Top Young Historians: 28 – Paul Friedland

Top Young Historians

Paul Friedland, 43

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor, History Department, Bowdoin College
Area of Research: The French Revolution, modern France, the 18th century and the birth of the “age of reason”-the concept of modernity and its critics, and crime and punishment in modern Europe.
Education: Ph.D. in History, May 1995, University of California at Berkeley
Paul Friedland  JPG Major Publications: Friedland is the author of Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution (Cornell University Press, 2002) which was awarded the 2003 David Pinkney Prize and “Parallel Stages: Theatrical and Political Representation in Early Modern and Revolutionary France” in The Age of Cultural Revolutions: Britain and France, 1750-1820 , edited by Dror Wahrman and Colin Jones (University of California Press, 2002). Friedland is currently completing a manuscript tentatively entitled “Seeing Justice Done: The Theory and Practice of Spectacular Punishment in Old Regime and Revolutionary France.”
Awards: Friedland is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
David Pinkney Prize, Society for French Historical Studies. For best book of 2002 by a North American scholar in any field of French history (April, 2003);
ACLS Fellowship (January – December 2006);
NEH Fellowship (August, 2005 – May, 2006);
NEH Fellow, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton NJ (1997-98);
Newberry Library\Loyola University Summer Research Grant (Summer, 1996);
Mellon Foundation Dissertation Write-Up Fellowship (1994-95);
Bicentennial Fellowship (French-American Foundation award for dissertation research in France, 1991-92);
Fulbright Grant, finalist (declined, 1991-92);
Ehrman Fellowship (U.C. Berkeley, 1989-90);
Council of European Studies Pre-dissertation Research Grant (Summer, 1989);
University Fellowship, University of Chicago (1987-88).
Additional Info:
Formerly Assistant Professor, History Department, Loyola University of Chicago. (1995-1997), and Instructor, History Department, University of California at Berkeley. (1993, 1994).
Member, School of Social Science, Institute for Advanced Study; Princeton, New Jersey. (1997-1998)

Personal Anecdote

My Heroic Participation in the Revolution of 1991

As someone who studies the French Revolution, I’ve often found myself wondering what I might have done if fate had put me on this planet two centuries earlier and in the general vicinity of Paris. I don’t think I would have been one of the more extreme revolutionaries who were constantly demanding blood and heads. No, I think someone a bit more genteel would have been my style- someone like Camille Desmoulins, who could harangue the masses as well as anyone, but who still received plenty of dinner invitations.

The truth is, though, that I got a pretty good inkling what kind of revolutionary I might have made about fifteen years ago. And I’m not sure Desmoulins would have been proud of me.

The year was 1991, and my soon-to-be-wife and I were on a pre-honeymoon trip to Russia. She happens to be a Russian historian, and I had spent a semester in Leningrad (now, as I result of the mini-revolution in which I was about to play a glorious role, St. Petersburg). So, Russia was a place we both had ties to, and seemed a natural enough place to have a pre-honeymoon.

We had taken an overnight train from Moscow to Leningrad, and arrived in the city, tired and a little dazed. Maybe that’s why neither of us noticed anything unusual as we made our way to the Astoria hotel. The Astoria, by the way, is a grand old hotel where Hitler, a little too optimistically, had planned to throw his victory party once he had conquered the city. My wife and I thought we’d use the excuse of a pre-honeymoon to weasel the extra cash out of our parents so that we could stay somewhere just a bit more swanky than our usual graduate-student lodgings.

In retrospect, I should have known that something was up when I went down to the front desk to complain about our dismal room with a view of the air shaft. I was all ready to go into a song and dance about our pre-honeymoon and all that, but the clerk just gave me a dazed look and forked over the key to a nicer room with a view of the square. No discussion. No argument. Now that sort of thing never happened in the old Soviet Union.

As soon as we’d deposited our luggage in the new, nicer room, I flipped on the TV. “Hey,” I said to my wife, “There’s something wrong with the TV. Swan Lake is on every channel.” She tried the remote, and sure enough, no matter what channel we tried, it was Swan Lake. We tried the radio: Triumphal, patriotic music was on every station. It was then that we noticed that people had begun to mass on the square below our hotel room (a square that just happened to house the offices of the city government). Suddenly, a voice came on the radio. My Russian wasn’t good enough to grasp every word, but the gist of it was: “Citizens, all is secure. Everything is under control. Have faith in the government which will restore order and security.” We looked at each other. Something was up. We flung open the windows and began reading the hastily-written signs that people were carrying: “No to totalitarianism,” “Freedom & Democracy.” “We won’t go back!” And then, as if on cue, a man on a white horse rode into the square waving an enormous tricolor flag – now, the flag of the Russian Federation, but then a strange anachronism. I had never seen it before, and with my expert knowledge of flags and history, I immediately informed my wife that the Dutch had invaded the Soviet Union. I think she just hushed me, not bothering to explain that the pre-Revolutionary Russian flag had been designed by Peter the Great on the model of the Dutch flag, but with the colors in a slightly different order.

I’ll make a long, story short: Within minutes we were out in the square, and were told by gathering protesters that Gorbachev had been kidnapped by hard-liners who were attempting to restore the old order and end his experiment with glasnost. “We will not go back,” a young man explained to us. “We will fight. We will revolt.” He had said the magic word. The wheels in my brain started turning. “It’s a revolution!” I screamed to my wife. And then I added “Follow me!” She had no intention of following me, of course, because there we were on the main square of Leningrad at the very center of political activity, and there was nowhere I could possibly go where she might want to follow. I looked around the square trying to figure out how I might effectively harangue the masses (this was going to be difficult, as I had a bad habit of confusing the Russian words for “freedom” and “Saturday.” But I thought I could pull it off). It was then that I noticed that a portion of the crowd was busy constructing barricades. They had overturned cars and buses, and were busy planning to protect the square from army troops that were rumored to be on their way. This really was my chance! It was July 1789 all over again: Army troops on the outskirts, ready to invade the city. A populace desperate for freedom from tyranny, massed on the public square just waiting for a leader to show them the way. This was my cue. I just needed to find a high spot and start talking. I gathered my thoughts: No to authority! Yes to Saturday! etc. etc. My wife was making her way to the barricades, talking to people, reveling in the moment. And I, I…. I had begun to wonder: If the troops came in, then all the stores would probably close. And I was almost out of saline solution for my contact lenses. Now, you might think this is a trivial detail, but I had forgotten to bring a pair of glasses. And I’m fairly near-sighted. So really, it was pretty important. Okay, maybe not of urgent, revolutionary importance, but not exactly irrelevant. So, that is the background of how it came to pass that I found myself shouting up to my wife, as she clambered on top of the barricades in the middle of a revolution, “Wait, I need to go find saline solution before the stores close.” Her look of complete, withering disdain brought home to me the fact that I was probably not destined to be a latter-day Camille Desmoulins. (She married me anyway, and we now have four kids, so I’m guessing the disdain wasn’t as complete and withering at it seemed on that August day).

I did learn a few things that day. I learned that when you’re in an enormous crowd being harangued by speakers (speakers who apparently do not wear contacts, and so have the luxury of being able to drone on and on without a care in the world), that you can’t actually hear anything. All those people seemingly cheering and shouting in approval? It’s just a lot of people asking simultaneously “What did they say?” And I learned that, for the most part, in the middle of a revolution, you don’t really have any clue what’s going on. We managed to find someone with a satellite connection, and marveled at CNN’s ability, thousands of miles away in Atlanta, to give seeming coherence to the chaos and confusion that surrounded us. The truth is that if nobody really knows what’s going on, you can spin events as you like, and no one can actually contradict you.

And, sad to say, I guess I learned that I’m probably a better student of revolutions than a maker of them. I do console myself, though, with the thought that it didn’t turn out to be a real revolution in the end. I think the Russians now commemorate the events of August 21 as “flag day.” But who’s to say that if I’d had plenty of saline solution on hand or had remembered to pack my glasses in the first place, that I wouldn’t have found my audience. If things had played themselves out just a little differently, Russia today might be the only place in the world with a week full of Saturdays.

Quotes

By Paul Friedland

  • “Even while the revolutionaries sang the praises of `democracy,’ they constructed, brick by brick, a political edifice predicated on the exclusion from active political power of the very people in whose name their government claimed to rule. And it is a curious fact that the rhetoric of democracy reached a crescendo precisely when political practice was at its most despotic: The politicians of the Terror proclaimed the will of the people to be triumphant, and claimed to be acting in an almost transparent relationship with that will, even while the various avenues through which that will had previously made itself manifest were being shut down. ‘Democracy,’ as it was defined during the Terror, seemed to call for the people’s complete acquiescence, rather than their direct participation. And here, far from being an aberration, the essential logic of the Terror is fully consistent with the other régimes of the Revolutionary period. Although many of the important political figures of the Terror may very well  JPGhave criticized representative democracy and extolled the virtues of direct democracy, if one looks at its political practice rather than its rhetoric, the Terror was, like the regimes that came before and after it, a government in which political actors acted, and political audiences watched, preferably in silence.

    …. [But] this is not … the story of how wily politicians hoodwinked the French people into believing that they were being freed, even as they laid the foundation for oppression. In fact, I am certain that no one was more convinced of the Revolution’s rhetoric of liberty, justice, and natural rights than the very people who spoke the words. And as for those who found themselves excluded from a political process performed in their name, they seemed only dimly aware of the fact that they had been removed from the political stage. The problem, then, is decidedly more complex than one that can be explained according to the simple dynamic of oppressors and oppressed. This utter conviction on the part of the political actors that they were the servants of the people, and were acting in their best interest; this willingness on the part of the political audience to sit back and partake vicariously in action from which they had been excluded; and the impenetrable yet invisible wall that divided these actors and these spectators — all of this seems to have very little to do with outright political subjugation. This is not oppression; this is theater.” — Paul Friedland in “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”About Paul Friedland

  • “Paul Friedland has developed a strong and provocative argument about how changes in abstract notions of representation – how one thing stands for another – shaped the emergence of new forms of political thought. He has uncovered remarkable and surprising parallels between changing ideas of representation in politics and in the world of theater, and also between the ideas of counterRevolutionary royalists on the one hand and the most radical Jacobins on the other. He uses these parallels to show why liberal ideas of representative democracy had such difficulty gaining acceptance in Revolutionary France..” — The New Republic reviewing “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “This is a book about a major conceptual development in political theory. And in terms of both argument and method, it is strikingly original and thoughtful. By focusing on an issue that was central to eighteenth-century epistemology and cultural life as well as democratic thought, Friedland succeeds in making concrete what would seem otherwise to be simply a metaphor: that revolutionary politics was a modern drama. And that makes this ambitious book itself an impressive performance.” — Sophia Rosenfeld, American Historical review, Oct 2003 reviewing “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “Theoretical changes in theatrical and political representation also took place during the final decades of the Old Regime…but the shift in political representation was institutionalized in a single year….Friedland achieves an impressive effect by anchoring this epistemological shift to the outbreak of the Revolution and by constructing a narrative of theatrical representation that also centers on the same year. The notorious political innstability of the Revolution, and the turbulence in the French public theaters of the 1790s, were manifestations of this epochal shift in French strategies of representation. Thre argument, elegant and powerful, is made even more compelling by the clarity of Friedland’s prose and the depth of this research.” — Jeffrey Ravel, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. H-France Book Review, June 2003 reviewing “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “This innovative contribution to French cultural and intellectual history elegantly juxtaposes the theory and practice of eighteenth-century drama with the rules governing political life before and during the Revolution. Bringing together these two domains, Paul Friedland documents the exclusion of ‘the public’ –as both spectators and citizens– from the newly separate stage and political assembly. This unusual coupling of drama and politics allows Friedland to bring fresh and provocative insights to our understanding of how public life was transformed during the most momentous years in French history. The book also implicitly invites us to reflect on the many overlaps between politics and entertainment in our own era.” — Sarah Maza, Northwestern University reviewing “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “Political Actors is one of the most important books written about the French Revolution in the past ten years. Paul Friedland advances a genuinely new and provocative interpretation of the Revolution as a whole.” — David A. Bell, Johns Hopkins University “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “Political Actors offers new insights on the important question of political representation before and during the French Revolution. It also provides innovative material on pamphlet literature and theatrical history.” — Marie Helene Huet, Princeton University “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “This is a bold, ambitious, and cogently argued book. It should become required reading for anyone interested in the idea of representation or in the political culture of the Old Regime and the French Revolution.” — Keith Michael Baker, Stanford University “Political Actors: Representative Bodies and Theatricality in the Age of the French Revolution”
  • “Interesting course. Friedland’s approach is straightforward, but his lectures are informative and entertaining. He is simultaneously relaxed and serious. I recommend taking a course from him. French Revolution was great.”… “Great lectures, especially the days he brings in the box o’ joe from Dunkin’ Donuts”… “Great lectures. Nice guy.”… “Top five at Bowdoin.”… “A reason to be a history major.”… “kept students engaged, felt like I knew the material extremely well because his lectures were so interesting, tells hilarious stories at the beginning of class.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, August 20, 2006 at 5:36 PM

    History Buzz: August 2006

    History Buzz

    By Bonnie K. Goodman

    Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

    August 20, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 21/08/1321 – 160 Jews of Chincon France, burned at stake
    • 21/08/1831 – Nat Turner slave revolt kills 55 (Southampton County, Virginia)
    • 21/08/1858 – 1st Lincoln-Douglas debate (Illinois)
    • 21/08/1863 – Raid at Lawrence KS by William Quantrill
    • 21/08/1864 – Battle of Summit Point, VA
    • 21/08/1945 – Pres Truman ends Lend-Lease program
    • 22/08/0565 – St Columba reported seeing monster in Loch Ness
    • 22/08/1138 – English defeated Scots at Cowton Moor Banners of various saints were carried into battle which led to being called Battle of the Standard
    • 22/08/1454 – Jews are expelled from Brunn Moravia by order of King Ladislaus
    • 22/08/1642 – Civil War in England began between Royalists and Parliament
    • 22/08/1654 – 1st Jewish immigrant to US, Jacob Barsimson arrives in New Amsterdam
    • 22/08/1762 – 1st female (Ann Franklin) US newspaper editor, Newport RI, Mercury
    • 22/08/1791 – Haitian Slave Revolution begins under voodoo priest Boukman
    • 22/08/1846 – US annexes New Mexico
    • 22/08/1902 – Pres Teddy Roosevelt became 1st US chief executive to ride in a car
    • 22/08/1945 – Vietnam conflict begins as Ho Chi Minh leads a successful coup
    • 22/08/1956 – Pres Eisenhower and VP Nixon renominated by Rep convention in SF
    • 22/08/1975 – Assassination attempt on president Gerald Ford
    • 23/08/1833 – Britain abolishes slavery in colonies; 700,000 slaves freed
    • 23/08/1850 – 1st national women’s rights convention convenes in Worcester Mass
    • 23/08/1866 – Treaty of Prague ends Austro-Prussian war
    • 23/08/1903 – 6th Zionist Congress, Theodor Herzl declares Jewish state
    • 23/08/1914 – Japan declares war on Germany in World War I
    • 23/08/1939 – Molotov-Ribbentrop pact: East Europe divided between Hitler and Stalin
    • 23/08/1942 – Battle of Stalingrad: 600 Luftwaffers bomb Stalingrad (40,000 die)
    • 23/08/1972 – Republican convention (Miami Beach, Fla) renominates VP Agnew but not unanimous-1 vote went to NBC newsman David Brinkley
    • 23/08/1978 – Iranian students occupies Iranian embassy at Wassenaar
    • 23/08/1990 – US begins call up of 46,000 reservists to the Persian Gulf
    • 24/08/0079 – Mt Vesuvius erupts, buries Pompeii and Herculaneum, 15,000 die
    • 24/08/0410 – Rome overrun by Visigoths, symbolized fall of Western Roman Empire
    • 24/08/1349 – Jews
    • 24/08/1349 – 6,000 Jews, blamed for the Plague, are killed in Mainz
    • 24/08/1891 – Thomas Edison patents motion picture camera
    • 24/08/1936 – FDR gives FBI authority to pursuit fascists and communists
    • 24/08/1949 – North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) goes into effect
    • 24/08/1954 – Eisenhower signs Communist Control Act, outlawing the Communist Party, at height of McCarthyism
    • 24/08/1991 – Gorbachev resigns as head of USSR Communist Party
    • 25/08/1814 – British forces destroy Library of Congress, containing 3,000 books
    • 25/08/1862 – Secretary of War authorizes Gen Rufus Saxton to arm 5,000 slaves
    • 25/08/1864 – Petersburg Campaign-Battle of Ream’s Station
    • 25/08/1921 – US signs peace treaty with Germany
    • 25/08/1944 – Paris liberated from Nazi occupation (Freedom Tuesday)
    • 26/08/1629 – Cambridge Agreement, Mass Bay Co stockholders agree to emigrate
    • 26/08/1920 – 19th amendment passes-women’s suffrage granted
    • 26/08/1964 – LBJ nominated at Democratic convention in Atlantic City, NJ
    • 27/08/1667 – Earliest recorded hurricane in US (Jamestown Virginia)
    • 27/08/1928 – Kellogg-Briand Pact, where 60 nations agree to outlaw war
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Alan Brinkley on Randall B. Woods: The Making of a War President LBJ Architect of American AmbitionNYT, 8-20-06
    • Randall B. Woods: LBJ Architect of American Ambition, First Chapter – NYT, 8-20-06
    • Randall Woods: A rave for UA prof – Arkansas Times, 8-20-06
    • Jason Sokol: A young historian explores what the struggle for freedom meant for white neighbors of Southern blacks THERE GOES MY EVERYTHING White Southerners in the Age of Civil Rights, 945-1975Wa Po, 8-20-06
    • James Bowman: In Brief: Honor Bound Honor: A HistoryWa Po, 8-20-06
    • Douglas Brinkley, Jed Horne: Storm surge Three books recount how a hurricane called Katrina became a national disaster – The State, SC, 8-20-06
    • Sir Martin Gilbert on David G. Dalin: Hitler’s Pope? The Myth of Hitler’s Pope: How Pope Pius XII Rescued Jews From the NazisAmerican Spectator, 8-16-06
    • Paul Kennedy on the U.N.: It’s Imperfect, but Consider the Alternative – NYT, 8-16-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    • Douglas Brinkley, Charles Reagan Wilson, John Hope Franklin: Reflecting on lessons storm taught about race and poverty – AP, 8-19-06
    • Dale Walde: Archeologist re-writing accepted Plains Indian history – Star Phoenix, 8-16-06
    • Dan Snow: Culloden defeat should be celebrated, says historian – The Sunday Times, UK, 8-20-06
    QUOTED:
    • John Hope Franklin “Reflecting on lessons storm taught about race and poverty”: “As far as race in America is concerned, Katrina was just another example of the failure of the people of the United States to come to terms with a centuries-old problem … and make a forthright effort to solve it. Thus, it ranks with the failure of our schools to serve the needs of blacks and whites alike. … It is a bed-mate with the disparities in housing, not only in New Orleans but across the nation.” – AP, 8-19-06
    • Jonathan Sarna on “Trends 101: The New Jewish Life on Campus”: “It’s much more common to see college students wearing yarmulkes, and outwardly displaying other Jewish symbols. Like other cultural groups, there’s been a coming out.” – Reform Judaism, NY, 8-17-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Thomas Kean and Lee Hamilton, authors of “Without Precedent,” interviewed by Marvin Kalb, Sunday, August 20 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Public Lives: Debby Applegate, The Most Famous Man in America: The Biography of Henry Ward Beecher, Monday, August 21 at 1:00 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: History on Book TV: Eric Burns, Infamous Scribblers: The Founding Fathers and the Rowdy Beginnings of American Journalism, Monday, August 13 at 3:50 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “The Revolution 12 – Road to the Presidency,” Sunday, August 20, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Miracle of Stairway B,” Sunday, August 20, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil,” Monday, August 21, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds Jesus’ Jerusalem,” Monday, August 21, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Capital of the World ,” Monday, August 21, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Rommel,” Marathon Monday, August 21, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Egyptian Book of the Dead,” Tuesday, August 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Strange Egypt, August 16, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Capital of the World,” Tuesday, August 22, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Infamous Murders Political Assassinations,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The World Trade Center,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Sex and the Imperial City,” Wednesday, August 23, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Exodus Decoded,” Thursday, August 24, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Gladiators and Slaves,” Thursday, August 24, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Rome: Engineering an Empire,” Friday, August 25, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Chaos,” Friday, August 25, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Life and Death in Rome Doom?,” Friday, August 25, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ottoman Empire: The War Machine,” Saturday, August 26, @ 8pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #3, (3 weeks on list) – 8-27-06
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #8, (14 weeks on list) – 8-27-06
    • Ron Suskind: THE ONE PERCENT DOCTRINE Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, #12, (8 weeks on list) – 8-27-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Mark Schleifstein: Path of Destruction: The Destruction of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms, August 2006
    • Judith Hicks Stiehm: Champions for Peace: Women Winners of the Nobel Peace Prize, August 2006
    • Mark Grotelueschen: AEF Way of War: The American Army and Combat in World War I, August 2006
    • John Botte: Aftermath: Unseen 9/11 Photos by a New York City Cop, August 22, 2006
    • Zahi A. Hawass: Mountains of the Pharaohs: The Untold Story of the Pyramid Builders, August 22, 2006
    • Robert Young Pelton: Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror, August 29, 2006
    • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
    • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
    • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
    • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
    • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
    • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    • Gil Troy: Hillary Rodham Clinton: Polarizing First Lady, October 4, 2006
    • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, August 20, 2006 at 6:23 PM

    August 14, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 14/08/1457 – Oldest known exactly dated printed book “Mainz Psalter” (c 3 years after Gutenberg)
    • 14/08/1765 – Mass colonists challenge British rule by an Elm (Liberty Tree)
    • 14/08/1842 – Seminole War ends; Indians removed from Florida to Oklahoma
    • 14/08/1862 – Lincoln receives 1st group of blacks to confer with US president
    • 14/08/1900 – 2,000 marines land to capture Beijing, ending Boxer rebellion
    • 14/08/1912 – 2,500 US marines invade Nicaragua; US remains until 1925
    • 14/08/1937 – China declares war on Japan
    • 14/08/1942 – Dwight D Eisenhower named commander for invasion of North Africa
    • 14/08/1945 – V-J Day; Japan surrenders unconditionally to end WW II
    • 14/08/1973 – US ends secret bombing of Cambodia
    • 15/08/1534 – Ignatius of Loyola forms society of Jesus/Jesuits
    • 15/08/1620 – Mayflower sets sail from Southampton with 102 Pilgrims
    • 15/08/1824 – Freed American slaves forms country of Liberia
    • 15/08/1867 – 2nd Reform Bill extends suffrage in England
    • 15/08/1870 – Transcontinental Railway actually completed in Colorado
    • 15/08/1944 – Operation Dragoon: Allied troops land in Provence
    • 15/08/1944 – Operation Anvil: Allies land on French Mediterranean sea coast
    • 15/08/1960 – UFO is sighted by 3 California patrolmen
    • 15/08/1969 – Woodstock Music and Art Fair opens in NY State (Max Yasgur’s Dairy Farm)
    • 16/08/1777 – Americans defeat British in Battle of Bennington, Vt
    • 16/08/1858 – Britain’s Queen Victoria telegraphs President James Buchanan
    • 16/08/1861 – Pres Lincoln prohibits Union states from trading with Confederacy
    • 16/08/1863 – Emancipation Proclamation signed
    • 16/08/1961 – Martin L. King, Jr. protests for black voting right in Miami
    • 16/08/1969 – Woodstock rock festival begins in NY
    • 17/08/1590 – John White returns to Roanoke, VA and found no trace of colonist’s he had left there 3 yrs earlier [or Aug 18, 1591]
    • 17/08/1808 – Napoleon asks King Louis for Holland brigade towards Spain
    • 17/08/1862 – Confederate troops under Kirby Smith enter Kentucky
    • 17/08/1870 – Mrs Esther Morris becomes 1st woman magistrate (South Pass, Wyoming)
    • 17/08/1903 – Joe Pulitzer donated $1 million to Columbia U and begins Pulitzer Prizes
    • 17/08/1915 – Mob lynches Jewish businessman Leo Frank in Cobb County, Ga after death sentence for murder of 13-year-old girl commuted to life
    • 17/08/1948 – Alger Hiss denies ever being a Communist agent
    • 17/08/1961 – Building of Berlin Wall begins
    • 17/08/1969 – -18] Hurricane Camille, kills 256 in Miss and Louisiana
    • 17/08/1988 – Republicans nominate George Bush for president
    • 18/08/1564 – Spanish King Philip II joins Council of Trente
    • 18/08/1864 – Petersburg Campaign-Battle of Weldon Railroad day 1 of 3 days
    • 18/08/1914 – Pres Wilson issues “Proclamation of Neutrality”
    • 18/08/1920 – Tennessee ratifies 19th Amendment, guarantees women voting right
    • 18/08/1958 – TV game show scandal investigation starts
    • 19/08/1561 – Mary Queen of Scots arrives in Leith Scotland to assume throne after spending 13 years in France
    • 19/08/1692 – 5 women executed for witchcraft in Salem Mass
    • 19/08/1698 – Russian czar Peter the Great begins term
    • 19/08/1849 – NY Herald reports gold discovery in California
    • 19/08/1934 – Hitler elected Fuhrer (95.7% of German voters)
    • 19/08/1942 – 1st American offensive in Pacific in WW2, Guadalcanal, Solomon Is
    • 19/08/1942 – 4,000 Canadian and British soldiers killed raiding Dieppe, France
    • 19/08/1955 – Hurricane Diane kills 200 and 1st billion $ damage storm (N.E. US)
    • 19/08/1958 – NAACP Youth Council begin sit-ins at Oklahoma City Lunch counters
    • 19/08/1960 – Sputnik 5 carries 2 dogs, 3 mice into orbit (later recovered alive)
    • 19/08/1965 – Auschwitz trials end with 6 life sentences
    • 19/08/1984 – Republican convention in Houston nominates Ronald Reagan for pres
    • 19/08/1988 – Iran-Iraq begin a cease-fire in their 8-year-old war (11 PM EDT)
    • 20/08/1619 – 1st Black slaves brought by Dutch to colony of Jamestown Virginia
    • 20/08/1781 – George Washington begins to move his troops south to fight Cornwallis
    • 20/08/1864 – 8th/last day of battle at Deep Bottom Run Va (about 3900 casualties)
    • 20/08/1865 – Pres Johnson proclaims an end to “insurrection” in Tx
    • 20/08/1866 – Pres Andrew Johnson formally declares Civil War over
    • 20/08/1896 – Dial telephone patented
    • 20/08/1910 – US supported opposition brings down Madriz in Nicaragua
    • 20/08/1918 – Britain opens offensive on Western front during WW I
    • 20/08/1974 – Pres Gerald Ford, assumes office after Richard Nixon’s resignation
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    • Jabotinsky’s ghost Beyond the war in Lebanon lies the ultimate question of Israel’s coexistence with a Palestinian state. To confront it, Ehud Olmert knows he must break with the political tradition into which he was born – Boston Globe, 8-13-06
    • Michael Oren: “This may be the first war that Israel does not win” – LA Times, 8-13-06
    • Tom Segev on “Israeli left divided over Lebanon clashes”: “Amir Peretz is the real surprise of Israeli politics, and everybody believed him that he is a man of peace. Maybe he is, but he is too weak. He started the wide-scale operations against the Palestinians and he led the army to this war in Lebanon.” – Christian Science Monitor, 8-11-06
    • Michael B. Oren: Israel could lose the war but win the peace – WSJ, 8-8-06
    • Gershom Gorenberg on “Israeli Citizens Continue to Support Military Action”: “It’s dependent on the military campaign providing clear gains of the sort that he’s claiming, of leaving Hezbollah defanged or significantly weaker, of Israel making political strategic gains that will make this whole military operation worthwhile….. There’s also a serious chance that precisely because Olmert and Peretz were people known for their civilian background, that they felt that to legitimize themselves, they had to act very strong, and that inclined them to take the military suggestions without proper considerations of the long-term policy impact.” – NPR, 30-7-06
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Paul Kennedy: Bad Company THE PARLIAMENT OF MAN The Past, Present, and Future of the United NationsNYT, 8-13-06
    • Paul Kennedy: THE PARLIAMENT OF MAN The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations, First Chapter – NYT, 8-13-06
    • Shaul Bakhash on Ali Gheissari and Vali Nasr: Reading Jefferson in Tehran One member of President Bush’s “axis of evil” has a surprising democratic heritage DEMOCRACY IN IRAN History and the Quest for LibertyWa Po, 8-13-06
    • Richard Labunski: You can thank James Madison The U.S. Constitution’s unlikely hero – Lexington Herald Leader, KY, 8-13-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: Katrina inspires varied works – News & Observer, NC, 8-11-06
    • James Sullivan: Jeans Now Need Their Own Specialist Scholars: Call It Jeanitics JEANS A Cultural History of an American IconNYT, 8-8-06
    • David S. Brown: Rave reviews for his bio of Hofstadter – Ralph Luker at HNN blog, Cliopatria (8-7-06)
    • Sheldon Rothblatt on William Clark: The Professor Comes of Age Academic Charisma and the Origins of the Research UniversityAmerican Scientist, 8-9-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Mark Grimsley on “Atrocities are a fact of all wars, even ours It’s not just evil empires whose soldiers go amok”: “It’s difficult to get through to cadets, officers and (enlisted) men the importance of targeting only enemy combatants, taking prisoners and not just shooting anybody.”Some officers are very concerned about these things, and do a good job of training their men. Others are more slipshod about it.” – San Francisco Chronicle, 8-13-06
    EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Juan Williams, author of “Enough,” interviewed by Michael Eric Dyson, Sunday, August 13 at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Bruce Knecht Hooked: Pirates, Poaching, and the Perfect Fish, Sunday, August 13 at 7:00 pm and Monday, August 14 at 12:00 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Chad Millman The Detonators: The Secret Plot to Destroy America and an Epic Hunt for Justice, Sunday, August 13 at 8:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History,” Sunday, August 13, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Countdown to Ground Zero,” Sunday, August 13, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Revolution 11 – Becoming a Nation,” Sunday, August 13, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Conspiracy? FDR and Pearl Harbor,” Monday, August 14, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Miracle of Stairway B,” Monday, August 14, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth City of the Gods,” Monday, August 14, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Three Wars of the Battleship Missouri,” Tuesday, August 14, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Man Who Predicted 9/11,” Tuesday, August 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Lincoln Assassination,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Infamous Murders Political Assassinations,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The World Trade Center,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past 666: The Sign of Evil,” Wednesday, August 16, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Grounded on 9/11,” Thursday, August 17, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries Ghost Ships,” Thursday, August 17, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Countdown to Ground Zero,” Friday, August 18, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon,” Friday, August 18, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels,” Marathon Saturday, August 19, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The True Story of Black Hawk Down,” Saturday, August 12, @ 5pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #1, (2 weeks on list) – 8-20-06
    • Ron Suskind: THE ONE PERCENT DOCTRINE Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, #8, (7 weeks on list) – 8-20-06
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #11, (13 weeks on list) – 8-20-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Mark Schleifstein: Path of Destruction: The Destruction of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms, August 2006
    • Judith Hicks Stiehm: Champions for Peace: Women Winners of the Nobel Peace Prize, August 2006
    • Mark Grotelueschen: AEF Way of War: The American Army and Combat in World War I, August 2006
    • John Botte: Aftermath: Unseen 9/11 Photos by a New York City Cop, August 22, 2006
    • Zahi A. Hawass: Mountains of the Pharaohs: The Untold Story of the Pyramid Builders, August 22, 2006
    • Robert Young Pelton: Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror, August 29, 2006
    • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
    • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
    • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
    • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
    • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
    • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    • Gil Troy: Hillary Rodham Clinton: Polarizing First Lady, October 4, 2006
    • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, August 13, 2006 at 6:56 PM

    August 7, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 07/08/1782 – George Washington creates Order of Purple Heart
    • 07/08/1934 – US Court of Appeals upheld lower court ruling striking down govt’s attempt to ban controversial James Joyce novel “Ulysses”
    • 07/08/1942 – 1st American offensive in Pacific in WW2, Guadalcanal, Solomon Is
    • 07/08/1964 – US Congress approves Gulf of Tonkin resolution
    • 07/08/1990 – Desert Shield begins – US deploys troops to Saudi Arabia
    • 08/08/1864 – Red Cross forms in Geneva
    • 08/08/1876 – Thomas Edison patents mimeograph
    • 08/08/1890 – Daughters of American Revolution organizes
    • 08/08/1945 – USSR establishes a communist government in North Korea
    • 08/08/1945 – US, USSR, England and France sign Treaty of London
    • 08/08/1945 – Pres Harry S Truman signs UN Charter
    • 08/08/1953 – US and South Korea initial a mutual security pact
    • 08/08/1968 – Republican convention in Miami Beach nominates Nixon for pres
    • 08/08/1973 – VP Spiro T Agnew says reports he took kickbacks are “damned lies” from govt contracts in Maryland. He vowed not to resign
    • 08/08/1974 – Pres Richard M Nixon announces he’ll resign his office 12PM Aug 9
    • 09/08/1638 – Jonas Bronck of Holland becomes 1st European settler in Bronx
    • 09/08/1842 – US-Canada border defined by Webster-Ashburton Treaty
    • 09/08/1655 – Lord Protector Cromwell divides England into 11 districts
    • 09/08/1673 – Dutch recapture NY from English; regained by English in 1674
    • 09/08/1790 – Columbia returns to Boston after 3 year journey, 1st ship to carry US flag around the world
    • 09/08/1842 – US-Canada border defined by Webster-Ashburton Treaty
    • 09/08/1848 – Barnburners (anti-slavery) party merges with Free Soil Party nominateing Martin Van Buren for president
    • 09/08/1941 – Winston Churchill reaches Newfoundland for 1st talk with FDR
    • 09/08/1974 – Richard Nixon resigns presidency, VP Gerald Ford becomes 38th pres
    • 10/08/0070 – “2nd Temple” of Jews is set aflame (approx)
    • 10/08/1497 – John Cabot tells King Henry VII of his trip to “Asia”
    • 10/08/1831 – Former slave Nat Turner leads uprising against slavery
    • 10/08/1846 – Congress charters “nation’s attic,” Smithsonian Institution
    • 10/08/1941 – FDR and Churchill’s 2nd meeting at Placentia Newfoundland
    • 11/08/1924 – US presidential candidates make 1st film for bio-scoop news
    • 11/08/1941 – FDR and PM Winston Churchill sign Atlantic Charter
    • 12/08/1676 – 1st war between American colonists and Indians ends in New England
    • 12/08/1867 – Pres A Johnson defies Congress suspending Sec of War Edwin Stanton
    • 12/08/1898 – Hawaii formally annexed to US
    • 12/08/1898 – Peace protocol ends Spanish-American War, signed
    • 12/08/1990 – Iraq President Saddam Hussein says he is ready to resolve Gulf crisis if Israel withdraws from occupied territories
    • 12/08/1994 – Stephen G Breyer, sworn in as Supreme Court Justice
    • 13/08/1608 – John Smith’s story of Jamestown’s 1st days submitted for publication
    • 13/08/1792 – Revolutionaries imprison French royals including Marie Antoinette
    • 13/08/1906 – Black soldiers raid Brownsville Texas
    • 13/08/1961 – Construction on Berlin Wall begins in East Germany (Dark day)
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • David S. Brown: The Education of Richard Hofstadter RICHARD HOFSTADTER An Intellectual BiographyNYT, 8-6-03
    • David S. Brown: RICHARD HOFSTADTER An Intellectual Biography, First Chapter – NYT, 8-6-03
    • SAM TANENHAUS: Reading List Richard Hofstadter (with orignal NYT reviews) – NYT, 8-6-03
    • Lawrence Wright: The Plot Against America THE LOOMING TOWER Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11NYT, 8-6-06
    • Lawrence Wright: The Plot Against America THE LOOMING TOWER Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11, First Chapter – NYT, 8-6-06
    • Brooke A. Masters: The Contender New York’s wildly ambitious attorney general took on Wall Street corruption — and isn’t done yet SPOILING FOR A FIGHT The Rise of Eliot SpitzerWa Po, 8-6-06
    • R. Stephen Humphreys on Fouad Ajami: The Iraqi Predicament One of America’s foremost Arab intellectuals explores the souring of a war he supported The Iraqi Predicament One of America’s foremost Arab intellectuals explores the souring of a war he supported. Wa Po, 8-6-06
    • Joe Speakman: Honor Thy Father A Historian’s Account Of The CCC – Evening Bulletin, PA, 7-31-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • David M. Kennedy on “The competence candidate Can Mitt Romney make competence sell?”: “Obviously you don’t want someone who can’t balance his checkbook. But the people we remember as truly effective presidents, it’s not primarily for their administrative competency. There’s something else, a dimension X. Mere administrative competence is surely not sufficient, and it may not even be necessary.” – Boston Globe, 8-6-06
    • Michael Kazin on “The competence candidate Can Mitt Romney make competence sell?”: “When people are voting for governors, they are in a sense electing the CEO of their state,” someone whose job is to manage the government. There are a lot of very uncharismatic guys elected governor. Romney, isn’t one of them.” – Boston Globe, 8-6-06
    • Bruce Schulman on “The competence candidate Can Mitt Romney make competence sell?” “Those presidencies don’t work well when they are true to their campaign mottos. Partly what presidential leadership is about is convincing large bodies of people to move in a certain direction, and managerial-style leaders have a harder time doing that.” Schulman, author of a recent history of the 1970s, points to Jimmy Carter as a president plagued by a sort of “engineer-manager” mind-set. If you look at every problem individually and analyze it on the merits, that makes for a good professor, but it makes for lousy leadership.” – Boston Globe, 8-6-06
    SPOTTED:
    • David M. Oshinsky: Makes President Bush’s Summer Reading List – KWTX, TX, 8-6-06
    EVENTS CALENDAR:
    • James C. Klotter: The Clark County Public Library will host “Is Kentucky Southern?” – Kentucky.com, 8-2-06
    HONORED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents In Depth: Gary Gallagher, Sunday, August 6 at 12:00 pm and Monday, August 7 at 12:00 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Tom Tancredo, author of “In Mortal Danger: The Battle for America’s Border and Security,” interviewed by Anne Mulkern, National Writer for The Denver Post, Sunday, August 6 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Ann Coulter Godless: The Church of Liberalism, Sunday, August 6 at 7:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “The Revolution 10 – The End Game,” Sunday, August 6, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds Athens-Ancient Supercity,” Sunday, August 6, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “America’s Lost Bombs: The True Story of Broken Arrows,” Monday, August 7, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth Lost Cities of the Amazon,” Monday, August 7, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Declassified Castro – The Survivor,” Tuesday, August 8, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Currahee,” Tuesday, August 8, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Day of Days,” Tuesday, August 8, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Carentan,” Wednesday, August 9, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Replacements,” Wednesday, August 9, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Little Big Horn: The Untold Story,” Thursday, August 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Crossroads,” Thursday, August 10, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Bastogne,” Thursday, August 10, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers The Breaking Point,” Friday, August 11, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers The Patrol,” Friday, August 11, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “American Eats,” Marathon Saturday, August 11, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Why We Fight,” Saturday, August 12, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band of Brothers Points,” Saturday, August 12, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle,” Saturday, August 12, @ 10pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #1, (1 week on list) – 8-13-06
    • Ron Suskind: THE ONE PERCENT DOCTRINE Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, #8, (6 weeks on list) – 8-13-06
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #9, (12 weeks on list) – 8-13-06
    • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #30 – 8-13-06
    • Douglas Brinkley: THE GREAT DELUGE Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, #35 – 8-13-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Lawrence Wright: The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11, August 8, 2006
    • Mark Schleifstein: Path of Destruction: The Destruction of New Orleans and the Coming Age of Superstorms, August 2006
    • Judith Hicks Stiehm: Champions for Peace: Women Winners of the Nobel Peace Prize, August 2006
    • Mark Grotelueschen: AEF Way of War: The American Army and Combat in World War I, August 2006
    • Jim Powell: Bully Boy: The Truth about Theodore Roosevelt’s Legacy, August 8, 2006
    • John Botte: Aftermath: Unseen 9/11 Photos by a New York City Cop, August 22, 2006
    • Zahi A. Hawass: Mountains of the Pharaohs: The Untold Story of the Pyramid Builders, August 22, 2006
    • Robert Young Pelton: Licensed to Kill: Hired Guns in the War on Terror, August 29, 2006
    • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
    • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
    • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
    • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
    • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
    • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
    • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
    • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
    • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
    • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, August 6, 2006 at 7:34 PM

    History Doyens: Joyce Oldham Appleby

    What They’re Famous For

    Joyce Oldham Appleby is professor emerita from UCLA and retired in 2001 after teaching there 21 years. She is one of the United States’ foremost historians of the early republic. Appleby is at the pinnacle of her profession through her powerful engagement with important ideas and controversial issues. Joyce  Appleby JPG Throughout her 40-year career, her scholarship has examined the formation of an ‘American’ political ideology, with particular focus on the connections between the history of ideas and the history of economic institutions, policies and practices.

    Her books include “Capitalism and a New Social Order: The Republican Vision of the 1790s,” “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans,” “Liberalism and Republicanism in the Historical Imagination,” “Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century England” and a recently published presidential biography of Thomas Jefferson. Appleby is past president of the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians and the Society for the History of the Early Republic.

    Personal Anecdote

    Perhaps because I began teaching at a university underfunded for research and overly funded with students with modest academic aptitude, I learned early in my career that the key point of teaching is to move students from one intellectual level to a higher one. What the study of history offers above all is an opening to the complexity of human experience. I devised ways to make complicated matters more accessible rather than simplifying the complexity.

    Joyce  Appleby JPGSince we toss around complex with the same abandon as nuanced, I’ll define how I think of complexity in history. Complexity in human affairs arises from the fact that human beings are never single-minded in their efforts and decisions, and events never slide along a predictable cause and effect continuum. Getting across this point has always been more important to me than raising consciousness about past injustices or rallying students to the heroism of dissenters and reformers. For this reason, I may have been perceived as conservative, even though in my extraprofessional, political life I have always been a left-leaning liberal with libertarian undertows.

    History offers students an opportunity to think and discuss sophisticated topics. For this words are needed, so I felt keenly the importance of habituating them to a larger vocabulary – one big enough to get at those nuances, complexities, and subtleties. I was astonished when I came to UCLA in my 15th year of teaching to run into a program in which the counseling staff monitored lectures in introductory classes with the idea of locating words that students could not be expected to know. This nefarious [in my view] enterprise ended with the production of a list of words that the monitors had found UCLA lecturers using which were deemed beyond the ken of the students. All that I cam remember from that list is the word, sovereignty. This is the dumbing down approach to education which still enchants some educators. I believe in the intelligencing up of students. From my point of view one of the greatest legacies of a college education is an expanded vocabulary. This may seem “small potatoes” to educational reformers, but not to me. One can not think of subtlety or complexity without the words to express their defining qualities.

    All of this is by way of introducing one of the most satisfying moments in my teaching career. It happened at San Diego State University in a lower division class with students more interested in getting a requirement out of the way than learning American History, much less participating in my “intelligencing up” project. The class size was limited to 40 because the department had committed itself to class discussions of the assigned primary texts that venerable collection, The People Shall Judge. The students sometimes let me know that my vocabulary was not theirs, but I insisted that it was the vocabulary of educated discourse. And during the semester, I noticed that some began to integrate new words when they spoke. During the final, one of the members of the class, a young man somewhat ragged around the edges, came up to me and softly asked how to spell, benign.

    Joyce  Appleby JPG I’ve remembered this moment all these years because it captured how studying a subject plunges one into a conceptual universe which soon becomes one’s own. In this new universe he had discovered a word that he wanted to use in his exam answer. He knew the meaning; he just lacked the spelling, because he had only heard it. He had to get the spelling because he couldn’t express his thought without it. There in a nutshell was evidence of learning. I’ve always wondered if he continued using benign.

    How I got involved in the History News Service

    Having begun my career working for Mademoiselle magazine in New York and the Pasadena Star-News in California, I was familiar with the world of journalism. When I was elected president of the American Historical Association years later, I saw a chance to create a link between historians and newspapers with historians writing oped pieces that provided historical perspectives on contemporary events. Receiving a go-ahead at my first AHA Council meeting, Perspectives, the newsletter of the American Historical Association, ran this notice in its October, 1996 issue.

    “AHA Seeking Volunteers to Write Articles: The AHA is looking for volunteers for a committee to promote the writing of feature articles and op-ed essays in the popular press. There are very few public issues that do not have a historical dimension, but the public rarely learns it. We would like to form a committee that would address this need by generating topic ideas and identifying appropriate authors within the profession as news stories break. Committee service would require a commitment of several hours a week and access to e-mail. Suggestions for committee members and ways to respond to this challenge should be sent to Joyce Appleby at Appleby@histr.ssnet.ucla.edu.”

    Joyce  Appleby C-Span JPGThe AHA Council decided that its sponsorship of a group distributing opeds could involve the association in unnecessary controversies, so HNS, not yet really an entity, was hived off from the AHA. By that time, I had received the most important response to my notice: James Banner wrote that he not only wanted to write for HNS, but would like to help me launch the enterprise. The offer of expert help could not have arrived at a better moment as I was about to enter my presidential year. I readily accepted his offer, and he set about developing an organization for HNS while I contacted newspapers, eventually finding more than 200 willing to look at our opeds.

    The oped writers nominated themselves by emailing submissions to both of us, now the HNS co-directors. Having hit our stride by the 2000 election, we learned that both prospective oped authors and the public thought about history in a time of crisis. More than two dozen opeds flooded into our in-boxes during the long, Florida stand-off. Jim and I wrote a pro and con piece on the Electoral College which appeared in some 20 newspapers, and elicited many, angry responses from both sides of the for or against divide. Our normal pace is a weekly distribution of one oped with six or seven papers (and many more web sites) picking it up, including the supportive History News Network.

    A tribute to the internet, all of our writing, revising, and distributing is done through email; any payment goes directly to the writer; anyone may use HNS pieces after they have been posted. Writers and members of the HNS steering committee are volunteers. We share the same goal: building bridges to the public by using our expertise and responding to our civic commitment to enhance the quality of public discourse.

    Quotes

    By Joyce Appleby

  • “There is a pervasive notion abroad in the land that somehow the past lingers on to force the hand of those who reconstruct it. Yet we know that the past as a series of events is utterly gone; only its consequences have infiltrated the present. Some remnants remain like litter from a picnic, but these material leftovers never speak for themselves. In fact they are inert traces until someone asks a question that turns them into evidence. We need to converse about the vital connection of curiosity and inquiry in scholarship, because one effect of the attacks on western knowledge has been to popularize a skepticism detached from its critical roots. Ours is a knowledge dependent society, yet people are quick to believe that knowledge changes in arbitrary ways, even that cabals of like-minded academics exist to poison the well of truth. We live in an age without consensus where paradoxically men and women all over the world are gravitating to the same opinions. Joyce Appleby  JPG History can minister to both perplexities, not only by preserving the endangered diversity of the human experience, but also by nurturing an understanding of how learned opinions are formed. Whether we meet our audience gathered in the classroom, at museum exhibits, reading our books, or in public forums, we need to offer an alternative to cynicism by making accessible how we reconstruct the past. And since our work is similar to the construction of all knowledge, learning how historical truths are put forward and tested possesses a protean utility?.History is powerful because we live with its residues, its remnants, its remainders and reminders. Moreover, by studying societies unlike our own, we counteract the chronocentrism that blinkers contemporary vision. That’s why we cannot abandon intellectual rigor or devalue accuracy. History has an irreducible positivistic element, for its subject is real, even if that reality is evanescent and dependent upon texts. Historical writing creates objects for our thoughts, making audible what had become inaudible, extracting latent information from the objects that men and women have constructed. This materiality of historical evidence does restrain us. Imagine a willful forgetting of the Holocaust had the Nazis won World War Two. Eventually someone would have picked up the trail of clues or stumbled over the contradictions in the documents created by the victors. Texts would then replace texts, but the impetus for the change would have come from the past itself just as scholars reconstructing the succession of post-Columbian demographic disasters had lots of evidence to go on, once their curiosity turned in that direction. The concreteness of history is what gives it the power to compel attention, to stretch imaginations, and to change minds?A hundred and fifty years ago, historians exalted the nation’s commercial values as proof of democratic vigor; since the Progressives they have focused more upon those groups that failed to benefit from a profit-driven economy. Perhaps now, as the twentieth century closes, we may be ready to explore the social complexity of our entrepreneurial system while shedding the celebratory and compensatory burdens of our predecessors.

    The power of history is liberating. The last four decades have demonstrated it, if proof be needed. First social historians located and analyzed group experiences which had been ignored by earlier historians. Then investigations of ideologies and paradigms, followed by postmodernist critiques and cultural studies, plumbed the depths of society’s shaping hand in organizing human consciousness through models, discourses and language’s insinuating codes. Today as teachers, exhibitors, preservers, and researchers of the past, we have been forced to think through the acts of appropriation and remembrance. We can no longer plead ignorance of their effects. We’re self-conscious about our voices, our genres, our assumptions. If we can live with this indeterminacy, pursue its implications, contend over meaning, give repeated witness to the magnificence of the human effort to understand, and share these acts with the public, we can be certain that history – the quintessential Western discourse – will have no end. — Joyce Appleby in “The Power of History,” January 9, 1998 Presidential Address, published in the American Historical Review , 103 (February, 1998) and reprinted in “A Restless Past,” Lanham, Maryland, 2005, pp.. 145-48.

  • “From the Springs of ardor and enthusiam issued a powerful mythabout America that metamorphosed ordinary labor into extraordinary acts of nation building. It also attached personal virtue to a narrative about human progress and claimed for liberty the protean capacity to sustain economic development and main maintain democratic vigor. Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans JPG In the simplicity of this national narrative there was little room for alternative constructions of reality, no place for failures, scant concern for diverging truths, and insufficient attention paid to prophetic voices. Only one division could not be printed and papered over-that between the Northern and Southern States that was leading inexorably to dividing the house that had gone in escrow at Philadelphia.The American Revolution had not produced its own reactionaries. The Southern gentry had applauded the break with Great Britain with even more fervor than Northern leaders. What they disdained to share was the interpretation of America’s revolutionary heritage as a call to innovation, enterprise, and reform. The sucess of Noretherners in fashioning this understanding of their jopint inheritance led to a new North that spoke for the nation and an old South that clung to values that pushed them apart. what was happening in the United States in its first fifty years-the elaboration od democratic institutions, the hardening of racist lines, the openess of oppotunity, thinning of intellectual traditions, and reconfiguring of Northern and Southern states into the North and the South-could not be comprehended within a unifying story, yet this did not prevent those in the first generation most concious of the nation from claiming their story for the whole. Rather than abandon the cherished object of an American truth, they accepted the half loaf of a half truth wrapped in a covering myth about the land of the free.” — Joyce Appleby in “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans”
  • Thomas Jefferson JPG “The most talked-about president in America’s history, Thomas Jefferson commands both praise and condemnation. He is regularly quoted when people speak of natural rights, but the contradiction between the Declaration of Independence’s evocation of ‘the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness’ and its author’s being a slave-holder troubles us more than ever before. Looking at Jefferson’s presidency helps us to understand this puzzle as well as his amazing accomplishment in washing out the elite traditions of the nation’s colonial past from the expansive democracy he so decisively shaped.” — Joyce Appleby on Thomas Jefferson
  • Yet in the end it was Jefferson’s words – his power as author – that outstripped and transcended his prejudices as a man. Like some Sorcerer’s Apprentice, he had got hold of and articulated a vision whose power he felt but whose full implications he barely comprehended. His words and phrases – most especially those of the Declaration of Independence – would later be borrowed, repeated, and refashioned for purposes that Jefferson did not intend, could not foresee, and almost certainly could not have imagined. 45 When in 1848 the delegates at the Seneca Falls conference sought a model for their own declaration of feminist principles, they turned almost immediately to Jefferson’s Declaration. The ex-slave and ardent Abolitionist Frederick Douglass looked back to the Declaration’s color-blind and universal principles for inspiration and legitimation. And Abraham Lincoln saw in Jefferson’s Declaration the real charter of American liberty for all, black and white alike. A product of political compromise, the Constitution had recognized, and thus legitimized, slavery; the Declaration in its magnificent abstractness had not. Thus the “four score and seven years” before Lincoln’s 1863 Gettysburg Address locates 1776 as America’s better origin and the real birth-date of the republic. If America had originated in an “idea,” then Jefferson was father to the thought. — Joyce Appleby and Terence Ball in “Thomas Jefferson, Political Writings”
  • “I was very interested in what… Who constructed this revolutionary heritage, because we think of ourselves very much as a nation that starts with a revolution, and I’m a historian of the revolution and the Constitution, and I was curious as to how it was interpreted by those people who had no contact with the colonial era, who had never been subjects of the king, who had none of the sensibilities and mores that their parents had….
    There are two levels: One, because it created the… a sense that they had to do something with their lives and with the society, that was almost as if it were a gift, but it was a gift with a lot of strings attached to it. And then the other reason why it’s important is because there were other developments that had nothing to do with the United States, per se– economic developments, cultural developments– which played out very differently for an independent nation than they would have had the Americans still been under Great Britain….
    I think it was a charter generation, and it was because it was the first generation to live with this revolutionary inheritance, but also because it was the…very self- consciously being different in the world. The society was democratizing, it was becoming more liberal. There was an outpouring of religious enthusiasm, and many new denominations were formed, so the… Learning to live in this newly-created public space was what this generation did, and they, sort of, blocked out the areas that we’re still living with. Joyce Appleby discussing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans” with Margret Warner on the “Newshour with Jim Lehrer”
  • “Well, I think that the founders would be impressed by the fact that democracy is spreading in the world. After all, theirs was one of the few republics in a world of tyrannies and monarchies, so that it would be quite remarkable to think that, what, there are 112 democracies in the world today. Clearly, there would be some sort of a jolt at seeing what kind of societies we have in the early 21st century.But I believe — again a kind of ambivalence — the founders really did believe these were universal principles, at the same time they recognized that they were path breakers, that they were experimenting, and I think it would be quite reassuring for them to see that democracies are flourishing many places, they’re struggling other places, but they are definitely in the ascendance. I think that would be extremely gratifying because they would feel that their revolution had been the beginning of an entirely new future for humankind. — Joyce Appleby on the “Newshour with Jim Lehrer” discussing “The Founders’ Vision,” July 4, 2003About Joyce Appleby
  • Joyce Appleby’s provocative and wide-ranging new book joins a growing group of works interested in the construction of our myths and how we remember our past. Appleby, long a scholar and admirer of Jefferson, has looked at how the generation of Americans, beginning to exert their power at the time of his election in 1800, gave meaning to the Revolution. She isolates America’s proverbial defining moment, crystallizes the ideas it produced, and indicates some it left behind. She consulted over 200 published autobiographies and memoirs in addition to myriad other accounts of this generation. Appleby’s group of Americans “did something in public,” and she acknowledges that failures did not get voices in her story. As a result, the tone often bears a strong resemblance to Tocqueville’s enthusiastic report of a country, brash and strong, expanding in every direction, a people serious, untutored, egalitarian, and pleased with themselves. Both writers find much to celebrate in tracing the effects of a democratic revolution on the character and practices of Americans. But Appleby’s primary story is not only about how these Americans construed their experience but also how that related to historical reality…. Appleby’s brilliant earlier work on the social construction of the liberal, economic man and the long preparation Americans had for the rapid penetration of the market lays the groundwork for her economic analysis…. While Appleby claims too much in some cases for the Revolution, her artful unfolding of the history of 1789-1830 and its participants’ simultaneous interpretation of it is a great achievement. In the end, as Appleby knows, it has mattered considerably less to most Americans exactly what historians believe the Revolution accomplished compared to what its legatees ascribed to it. Examining the gap between our reassuringly heroic revolutionary tradition and reality is an invaluable project, no matter what its precise measurements turn out to be. — Martha Saxton reviewing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans”
  • Joyce Appleby deals with two themes in this book: the historical experience of the generation after the American Revolution and conflicts within American identity. The result is Whitmanesque, both in its complex but coherent vision and in its elegant expression. — Edward Countryman reviewing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans” in the NYT
  • In her rich new book…[Appleby] argues that the first generation of Americans… experienced a degree of political and social change unrivalled before or since… This first generation reached a kind of closure about the meaning of democracy that has made it difficult for succeeding generations to articulate a vision of America other than the one they created: a society devoted to individualism and free enterprise… What emerges is a striking tale, on its face one of the most celebratory accounts of American gumption in recent historiography. — Marc Arkin reviewing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans” in the “New Criterion”
  • Appleby documents, in precise and persuasive detail, the evolution and elaboration of assumptions about what it is to be an American that we now take completely for granted. What we think of as the “natural phenomenon” of individualism, for example, she describes as first appearing in the “prototype for the self-made man,” who eventually evolved into “a new character ideal…the man who developed inner resources, acted independently, lived virtuously, and bent his behavior to his personal goals–not the American Adam, but the American homo faber, the builder.” — Jonathan Yardley reviewing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans” in “Washington Post Book World”
  • “Joyce Appleby perfectly captures the world created by the sons and daughters of the American Revolution. Enterprising and energetic, mad about money and seemingly constantly on the move, deeply pious and convinced of their own capacity to shape their own destinies, they took their Revolutionary legacy and made it into the world that we still inhabit, if with a little less optimism and a better sense of its contradictions.” –Jan Lewis, author of “The Pursuit of Happiness: Family and Values in Jefferson’s Virginia” reviewing “Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans”
  • “This superb collection will have a major influence on our understanding of early American history.” — Gordon S. Wood, Brown University reviewing “Liberalism and Republicanism in the Historical Imagination”
  • “Appleby has succeeded in writing as good a brief study of this complex man as is imaginable. Another in a series on the American chief executives edited by Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., her elegant book is a liberal’s take on the complex, sphinx-like founder of American liberalism. Appleby convincingly argues that the third president’s greatest legacies were limited government (breached, however, by the opportunism that characterized his own presidency) and the great expansion of democracy . . . She fully explains the man’s sorry record and tortured views on slavery and race. Providing along the way a short, up-to-date history of the early 19th-century nation, she also concisely surveys the day’s great issues—voting, democracy, political parties, commerce, westering and religion.” — Publishers Weekly reviewing “Thomas Jefferson [The American Presidents Series]“
  • “Is there a truth that historians can tell? Yes, in thunder, answer the authors of “Telling the Truth About History,” a confident, breezy account of the historical profession’s encounters with post-modernism and multiculturalism….
    Those affirmations in this book flow from three distinguished scholars. Joyce Appleby of the University of California, Los Angeles, has worked primarily on 18th- and early 19th-century America; Lynn Hunt of the University of Pennsylvania is a specialist in modern French history, and Margaret Jacob of the New School for Social Research is a historian of science. The three speak in a single voice, in the “I work in the archives” tone of researchers unwilling to leave to theorists the task of explaining to the public the politics and cognitive mission of historians….
    “Telling the Truth About History” is at once a vindication of historical knowledge against skeptical and relativist doubts and a popular history of the process by which these doubts came into being….
    These three authors sharpen their pragmatic realism by making good use of the recent work of the philosopher Hilary Putnam, and they rightly insist that a consensus-based theory of truth is more defensible if the group of inquirers is genuinely open to women and minorities. Despite these whiffs of contemporary thought, the doctrinal core of “Telling the Truth About History” is a pragmatic realism long since appreciated by many historians in the United States. Making this pragmatic realism more accessible to the public is the greatest contribution of this book. It will no doubt serve also to help undergraduates majoring in history find their way through the post-modernist debates…. — David A. Hollinger reviewing “Telling the Truth About History” in the NYT
  • “This excellent little book is part of a distinguished series of studies, each of which developped out of the Anson G. Phelps Lectureship on Early American History. This volume attempts “to uncover how the market economy influenced the way people thought about politics and the human potential for purposefully reordering social institutions.”…Appleby offers both a valuable explanation of the development of a capitalist ideology and a needed corrective for the traditional image of the Jeffersonians….This ia an excellent book, written in a lively style and particularly well suited for classroom use.” — Billy G. Smith reviewing “Capitalism and a New Social Order: The Republican Vision of the 1790s”
  • “In this 1979 Book Award of the Berkshire Conference of Women Historians, Joyce Oldham Appleby proposes to answer a number of questions about the meaning of economic activity to seventeenth-century English people. How did some explain and justify and other reject the changing material conditions of life? What moral values, evidence and logic were used in the debates? How did discussions of the market, trade, and currency influence the emerging modern worldview as well as subsequent economic thought? Appleby develops a lucid, provoking essay which may do for our understanding of seventeeth-century economic thought what Perry Miller began for the image of New England Puritanism; free it from the accretion of projections and historiographic stereotypes….Taken collectively, the detractions weigh lightly against the considerable strentghs of this study. Whether readers will agree or disagree with Professor Appleby’s assumptions about ideology and the process of change, all will be challenged and rewarded in some way by her book.” — Paul A. Fideler reviewing “Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century England”
  • Basic Facts

    Teaching Positions:
    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, assistant professor, 1967-70, associate professor, 1970-73, professor of American history, 1973-81, associate dean of College of Arts and Letters, 1974-75;
    University of California, Los Angeles, professor of history, 1981–.

    Visiting associate professor, University of California, Irvine, 1975-76;
    visiting professor, University of California, Los Angeles, 1978-79.
    Joyce Appleby  JPGMember of board of fellows, Claremont Graduate School, 1970-73;
    fellow commoner, Churchill College, Cambridge University, 1977-78;
    summer fellow, Regional Economic History Research Center, Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation, 1979;
    visiting fellow, St. Catherine’s College, Oxford University, 1982;
    Phelps Lecturer, New York University, 1982;
    Becker Lecturer, Cornell University, 1984;
    Harmsworth Professor of American History, Oxford University, and fellow of Queen’s College, 1990-91.
    Institute of Early American History and Culture, member of council, 1980-, chairperson, 1983-86.

    Area of Research:
    seventeenth and eighteenth century America, economic thought in early modern England, and the intellectual origins of capitalism.

    Education:
    Stanford University, B.A., 1950;
    University of California, Santa Barbara, M.A., 1959;
    Claremont Graduate School, Ph.D., 1966.

    Major Publications:

  • Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century England, (Princeton University Press, 1978).
  • Capitalism and a New Social Order: The Republican Vision of the 1790s, (New York University Press, 1983).
  • (With Joseph Cropsey and Forrest McDonald) Understanding the United States Constitution 1787-1987: Three Bicentennial Lectures, (Colorado College, 1988).
  • Without Resolution: The Jeffersonian Tension in American Nationalism: An Inaugural Lecture Delivered before the University of Oxford on 25 April 1991, (Oxford University Press, 1991).
  • Liberalism and Republicanism in the Historical Imagination, (Harvard University Press, 1992).
  • (With Lynn Avery Hunt and Margaret C. Jacob) Telling the Truth about History, (Norton, 1994).
  • (With Alan Brinkley and James M. McPherson) The American Journey, (Glencoe/MacGraw-Hill, 1998).
  • Inheriting the Revolution: The First Generation of Americans, Belknap Press, 2000.
  • (With Noble E., Jr. Cunningham), Jefferson and Monroe, (University of North Caroilina, 2003)
  • A Restless Past: History and the American Public, (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2005)
  • Editor, Contributor, Joint Author:

  • Materialism and Morality in the American Past: Themes and Sources, 1600-1800, Addison-Wesley (Reading, MA), 1974.
  • (With others) Knowledge and Postmodernism in Historical Perspective, (Routledge, 1996).
  • Recollections of the Early Republic: Selected Autobiographies, (Northeastern University Press, 1997).
  • (With Terence Ball) Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Jefferson, Political Writings, (Cambridge University Press, 1999).
  • Joyce  Appleby JPG Contributor to books, including The Origins of Anglo-American Radicalism, edited by Margaret Jacob and James Jacob, Allen & Unwin (Boston, MA), 1983; and Colonial British America: Essays in the New History of the Early Modern Era, edited by Jack P. Green and J. R. Pole, Johns Hopkins Press (Baltimore, MD), 1983.

    Contributor to numerous journals, including American Quarterly, Business History Review, Civil War History, Journal of American History, and Past and Present. William and Mary Quarterly, member of editorial board, 1980-83, chairperson, 1981-83. Member of editorial board of Intellectual History Group Newsletter, 1981–, Eighteenth-Century Studies, 1982–, Journal of the Early Republic, 1982–, American Historical Review, and Encyclopedia of American Political History.

    Awards and Grants:

    Berkshire Prize, 1978, for Economic Thought and Ideology in Seventeenth-Century England.
    1993, Annual Distinguished Faculty Award of the UCLA College of Letters and Science;
    1995, Guggenheim Fellowship for her project on the intellectual origins of liberalism;
    She has received support from the Mellon Foundation to train advanced graduate students to offer undergraduate seminars on current trends in historical theory.

    Additional Info:

    Appleby co-directs with James Banner, the “History News Service,” an informal association that distributes op-ed essays written by historians to over 300 newspapers weekly.
    She also writes op-eds and book reviews for the news media, including the “New York Times,” and has done commentary on the “Newshour with Jim Lehrer, anf recently appeared on C-Span2, Book TV “In Depth” show discussing her life, career, and writings.
    Memberships: American Antiquarian Society, American Historical Association (member of Chester Higby Prize committee, 1982; member of council, 1982-85; president, 1997), Organization of American Historians (member of program committee, 1982; president, 1991).

    Posted on Sunday, August 13, 2006 at 7:31 PM

    Top Young Historians: 27 – Kevin M. Kruse

    Kevin M. Kruse, 34

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, Princeton University
    Area of Research: political, social, and urban/suburban history of 20th-century America, with particular interest in the making of modern conservatism. Focused on conflicts over race, rights, and religion, he also studies the postwar South and modern suburbia.
    Education: 2000 Ph.D., History, Cornell University
    Major Publications: Kruse is the author of White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism (Princeton University Press, 2005), a recent selection for the Holiday Book List of The New Republic. Kevin Kruse JPGHe is also co-editor of The New Suburban History (University of Chicago Press, 2006) with Thomas J. Sugrue. He is currently co-editing two additional collections now under review — one on global urban history and another on the impact of the Second World War on the civil rights movement. He is also working on a new research project, titled One Nation Under God: Cold War Christianity and the Origins of the Religious Right.
    Awards: Kruse is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
    2006-2008, Behrman Fellowship in the Humanities, Princeton University;
    2003-2006, David L. Rike University Preceptorship in History, Princeton University ;
    2002, Spencer Foundation, Research Grant;
    1999-2000, Andrew Mellon Dissertation Fellowship;
    1998, Ihlder Fellowship, Cornell University;
    1998, Hughes-Gossett Prize, Supreme Court Historical Society;
    1998, John S. Knight Prize for Freshman Writing Seminars, Cornell University;
    1998, Industrial and Labor Relations Fellowship, Cornell University;
    1997, Andrew Mellon Fellowship;
    1994-1995, Henry Sage Fellowship, Cornell University;
    1993, Phi Beta Kappa.
    Additional Info:
    Kruse is affiliated with Princeton University’s Program in Law and Public Affairs, a joint venture of the Politics Department, the University Center for Human Values, and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.
    Manuscript Referee for Bedford/St. Martin’s Press, University of Chicago Press.
    Articles Referee for Journal of American History Book Reviewer for “American Historical Review,” “Journal of American History,” “Reviews in American History,” “Journal of Southern History,” “Social History,” “American Journal of Legal History.”

    Personal Anecdote

    As two years of dissertation research in Atlanta came to a close, I realized that I still hadn’t conducted a single interview. Oral histories were all the rage at the time, and as a result, no matter how much great material I found in manuscript collections and government archives, I still felt I hadn’t done enough.

    Now, in my defense, I had always wanted to interview the segregationists at the heart of my story. But they apparently had other plans. A few refused to return my letters and calls, while a disturbingly large number chose death before the dishonor of meeting me. The Grand Dragon of the Ku Klux Klan, most notably, passed away weeks before I moved to Atlanta. In my early research, I’d discovered that, when he wasn’t moonlighting as a racist terrorist, the Grand Dragon ran a dry cleaners. I found the gap between the two identities striking. (There was, I suppose, a perverse sense in a man wearing sheets at night and cleaning them by day.) I’d wanted to see for myself what kind of man could walk that line, but I’d never get the chance.

    With my subjects passing away as I reached out to them, I nearly gave up on interviews altogether. I had unearthed an incredible wealth of material in the archives and drawn on transcripts of interviews conducted by other scholars – ones who apparently had the ability to approach their subjects without causing death. I felt I had more than enough material to craft a decent history and an engaging story. So why bother?

    But late in my research, I stumbled across a recent newspaper interview with the most significant segregationist in my story – Lester Maddox. Maddox had gained notoriety for chasing civil rights activists away from his fried chicken restaurant with a pistol; his son, meanwhile, was armed with what would become Maddox’s trademark ax-handle. Soon thereafter, Maddox became a martyr for segregationists by closing his business down rather than have it “ruined” by integration. Ultimately, his fierce resistance to integration landed him in the governor’s mansion.

    Because of Maddox’s centrality to my story, I knew I had to interview him. Over the telephone, he kindly agreed and arranged for me to drive out to his home in the suburbs. The day before our meeting, however, the 85-year-old called to say his health had taken a turn for the worse and he’d be coming into the city for an emergency visit with his doctor. Here we go again, I thought.

    Maddox offered to meet me in my neighborhood to conduct the interview. Trying to find an appropriate place to meet, I suggested a coffee shop around the corner. The last time I’d been there, it was empty, with just a middle-aged couple working the counter and playing soft classical music. It seemed like the perfect place for an interview.

    Walking in a few minutes before our meeting, however, I found a somewhat different scene. Behind the register stood a teenager with multiple piercings and bright purple hair pulled up in dreadlocks. And instead of classical music, the speakers were now blaring disco hits from the `70s. Trying to make the best of the situation, I nervously grabbed a coffee and found a table in the corner.

    I had barely taken my seat when Maddox walked in. He was wearing a seersucker suit, horn-rimmed glasses, and a lapel pin of the Confederate battle flag. He even wore a wristwatch he once manufactured and sold, with his caricature in the center and a chicken drumstick and ax-handle marking the minute and hour. An editorial cartoonist couldn’t have drawn a more classic image of a Southern segregationist. For a second I sat there, soaking in the sight.

    Suddenly, I realized what song was blaring from the coffee shop’s speakers: “Play That Funky Music, White Boy.”

    Once I controlled my laughter, the interview was no problem at all.

    Quotes

    By Kevin M. Kruse

  • If we truly seek to understand segregationists – not to excuse or absolve them, but understand them – then we must first understand how they understood themselves. Until now, because of the tendency to focus on the reactionary leaders of massive resistance, segregationists have largely been understood as simply the opposition to the civil rights movement. They have been framed as a group focused solely on suppressing the rights of others, whether that be the larger cause of “civil rights” or any number of individual entitlements, such as the rights of blacks to vote, assemble, speak, protest, or own property. Segregationists, of course, did stand against those things, and often with bloody and brutal consequences. But like all people, they did not think of themselves in terms of what they opposed, but rather in terms of what they supported. White Flight JPGThe conventional wisdom has held that they were only fighting against the rights of others. But in their own minds, segregationists were instead fighting for rights of their own – such as the “right” to select their neighbors, their employees, and their children’s classmates, the “right” to do as they pleased with their private property and personal businesses, and, perhaps most importantly, the “right” to remain free from what they saw as dangerous encroachments by the federal government. To be sure, all of these positive “rights” were grounded in a negative system of discrimination and racism. In the minds of segregationists, however, such rights existed all the same. Indeed, from their perspective, it was clearly they who defended individual freedom, and not the “‘so-called’ civil rights activists” who aligned themselves with a powerful central state, demanded increased governmental regulation of local affairs, and waged a sustained assault on the individual economic, social and political prerogatives of others. The true goal of desegregation, these white Southerners insisted, was not to end the system of racial oppression in the South, but to install a new system that oppressed them instead. As this study demonstrates, Southern whites fundamentally understood their support of segregation as a defense of their own liberties, rather than a denial of others’.” — Kevin M. Kruse in “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • New  Suburban  History JPG “Postwar suburbanization was fundamentally intertwined with the processes that reshaped postwar urban America, including capital flight, the concentration of African Americans in central cities, the hardening of racial divisions in housing markets, and the large-scale shift of governmental resources away from urban centers. Suburbs played a distinct role in the redrawing of racial and ethnic boundaries, in the reconfiguration of the role of the federal government, in the remapping of capital in America’s geography, and in the rise of some of the most important postwar social movements, ranging from the New Right to modern environmentalism. For all these reasons and more, suburbanization has come to affect all aspects of postwar life. Any effort to understand modern America must put suburbs at the center. The two are inseparable.” — Kevin M. Kruse and Thomas J. Sugrue in “New Suburban History”
  • About Kevin M. Kruse

  • “In White Flight, a study of white resistance to desegregation in Atlanta, Kruse produces a panoramic and engaging portrayal of the struggle over desegregation.” — Ronald Brownstein, American Prospect reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “Kruse presents a nuanced portrayal of the trends that fostered the growth of the suburbs and the casting aside of racist demagoguery.” — Jonathan Tilove, Times-Picayune reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “White Flight is a myth-shattering book. Focusing on the city that prided itself as ‘too busy to hate,’ Kevin Kruse reveals the everyday ways that middle-class whites in Atlanta resisted civil rights, withdrew from the public sphere, and in the process fashioned a new, grassroots, suburban-based conservatism. This important book has national implications for our thinking about the links between race, suburbanization, and the rise of the New Right.” — Thomas J. Sugrue, Kahn Professor of History and Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, author of “The Origins of the Urban Crisis” reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “This is an imaginative work that ably treats an important subject. Kruse gets beyond and beneath Atlanta’s image as a place of racial moderation, the national center of the civil rights movement, and a seedbed of black political power to reveal other simultaneous, important currents at work.” — Clifford Kuhn, Georgia State University reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “In his study of Atlanta over the last 60 years, Kevin Kruse convincingly describes the critical connections between race, Sun Belt suburbanization, the rise of the new Republican majority. White Flight is a powerful and compelling book that should be read by anyone interested in modern American politics and post-World War II urban history.” — Dan Carter, University of South Carolina reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “Kevin Kruse recasts our understanding of the conservative resistance to the civil rights movement. Shifting the spotlight from racial extremists to ordinary white urban dwellers, he shows that “white flight” to the suburbs was among the most powerful social movements of our time. That movement not only reconfigured the urban landscape, it also transformed political ideology, laying the groundwork for the rise of the New Right and undermining the commitment of white Americans to the common good. No one can read this book and come away believing that the politics of suburbia are colorblind.” — Jacquelyn Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill reviewing “White Flight: Atlanta and the Making of Modern Conservatism”
  • “He just stood out from the crowd. From the first time we read the dissertation, we knew we were dealing with an exceptional historian. And he’s turned into exactly what we hoped: a bold and pioneering emerging star in his field.” — Jeremy Adelman, chair of Princeton’s history department on Kevin M. Kruse in “Princeton Weekly Bulletin”
  • “Professor Kruse was an incredible lecturer. His lectures were always perfectly timed, engaging, informative, and interesting.”…
    “Kruse is by far the best lecturer I’ve had at Princeton.”…
    “This is the best class I’ve taken at Princeton and maybe ever. The lectures were stimulating, honest, and overall incredible – I was moved to tears once.”…
    “Kruse’s lectures are not to be missed. His organization is impeccable, he speaks clearly, and he’s funny too.”…
    “Prof. Kruse genuinely cares about his students–he wants them to do well. He makes his lectures engaging, adding variety with different forms of media. I never got bored during his lectures as he has a great presence even in a large lecture hall like McCosh 10. He is extremely well organized and makes his expectations clear to his students from the very beginning of the semester. Nothing comes out of left field. In precept, he encourages debate and makes his precepts about the students, jumping in to clarify difficult concepts. Taking ANY of his courses will greatly add to your academic experience at Princeton!”…
    “Prof. Kruse is an excellent and outstanding professor. He is very engaging, a good lecturer, and picks excellent readings. He is also very thoughtful and goes the extra mile in giving feedback and in being responsive to student needs. I would strongly recommend him, even to those who are not inclined to take history classes. He makes the material rich and engaging.” — Anonymous Students
  • // <![CDATA[// Posted on Sunday, August 6, 2006 at 7:21 PM | Comments (2)

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