Top Young Historians: 24 – Jonathan Sheehan

Jonathan Sheehan, 36

Top Young Historians: Index

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, University of Michigan
Area of Research: Early Modern Europe; intellectual and cultural history; history of Christianity and Judaism; history of science; history of media and print culture; secularization theory; political theology; systems-theory.
Education: Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, 1999
Major Publications: Sheehan is author of The Enlightenment Bible: Translation, Scholarship, Culture (Princeton University Press, 2005) Jonathan  Sheehan JPG Sheehan is currently working on two projects: Invisible Hands: Self-Organization in the Eighteenth Century co-authored with Dror Wahrman, a synthetic study of the relationship between the eighteenth-century interest in human autonomy and in suprahuman systems of social, political, and intellectual organization and, Theology and the Human Sciences in Early Modern Europe a book on the religious origins of the human sciences, including anthropology, geography, comparative religions, and comparative philology.
Awards: Sheehan is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
The 2005 George L. Mosse Prize, American Historical Association for The Enlightenment Bible: Translation, Scholarship, Culture which was also named one of Choice’s Outstanding Academic Titles for 2005.
He was also awarded: National Endowment for the Humanities, two year Collaborative Research Grant ($100,000) to write Invisible Hands with co-author Dror Wahrman, January 2007-December 2008;
Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbuettel, Germany. Research fellowship, Summer 2006;
Central European University, invited faculty participant in “Bookish Traditions: Authority and the Book in Scripturalist Religions,” Summer 2005;
President’s Arts and Humanities Initiative Indiana University fellowship, Spring 2004;
Outstanding Junior Faculty Award. Indiana University, Fall 2003;
Summer Faculty Fellowship. RUGS. Indiana University, Summer 2004;
Travel Grant. West European Studies, Indiana University, Fall 2003;
Center for the Study of Religion. Princeton University fellowship. Fall 2002-Spring 2003;
Summer Faculty Fellowship. COAS. Indiana University, Summer 2002 and 2001;
Andrew Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship. UCLA Humanities Consortium thematic fellowship on the topic “The Sacred and the Profane,” Fall 1999-Spring 2000;
Charlotte Newcombe Fellowship for Religion and Ethics. Woodrow Wilson Foundation. Fall 1998-Spring 1999;
William Andrews Clark Library. Predoctoral Research Grant, Summer 1998;
Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, UC Berkeley. Dissertation Fellowship, Fall 1997-Spring 1998;
Mabel Mcleod Lewis Fellowship. Dissertation Fellowship. Fall 1997-Spring 1998. DAAD. Annual Research Fellowship, Fall 1996-Spring 1997;
Andrew Mellon Research Grant, Summer 1995.
Additional Info:
Formerly Assistant Professor of History at Indiana University in Bloomington, joint appointment with the department of Religious Studies.

Personal Anecdote

It Hasn’t Happened to Me

I have never left a briefcase full of precious research notes aboard a Berlin subway, only to have it airmailed to my apartment in New York by some elderly Samaritan who read through the address book stored inside. Nor I have ever showed up at 1 a.m. to a deserted and snowy airport and hitchhiked to an on-campus interview where it turned out that no one expected me anyways. Nor have I ever been wheeled into the emergency room at the end of three sleepless nights of writing for treatment of advanced caffeine poisoning. I get nervous before I deliver big public lectures, but I have never vomited in anticipation. Once I did drop my laptop onto a concrete floor. But it did not break. In any case, I had it backed up.

When I describe writing and thinking to myself, it is anyways rarely colored by horror or drama. And that suits me fine. In all honesty, I would rather hold onto their simpler pleasures. So here are a few mundane anecdotes about these:

I had a friend in high school who spent much of her work time listening to a single song, carefully recorded over and over again on an old and, by the end of the year, doubtless scratchy cassette tape. She plugged into her headphones at study hall and unplugged from the chaos and stimulation of two thousand rowdy adolescents. The sheer monotony of the music—and don’t ask me what it was, likely something embarrassing—must have been a comfort. She became an academic too.

“Monotonously beautiful,” was a description offered to me when I arrived in Berkeley, with its endlessly sunny afternoons and foggy mornings. And it was true: after a certain point, even beauty can become the setting for the ordinary. Indeed, it had to if I was ever going to finish graduate school and take my reluctant leave from the place. Monotony seems to be a key element of the intellectual process, at least for me. Maybe it is the sensory buffer that keeps the world slightly at a distance, and gives my thought the space for freedom and play.

That’s a romantic way to look at it, of course. But why not look at it that way, since this is what I love to do? I wrote my book sitting two stories below ground in a room a quarter the area of a federal prison cell. Four by four were the dimensions of its walls, and its only light came from a tiny table lamp I brought in myself and mounted on the shelf in front of me. The first week I was there, I accidentally banged the bulb and ever after, it burned with a white light too fierce to look at and burning hot to touch. Books were piled in enormous stacks around front and back. A librarian’s nightmare, I imagine, with half of them open and strewn about without a conservatorial care. Every three weeks I shoveled all of the books out onto the reshelving table and reloaded the room with new ones, flipping them open and heaping them up. The occasional toppling of a stack brought a spike of adrenaline to the day. To keep me tranquil, I endlessly replayed Kind of Blue, the Miles Davis tribute to blues, modal tones, and heroin. Seven months later, the manuscript was done and a pallid man put down his headphones, and left, happy.

And the last word is important to me. I don’t tend to hear much talk about the pleasures of historical labor, perhaps because they tend to be rather undramatic. A day of research or writing has many of the qualities of a melting glacier. You know you are making progress because you can see words stream (or trickle) across a page. They gather in a small pool and represent enormous amount of energy. And the end of the day, though, that huge mountain of ice looks just about the same. Yet for me, the pleasures of thought demand slowness, stillness, and the time for cool reflection. They are the pleasures of the turn of phrase, the connection forged, the idea imagined. For me, more than anything, these make this whole business worth it.

Quotes

Jonathan Sheehan

  • “Prophets of modernity count the hours until religion’s death. They should not hold their breath. Modern society will never lack for religion, not because humans are essentially superstitious or because, in their frailty, they crave supernatural comfort, but because the process of religion’s disappearance is itself integral to the self- definition of modernity. For modern society, secularization always is and always must be incomplete. The Enlightenment Bible JPG Even as religion seems to vanish from politics and public culture, it never ceases to define the project of modernity, whether negatively, in specters of intolerance and hatred, or positively, in ethics of social justice and equality. Religion is always receding and returning and its repeated tidal flow is essential to the self- image of modernity, which can no more dispense with religion than embrace it.
    There are few clearer witnesses to this process than the Bible. If indeed modernity were secular, this provincial and archaic artifact should long have been discarded. Instead, its prescriptive content is rejected, even as it has become one of the sturdiest pillars of Western “culture.” At the same moment that the Bible is mourned (or celebrated) as a victim of secularism, it has also been recuperated as an essential element of that transcendent moral, literary, and historical heritage that supposedly holds together Western society.” — Jonathan Sheehan in “The Enlightenment Bible”
  • About Jonathan Sheehan

  • “This lively, elegant and erudite book sheds new light on intellectual relations between eighteenth-century Germany and England. The book will have much to offer historians of the early-modern period, as well as historians of science, literary critics, and theologians.” — Anthony Grafton, Princeton University reviewing “The Enlightenment Bible”
  • “I can genuinely say that this is one of the most interesting books I have read in a long time. Elegantly written, it presents the issues in a clear, thorough, and scholarly fashion. It is sure to win high praise.” — Susannah Heschel, Dartmouth College reviewing “The Enlightenment Bible”
  • Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 at 7:07 PM

    History Buzz: June 2006

    History Buzz

    By Bonnie K. Goodman

    Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

    June 26, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 06-28-1541 Conqueror of the Incas assassinated
    • 06-28-1917 First U.S. troops arrive in France
    • 06-28-1965 Westmoreland given authority to commit U.S. forces
    • 06-28-1993 Clinton punishes Iraq for plot to kill Bush
    • 06-27-1950 Truman orders U.S. Forces to Kores
    • 06-27-1963 JFK visits Ireland
    • 06-27-1968 U.S. forces begin to evacuate Khe Sanh
    • 06-28-1519 Charles elected Holy Roman emperor
    • 06-28-1914 Archduke Ferdinand assassinated
    • 06-28-1919 John Maynard Keynes predicts economic chaos
    • 06-28-1969 The Stonewall Riot
    • 06-29-1835 Texan William Travis prepares for war with Mexico
    • 06-29-1966 Vietnam air war escalates
    • 06-29-1970 U.S. ground troops return from Cambodia
    • 06-29-1974 Isabela Peron takes office as Argentine president
    • 06-29-1989 Congress votes new sanctions against China
    • 06-30-1520 Spanish retreat from Aztec capital
    • 06-30-1775 Congress impugns Parliament and adopts Articles of War
    • 06-30-1876 Soldiers are evacuated from the Little Big Horn by steamboat
    • 06-30-1936 Gone with the Wind is published
    • 06-30-1950 Truman orders U.S. forces to Korea
    • 07-01-1863 The Battle of Gettysburg begins
    • 07-01-1867 Canadian Independence Day
    • 07-01-1916 Battle of the Somme begins
    • 07-01-1997 Hong Kong returned to China
    • 07-02-1839 Mutiny on the Amistad slave ship
    • 07-02-1863 The second day of battle at Gettysburg
    • 07-02-1881 President Garfield shot
    • 07-02-1937 Amelia Earhart Disappears
    • 07-02-1964 Johnson signs Civil Rights Act
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Barbara Leaming: A Special Relationship Jack Kennedy: The Education of a Statesman6-25-06
    • Steven B. Smith: Neocon or Not? Reading Leo Strauss Politics, Philosophy, JudaismNYT, 6-25-06
    • Steven B. Smith: Reading Leo Strauss Politics, Philosophy, Judaism First Chapter – NYT, 6-25-06
    • Nicholas Faith: Whiskey Chasers The Bronfmans The Rise and Fall of the House of SeagramNYT, 6-25-06
    • Elie Wiesel on Jan T. Gross: The Killing After the Killing FEAR Anti-Semitism in Poland After AuschwitzWashington Post, 6-25-06
    • Geoffrey Hosking: The Bear’s Embrace RULERS AND VICTIMS The Russians in the Soviet UnionWashington Post, 6-25-06
    • Michael R. Marrus on Martin Gilbert: Darkness Falling KRISTALLNACHT Prelude to DestructionWashington Post, 6-25-06
    • Mark Bowden: Imprisoned by violence, then and now Guests of the Ayatollah: The First Battle in America’s War With Militant IslamBoston Globe, 6-25-06
    • Edwin M. Yoder Jr. on Gordon S. Wood: The Spirits of ’76 Revolutionary Characters What Made the Founders DifferentWashington (The Weekly Standard), 7-3-06
    • Catherine Allgor: Former first lady Dolley Madison is a lot more than a snack cake name A Perfect UnionFlint Journal, MI, 6-25-06
    • Frank Argote-Freyre of Freehold: FROM FARM BOY TO DICTATOR Fulgencio Batista: Volume 1, From Revolutionary to StrongmanAsbury Park Press, 6-25-06
    • Historians: Encyclopedia of American Conservatism pulls together threads of right’s thinking – NYT, 6-25-06
    • Richard Labunski: Professor’s Book Sheds Light on the Bill of Rights James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of RightsUK News – Kentucky, 6-20-06
    • LOUIS MENAND: ACID REDUX The life and high times of Timothy Leary – New Yorker, 6-19-06
    • Wolfram Wette, translated by Deborah Lucas Schneider: Historian concludes racism in Germany had deep roots The Wehrmacht History, Myth, Reality - San Francisco Chronicle, 6-19-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    QUOTED:
    • John Hope Franklin: “When the N-word is used, it’s not a sign of sophistication or advancement. It’s a sign from my point of view of degradation. It’s a sign that you don’t have any respect for yourself and don’t have any respect for anybody else.” – Chicago Sun-Times, 6-25-06
    • John F. Marszalek on the meaning of ‘Band of Brothers’ on a new Civil War marker at the Oktibbeha county courthouse honoring Union troops: “The meaning is pretty clear to any Civil War historian. It’s pro-Confederate.” – Biloxi Sun Herald, AP, 6-21-06
    • Erik Eggers on Finally, Germans can freely admit, ‘I love my country’: “”They’re far larger, and the outpouring of emotion is much greater. There’s never been anything like this before since World War II.” – The Christian Science Monitor, 6-22-06
    SPOTTED:
    EVENTS CALENDER:
    • July 4, 2006: Historical Society of PA, the National Archives July 4th panel on Thomas Paine’s legacy Robins Bookstore
    • June 25, 2006: “Abolition: Long Road to Freedom” a series of programs on slavery and anti slavery activity in the region south of Boston – Boston Globe, 6-22-06
    • July 1, 2006: Peter Nabokov will lecture on Native American sacred spaces at the Huntington Library – LA Times, 6-19-06
    • July 25, 2006: Richard Labunski speaking about his new book James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights @ Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Lexington at 7 p.m – UK News – Kentucky, 6-20-06
    • Howard Zinn: You Can’t be Neutral on a Moving Train on Book Television – Channel Canada, 6-22-06
    ON TV:
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Charles Murray In Our Hands: A Plan To Replace The Welfare State, Sunday, June 25 at 7:30 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Al Gore An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It, Sunday, June 25 at 7:00 pm and Monday, June 26 at 7:45 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Senator Edward Kennedy My Senator and Me: A Dogs-Eye View of Washington, D.C., Sunday, June 25 at 8:30 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Peter Beinart, William Kristol, Jeffery Goldberg, Lawrence Korb The Good Fight: Why Liberals – and Only Liberals – Can Win the War on Terror and Make America Great Again, Sunday, June 25 at 10:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War Nathaniel Philbrick, Monday, June 26 at 4:30 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Declaring Independence,” Sunday, June 25, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Rome: Engineering an Empire,” Sunday, June 25, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Revolution American Crisis,” Sunday, June 25, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels Guns of the Civil War,” Monday, June 26, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives Disaster of Napoleon’s Fleet,” Monday, June 26, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Crusades: Crescent & the Cross #1,” Tuesday, June 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past Prophecies of Israel,” Tuesday, June 27, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Crusades: Crescent & the Cross #2,” Wednesday, June 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past Relics of The Passion,” Wednesday, June 28, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Brothers in Arms: The Untold Story of The 502 Part 1: D-Day,” Wednesday, June 28, @ 12 and 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Brothers in Arms: The Untold Story of The 502 Part 2: The Road to Carentan,” Thursday, June 29, @ 12 and 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Behind The Da Vinci Code,” Thursday, June 29, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Presidents,” Marathon Saturday, July 1, @ 9am-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ben Franklin,” Saturday, July 1, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power,” Saturday, July 1, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy,” Saturday, July, @ 10pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #6, (5 weeks on list) – 7-02-06
    • David Maraniss: Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero, #10, (5 week on list) – 6-25-06
    • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #11, (13 week on list) – 6-25-06
    • William J. Bennett: America: The Last Best Hope, Vol. I, #23 – 7-02-06
    • Mark Bowden: Guests of the Ayatollah, #27 – 7-02-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge, #30 – 6-25-06
    • Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy, #31 – 6-25-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Lawrence Otis Graham: The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty, June 27, 2006
    • Martin Gilbert: The Somme: Herosim and Horror in the First World War, June 27, 2006
    • John Dunn: Democracy : A History, June 28, 2006 Amazon.com
    • Nick Bryant: The Bystander: John F. Kennedy and Struggle for Black Equality , June 30, 2006 – Amazon.com
    • Peter W. Galbraith: End of Iraq: How the United States Unintentionally Broke Up Iraq and Changed the Middle East, July 2006
    • Richard Labunski: James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights, July 2006
    • Peter Wallsten: One Party Country: The Republican Plan for Dominance in the 21st Century, July 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    APPOINTED:
    • Barry Bergdoll: Museum of Modern Art Chooses Columbia Professor as Architecture Curator – NYT, 6-21-06
    HONORED:
    • Francis Robinson: Appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) – Staines Guardian, UK, 6-22-06
    • Tsuyoshi Hasegawa: UCSB Historian Wins Prestigious Japanese Book Prize for Acclaimed Book About the Role of the Atomic Bomb in Japan’s Surrender in WWII – 6-13-06
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, June 25, 2006 at 7:11 PM

    June 19, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 06-19-1856 First Republican national convention ends
    • 06-19-1864 CSS Alabama sunk off France during the Civil War
    • 06-19-1885 Statue of Liberty arrives in New York Harbor
    • 06-19-1917 Britain’s King George V changes royal surname
    • 06-20-1782 Congress adopts the Great Seal of the United States
    • 06-20-1863 West Virginia enters the Union
    • 06-20-1963 United States and Soviet Union will establish a “hot line”
    • 06-20-1964 Westmoreland becomes Commander of MACV in Vietnam
    • 06-21-1788 U.S. Constitution ratified
    • 06-21-1864 General Grant extends the Petersburg line during the Civil War
    • 06-21-1942 Allies surrender at Tobruk, Libya
    • 06-21-1964 The KKK kills three civil rights activists: Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman and James Chaney.
    • 06-22-1775 Congress issues Continental currency
    • 06-22-1944 FDR signs GI bill
    • 06-23-1956 Gamal Abdel Nasser elected as the first president of the Republic of Egypt.
    • 06-24-1675 King Philip’s War begins
    • 06-24-1812 Napoleon’s Grande Armee invades Russia
    • 06-24-1970 Senate repeals Tonkin Gulf Resolution
    • 06-25-1876 Indians defeat Custer at Little Big Horn
    • 06-25-1942 Major General Dwight D. Eisenhower takes command of U.S. forces in Europe.
    • 06-25-1950 Korean War begins
    • 06-24-1993 Kim Campbell takes office as Canada’s first female Prime Minister
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Rebecca Goldstein: The Heretic Jew BETRAYING SPINOZA The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us ModernityNYT, 6-18-06
    • Rebecca Goldstein: BETRAYING SPINOZA The Renegade Jew Who Gave Us Modernity, First Chapter – NYT, 6-18-06Morris Berman: Grim View of a Nation at the End of Days Dark Ages America: The Final Phase of Empire- NYT, 6-16-06
    • Niall Ferguson: It’s long, Niall, but actually, it’s too short – The Observer, UK, 6-18-06
    • Patricia Nelson Limerick on Rita Williams: Treacherous territory If the Creek Don’t Rise My Life Out West With the Last Black Widow of the Civil Warcalendarlive.com, 6-18-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    • John Hope Franklin: Civil Rights Activist, Historian Discusses New Autobiography on Newshour – PBS, 6-15-06
    • Fernando Arcas Cubero HISTORIAN AND PROFESSOR OF HISTORY AT MALAGA UNIVERSITY – Sur, Spain, 6-06
    QUOTED:
    • Bob Wilson: Touring Sites That Survived Sherman’s March Union Troops Razed Military, Commercial Infrastructure But Left Much Of Georgia’s Antebellum Beauty Unscathed – Chicago Tribune, 6-18-06
    • Keith Watenpaugh: Expert Sources on the Iraq War – UC Davis, CA, 6-15-06
    APPEARANCES & SPOTTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Rebellion to Revolution,” Sunday, June 18, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Declaring Independence,” Sunday, June 18, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels The Alaskan Oil Pipeline” Monday, June 19, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “UFO Files Mexico’s Roswell,” Monday, June 19, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth Roanoke: The Lost Colony,” Monday, June 19, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives 6-Day War,” Tuesday, June 20, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ottoman Empire: The War Machine,” Thursday, June 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History Rocks #1,” Thursday, June 22, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels,” Marathon Saturday, June 17, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Encore Booknotes: Jane Holtz Kay, Asphalt Nation: How the Automobile Took Over America and How We Can Take it Back, Saturday, June 24 @ 6pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: After Words: After Words: Mark Smith interviewed by Nan Aron Saturday, June 24 @ 9pm, Sunday 25 @ 6pm and 9pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #6, (5 weeks on list) – 6-25-06
    • William J. Bennett: America: The Last Best Hope, Vol. I, #13, (3 week on list) – 6-25-06
    • David Maraniss: Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero, #15, (4 week on list) – 6-25-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge, #24 – 6-25-06
    • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #25 – 6-25-06
    • Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy, #30 – 6-25-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • George Lakoff: Whose Freedom? The Battle Over America’s Most Important Idea, June 2006 -
    • John Lynch: Simon Bolivar: A Life, June 2006
    • Rita A. Scotti: Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal: Building St. Peter’s, June 2006
    • Paul M. Kennedy: The Parliament of Man: The past, Present, and Future of the United Nations, June 20, 2006
    • Ron Suskind: The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, June 20, 2006
    • Lawrence Otis Graham: The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty, June 27, 2006
    • Martin Gilbert: The Somme: Herosim and Horror in the First World War , June 27, 2006
    • John Dunn: Democracy : A History, June 28, 2006 Amazon.com
    • Nick Bryant: The Bystander: John F. Kennedy and Struggle for Black Equality , June 30, 2006 – Amazon.com
    • Peter W. Galbraith: End of Iraq: How the United States Unintentionally Broke Up Iraq and Changed the Middle East, July 2006
    • Richard Labunski: James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights, July 2006
    • Peter Wallsten: One Party Country: The Republican Plan for Dominance in the 21st Century, July 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    HONORED:
    • Tsuyoshi Hasegawa: UCSB Historian Wins Prestigious Japanese Book Prize for Acclaimed Book About the Role of the Atomic Bomb in Japan’s Surrender in WWII – 6-13-06
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006 at 8:47 PM

    June 12, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 06-12-1776 Virginia adopts George Mason’s Declaration of Rights
    • 06-12-1898 Philippine Independence Declared
    • 06-12-1963 Medgar Evers assassinated
    • 06-12-1987 Reagan challenges Gorbachev to tear down the Berlin Wall
    • 06-13-1807 Thomas Jefferson subpoenaed in Aaron Burr’s treason trial
    • 06-13-1914 Kaiser Wilhelm concludes meeting with Archduke Franz Ferdinand
    • 06-13-1967 Thurgood Marshall appointed to Supreme Court
    • 06-13-1971 The New York Times publishes the “Pentagon Papers”
    • 06-14-1777 Continental Congress chooses national flag
    • 06-14-1917 U.S. President Woodrow Wilson gives Flag Day address
    • 06-14-1922 Harding becomes first president to be heard on the radio
    • 06-15-1215 Magna Carta Sealed
    • 06-15-1775 George Washington assigned to lead the Continental Army
    • 06-15-1846 U.S.-Canadian border established
    • 06-15-1864 Battle of Petersburg begins
    • 06-15-1964 Johnson decides against submitting Vietnam resolution to Congress
    • 06-16-1858 Lincoln warns that America is becoming a “house divided”
    • 06-16-1862 Battle of Secessionville
    • 06-16-1961 Kennedy agrees to send instructors to train troops
    • 06-17-1579 Drake claims California for England
    • 06-17-1775 Battle of Bunker Hill begins
    • 06-17-1930 Hoover signs Smoot-Hawley Tariff
    • 06-17-1972 Watetgate Burglars Arrested
    • 06-18-1798 Adams passes first of Alien and Sedition Acts
    • 06-18-1812 Second Anglo-American War begins
    • 06-18-1815 Napoleon Defeated at Waterloo
    • 06-18-1979 Carter and Brezhnev sign the SALT-II treaty
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    QUOTED:
    • Michal R. Belknap on Military Justice & Iraq Killings: “The big question, is whether any of those who will be charged will be high ranking officers, or whether somebody of comparatively low rank will be stuck with responsibility.” – Newswise (press release), 6-9-06
    APPEARANCES & SPOTTED:
    • Josh Freeman, NY Historians: Conference on New York State History and Association of Public Historians of New York State, June 2-4, 2006- NY Sun, 6-5-06
    • David McCullough: Delivers commencement address at Bates College – Bates College website, 5-28-06
    ON TV:
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Boston, Bloody Boston,” Sunday, June 11, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Rebellion to Revolution,” Sunday, June 11, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • C-Span2, BookTV: History on Book TV: Michael Sallah & Mitch Weiss, Tiger Force: A True Story of Men and War Sunday, June 11 @ 7:00 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: William Hogeland, The Whiskey Rebellion: George Washington, Alexander Hamilton, and the Frontier Rebels Who Challenged America’s Newfound Sovereignty, Sunday, June 11 @ 8:10 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Alexander Polikoff, Waiting for Gautreaux: A Story of Segregation, Housing, and the Black Ghetto, Monday, June 12 @ 12:10am ET/PT C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Bob Zeller, The Blue and Gray in Black and White: A History of Civil War Photography, Monday, June 12 @ 1:00am ET/PT C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “The True Story of Black Hawk Down,” Monday, June 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth The Vikings: Voyage to America,” Monday, June 12, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 500 Years Later,” Tuesday, June 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Iran: The Next Iraq?,” Friday, June 16, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives Disaster of Napoleon’s Fleet,” Friday, June 16, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Mega Movers,” Marathon Saturday, June 17, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Save Our History Jefferson’s Other Revolution,” Saturday, June 17, @ 8pm ET/PT –
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #5, (4 weeks on list) – 6-18-06
    • William J. Bennett: America: The Last Best Hope, Vol. I, #11, (1 week on list) – 6-18-06
    • David Maraniss: Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero, #18 – 6-18-06
    • Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy, #23 – 6-18-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge, #25 – 6-18-06
    • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #26 – 6-18-06
    • Gordon Wood: Revolutionary Characters, #33 – 6-18-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Juliet Barker: Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England, June 2006
    • George Lakoff: Whose Freedom? The Battle Over America’s Most Important Idea, June 2006 -
    • John Lynch: Simon Bolivar: A Life, June 2006
    • Rita A. Scotti: Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal: Building St. Peter’s, June 2006
    • Paul M. Kennedy: The Parliament of Man: The past, Present, and Future of the United Nations, June 20, 2006
    • Ron Suskind: The One Percent Doctrine: Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, June 20, 2006
    • Lawrence Otis Graham: The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty, June 27, 2006
    • Martin Gilbert: The Somme: Herosim and Horror in the First World War , June 27, 2006
    • John Dunn: Democracy : A History, June 28, 2006
    • Nick Bryant: The Bystander: John F. Kennedy and Struggle for Black Equality , June 30, 2006 -
    • Peter W. Galbraith: End of Iraq: How the United States Unintentionally Broke Up Iraq and Changed the Middle East, July 2006
    • Richard Labunski: James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights, July 2006
    • Peter Wallsten: One Party Country: The Republican Plan for Dominance in the 21st Century, July 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    APPOINTED:
    HONORED:
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, June 11, 2006 at 7:12 PM

    June 5, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 06-05-1805 – 1st recorded tornado in “Tornado Alley” (Southern Illinois)
    • 06-05-1884 – William Sherman refuses Republican presidential nomination saying “I will not accept if nominated & will not serve if elected”
    • 06-05-1899 – Alfred Dreyfus’ acquitted
    • 06-05-1940 – Battle of France begins in WW II
    • 06-05-1947 – Sec. of State George C Marshall outlines “Marshall Plan”
    • 06-05-1950 – US Supreme Court undermines legal foundations of segregation
    • 06-06-1536 – Mexico begins it’s inquisition
    • 06-06-1664 – New Amsterdam renamed NYC
    • 06-06-1716 – 1st slaves arrive in Louisiana
    • 06-06-1813 – US invasion of Canada halted at Stoney Creek (Ont)
    • 06-06-1816 – 10″ snowfall in New England, “year without a summer” (Krakatoa)
    • 06-06-1944 – D-Day: 150,000 Allied Expeditionary Force lands in Normandy, France
    • 06-06-1966 – Stokely Carmichael launches “Black Power” movement
    • 06-06-1972 – US bombs Haiphong, North-Vietnam; 1000s killed
    • 06-07-1099 – 1st Crusaders arrive in Jerusalem
    • 06-07-1775 – United Colonies change name to United States
    • 06-07-1776 – Richard Lee (VA) moves Declaration of Independence in Continental Congress
    • 06-07-1863 – Battle of Milliken’s Bend, LA-Jefferson Davis’ home burnt
    • 06-07-1864 – Abe Lincoln renominated for President by Republican Party
    • 06-07-1929 – Vatican City becomes a sovereign state
    • 06-07-1942 – Battle of Midway ends, 1st WW II naval defeat of Japan
    • 06-07-1965 – Supreme Court rules 1879 CT law ban of contraceptives unconstitutional
    • 06-07-1982 – Pres Reagan meets Pope John Paul II & Queen Elizabeth
    • 06-08-1861 – People of Tennessee vote to succeed from Union
    • 06-08-1886 – 1st Civil Rights Act passes
    • 06-08-1965 – US troops ordered to fight offensively in Vietnam
    • 06-08-1982 – Reagan addresses joint session of British Parliament
    • 06-08-1987 – Oliver North’s secretary Fawn Hall tesifies at Iran-Contra hearing
    • 06-09-1534 – Jacques Cartier 1st sails into mouth of St Lawrence River
    • 06-09-1549 – Book of Common Prayer is adopted by the Church of England
    • 06-09-1732 – Royal charter for Georgia granted to James Oglethorpe
    • 06-09-1802 – US Academy at West Point founded
    • 06-09-1967 – Israeli troops reach Suez Canal
    • 06-09-1983 – Margret Thatcher’s Conservative Party wins British parliamentary election
    • 06-10-1752 – Ben Franklin’s kite is struck by lightning
    • 06-10-1793 – Washington replaced Philadelphia as US capital
    • 06-10-1850 – Millard Fillmore sworn-in as president of US (replacing Taylor)
    • 06-10-1943 – FDR becomes 1st US pres to visit a foreign country during wartime
    • 06-11-1578 – England grants Sir Humphrey Gilbert a patent to explore & colonize US
    • 06-11-1942 – US & USSR sign Lend-Lease agreement during WW II
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Pilgrims and Indians Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War.NYT, 6-4-06
    • Simon Schama: Give Us Liberty Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American RevolutionNYT, 6-4-06<
    • Simon Schama: Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution First Chapter – NYT, 6-4-06<
    • Stanley Weintraub on Simon Schama: Breaking Away If you were a slave at the time of the American Revolution, which side would you root for? Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American RevolutionWashington Post, 5-8-06
    • Michael Kazin: A Godly Hero Makes Valiant Attempt to Revamp Reputation of Democratic Presidential Candidate William Jennings Bryan – Huntington News Network, 6-2-06
    • Antony Beevor: THE BATTLE FOR SPAIN The Spanish Civil War 1936-1939Times Online, 5-31-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    QUOTED:
    • Richard Holt on England’s tribal rivalry with Germany takes centre stage ahead of World Cup: “This anti-Germanism should have been evident in the 1950s. But when England played Germany, there was no chanting … (no one) put their arms out and pretended to be (RAF) bombers in the 1950s.” – AP, 6-4-06
    • Jacques Barzun on Why the teachers are angry : “Teaching is not a lost art, but the regard for it is a lost tradition.” Manila Times, 6-5-06
    • Hatta Ikuhiko, Japan’s pre-eminent historian of the modern dynasty on for the first time in centuries a girl stands to inherit the Japanese throne: :This was a deliberate strategy by the Imperial family. I have heard that Princess Akishino [Kiko] consulted doctors, and that new medical technology allows for a 70% probability of a boy. We expect rumours to that effect to be spread by the household this summer.” – The Sunday Times, 6-4-06
    • Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. on John Kenneth Galbraith: “He was the republic’s most valuable subversive. Underneath his joy in combat, he was a do-gooder in the dark of night.” – NYT, 6-1-06
    • David McCullough to Bates College Graduates: “Choose work you love. Work hard. Take your work seriously, not yourself. Don’t let setbacks or skeptics get you down. And when, as is bound to happen, some supposedly all-knowing somebody says to you, ‘Well, welcome to the real world,’ remember that Bates College too is the real world. Remember that Shakespeare, and Cervantes, Botticelli and Tchaikovsky are the real world.” – AScribe, 5-30-06
    APPEARANCES & SPOTTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel: Digging for the Truth The Da Vinci Code: Bloodlines, Sunday, June 4, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Revolution Boston, Bloody Boston,” Sunday, June 4, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • C-Span2, BookTV: History on Book TV: Eric Burns, Infamous Scribblers: The Founding Fathers and the Rowdy Beginnings of American Journalism Sunday, June 4 @ 7:00 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: History on Book TV: Caroline Finkel, Osman’s Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire,” Monday, June 4 @ 8:10 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Kenneth Osgood, Total Cold War: Eisenhower’s Secret Propaganda Battle at Home and Abroad, Monday, June 5 @ 7:00am C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth Stonehenge Secrets Revealed,” Monday, June 5, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • PBS: American Experience, “The Wizard of Photography,” Monday, June 5 @ 9pm – PBS
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past 666: The Sign of Evil,” Tuesday, June 6, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries The Essex: The True Story of Moby Dick,” Thursday, June 8, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Days That Shook the World The Rosetta Stone/The Discovery of Tutankhamun’s Tomb, Friday, June 9, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “UFO Files,” Marathon Saturday, June 10, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Washington the Warrior,” Saturday, June 10, @ 5pm ET/PT — Warrior’ a fresh look at George Washington – AP, 5-29-06
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #4, (3 weeks on list) – 6-11-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge, #14, (3 weeks on list) – 6-11-06
    • David Maraniss: Clemente: The Passion and Grace of Baseball’s Last Hero, #17 – 6-11-06
    • Kevin Phillips: American Theocracy, #21 – 6-11-06
    • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #28 – 6-11-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Juliet Barker: Agincourt: Henry V and the Battle That Made England, June 2006 – Amazon.com
    • George Lakoff: Whose Freedom? The Battle Over America’s Most Important Idea, June 2006 -
    • John Lynch: Simon Bolivar: A Life, June 2006
    • Rita A. Scotti: Basilica: The Splendor and the Scandal: Building St. Peter’s, June 2006
    • Martin Gilbert: Kristallnacht: Prelude to Destruction, June 13, 2006
    • Paul M. Kennedy: The Parliament of Man: The past, Present, and Future of the United Nations, June 20, 2006
    • John Dunn: Democracy : A History, June 28, 2006 Amazon.com
    • Nick Bryant: The Bystander: John F. Kennedy and Struggle for Black Equality , June 30, 2006 – Amazon.com
    • Richard Labunski: James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights, July 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    APPOINTED:
    HONORED:
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, June 4, 2006 at 7:28 PM

    Top Young Historians: 23 – Greg Grandin

    Greg Grandin, 43

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Professor of History, New York University, 2006-
    Area of Research: political violence, revolution and counter-revolution, the development of human rights, US-Latin American relations, and the Latin American Cold War.
    Education: Ph.D. History, Yale University, May 1999, with distinction
    Major Publications: Greg Grandin is author of The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War (University of Chicago, 2004), Greg Grandin  JPG The Blood of Guatemala: A History of Race and Nation, (Duke University Press. 2000), (winner of the Latin American Studies Association’s Bryce Wood award for best book published in English in the humanities and social sciences on Latin America)) and most recently,Empire’s Workshop: Latin America, The United States and The Rise of the New Imperialism (Imperialism, Metropolitan/Henry Holt Books, May 2006).
    Grandin is also the author of A Revolução Guatemalteca, (São Paulo, Brazil: Fundação Editora de UNESP, 2005), and the translator of La Sangre de Guatemala: Una Historia de Raza y Nación (Spanish translation of Blood of Guatemala) (Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica, 2005), and Denegado en su totalidad: Documentos estadounidense liberados (a collection of declassified United States documents pertaining to Guatemala), (translated into Spanish and published in Guatemala by Asociación para el Avance de Ciencias Sociales, 2001).
    Grandin is the co-editor with Gilbert Joseph of A Century of Revolution: Insurgent and Counterinsurgent Violence during Latin America’s Long Cold War, (under contract, Duke University Press) and he is also the editor of Human Rights and Revolutions, (Rowman and Littlefield, 2nd ed., Forthcoming, invited to join editors of first edition, Jeffrey Wasserstrom, Lynn Hunt, Marilyn Young, for second edition)
    Awards: John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship, (taken Fall 2005/Spring 2006);
    American Council of Learned Societies, Charles Ryskamp Fellowship, (taken Spring 2005);
    Faculty Fellow, New York University’s International Center for Advanced Studies, 2003-2004;
    Bryce Wood Award for Best English-Language Book published in the Humanities and Social Sciences on Latin America. Given by the Latin American Studies Association, 2001;
    The Howard Cline Memorial Prize for Best Book on Latin American Ethnohistory, honorable mention. Given by the Conference on Latin American History, 2001;
    John Hope Franklin Seminar for Interdisciplinary Studies, Duke University, 2000-2001;
    Arthur and Mary Wright Prize for outstanding dissertation, Yale University, 1999;
    Mellon Dissertation Fellowship, Yale University, 1997-98;
    J. William Fulbright Scholarship, 1997;
    Center for International Area Studies’ Dissertation Fellowship, Yale University, 1996;
    Latin American Dissertation Fellowship, Social Science Research Council, 1996;
    Agrarian Studies Program Research Fellowship, Yale University, 1995;
    International Area Studies Research Grant, Yale University, 1995;
    International Predissertation Fellowship, Social Science Research Council, 1993-1994;
    Jacob K. Javits Graduate Fellowship, 1992.
    Additional Info:
    Formerly Assistant Professor, Department of History, Duke University 1999-2001.
    Researcher and Historical Consultant for the United Nations’ Guatemalan Truth Commission (Comisión para el Esclarecimiento Histórico), 1997-1998.
    Consultant to the photographic exhibit, Guatemala ante la lente: Imágenes de la Fototeca de CIRMA, organized by the Centro de Investigaciones Regionales de Mesoamérica. Guatemala City, Bogota, New York, Los Angeles 1998-2000.
    Interviews on NPR, Voice of America, and Pacifica radio networks on topics related to Latin American history and politics.
    Provided sworn testimony in genocide prosecution in Guatemala and in immigration cases in the United States.

    Personal Anecdote

    I had the good fortune of receiving my BA from Brooklyn College, City University of New York, a greatly underfunded public institution attended primarily by working-class and immigrant students, and my doctorate from Yale, which was, well, it was Yale. I started at Brooklyn during the early years of the Gorbachev period, continuing through Reagan’s Central American wars, the Iran-Contra scandal, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the invasion of Panama, and the first Gulf War. It was an exciting moment. Students organized (on both sides of any given issue — it was the 1980s). Faculty, particularly those in the history and political science departments such as Renate Bridenthal, Hobart Spalding, Bonnie Anderson, Teo Ruiz, Steve London, Sam Farber and Norman Finkelstein, were vitally engaged with what was going on in the world, linking what they were teaching on their syllabi to fast-breaking events. Initially I thought I would go on to study Soviet history but my increasing involvement in Central American solidarity work led to a growing research interest in Latin America.

    Then I landed at Yale, sometime after the failed coup that led to the break up of the USSR and the end of the Cold War. The university’s faux gothic spires nicely accented what seemed to be a rapid deceleration of history, and there appeared to be an elective affinity between the place and the self-assured post-Cold War triumphalism that began to seep into much American culture, scholarship, and politics in the 1990s. This perhaps helps explains why that triumphalism has been the subject of my last two books. Looking back, the distinction between the two institutions helped shaped my scholarship in another fundamental way. At Brooklyn College, I learned about ‘class’ as a category of analysis, in books, seminars, and lectures. At Yale, ‘class’ presented itself primarily as a felt experience of entitlement. Luckily, this distinction coincided with a trend in the humanities and social science which sought to combine analytical explanation with hermeneutic interpretation to get at political subjectivity and historical change in a more holistic manner. I’ve tried to apply a similar combination in my writing, whether on local histories of peasant politics in Guatemala or on the formation of the American New Right.

    I was also lucky enough to have worked for a year, just before finishing my doctorate and after I had all but written my thesis, with the United Nations ‘ Truth Commission investigating political violence in Guatemala. Working as something of a house historian to an institution largely staffed by lawyers made me appreciate the value of historical analysis – lawyers get nervous with any attempt to move beyond the immediate mechanics of an act to get at the larger ‘why.’ It also shaped much of my subsequent scholarship agenda, leading to the research that resulted in both The Last Colonial Massacre and Empire’s Workshop.

    Quotes

    By Greg Grandin

  • “Yet the links between the current Bush administration’s revolution in foreign policy and Reagan’s hard line in Central America are even more profound than the simple recycling of personnel. It was Central America, and Latin America more broadly, where an insurgent New Right first coalesced, as conservative activists used the region to respond to the crisis of the 1970s, a crisis provoked not only by America’s defeat in Vietnam but by a deep economic recession and a culture of skeptical antimilitarism and political dissent that spread in the war’s wake. Indeed, Reagan’s Central American wars can best be understood as a dress rehearsal for what is going on now in the Middle East. It was in these wars where the coalition made up of neoconservatives, Christian evangelicals, free marketers, and nationalists that today stands behind George W. Bush’s expansive foreign policy first came together. There they had near free rein to bring the full power of the United States against a much weaker enemy in order to exorcise the ghost of Vietnam-and, in so doing, begin the transformation of America’s foreign policy and domestic culture.” — Greg Grandin in “Empire’s Workshop”
  • “In Latin America, obstacles toward the achievement of even the most minimal approximation of democratic reform persisted not only through the visible institutions of government bureaucracies, courts, militaries, land tenure, and labor relations but in the closed quarters of family, sex, and community. The Last Colonial Massacre JPG What is today understood as democracy was achieved by individuals engaged in a myriad of small yet pitched struggles that strained such hierarchical, private, and steadfastly obdurate relations of domination and control. Secular ideologies of nationalism, socialism, Marxism, and Communism — those dangerous scions of liberalism — did motivate and give solace to people’s lives. But this gift did not merely satisfy an abstract or innate desire for meaning in an increasingly uncertain world, as some theorists would now dismiss the appeal of socialism and communism. Rather, by providing the fuel and steel needed to contest the terms of nearly intolerable conditions, it combined the stuff of mundane survival with the more sublime advance of democracy. In the decades following WWII, the left in every country lost its bid to take over the state and restructure the economy but it did force a transformation of power relations that allowed broader participation in politics, culture, and society. Panzós was not a “colonial” massacre in the technical sense since it took place well into the second century of independent rule. Yet it was part of a larger epic assault on the private fiefdoms of social control that grew simultaneously besieged and emboldened with the spread of commodified social relations and the extension of state power throughout Latin America.” — Greg Grandin in “The Last Colonial Massacre: Latin America in the Cold War”
  • “Historical analogies tend to be as fickle as flattery, as Washington has recently learned. The more the United States strives to attain the glories promised by its enthusiasts, the more it disappoints. Think of recent comparisons to World War II. In the yearlong buildup to the U.S. invasion of Iraq, no analogy was more favored by the Bush Administration and its neoconservative advisers than the liberation of Western Europe six decades earlier. Like their grandfathers in Paris and Rome, American G.I.’s in Baghdad would be graciously received as freedom’s foot soldiers. In the same way that the United States brought liberal democracy to Nazi Germany, so would it make the political desert bloom in the Middle East. Behind such boosterism, however, neocons can barely conceal their contempt for a decadent American culture. . . . ” — Greg Grandin in “The Right Quagmire: Searching History for an Imperial Alibi,” Harper’s December 2004
  • About Greg Grandin

    “But there may have been one more defeat, which Grandin’s [Last Colonial Massacre] suggests not by explicit argument but by the force of its analysis. For all its violence and misery, the Cold War had the virtue of imposing on Western intellectuals, Communist and anti-Communist alike, the duty of historical intelligence. Marxism attracted its share of morally blind and politically repellent followers, but its varied currents carried scholars and writers – in happy or unhappy conveyance – to an unparalleled appreciation of the effects of time and place. Whether it was Lukács discerning the failed revolutions of 1848 in the stilted realism and archaic dialogue of Flaubert’s Salammbô or Louis Hartz attributing American liberalism to the absence of feudalism in the United States or George Steiner hearing the ‘hoofbeats’ of Napoleon’s armies in Hegel’s Phenomenology (‘the master statement of the new density of being’), Marxism pressed intellectuals of varying stripes to think about history’s wayward intrusions . . . But the collapse of Communism and disappearance of Marxism have eased the burdens of intelligence. With the market – and now religion – displacing social democracy as the language of public life, writers are no longer compelled by the requirements of the historical imagination. Facing a new enemy, which does not make the same demands that Communism once did, today’s intellectuals wave away all talk of ‘root causes’: history, it seems, will no longer be summoned to the bar of political analysis – or not for the time being. Mimicking the theological language of their antagonists, contemporary writers prefer catchwords such as ‘evil’ and ‘Islamo-fascism’ to the vocabulary of secular criticism. Their language may be a response to 9/11, but it is a product of the end of the Cold War. When Marxism was banished from the political scene in 1989, it left behind no successor language – save religion itself – to grapple with the twinned fortunes of the individual and the collective, the personal and the political, the present and the past. That Grandin has managed to salvage some portion of that historical vision from the dustbin of history suggests not only his resourcefulness, but also the timeliness of this most untimely of meditations.” — Corey Robin, reviewing The Last Colonial Massacre, in the London Review of Books

  • “Greg Grandin knows the history of modern Guatemala better than anybody else in the world outside of that country-and therefore understands the nature of U.S. attitudes and action toward Latin America at their most disturbing. This grants him keen insight into the manic ferocity behind U.S. imperialism across the globe today, which he describes in fine, rich, vivid, bitter detail. Grandin also shrewdly observes that the outrages possible in little U.S. neo-colonies are not so easy to accomplish on a grand scale. His admirable book deserves many, many serious readers.” — John Womack, Robert Woods Bliss Professor of Latin American History and Economics, Harvard University, reviewing “Empire’s Workshop”
  • “This remarkable and extremely well-written work is about more than the dark history of Guatemala and the Cold War in Latin America. It is about how common people discover politics. It is about how common people discover politics. It is about the roots of democracy and those of genocide. It is about the hopes and defeats of the twentieth-century Left. I could not put this book down.” — Eric Hobsbawm reviewing “The Last Colonial Massacre”
  • The Americans who engineered countless military coups, death squads and massacres in Latin America never paid for their crimes — instead they got promoted and they’re now running the ‘War on Terror.’ Grandin had always been a brilliant historian, now he uses those detective skills in a book that is absolutely crucial to understanding our present.” — Naomi Klein, author of “No Logo,” reviewing “Empire’s Workshop”
  • “A remarkable tour de force. It is one of the glories of American democracy that North Carolina is home to both Jesse Helms and the Duke University Press. This book describes a Latin America about as far away from the senator’s conception of the place as can be imagined. Grandin, who worked with the Guatemalan Truth Commission in 1997-98, displays a powerful narrative style — touching on nationalism, state power, class and caste divisions, ethnic identity, and political violence.” — Kenneth Maxwell, reviewing Blood of Guatemala, in Foreign Affairs
  • // <![CDATA[// Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006 at 7:49 PM

    Top Young Historians: 22 – Marci Lynn Shore

    Marci Lynn Shore, 34

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: 2002-2006: Assistant Professor of History and Jewish Studies, Indiana University;
    2006-2007: Blaustein Visiting Assistant Professor of Judaic Studies (courtesy appointment in History) at Yale University;
    As of July 2007, Assistant Professor of History, Yale University
    Area of Research: Modern European history, East European history, Polish-Jewish History; Jewish Intellectual and Cultural History in Modern Europe
    Education: Ph.D., Stanford University, Department of History, 2001
    Major Publications: Shore is the author of Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (Yale University Press, 2006). Marci  Lynn Shore JPG Shore is also the translator of The Black Seasons, translation of the Polish Holocaust memoir Czarne sezony by Michal Glowinski (Northwestern University Press, 2005). In 2004, she began a project on avant-garde movements throughout eastern and central Europe in the 1910s and 1920s.
    Awards: 2004 Fraenkel Prize in Contemporary History (Category A) for Caviar and Ashes;
    2004 Indiana University Trustees’ Teaching Award;
    1998 Joint Research/Exchange Program Award of Excellence for the project “Gender and Historical Memory in Former Czechoslovakia” (with Jacqui True and Eva Vešínová-Kalivodová);
    1994 Firestone Medal for Excellence in Undergraduate Research for thesis The Sacred and the Myth: Power, Ideology, and Dissent in Normalization-era Czechoslovakia;
    2005 Russian and East European Studies Institute Summer Faculty Research Fellowship;
    2005 Indiana University College Arts and Humanities Institute Research Travel Grant;
    2004 Indiana University President’s Council on International Programs International Projects and Activities Grant;
    2004 Indiana University Grant-in-Aid of Research;
    2004 Koret Foundation Jewish Studies Publication Programs Subvention Award 2004 Trustees’ Teaching Award;
    2004 Indiana University Summer Faculty Fellowship;
    2003 Kulturwissenschaftliches Institut, Essen (resident fellowship for the project “Europe and Love”);
    2003 Indiana University Russian and East European Studies Institute Mellon Endowment Faculty Grant-in-Aid;
    2002 American Councils for International Education Title VIII Research Scholar/ Combined Research and Language Training Program;
    2001-2002 Columbia University Harriman Postdoctoral Fellowship;
    2000-2001 Mellon Dissertation Writing Fellowship Department of Education Fulbright-Hays doctoral dissertation award ;
    1999-2000 International Research and Exchange Board (IREX) Individual Advanced Research in Central and Eastern Europe grant;
    1999 Stanford Center for Russian and East European Studies, summer FLAS grant;
    1998 Stanford Center for Russian and East European Studies, summer research grant;
    1998 Jewish Community Endowment Newhouse Fund Grant;
    1997 Joint Research/Exchange Program grant for international collaborative projects (with Jacqui True and Eva Vešínová-Kalivodová);
    1996-1999 Stanford University History Department Graduate Fellowship;
    1997 Institute of International Education Fulbright, Warsaw, Poland;
    1996 University of Toronto Centre for Russian and East European Studies Mellon language study grant;
    1995-1996 University of Toronto Connaught Scholarship.
    Additional Info: Shore was the 2004-2005 Senior Fellow, Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, Vienna and the 2001-2002 Post-Doctoral Fellow, Harriman Institute, Columbia University.
    Shore was the Co-editor of the two-part special issue of the bilingual journal Jedním Okem/One Eye Open (1997-1998).

    Personal Anecdote

    When I left Warsaw in September 2000 after 12 months of dissertation research, I had thousands of pages of photocopies from Polish archives. There were too many to fit into my carry-on luggage, so I packed them in suitcases and checked them on the flight from Warsaw to New York. Mercifully, nothing was lost. The experience, though, was so anxiety-provoking, that I couldn’t bear the thought of doing it once more when I flew from the east coast back to Stanford. Insurance is worthless in such cases after all, I couldn’t possibly insure the photocopies for what they were worth to me. If I were to lose them, I’d have no dissertation.

    I spoke to my (ever generous and long-suffering) dissertation advisor on the phone, and told him I didn’t think I could come back to Stanford due to my inability to face either the anxiety of checking the archival documents on the plane one more time or the anxiety of shipping them. My advisor then suggested that I drive back to California in which case I could keep the documents with me at all times. I’d had no experience in the middle of the country I’d only ever flown between New York and San Francisco and had little idea of what was in between or how long it might take. So I asked him, “Isn’t that a long drive?” The reply: “Oh, it’s not such a big deal. Just enjoy the scenery.”

    I didn’t actually have a car. In fact, I’d barely driven at all since high school. But my inclination was to always follow my advisor’s advice (which 99% of the time worked out beautifully), so half an hour or so later I was at a used car lot, talking to Troy, the used car dealer from whom my little brother had recently bought a car. Troy shook my hand and asked, So, do you want the tinted windows and the moon roof and the spiked hubcaps like your brother? About twenty minutes after I had explained to Troy that no, there was really no need for me to look cool in the car, I was driving away in a little blue Honda (the first and only car I test drove I was reluctant to do too much test driving given that I hadn’t driven in so long and wasn’t entirely certain I remembered how). I packed all my folders of documents in the trunk, mostly loose (on the assumption that if someone were to break into the car, that person might grab a box or a suitcase, but would be unlikely bother to gather up several thousand pages of Polish documents).

    Soon after that I was on the highway, heading west. The first night I visited my friend Basia in Columbus; the second night I stayed with my brother’s girlfriend in Chicago. Everything was going quite well. But once I’d left Chicago and settled onto route 80 the country seemed to stretch out endlessly. In Moscow that summer, I’d bought lots of Russian literature and poetry on tape, and so I was practicing my Russian. I listened to Turgenev’s Mumu over and over again, and cried each time when Gerasim had to drown the little dog.

    It was September and quite hot. I was wearing a sleeveless dress and sunglasses and had the air conditioner turned on. Days passed one after another and I still seemed to be in the middle of nowhere. And each time Mumu had to die. At one point it began to rain. I took my sunglasses off and turned off the air conditioner. Some time later I noticed something white and vaguely fluffy on the ground, but I supposed that it must be some kind of foam fertilizer.

    As I was approaching a truck struck in Laramie, Wyoming policemen began pulling everyone off the highway. When I got out of the car, it had suddenly gotten very cold. No one was being allowed back on the highway, and the truck drivers were saying the road was closed. Somewhat frantically I began asking the other drivers, “What happened? When are they going to open the highway?” No one seemed to know anything. I was getting more and more anxious. The third or fourth person I asked was a man in his fifties, who said, “Oh, I know you. You’re driving the blue Honda. We stayed at the same Motel 6 last night. I’m a psychotherapist, and I can already tell you have a problem with panic disorder.” I asked him again: “When are they going to open the highway???”

    As it turned out, he didn’t know when anyone was going to open the highway, but he did know what had happened: there was a freak September blizzard half an hour or so west of where we were; the driving had become dangerous, and this was the closest town in which to pull people off the highway. Moreover, this wasn’t like in New York, where the police closed a road and you had to follow detour signs there only was one road, and they had closed it in both directions.

    I felt as if I were in the midst of a surrealist nightmare, which the psychotherapist seemed to find rather amusing. He suggested we sit down at the Wendy’s at the truck stop. We were joined by a born-again Christian Federal Aviation worker from Oklahoma, who immediately brought up God (and what he just as immediately suspected was my insufficiently close relationship to Him). Needless to say, I didn’t get rid of them for the rest of the my time there. We became a strange trio: each morning they would knock on the door of my motel room and drag me to a Mexican restaurant for breakfast they insisted upon this, on the grounds that I wasn’t eating enough protein, and bagels (low in protein, high in carbohydrate who knew?) were precisely what one should not be eating for breakfast. They put antifreeze in my car. By the second or third day I had, strangely, begun to accept the situation. We found the local gym and got guest passes. We found the local movie theater and went to see Almost Famous.

    I had no idea how long this would last, how long I would be there. In the meantime I began sending postcards back to my dissertation committee: “I’m stranded in Laramie, Wyoming with several thousand pages of photocopies of Polish archival documents. Hope very much to see you soon. . .”

    And in fact on the morning of the fourth day, the police opened the highway. A few days later I was back at Stanford. Shortly after that I spotted a fire truck on the street where I was living and immediately went to Office Depot to buy a fireproof safe for my photocopies. . .

    Quotes

    By Marci Lynn Shore

  • “For this generation of Varsovian intellectuals born at the fin-de-siècle, life was unbearably heavy. They moved about in entangled circles with shifting boundaries, connected to one another by not more than one or two degrees of separation. They were quintessential cosmopolitans, polyglots who felt at home in Moscow, Paris and Berlin yet who at once felt inextricably bound to Poland, who believed in their role as the conscience of the nation, who very much felt that Warsaw belonged to them. They suffered (sometimes advantageously, sometimes painfully) from a certain pathological narcissism. They sat in their café called Ziemianska and believed, with absolute sincerity, that the world turned on what they said there. Often they fell into bouts of despair and self-hatred, and not despite, but rather precisely because of their narcissism, they embody the observation that intellectuals comprise the only class that loves to hate itself.
    Caviar and Ashes JPG In the elegant capital city of Warsaw, the editor Mieczyslaw Grydzewski would come with his two dachshunds to a café called Ziemianska. In the summer the café on Mazowiecka Street opened its garden, yet the place of honor remained a table poised on a platform that protruded from the stairway. In these years following the First World War, a small group of poets would gather at Ziemianska. Their Warsaw was a city of cafés and cabarets, of droshkies pulled by horses through cobblestone streets. Often they fell into depressions, overcome with nihilism, with the premonition that the world would soon end. Even so, just so, these were lively times at Ziemianska. The beautiful Ola Watowa, who might have become an actress, loved their café life: At Ziemianska our friends, people we knew sat around every table, passing from one to another. The atmosphere was lively, amusing, people were witty. There were some venomous jokes as well: instances of ridicule, like ‘Wazyk with the ugly little face’ [Wazyk brzydki twarzyk]. Painters, writers, poets. Slonimski was incomparable in his sharp wit. . . . Impassioned discussions would break out constantly, everywhere. . . .On rare occasions the wonderful Witkacy would appear. In the summer Stefan Zeromski beautiful, imposing would sit in the garden at Ziemianska. . . . I would mix chocolate into my coffee.” — Marci Lynn Shore in “Caviar and Ashes”
  • About Marci Lynn Shore

  • “Marci Shore’s account of the founding generation of Polish intellectual Communists reaches far beyond its subject. In its deeply engaged narrative of the lives and illusions of the twentieth-century Polish avant-garde, Caviar and Ashes recovers a fascinating, talented community of men, women and ideas now rapidly receding beyond memory. Professor Shore’s history of Polish Marxists is not just an impressive work of historical scholarship; it is a moving elegy to a turbulent century and a forgotten world.” — Tony Judt, author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945 reviewing “Caviar and Ashes”
  • “This book is utterly original, and its scholarship and I don’t use this word lightly is breathtaking. Shore has produced a penetrating study of a host of the twentieth century’s most perplexing issues.” — Jan T. Gross, Princeton University reviewing “Caviar and Ashes”
  • “Shore chronicles the collective journey of a group of brilliant and endlessly dedicated intellectuals through one of the worst hells, both physical and spiritual, of the century just ended. There is scarcely any study I can think of in any language to compare to this one.” — Michael Steinlauf, Gratz College reviewing “Caviar and Ashes”
  • “A marvelous example of intellectual history at its best, this book captures the moral and political dilemmas of a generation of brilliant writers who experienced communism first as a dream, then as a nightmare. A superb addition to the ever disturbing literature on the ‘God that failed.’” — Vladimir Tismaneanu, author of Stalinism for All Seasons: A Political History of Romanian Communism reviewing “Caviar and Ashes”
  • “This was an excellent class. Professor Shore definitely enjoys her subject and is very knowledgeble. I actually looked forward to the lectures everytime.”…”Professor Shore is still the best professor I’ve ever had. her class was beyond interesting, and was responsible for my wanting to learn so much more about the topic. She is funny, compassionate, and brilliant. if I still went to IU, I would take any class.” Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, June 11, 2006 at 1:32 PM

    Top Young Historians: 21 – Tiya Alicia Miles

    Tiya Alicia Miles, 36

    Top Young Historians: Index

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, Department of American Studies, Program in American Culture, Center for Afroamerican and African Studies, Native American Studies Program University of Michigan
    Area of Research: Ethnic studies, gender and slavery, western history, African American and Native American history in the the nineteenth century.
    Education: Ph.D. American Studies, 2000, University of Minnesota
    Major Publications: Miles is the author of Ties That Bind: The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom (University of California Press, 2005). Tiya Alicia Miles  JPG Miles is the co-editor with Sharon P. Holland of Crossing Waters, Crossing Worlds: The African Diaspora in Indian Country, essay collection (Duke University Press, Forthcoming fall 2006).
    Awards: Faculty Cornerstone Award (for commitment to undergraduate students), Black Celebratory Graduation Event, University of Michigan, 2006
    Frederick Jackson Turner Award (for a first book in American history), Organization of American Historians, 2006
    Rackham School of Graduate Studies Fellowship and Research Grant, University of Michigan, 2006
    Center for Research, Learning and Teaching, Faculty Associate for Multicultural Innovations Grant, University of Michigan, 2005
    Outstanding Teaching Award, Panhellenic Association and Interfraternity Council, University of Michigan, 2005
    Arts of Citizenship Faculty Grant, University of Michigan, 2004
    Finalist, Ralph Henry Gabriel Dissertation Prize, American Studies Association, 2001
    Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship for Minorities, 2001-2002
    D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History Summer Institute Fellow, Newberry Library, Chicago, IL, 2001
    Allen and Joan Bildner Endowment for Human and Intergroup Relations Grant, 2000
    Dartmouth College Hewlett Foundation Grant, 2000
    Dartmouth College Thurgood Marshall Dissertation Fellowship, 1999-2000
    Dartmouth College Shabazz African American Center Residency, 1998-2000
    Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for Minorities, 1998-1999
    U. C. Santa Barbara Center for Black Studies Dissertation Fellowship, 1998-1999 (Declined)
    Newberry Library Short-term Research Fellowship, Chicago, IL, August 1998
    The Loft Literary Center Mentor Series Award in Fiction, Minneapolis, MN, 1997-1998
    Committee on Institutional Cooperation Fellowship (Big Ten Universities) 1995-1996, 1997-1998
    Additional Info:
    Formerly Assistant Professor Department of Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley, 2000-2002.

    Personal Anecdote

    After two years of master’s course work at Emory University and three years of doctoral course work at the University of Minnesota, I set out for Hanover, New Hampshire to begin a two year residency as a Thurgood Marshall Dissertation Fellow (in tandem with a one year Ford Dissertation Fellowship). This incredible residency at Dartmouth College included a stipend, a research account, no teaching responsibilities, and a small cottage on a campus lane that I shared with my husband, who had received the Charles Eastman Dissertation Fellowship, and our peppy Beagle pup, named Shunka.

    I found Hanover to be a lovely town nestled in a dreamlike landscape of lush hills, pebbled streams, and reedy ponds. The town even had a Ben and Jerry’s ice cream shop and a caf? (Rosey’s) that sold the best chocolate chip cookies I had ever encountered. In short, this was the writing location of my wildest dreams – beautiful, quiet (except for the predictable weekend frat parties, which, I must admit, were a disturbing phenomenon), naturally restorative, and well-stocked with exquisite sweet treats.

    There was just one problem that I could not get around regarding my fellowship at Dartmouth: I was not writing. Before my arrival I had spent months reading secondary materials, weeks buried in documents in the Newberry Library in Chicago, and days in archives and at historic sites in the state of Georgia. I had plenty of material to work with, but as the sun-ripened summer melted into a glorious fall, I had yet to put pen to paper. There was no excuse for my inaction — except that I was terrified. Despite the wise advice given to my graduate school cohort by a Minnesota faculty member – that the dissertation was only the first major work we would undertake, not the last, nor necessarily the most important, I felt as though my future career and fledgling intellectual identity were wrapped in and riding on this behemoth of a research project that I had no idea how to tame.

    September stretched into October. I spent long hours in the library finding and reading more secondary sources. I catalogued and filed journal articles, creating a color-coded system in pastel high-lighter hues. I toured the Ben and Jerry’s factory in Waterbury, Vermont with a fabulous circle of African American Studies faculty members and dissertation fellows and learned that a pint is not, in fact, a single serving of ice cream. I took lazy walks around Occum Pond with our dog, Shunka. And it wasn’t uncommon for me to hop into my grandfather’s fifteen-year-old Plymouth Horizon on a sunny afternoon and drive down the country roads with Shunka in the passenger seat, his long silken ears riding the breeze. That autumn was a lovely season that struck terror in my heart. I still had not typed a single word of my dissertation. Would I ever?

    Then the annual conference of Ford Fellows roused me out of my petrified daze. I attended a panel on writing the dissertation and heard words that echoed all the way home: Stop reading. Start writing. Stop reading. Start writing. When I left the tiny West Lebanon airport upon my return to New England, I stopped by Dunkin’ Donuts and ordered my first ever cup of coffee. That very day, with a tall one in hand, I began to write. The words came; the thoughts came; the dissertation became.

    Now at the start of each new project, in the face of each blank page, I feel the steady rising of that same old tide of fear. Only now I know that with a little faith and a lot of java, I can begin.

    Quotes

    By Tiya Alicia Miles

  • “In a process whereby historical narratives are shaped, not found, constructing a story line for the Ties That Bind JPGhistory of an Afro-Cherokee family in the contexts of colonialism, slavery, and nation-building was a special challenge. While putting bits of evidence into coherent order, I found myself in a quandary. How could I tell the story of a black slave woman and the story of her Cherokee master and husband? How could I articulate the Cherokee enslavement of black people and the colonization of Cherokees by white people? And as an African American woman and a descendant of slaves, what biases would I bring to the story? It seemed that to capture the multiplicity and contradictory nature of this past, I would have to tell at least two stories – sketch two histories, enter two worlds, enlist two purposes, and sound two calls for justice – at once. — Tiya Alicia Miles in “Ties That Bind : The Story of an Afro-Cherokee Family in Slavery and Freedom”
  • About Tiya Alicia Miles

  • “In this lyrical narrative about Shoeboots, Doll, and their descendants, Tiya Miles explores the constant push and tug between family connections and racial divides. Building on meticulous and inspired historical detective work, Miles shows what it might have felt like to be a slave and reassesses the convoluted ideas about race that slavery generated and left as a legacy.” — Nancy Shoemaker, author of A Strange Likeness: Becoming Red and White in Eighteenth-Century North America reviewing “Ties That Bind”
  • “Ties That Bind is a haunting and innovative book. Tiya Miles refuses to avoid or cover over the most painful aspects of the shared stories of Indians and African Americans. Instead, Miles passionately defends the need to explore history, even when the facts provided by history are not those that contemporary people want to hear.” — Peggy Pascoe, author of Relations of Rescue: The Search for Female Moral Authority in the American West, 1874-1939 reviewing “Ties That Bind”
  • “Tiya is very nice, but more importantly, extremely knowledgeable. You can tell she really understands and is passionate about the topic (in my class it was women of color) and wants the students to be as well. Presents the info in an interesting way.”…
    “Tiya is one of the nicest teachers ever. Her class “Blacks, Indians and the Making of America” is one of the best I’ve taken in four years. She is very knowledgeable in her areas.” — Anonymous students
  • Posted on Sunday, June 4, 2006 at 1:45 PM

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