such things – Len Travers – to arrange for me to shoot a black powder dueling pistol. Len kindly obliged by contacting a friend from a local police department, Officer Victor Duphily, who took us to a police firing range and taught me how to shoot a pistol. I have to confess that it was oddly satisfying. Not much of a kick, but a nice full pop and a dramatic puff of smoke soon after. Of course, when Officer Duphily allowed me to shoot his regulation police sidearm, I had an entirely different experience. Shooting this gun really felt like holding death in your hand, and after one shot I handed it back, very happy not to shoot another such pistol again.

    Obviously, I’ve enjoyed such experiences, but not just because they’ve been fun. Shooting a dueling pistol, paying a stamp tax, or simply rummaging among eighteenth-century documents all offer a little whiff of a past reality, a smell or a sound or a sensation that at least whispers back to the past. Sensory research can’t quite be footnoted, but it can be an intensely powerful source of scholarly inspiration.

    Quotes

    By Joanne Freeman

  • “In early national America, honor, democracy, and republicanism joined to form a distinctive political culture, governed by a grammar of political combat: a shared understanding of the weapons at one’s disposal – their power, use, and impact. This grammar was no defined rule book, no concrete tactical guide. It was a body of assumptions too familiar to record and thus almost invisible to modern eyes. National politicians had a remarkably precise understanding of this code, sifting through a defined spectrum of weapons in response to a corresponding spectrum of attacks. Publicly insulted by John Adams in 1798, James Monroe methodically considered these weapons when planning his response. Ignoring the offense was impossible, for ‘not to notice it may with many leave an unfavorable impressions agnst me.’ Responding to Adams “personally” with a challenge to a duel was also impossible: ‘I cannot I presume, as he is an old man & the Presidt.’ A pamphlet might serve, but Monroe had tried that, and Adams continued to insult him. Here is the application of an honor-bound grammar of combat.” — Joanne Freeman in Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic
  • About Joanne Freeman

  • “The book’s virtues are mighty ones. Looking at Hamilton, Burr, and Jefferson through the lens of honor brings a logic to their actions that most histories have heretofore lacked.” — New York Times
  • “A slew of popular historians have gone on tour in recent years with their speculative psychodramas about the American founders. Joanne B. Freeman puts them all to shame. In her probing book, there are no heroes, no villains–only politicians. . . . This hard-hitting, fast-paced, comprehensively researched book is one of the most intelligent and innovative studies in early American political culture to have appeared in recent years. . . . Affairs of Honor is a welcome antidote to Hollywood history.” — Andrew Burstein, American Scholar
  • Affairs of Honor is a landmark work in the history of our national origins. With considerable style and grace, Freeman shows that the central story line must include such old-fashioned notions as honor and character, and that, in her capable hands, political history is once again alive and well.” — Joseph J. Ellis, author of Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation
  • “Very clear, accessible, and engaging.” — Anonymous Student
  • Posted on Saturday, December 10, 2005 at 11:36 PM |

    Top Young Historians: 5 – Julian E. Zelizer

    Julian Zelizer, 36

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Professor of History, Boston University and Faculty Associate, Center for American Political Studies, Harvard University.
    Formerly: Associate Professor, Department of History, State University of New York at Albany (Joint Appointment with Department of Public Administration and Policy), Affiliated Faculty, Center of Policy Research, State University of New York at Albany.
    Area of Research: 20th century U.S. political history
    Education: Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1996
    Major Publications: On Capitol Hill: The Struggle to Reform Congress and its Consequences, 1948-2000 (Cambridge University Press, 2004), and Taxing America: Wilbur D. Mills, Congress, and the State, 1945-1975 (Cambridge University Press, 1998; paperback edition 2000).Julian Zelizer JPG Editor, New Directions in Policy History (Penn State Press, 2005). (This book was previously published as a special issue of the Journal of Policy History); Editor, The American Congress: The Building of Democracy (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2004) and Co-Editor, The Democratic Experiment: New Directions in American Political History (Princeton University Press, 2003). Zelizer is also a co-editor for the Politics and Society in Twentieth Century America series of Princeton University Press and on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Policy History.
    Current projects include; Chicken Hawks and Lonely Doves: How Eight American Presidents Struggled withConservatism and the Legacy of Vietnam. (Book Manuscript under contract with Yale University Press), and Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s. Co-editor with Bruce Schulman. (Book Manuscript, under contract with Harvard University Press).
    Awards: Zelizer’s Taxing America was the winner of the Organization of American Historians 2000 Ellis Hawley Prize for Best Book on the Political Economy, Politics, and Institutions of the United States and winner of the Lyndon B. Johnson Foundation’s 1998 D.B. Hardeman Prize for Best Publication on Congress.
    The Harry Middleton Fellowship in Presidential Studies, Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation, 2005.
    Mellon Visiting Senior Scholar, University of Cambridge, 2004.
    Research Fellow, The Brookings Institution, 1995-1996.
    Additional Info: Zelizer has appeared on national television (History Channel, Fox Television, C-SPAN), commercial and public radio, and newspapers such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Sacramento Bee, The Los Angeles Times, and The Albany Times Union.
    Zelizer is working with BU colleague Bruce Schulman on establishing an Institute of Political History at Boston University.
    Zelizer has been named to the board of directors of the Dirksen Congressional Center, a nonprofit research and educational institution that focuses on the history of Congress.

    Personal Anecdote

    The Ford Foundation Fellowship was a terrific experience for me, intellectually and professionally. James Kloppenberg and I would meet regularly, including for lunches and dinners, and he worked very closely with me for two years. I had the opportunity to dig into the archives of Massachusetts to complete a substantive piece of historical research. The experience had a major impact on me and helped me decide to pursue this career. I also learned early on how historical research could be used to tackle contemporary questions. To this day, I have continued to work closely with undergraduates interested in conducting their own historical research.

    I have always been inspired by interdisciplinary approaches to History, although I remain a historian at heart. I first encountered this way of thinking while I was a Research Fellow at the Brookings Institution, where I regularly dined and met with fellow political scientists, economists, and sociologists who were working on similar issues from radically different perspectives. During those years, I formed several terrific friendships that have continued to this day. My first publication was also in a volume on the history of taxation since WWII, published by Cambridge University Press and the Woodrow Wilson Center. During the seminars leading up to the book, I was required to present my chapter to quite vigorous questioning at this stage in my career, by prominent scholars like Herbert Stein, another contributor who worked as an economist in Richard Nixon’s administration.

    Sometimes my youth has brought unexpected benefits. Every day, I purchase a salad for lunch at the Boston University food court. One day, I bought my salad right after a colleague and realized that I had been charged about 25 cents less. When I asked the cashier why I had been charged less, she said that was the undergraduate price! It turns out there is a two price system. Since that time, I have lost my discount.

    Quotes

    By Julian Zelizer

  • “Reform is the work of the tortoise, not the hare. Whereas popular accounts often suggest that one large scandal or piece of legislation is capable of fundamentally changing how government works, reform is a thoroughly historical process that is messy, slow, and involves multiple institutitions . . . The narrative about congressional reform takes place in fits and starts. The changes were not inevitable or automatic; they resulted from a fierce and protracted struggle.” — Julian Zelizer in On Capitol Hill
  • About Julian Zelizer

  • “Julian Zelizer’s remarkable book offers us nothing less than a hidden history of our times, a parallel universe that explains why Congress was able to enact some of the most APSA Legislative Studies Section Newsletter, and why other equally popular bills were consigned to the dustbin. If the action takes place well within the beltway, Zelizer demonstrates that the impact of procedural reform in the Congress has had enormous consequences all across the land. This book is essential reading, not just for policy historians, but for all those concerned with American labor, race, media, and political culture during the last half of the 20th century.” — Nelson Lichtenstein, Professor of History, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • “Zelizer’s work is an important contribution to the literature on Congress. Besides being informative, it also is a highly entertaining read.” — Perspectives on Political Science
  • “Zelizer is a legend here. I have a friend who comes in from Harvard just to sit on his lectures. Best experience I have had in 4 years! And he is a really cool guy” … “AMAZING! Zelizer is the nicest, most interesting professor and it is evident that he cares about the success of his students. Brings us cookies every week!!! Oh yeah and is attempting to get our entire class tickets to the Phil Lesh concert!” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, December 4, 2005 at 1:14 PM |

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