History Buzz: September 2006

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

September 25, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
BIGGEST STORIES:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
  • 25/09/1639 – 1st printing press in America
  • 25/09/1775 – American Revolutionary War hero Ethan Allen captured
  • 25/09/1789 – Congress proposes Bill of Rights (10 of 12 will ratify)
  • 25/09/1804 – 12th amendment to US constitution, regulating judicial power
  • 25/09/1846 – US troops under Gen Taylor occupies Monterey Mexico
  • 25/09/1867 – Congress creates 1st all-black university, Howard U in Wash DC
  • 25/09/1919 – President Woodrow Wilson is paralyzed by a stroke
  • 25/09/1926 – Henry Ford announces 8 hour, 5-day work week
  • 25/09/1926 – Canadian govt of MacKenzie King forms
  • 25/09/1956 – 1st transatlantic telephone cable goes into operation (Scot-Canada)
  • 25/09/1957 – 300 US Army troops guard 9 black kids return to Central HS in Ark
  • 25/09/1981 – Sandra Day O’Connor sworn in as 1st female supreme court justice
  • 26/09/1789 – Jefferson appointed 1st Sec of State; John Jay 1st chief justice; Samuel Osgood 1st Postmaster and Edmund J Randolph 1st Attorney Genl
  • 26/09/1941 – Nazi’s slaughter about 34,000 Jews of Kiev
  • 27/09/0070 – Walls of upper city of Jerusalem battered down by Romans
  • 27/09/1777 – Battle of Germantown; Washington defeated by British [NS=Oct 6]; English General William Howe occupies Philadelphia
  • 27/09/1779 – John Adams negotiates Revolutionary War peace terms with Britain
  • 27/09/1787 – Constitution submitted to states for ratification
  • 27/09/1916 – 1st Native American Day celebrated, honoring American Indians
  • 27/09/1919 – Democratic National Committee voted to allow female members
  • 27/09/1940 – Nazi-Germany, Italy and Japan sign 10 year formal alliance (Axis)
  • 27/09/1954 – School integration begins in Wash DC and Baltimore Md public schools
  • 27/09/1964 – Warren Commission released, finds Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in JFK Assasination
  • 27/09/1979 – Congress’ final approval to create Dept of Education
  • 28/09/1678 – “Pilgrim’s Progress” published
  • 28/09/1745 – Bonnie Prince Charlie becomes king of Scotland
  • 28/09/1928 – US acknowledge Chinese govt of Chiang Kai-shek
  • 29/09/1789 – 1st congress adjourns
  • 29/09/1789 – US War Dept established a regular army
  • 29/09/1906 – US intervenes in Cuba ousts dictator Estrada Palma
  • 29/09/1907 – Construction begins on Washington National Cathedral
  • 29/09/1943 – Eisenhower and Italian Marshal Pietro Badoglio sign an armistice
  • 29/09/1953 – US govt gives France $385 million for combat in Indo-China
  • 29/09/1962 – JFK authorized use of federal troops to integrate U of Mississippi
  • 30/09/1199 – Rambam (Maimonides) authorizes Samuel Ibn Tibbon to translate Guide of Perplexed from Arabic into Hebrew
  • 30/09/1452 – 1st book published, Johann Guttenberg’s Bible
  • 30/09/1777 – Congress, flees to York Pa, as British forces advance
  • 30/09/1787 – 1st US voyage around the world – Columbia leaves Boston
  • 30/09/1805 – Napoleons army draws into the Rhine
  • 30/09/1864 – Black Soldiers given Medal of Honor
  • 30/09/1946 – 22 Nazi leaders found guilty of war crimes at Nuremberg
  • 30/09/1953 – Earl Warren appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
  • 30/09/1962 – James Meredith registers for classes at University of Mississippi; JFK routes 3,000 federal troops to Mississippi
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Thomas Fleming: Writes children’s history book – HNN Staff, 9-22-06
  • RON ROSENBAUM on Daniel Mendelsohn: Giving Death a Face THE LOST A Search for Six of Six Million NYT, 9-24-06
  • An Interview With Daniel Mendelsohn (From This Week’s Book Review Podcast) – NYT, 9-24-06
  • Daniel Mendelsohn: Recovering Lost Relatives From Holocaust Oblivion THE LOST A Search for Six of Six MillionNYT, 9-20-06
  • Sidney Blumenthal: Taking Aim HOW BUSH RULES Chronicles of a Radical Regime9-24-06
  • Sidney Blumenthal: HOW BUSH RULES Chronicles of a Radical Regime, First Chapter – 9-24-06
  • David Greenberg on Frank Rich: Spin Doctors A columnist accuses the Bush administration of replacing facts with public relations gambits THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth from 9/11 to KatrinaWa Po, 9-24-06
  • Garrett Epps: Professor reaches way back for engaging story of how we got our civil rights Democracy Reborn: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Fight for Equal Rights in Post-Civil War AmericaOregonLive.com, OR, 9-24-06
  • David Thomson: ‘Nicole Kidman’ Biography Gives Film Historian a Platform for Alternative Takes on Movies – HNN Huntingtonnews.net, 9-24-06
  • David Greenberg: The History of White House Doodles Spontaneous Art or Psychological Insight – ABC News, 9-22-06
  • Walter Berns: Democracy and the ConstitutionAmerican Enterprise Institute, 9-21-06
  • Thomas B. Edsall: The Republican Collapse May Not Be So Imminent BUILDING RED AMERICA The New Conservative Coalition and the Drive for Permanent Power - NYT, 9-12-06
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
FEATURE:
QUOTED:
SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • Sept. 25, 2006: Seth Bramson: Book captures Gables’ early history A South Florida historian and memorabilia collector will present his book on the history of Coral Gables at 6:30 p.m. Monday at Books & Books, 265 Aragon Ave – Miami Herald, FL, 9-24-06
  • Sept. 27, 2006: Daniel Blatman: Holocaust historian to discuss Nazi genocide, the lecture “Disintegration, Fear, and Massacre: Germany 1945,” will take place in the Martin Institute Auditorium on Wednesday, Sept. 27 at 7:30 p.m – Easton Journal, MA, 9-22-06
  • Sept. 29, 2006: Walter Berns: Burns along with syndicated columnist George Will and legal scholar Robert Bork, will discuss Democracy and the Constitution at AEI (1150–17th Street, NW, 12th floor, Washington, DC) from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. – American Enterprise Institute, 9-21-06
  • Oct. 6, 2006: Colin A. Palmer: Will give the eighth annual Eric E. Williams Memorial Lecture at Florida International University’s University Park campus in West Miami-Dade as part of the African-New World Studies Program’s Distinguished Africana Scholars Lecture Series on Oct. 6 at 6:30 p.m. on “Eric Williams and the Continuing Challenges of a Diverse Caribbean” – Miami Herald, 9-24-06
  • Oct. 12, 2006: William J. Cooper, noted historian and author of “Jefferson Davis, American,” will deliver the 5th Annual Vaughn Lecture in the Humanities at Williams Baptist College, October 12, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. in the WBC Chapel – Williams Baptist College News, AR, 9-12-06
  • Feb. 23 to 25, 2007: John Gillingham: Camden Conference marks its 20th anniversary, Feb. 23 to 25, 2007, at the Camden Opera House – 8-15-06
  • October 2006: Geoffrey Blainey: To speak at a $250 a head dinner to raise funds for The Courier Community Fund at Craig’s Royal Hotel next month (Australia) – Ballarat Courier, Australia, 9-22-06
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
ON TV:
  • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
  • History Channel: “Sharp Shooters,” Sunday, September 24, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : The First Christians,” Sunday, September 24, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : The Kings: From Babylon to Baghdad,” Monday, September 25, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : The Pagans,” Monday, September 25, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth : The Vikings: Voyage to America.,” Monday, September 25, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels : Guns of the Civil War,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 1pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : Eighty Acres of Hell,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tales of the FBI : The Bureau vs. the Klan.,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” History’s Mysteries : Ghost Ships,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Comets: Prophets of Doom,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters : Asteroid Apocalypse,” Wednesday, September 27, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Lost Evidence : D-Day: The Lost Evidence” Thursday, September 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” History’s Mysteries : Nazi Ghost Train,” Thursday, September 28, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past : The Templar Code: Crusade of Secrecy,” Thursday, September 28, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Return of the Pirates,” Friday, September 29, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels : Pirate Tech,” Friday, September 29, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Mexican-American War,” Friday, September 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Horrors at Andersonville Prison: The Trial of Henry Wirz,” Friday, September 29, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Mexican-American War,” Saturday, September 30, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth” Marathon, Saturday, September 30,, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
  • PBS: American Experience “Eyes on the Prize”, 16 hour series on the civil rights movement, re-airing Oct. 2, Oct. 9, and Oct. 16 @ 9pm ET – PBS
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #7, (8 weeks on list) – 10-1-06
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #28 – 10-1-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
  • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
  • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
  • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
  • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
  • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
  • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
  • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
  • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
  • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
  • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
  • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
  • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
  • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
  • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
  • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
  • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
  • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
  • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
  • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, September 25, 2006 at 12:20 PM

September 17, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
BIGGEST STORIES:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
  • 18/09/1502 – Christopher Columbus lands at Costa Rica on his 4th and last voyage
  • 18/09/1759 – Battle of Quebec ends, French surrender to British
  • 18/09/1793 – Pres Washington lays cornerstone of Capitol building
  • 18/09/1812 – Fire in Moscow destroys 90% of houses and 1,000 churchs
  • 18/09/1850 – Congress passes Fugitive Slave Law as part of Compromise of 1850
  • 18/09/1851 – NY Times starts publishing (2› a copy)
  • 18/09/1862 – General Read army pulls out of Antietam Creek Virginia
  • 18/09/1895 – Booker T Washington delivera “Atlanta Compromise” address
  • 18/09/1914 – Battle of Aisne ends with Germans beating French during WW I
  • 18/09/1945 – 1000 whites walk out of Gary Ind schools to protest integration
  • 18/09/1947 – National Security Act, passes
  • 18/09/1987 – US and Russia sign accord to remove mid range missiles
  • 19/09/1676 – Rebels under Nathaniel Bacon set Jamestown Va on fire
  • 19/09/1777 – Battle of Freeman’s Farm (Bemis Heights) or 1st Battle of Saratoga
  • 19/09/1796 – George Washington’s farewell address as president
  • 19/09/1863 – Battle of Chickamauga GA (near Chattanooga) begins; Union retreat
  • 19/09/1873 – Black Friday: Jay Cooke and Co fails, causing a securities panic
  • 19/09/1911 – Red Tuesday-20,000 protest for universal rights
  • 19/09/1941 – Nazi’s force German Jews, 6 and over to wear Jewish stars
  • 20/09/1530 – Luther advises protestant monarch compromise
  • 20/09/1664 – Maryland passes 1st anti-amalgamation law to stop intermarriage of English women and black men
  • 20/09/1797 – US frigate Constitution (Old Ironsides) launched in Boston
  • 20/09/1850 – Slave trade abolished in DC, but slavery allowed to continue
  • 20/09/1861 – Battle of Lexington, MI-captured by Union
  • 20/09/1863 – Battle of Shepardstown VA
  • 20/09/1863 – Civil War Battle of Chickamauga, near Chattanooga Tenn, ends
  • 20/09/1881 – Chester A Arthur sworn in as 21st president
  • 20/09/1961 – James Meredith refused access as a student in Mississippi
  • 20/09/1963 – JFK proposes a joint US-Soviet voyage to the moon
  • 20/09/1976 – Playboy releases Jimmy Carter’s interview that he lusts for women
  • 20/09/1990 – Saddam Hussein demands US networks broadcast his message
  • 21/09/1621 – King James of England gives Canada to Sir Alexander Sterling
  • 21/09/1745 – Battle at Preston Pans: Bonnie Prince Charles beats English army
  • 21/09/1776 – 5 days after British take NY – Great fire in NY
  • 21/09/1784 – Pennsylvania Packet and Daily Advertiser 1st success US daily newspaper
  • 21/09/1792 – Proposal by Collot D’Herbois, to abolish the monarchy in France – 1st French Republic forms
  • 21/09/1814 – “Star Spangled Banner” published as a poem
  • 21/09/1863 – Union forces retreat to Chattanooga after defeat at Chickamauga
  • 21/09/1897 – NY Sun runs famous “Yes, Virginia there is a Santa Claus,” editorial
  • 21/09/1922 – Pres Warren G Harding signs a joint resolution of approval to establish a Jewish homeland in Palestine
  • 21/09/1981 – Sandra Day O’Conner becomes 1st female Supreme Court Justice
  • 22/09/1692 – Last (8) person hanged for witchcraft in US (Salem Mass)
  • 22/09/1817 – John Quincy Adams becomes secretary of State
  • 22/09/1862 – President Lincoln, says he will free slaves in all states on Jan 1
  • 22/09/1893 – 1st auto built in US (by Duryea brothers) runs in Springfield
  • 22/09/1970 – Pres Nixon requests 1,000 new FBI agents for college campuses
  • 22/09/1973 – Henry Kissinger, sworn in as America’s 1st Jewish Secretary of State
  • 22/09/1975 – Sara Jane Moore tries to assassinate President Ford in SF Calif
  • 23/09/1642 – Harvard College in Cambridge, Mass, 1st commencement
  • 23/09/1780 – Brit Maj John Andr‚ reveals Benedict Arnold’s plot to betray West Pt
  • 23/09/1806 – Lewis and Clark return to St Louis from Pacific Northwest
  • 23/09/1862 – Lincoln’s Emancipation is published in Northern Newspapers
  • 23/09/1863 – Confederate siege of Chattanooga begins
  • 23/09/1941 – General de Gaulle forms govt in exile in London
  • 23/09/1949 – Truman announces evidence of USSR’s 1st nuclear device detonation
  • 23/09/1952 – Richard Nixon makes his “Checker’s” speech
  • 23/09/1957 – White mob forces 9 black students who had entered a Little Rock high school in Arkansas to withdraw
  • 23/09/1976 – Ford-Carter TV debate
  • 23/09/1979 – Jane Fonda and 200,000 attend anti-nuke rally in Battery Park, NYC
  • 23/09/1979 – Jane Fonda and 200,000 attend anti-nuke rally in Battery Park, NYC
  • 24/09/1789 – President George Washington appointed John Jay the 1st Chief Justice
  • 24/09/1789 – Federal Judiciary Act is passed and creates a six-person Supreme Court
  • 24/09/1789 – Congress creates Post Office
  • 24/09/1845 – 1st baseball team is organized
  • 24/09/1862 – Confederate Congress adopts confederacy seal
  • 24/09/1890 – Pres of Mormon Church in Salt Lake City issues a manifesto advising members that teaching and practice of polygamy should be abandoned
  • 24/09/1950 – “Operation Magic Carpet”-All Jews from Yemen move to Israel
  • 24/09/1957 – Eisenhower orders US troops to desegregate Little Rock schools
  • 24/09/1976 – Newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst sentenced to 7 years for her part in a 1974 bank robbery. Released after 22 months by Pres Carter
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Frank Rich: Theater of War THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to KatrinaNYT, 9-17-06
  • An Interview With Frank Rich – NYT, 9-17-06
  • Fritz Stern: The Persistence of Memory A great historian offers a memoir about a life marked by the shadow of Nazism – FIVE GERMANYS I HAVE KNOWNWa Po, 9-17-06
  • Randall Woods: Sympathetic look at Johnson includes flaws LBJ: Architect of American AmbitionCleveland Plain Dealer, OH, 9-17-06
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
FEATURE:
QUOTED:
  • Edward Luck on “World leaders face a U.N. overloaded with crises”: “It is a very subtle, very deep, very divisive issue. I don’t think anyone is going to come away as the great savior of the Middle East. We are just not at that point.” – Reuters AlertNet, UK, 9-17-06
  • Kevin Starr on Thomas Starr King “California diminishes its shining Starr”: “Is he suddenly chopped liver? When you’re building up a frontier commonwealth, deeply ethical public and religious figures are extremely important, and from that point of view he enlarged the definition of what it means to be a Californian. He helped transform California from a frontier to a province.” – Toledo Blade, OH, 9-17-06
SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • Howard Lamar: Will discuss his new book “Charlie Siringo’s West: An Interpretive Biography” at 6 p.m. Monday at St. Francis Auditorium in the New Mexico Museum of Fine Arts – Santa Fe New Mexican, NM, 9-17-06
  • Kathleen Neils Conzen: Will deliver the 22nd annual O. Truman Driggs Distinguished Lecture at the University of Minnesota, Morris on “Why They Fought: Immigrant Colonists and Minnesota’s Civil War,” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in Humanities Fine Arts Recital Hall – UMM News, Sports & Events, Minnesota, 9-8-06
  • Howard Segal: Will present a talk about his book, “Recasting the Machine Age: Henry Ford’s Village Industries,” at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in Room 1030 of the College of Arts, Sciences and Letters Building on the University of Michigan-Dearborn campus – Detroit Free Press, 9-10-06
  • William J. Cooper, noted historian and author of “Jefferson Davis, American,” will deliver the 5th Annual Vaughn Lecture in the Humanities at Williams Baptist College, October 12, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. in the WBC Chapel – Williams Baptist College News, AR, 9-12-06
  • John Gillingham: Camden Conference marks its 20th anniversary, Feb. 23 to 25, 2007, at the Camden Opera House – 8-15-06
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
ON TV:
  • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Joe Mathews, author of “The People’s Machine: Arnold Schwarzenegger and the Rise of Blockbuster Democracy” interviewed by Rachel Smolkin, managing editor for the American Journalism Review, Sunday, September 17 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm- C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: B Book TV presents Simon Schama Rough Crossings: Britain, the Slaves and the American Revolution, Sunday, September 17 at 7:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents W. Joseph Campbell, The Year That Defined American Journalism: 1897 and the Clash of Paradigms, Sunday, September 17 at 10:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: ” The Revolution : 02 – Rebellion to Revolution,” Sunday, September 17, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Lost Worlds : Braveheart’s Scotland,” Sunday, September 18, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Vesuvius,” Monday, September 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : The First Christians,” Monday, September 18, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth : The Da Vinci Code: Bloodlines,” Monday, September 18, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Nature’s Fury: New England’s Killer Hurricane,” Tuesday, September 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Mega Disasters : California’s Katrina,” Tuesday, September 19, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Days That Shook The World : War of the Worlds and the Hitler Diaries,” Tuesday, September 19, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The True Story of Black Hawk Down,” Wednesday, September 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Days That Shook The World : The War to End All Wars.,” Wednesday, September 20, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth,” Marathon Thursday, September 21, @ 8am-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Where Did It Come From? : Ancient Egypt: Iconic Structures.,” Thursday, September 21, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Behind the Mask of Zorro,” Friday, September 21, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Weird U.S. : Rebels and Traitors,” Friday, September 22, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels” Marathon, Saturday, September 23, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #5, (7 weeks on list) – 9-24-06
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #11, (18 weeks on list) – 9-24-06
  • Ron Suskind: THE ONE PERCENT DOCTRINE Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, #28 – 9-24-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
  • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
  • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
  • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
  • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
  • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
  • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
  • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
  • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
  • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
  • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
  • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
  • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
  • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
  • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
  • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
  • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
  • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
  • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
  • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 at 5:41 PM

September 11, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
9/11 5TH ANNIVERSARY:
  • 11/09/2001 – Terrorists hijack two passenger planes crashing them into New York’s World Trade Towers causing the collapse of both and death of 2,752 people
  • 11/09/2001 – Terrorists hijack a passenger plane and crash it into the Pentagon causing the death of 125 people
  • 11/09/2001 – Attempt by passengers and crew of United Airlines Flight 93 to retake control of their hijacked plane from terrorists causes plane to crash in Pennsylvania field killing all 64 people onboard
  • History Teachers: Bringing 9/11 into classroom Today’s students lived it and are studying it – Chicago Tribune, 9-10-06
  • Peter Bergen, Jack Granatstein: What if 9/11 had not happened? – Toronto Star, 9-10-06
  • Ken Burns: Born on 9/11: Life at five In 2001, USA WEEKEND introduced six babies, symbols of hope born on that dark day. Today, we catch up with them as they turn 5 – USA Weekend, 9-10-06
  • 9/11 books follow different paths – Indianapolis Star, 9-9-06
  • Arthur Schlesinger: Joined the chorus of Democrat voices demanding ABC be stopped from airing their 9/11 mini-series – The Conservative Voice, 9-9-06
  • Joanne Meyerowitz, Thomas Bender, Stephen Thernstrom, Joyce Appleby, Jan Lewis: 9/11 Leaves Its Mark on History Classes – NYT, 9-6-06
  • Daniel Pipes: Improvising after 9/11 – American Daily, 9-6-06
  • John Spencer: 9/11 in the Classroom: A Valuable Teaching Moment – Newswise (press release), 9-7-06
KATRINA 1 YEAR LATER:
  • Leonard Moore, Edward Haas: Roundtable: New Orleans’ Race Relations – 9-1-06
  • Charles L. Sullivan: Historian tells the stories of Gulf Coast hurricanes – Biloxi Sun Herald, 8-26-06
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
  • 11/09/1557 – Catholic and Lutheran theology debated in Worm
  • 11/09/1649 – Massacre of Drogheda, Ireland, Oliver Cromwell kills 3,000 royalists
  • 11/09/1773 – Benjamin Franklin writes “There never was a good war or bad peace”
  • 11/09/1789 – Alexander Hamilton appointed 1st Secretary of Treasury
  • 11/09/1940 – Buckingham Palace in London destroyed by German bombs
  • 11/09/1943 – Jewish ghettos of Minsk and Lida Belorussia liquidated
  • 11/09/1944 – FDR and Churchill meet in Canada at 2nd Quebec Conference
  • 12/09/1695 – NY Jews petition governor Dongan for religious liberties
  • 12/09/1862 – Battle of Harpers Ferry VA
  • 12/09/1953 – Sen John F Kennedy, 36, marries Jacqueline Bouvier, 24
  • 12/09/1958 – US Supreme Court orders Little Rock Ark high school to integrate
  • 13/09/1556 – Charles V and Maria of Hungary march into Spain
  • 13/09/1663 – 1st serious slave conspiracy in colonial America (Virginia)
  • 13/09/1788 – NY City becomes 1st capital of US
  • 13/09/1847 – American-Mexican war: US Gen Winfield Scott captures Mexico City
  • 13/09/1861 – 1st naval battle of Civil War, Union frigate “Colorado” sinks privateer “Judah” off Pensacola, Fla
  • 13/09/1906 – 1st airplane flight in Europe
  • 13/09/1943 – Chiang Kai-shek became president of China
  • 13/09/1948 – Margaret Chase Smith (R-Me) elected senator, 1st woman to serve in both houses of Congress
  • 13/09/1953 – Nikita Khrushchev appointed 1st secretary-general of USSR
  • 13/09/1993 – Israeli min of Foreign affairs Peres and PLO-Abu Mazen sign peace accord
  • 14/09/1862 – Federal troops escape from beleaguered Harpers Ferry West Virginia
  • 14/09/1872 – Britain pays US $15« M for damages during Civil War
  • 14/09/1917 – Provisional government of Russia forms, Republic proclaimed
  • 14/09/1940 – Congress passes 1st peace-time conscription bill (draft law)
  • 14/09/1948 – Ground breaking ceremony for UN world headquarters
  • 14/09/1948 – Gerald Ford upsets Rep Bartel J Jonkman in Mich 5th Dist Rep primary
  • 14/09/1983 – US House of Representatives votes, 416 to 0, in favor of a resolution condemning Russia for shooting down a Korean jetliner
  • 15/09/1620 – Mayflower departs from Plymouth England with 102 pilgrims [OS May 8]
  • 15/09/1656 – England and France sign peace treaty
  • 15/09/1776 – British forces capture Kip’s Bay Manhattan during Revolution
  • 15/09/1862 – Confederates conquer Union-weapon arsenal at Harpers Ferry WV
  • 15/09/1914 – Battle of Aisne begins between Germans and French during WW I
  • 15/09/1923 – Gov Walton of Oklahoma declares state of siege because of KKK terror
  • 15/09/1935 – Nuremberg Laws deprives German Jews of citizenship and makes swastika official symbol of Nazi Germany
  • 15/09/1941 – Nazis kill 800 Jewish women at Shkudvil Lithuania
  • 15/09/1959 – Soviet Premier Khrushchev arrives in US to begin a 13-day visit
  • 15/09/1963 – 4 children killed in bombing of a black Baptist church in Birmingham
  • 15/09/1981 – US Senate Judiciary Committee unanimously approves Sandra Day O’Connor
  • 16/09/1630 – Mass village of Shawmut changes name to Boston
  • 16/09/1782 – Great Seal of US used for 1st time
  • 16/09/1848 – Slavery abolished in all French territories
  • 16/09/1908 – Carriage-maker, William Durant, founded General Motors Corp
  • 16/09/1940 – Luftwaffe attacks center of London
  • 16/09/1940 – FDR signs Selective Training and Service Act (1st peacetime draft)
  • 16/09/1941 – Jews of Vilna Poland confined to Ghetto
  • 16/09/1968 – Richard Nixon appears on “Laugh-in”
  • 16/09/1971 – 6 Klansmen arrested in connection with bombing of 10 school buses
  • 16/09/1974 – Pres Ford announces conditional amnesty for US, Vietnam War deserters
  • 17/09/1562 – Council of Trente takes ecclesiastical canon
  • 17/09/1691 – Colony Massachusetts Bay gets new charter
  • 17/09/1787 – US constitution adopted by Philadelphia convention
  • 17/09/1796 – Pres George Washington delivers his farewell address
  • 17/09/1850 – Great fire in San Francisco
  • 17/09/1862 – Battle of Sharpsburg (Antietam)-bloodiest day of Civil War, 23,110 die
  • 17/09/1900 – Commonwealth of Australia proclaimed
  • 17/09/1952 – “I am an American Day” and “Constitution Day” renamed “Citizenship Day”
  • 17/09/1986 – US Senate confirms William Rehnquist as 16th chief justice
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Sean Wilentz on Nicholas Lemann: A Less Perfect Union REDEMPTION The Last Battle of the Civil WarNYT, 9-10-06
  • Nicholas Lemann: REDEMPTION The Last Battle of the Civil War, First Chapter – NYT, 9-10-06
  • An Interview With Nicholas Lemann with Sam Tanenhaus, the editor of The New York Times Book Review. (MP3 format)
  • Flores A. Forbes: By Any Means Necessary WILL YOU DIE WITH ME? My Life and the Black Panther PartyNYT, 9-10-06
  • Flores A. Forbes: WILL YOU DIE WITH ME? My Life and the Black Panther Party, First Chapter – NYT, 9-10-06
  • James Goodman on Jason Sokol: Across the Great Divide THERE GOES MY EVERYTHING White Southerners in the Age of Civil RightsNYT, 9-10-06
  • Nicholas Lemann: After the War Between the States, the South set out to rise again — by any means necessary REDEMPTION The Last Battle of the Civil WarWA Po, 9-10-06
  • Louis Fisher: Writes new book about state secrets – Secrecy News, written by Steven Aftergood, is published by the Federation of American Scientists, 9-5-06
  • Frank Argote-Freyre: Author relates life story of Cuban leader Batista – Holmdel Independent, NJ, 9-6-06
OP-ED:
  • Niall Ferguson: Did the U.S. overreact to Sept. 11? – Time, 9-3-06
  • David Rosner and Gerald Markowitz: 9/11: Katrina Started at Ground Zero – TomDispatch.com. 9-5-06
  • Juan Cole: Shiite vs. Shiite – HNN
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
  • Michael Kazin: A History Both Global and Personal – NPR, 9-1-06
FEATURE:
QUOTED:
  • Juan Cole on “Was government in on Sept. 11? Internet helps to add fuel to belief by some that terrorists weren’t behind attacks”: “When you have irrational allegations being made, it raises the question of what is underlying that irrationality. It just seems to me that it’s a manifestation of extreme anxiety about the degree to which the U.S. government is not leveling with people.” – Detroit News, 9-9-06
  • Joyce Appleby on “9/11: Is there any more to say?”: “It was an attack on a whole range of values in America. Here were two buildings that represented modernity, success, power. Then you have those pictures. They’re going to be powerful for a long time.” – Christian Science Monitor, MA, 9-7-06
  • Leo Braudy on “ABC Stands By Its 9/11 Story — Almost”: “The 9/11 commission comes out with one narrative, which no one reads. Then movies take a piece of it — there’s ‘United 93′ and ‘World Trade Center.’ The Bush administration is pushing its own narrative of the meaning of 9/11 as justification for its policies. And now a miniseries comes into being that creates a narrative in a semi-documentary, fictionalized manner, which is very persuasive. Suddenly people who felt they know what really happened are being preempted by this fiction. Naturally they are going to be upset about it. Narrative creates closure.” – calendarlive.com, CA, 9-9-06
  • Roy Rosenzweig on “Google opens up 200 years of news “: “As a scholar and historian I want as much information as possible, accessible to as many people as possible at the least cost, and the extent to which Google is doing that is compelling.” – Trade Arabia, Bahrain, 9-6-06
SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • James Oliver Horton will present the 27th Annual R. Gerald McMurtry Lecture “Naturally Anti-Slavery: Lincoln, Race and the Complexity of American Liberty, at 7:30 p.m., Sept. 16 at the Lincoln Museum – Frost Illustrated, IN, 9-5-06
  • Kathleen Neils Conzen: Will deliver the 22nd annual O. Truman Driggs Distinguished Lecture at the University of Minnesota, Morris on “Why They Fought: Immigrant Colonists and Minnesota’s Civil War,” at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19, in Humanities Fine Arts Recital Hall – UMM News, Sports & Events, Minnesota, 9-8-06
  • Howard Segal: Will present a talk about his book, “Recasting the Machine Age: Henry Ford’s Village Industries,” at 4:30 p.m. Sept. 20 in Room 1030 of the College of Arts, Sciences and Letters Building on the University of Michigan-Dearborn campus – Detroit Free Press, 9-10-06
  • R. David Edmunds and Brian Hosmer: Will speak during the 10th annual Susan B. Horton Cone Family Distinguished Lecture entitled “35 Years of American Indian History” Wednesday, Sept. 13, from 5-7 p.m. in the College of Agriculture auditorium at the University of Wyoming – University of Wyoming News, WY, 9-8-06
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
ON TV:
  • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents David Brion Davis Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World, Sunday, September 10 at 4:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Lawrence Wright, author of “The Looming Tower: Al-Qaeda and the Road to 9/11,” interviewed by James Zogby, Sunday, September 10 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents Brian Jenkins Unconquerable Nation: Knowing Our Enemy Strengthening Ourselves, Sunday, September 10 at 10:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “The 9/11 Hijackers: Inside the Hamburg Cell,” Sunday, September 10, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Zero Hour : The Last Hour of Flight 11,” Sunday, September 10, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “World War III? Beyond Lebanon,” Sunday, September 10, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Grounded on 9/11,” Sunday, September 10, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Vesuvius,” Sunday, September 10, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution : 01 – Boston, Bloody Boston,” Sunday, September 10, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The World Trade Center: Rise and Fall of an American Icon,” Monday, September 11, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Day the Towers Fell,” Monday, September 11, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The 9/11 Commission Report,” Monday, September 11, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” The Man Who Predicted 9/11,” Monday, September 11, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Miracle of Stairway B,” Monday, September 11, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Lost Worlds : Braveheart’s Scotland,” Monday, September 11, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Countdown to Ground Zero : Countdown to Ground Zero,” Monday, September 11, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Where Did It Come From? : Ancient Rome: The Rise of Apartments,” Thursday, September 14, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : The Real Tomb Hunters: Snakes, Curses, and Booby Traps.,” Friday, September 15, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds” Marathon, Saturday, September 16, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Vesuvius,” Saturday, September 16, @ 5pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #4, (6 weeks on list) – 9-17-06
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #14, (17 weeks on list) – 9-17-06
  • Ron Suskind: THE ONE PERCENT DOCTRINE Deep Inside America’s Pursuit of Its Enemies Since 9/11, #31 – 9-17-06
  • Thomas H. Kean and Lee H. Hamilton: Without Precedent The Inside Story of the 9/11 Commission, #33 9-17-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Edward P. Crapol: John Tyler: The Accidental President, September 2006
  • Marion V. Creekmore: A Moment of Crisis: The Inside Story of Jimmy Carter in North Korea, September 2006
  • Charles W. Calhoun: Conceiving a New Republic: The Republican Party and the Southern Question, 1869-1900, September 2006
  • Nicholas Lemann: Redemption: The Last Battle of the Civil War, September 2006
  • Greil Marcus: The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice September 2006
  • Wilson D. Miscamble: From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima, and the Cold War, September 2006
  • Eva Plach: Clash of Moral Nations: Cultural Politics in Pilsudski’s Poland, 1926-1935, September 2006
  • Ryan Sager: The Elephant in the Room: Libertarians, the Christian Right, and the Looming Battle for the Soul of the Republican Party, September 2006
  • James E. Wise: Women at War: Iraq, Afghanistan, and Other Conflicts, September 2006
  • Rodric Braithwaite: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, September 26, 2006
  • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
  • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
  • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
  • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
  • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
  • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
  • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
  • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
  • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
  • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
  • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
DEPARTED:
  • John Munroe: One of Delaware’s best-known historians and a member of the UD faculty for more than 60 years, died Sept. 6. He was 92. – UDaily, DE, 9-7-06
  • Leonard W. Levy: Distinguished constitutional historian who won the Pulitzer Prize for History in 1969 and who taught at Brandeis University and the Claremont Graduate School, died on 24 August 2006 in Ashland, Oregon, at the age of 83 (H-OIEAHC)

Posted on Sunday, September 10, 2006 at 4:10 PM

Top Young Historians: 30 – Jeffrey Veidlinger

Top Young Historians

Jeffrey Veidlinger, 35

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, Indiana University, Bloomington
Associate Professor and Associate Director of Borns Jewish Studies Program, Indiana University, Bloomington
Co-Director, AHEYM (Archive of Historical and Ethnographic Yiddish Memories) Oral History Project
Area of Research: Russian and Eastern European Jewish history, Jewish cultural history
Education: Ph.D. (History) Georgetown University, 1998
Jeffrey Veidlinger JPG Major Publications: Veidlinger is the author of The Moscow State Yiddish Theater: Jewish Culture on the Soviet Stage (Indiana University Press, 2000; paperback edition, 2006) winner of National Jewish Book Award, Barnard Hewitt Award, Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title and The George Freedley Memorial Award Finalist.
He is also the co-editor of 150 Years of Jewish Emigration from Russia-USSR-Russia (1885-2005): History and Destinies, Volume 2: Migration Between Extremes, 1914-1939 which is in progress and under contract to be published by The International Center for Russian and East European Jewish Studies in Moscow and the Leonid Nevzlin Research Center for Russian and East European Jewry at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
Veidlinger is currently working on a book tentatively entitledJewish Public Culture in the Late Russian Empire.
Awards: Veidlinger is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
National Jewish Book Award Winner in Yiddish Language and Literature Category, 2000;
Choice Outstanding Academic Title (Choice Magazine), 2001;
Barnard Hewitt Award for Outstanding Research in Theater History and Cognate Studies, American Society of Theatre Research, 2001;
National Jewish Book Award Finalist in Eastern Europe Category. 2000;
The George Freedley Memorial Award Finalist, Theatre Library Association, 2000;
Lucius N. Littauer Foundation Book Grant, 2000.
ACLS/SSRC/NEH International and Area Studies Fellowship, 2002-2003;
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, 2001;
Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Fellowship, 1996-98;
Mellon Summer Fellowship, 1998;
REEI Mellon Endowment Grant-in-Aid for international travel, May 2004, June 2006;
Indiana University Arts and Humanities Institute Fellowship, 2002-2003;
Indiana University Research and the University Graduate School Summer Faculty Fellowship, 2002;
Indiana University College of Arts and Sciences Summer Faculty Fellowship, 2001;
Russian and East European Institute Travel Grants, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2005;
Indiana University Trustees’ Teaching Award, 2001;
National Endowment for the Humanities Grant to Preserve and Create Access to Humanities Collections ($200,000) 2005-2007;
Atran Foundation ($10,000) 2005;
Indiana University Arts and Humanities Institute ($6000), 2003;
Indiana University Arts and Humanities Initiative Fellowship ($50,000) 2003;
Indiana University Russian and East European Institute Fellowship ($2000), 2003;
Indiana University Multidisciplinary Ventures Grant ($3500), 2002;
Indiana University President Council on International Programs ($2000), 2002;
Indiana University Russian and East European Institute Fellowship ($3500) 2002.
Additional Info:
He is co-director of AHEYM (The Archive of Historical and Ethnographic Yiddish Memories), a project that collects videotaped oral histories of Yiddish speakers in Eastern Europe, mostly about Jewish life in the region before the Second World War.
Veidlinger is a member of the Association for Jewish Studies, American Historical Association, American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies, Oral History Association.
He has published articles and reviews on Jewish cultural and intellectual history in numerous periodicals, including Slavic Review, Studies in Jewish Civilization, Ab Imperio, Kritika¸ Jews in Eastern Europe, East European Jewish Affairs, Studies in Contemporary Jewry, Simon Dubnow Institute Yearbook, Cahiers du Monde Russe, and others.

Personal Anecdote

My story takes place in a small Ukrainian town that was, before the Second World War, a center of Jewish life. Like many others of its type, this shtetl (Yiddish for small town) once thrived with urban bustle, its marketplace teeming with Yiddish conversation. Today it is more like a country village, its town center virtually deserted. When I was there a few years ago, a lone chicken roamed through the empty square and a goat bleated, tied to a tree. The former Yidishe Gas (Jewish Street) was then Vladimir Lenin Street, so neglected that it had not even been renamed since the collapse of Communism over a decade before. Abandoned houses still bore the marks of mezuzahs on their doorposts, but inside only chickens made their homes. The seventeenth-century synagogue, famous throughout the district, had been converted into a juice-bottling factory sometime after the war. It had not yet been reclaimed, as was happening in many similar towns, by the nascent Jewish community, which, incidentally, was sometimes directed by the same individual who, in a prior incarnation, led the local Communist Party branch that seized the synagogue in the first place.

I was here, with my colleagues Dov-Ber Kerler and Dovid Katz, as part of an oral history, linguistic, and ethnographic project about Yiddish-speaking Jews in Eastern Europe. Local lore, we discovered, held that the town had been spared some of the worst of Nazi atrocities because it was protected by the spirits of two Hasidic holy men who were buried in the cemetery. With one of our informants as our guide, we set off for the burial ground to pay homage to the town’s saviors and to recite the Jewish prayer for the dead. Like most of the Jewish cemeteries of the region, it was overgrown with weeds; even fully mature trees had grown over time amidst the underbrush. Only a handful of gravestones remained, jutting out of the earth sporadically throughout the field. Most of the stones had been carried off long ago to pave the streets or to repair broken walls.

I decided to wander off on my own, to see if any old stones could still be found protruding from the ground. In an isolated corner of the graveyard, I found a few inches of stone, surrounded by earth and foliage. I squatted down to see if I could make out any of the epitaph, but the inscription was concealed behind layers of thorny weeds. Lost in my thoughts, I felt a shadow creep over the tomb and heard heavy breathing behind me. I glanced up and saw, standing over me, a somber-looking man in black, brandishing an enormous scythe.

Suddenly encountering the image of Death Himself can be startling in the best of circumstances. It is even more so in an abandoned cemetery in a strange land. In my moment of terror, I saw in the shimmering blade the blood of all those Jewish martyrs who had been murdered by Cossaks, in pogroms, by Hitler’s henchmen, and by Stalin’s agents, just like this, on the outskirts of Ukrainian villages in centuries past. The peasant from the neighboring field, aware only that he had inadvertently startled me, smiled, revealing a mouthful of gold and silver teeth, and gently lowered the rusting blade to help clear the brush away from the stone. I thanked him with a dollar bill as the name of the deceased came into view.

Quotes

By Jeffrey Veidlinger

  • “Soviet politics on the Yiddish stage retained a’ distinctly Jewish orientation not The Moscow State Yiddish Theater JPGmerely by dint of being performed in what is almost exclusively a Jewish language, but also by virtue of overt and covert cultural contexts and signifiers. The theatrical personnel interpreted their assignments through their own national perspectives and conveyed meaning to their Jewish audiences by referring to shared cultural assumptions. Under the guise of conventional socialist realism, the Yiddish theater brought to life shtetl fables, biblical heroes, Israelite lore, exilic laments, and contemporary conundrums. Whether depicting proletarian workers in the Soviet state or Jewish rebels in ancient Judaea, I argue that the Yiddish theater balanced its communist aspirations with a distinct Jewish identity to varying degrees throughout its existence. — Jeffrey Veidlinger in “The Moscow State Yiddish Theater”
  • About Jeffrey Veidlinger

  • “”Jeffrey Veidlinger relates a fascinating and little-known piece of history. . . . [He] distills a remarkable amount of research into a pithy, well-turned account that will interest readers of cultural and political history.” — Publishers Weekly reviewing “The Moscow State Yiddish Theater”
  • “Jeffrey Veidlinger’s book, The Moscow State Yiddish Theater: Jewish Culture on the Soviet Stage, is an overdue addition to the growing body of scholarly work on Yiddish theatre. This first comprehensive study of the GOSET in English is geared toward a wide-ranging readership. For the historian, Veidlinger clearly presents the intrusion of totalitarian politics into artistic activities; for the theatre scholar, he provides evocative details and illustrative descriptions of the theatre’s artistic work…. Veidlinger’s seminal study, The Moscow State Yiddish Theater: Jewish Culture on the Soviet Stage, does an important work in bringing it to the attention of the English-speaking audience. — Nina Hein, Columbia University reviewing “The Moscow State Yiddish Theater”
  • “Jeffrey Veidlinger’s thoroughly researched, engagingly written, and richly informative book tackles these issues through the tale of the rise and fall of the Moscow State Yiddish Theater. The choice of the Moscow Theater is ingenious…. Veidlinger’s analysis of the increasingly unbridgable agendas of the Soviet regime and the Jewish cultural elite is on the mark, especially the watershed of World War II…. Veidlinger’s book is an important and much-needed contribution to the literature on oviet nationality policy in general and Soviet Jewry in particular.” — Amir Weiner, Stanford University reviewing “The Moscow State Yiddish Theater”
  • “Very Very intesting and quite funny at times. Not too much work and very resonable with his students. I highly recomend taking a class from him, if given the oppurtunity.”…
    “Veidlinger is extremely knowledgable and I learned so much from him! Rock on!” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Friday, September 22, 2006 at 12:35 PM

    History Doyens: Stephan Thernstrom

    What They’re Famous For

    Stephan Thernstrom is the Winthrop Professor of History at Harvard University where he teaches American social history, and Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute. He was born in Port Huron, Michigan and educated in the public schools of Port Huron and Battle Creek. He graduated with highest honors from Northwestern University in 1956, and was awarded the Ph.D. by Harvard in 1962. Stephan Thernstrom JPGHe held appointments as assistant professor at Harvard, associate professor at Brandeis University, and professor at UCLA before returning to Harvard as a professor in 1973. In 1978-1979 he was the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at Cambridge University and Professorial Fellow at Trinity College.

    He has been awarded fellowships from the John S. Guggenheim Foundation, the American Council of Learned Societies, the Social Science Research Council, and the John M. Olin Foundation, and research grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mathematical Social Science Board, the American Philosophical Society, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Smith Richardson Foundation. His most recent book, co-authored with Abigail Thernstrom, is No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning. He also collaborated with Abigail Thernstrom in America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible. He is the editor of the Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups, the co-editor of Nineteenth Century Cities: Essays in the New Urban History and Beyond the Color Line: New Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity , and the author of Poverty and Progress: Social Mobility in a 19th-Century City,

    His books have been awarded the Bancroft Prize in American History, the Harvard University Press Faculty Prize, the Waldo G. Leland Prize of the American Historical Association, and the R. R. Hawkins Award of the Association of American Publishers. He also has written widely in periodicals for general audiences, including The New Republic, the Times Literary Supplement, The Public Interest, Commentary, Dissent, Partisan Review, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. He was appointed to serve on the National Humanities Council by President Bush in 2002.

    Personal Anecdote

    I cannot offer a neat little anecdote that sums up why I became a historian. I came relatively late and only gradually to the discipline. Indeed, I must confess that my interest in anything that happened in school developed relatively late in the day. I was bored out of my mind in my elementary and junior high classes, and devoted my energies to making life miserable for my teachers. Dipping the pigtails of the girl sitting at the desk in front of me into my inkwell (yes, we had inkwells back in Port Huron, Michigan in the 1940s), releasing garter snakes in class, putting thumb tacks on the teacher’s chair, etc. I was an ardent reader from an early age, but saw no connection between the books I was devouring and what the teachers were trying to do. One day in 8th-grade English, the teacher urged us to consider attending college, not very common for my age group those days. To underscore the point that mere brains would not suffice, she declared that Steve Thernstrom might be smart enough for college but never would make it there because he was such a goof-off and troublemaker.

    When I hit 9th-grade, we were all placed in one of three tracks–academic, general, or vocational. It was no surprise to me that I was consigned to Metal Shop, while the diligent, well-behaved students were put in Latin. It was a great surprise to my mother, though, and she marched over to the school and raised hell. As a result of her intervention, I did get into Latin, and was a crucial turning point in my education. I loved it.

    Stephan  Thernstrom JPGIn the summer before 10th-grade, we moved from Port Huron to Battle Creek. I continued with Latin, but found a new love that engaged me even more deeply—the debate team. The academic subjects other than Latin continued to bore me; certainly the U.S. and World History surveys I took were uninspiring. But the debate coach proved to be the greatest teacher I had until graduate school, and he was responsible for my intellectual awakening. I spent more time working on debate than on all my other courses put together, and my enthusiasm for it determined my choice of college.

    All the best students in my high school automatically went on to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; the only one who went East to an Ivy was the son of a Princeton man, and he followed in his daddy’s footsteps. I decided, though, that Michigan was not for me, because it had recently abandoned intercollegiate debate. So I chose to attend Northwestern, which not only had a strong debate team but scholarships for students who were good at it. The scholarship required that recipients enroll in the School of Speech rather than the College of Liberal Arts, so that’s what I had to do to be eligible for it. That did not prove very constraining. The requirements of the School of Speech were minimal and the courses were a snap, so that I always took five courses rather than the required four-course load and had ample opportunity to explore the liberal arts. Everything in the social sciences and humanities interested me in my college years. I did a fair amount of work in history (mostly European), in economics, sociology, and political science. I thought seriously about graduate school in economics, but my teacher in an economic history course advised me that I needed a strong math background to get anywhere in economics. After floundering in the math class I took as a result of this advice—ironically in light of the quantitative character of much of my later research—I gave up that idea, and decided on graduate school in political science.

    When I came Harvard, in 1956, political science was taught in the Department of Government, and the faculty’s commitment to that old-fashioned label was significant. The teachers I had my first year were all historians of sorts. V.O. Key taught a historically rich course in Southern politics; Robert G. McCloskey’s American Constitutional Law would have fit perfectly into a history department’s offerings. Most important to me was the offerings of the political theorist Louis Hartz, who had published his remarkable volume, The Liberal Tradition in America, the year before I arrived in Cambridge.

    Hartz dazzled me, and it happened he was then serving as chair of the interdisciplinary History of American Civilization Ph.D. program. My excitement over his explorations in what later came to be called “consensus history” led me to transfer into that program. I was not primarily interested in the history of political thought, though, and could not accept Hartz’s view that the roots of American exceptionalism were fundamentally ideological. I thought that a closer look at the evolution of the American social structure would illuminate the question more than further study of Madison or Calhoun. After entering the Am Civ program, I studied with Hartz, Oscar Handlin, Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., and Frank Freidel, and took two sociology courses, one on social stratification and social mobility, and another, from Barrington Moore on modern social theory and political power.

    Stephan  Thernstrom JPGAfter passing my orals, I began work on my dissertation–what became Poverty and Progress: Social Mobility in a 19th-Century City–under the wise guidance of Oscar Handlin. The underlying question it addressed—the absence of a class-conscious proletariat in the United States—had been explored by Hartz, and by Sombart and Marx before him. But I sought to answer it by using some simple quantitative techniques borrowed from sociology as well as the usual tools of the historian, building on a foundation supplied by the rarely used manuscript schedules of the U.S. Census I chose to work on Newburyport rather than another city conveniently near Cambridge—Lowell or Lawrence, say—because it was famous in American sociology as the site of W. Lloyd Warner’s five-volume “Yankee City” series.

    While I was doing my Newburyport research, I continued to learn from exposure to scholars in other disciplines. I worked as a section leader in sociologist David Riesman’s “American Character and Social Structure” and political scientist Samuel Beer’s “Western Thought and Institutions ” A fellowship from the Harvard-MIT Joint Center for Urban Studies gave me a final year free to do the final writing of the dissertation, and fruitful contact with specialists in urban economics, urban politics, demography, geography, and city planning.

    As I neared the end of graduate school, I had come to consider myself an American historian, and those were the job advertisements that I began to pore over anxiously. (I did have an inquiry from a leading sociology department, but decided that much of what I wanted to teach wouldn’t fit there and withdrew my name from consideration.) But I was also determined to keep up with the other social sciences as much as possible, and to make use of concepts and methods from other disciplines that might prove useful in explaining historical developments. In the four decades or so that have passed since then, my interests have changed to some extent; I work mainly on the 20th century rather than 19th century now, for example. But I still am doing the kind of history I learned to do in graduate school.

    Quotes

    By Stephan Therstrom

  • “In 1991, 13 percent of the whites of the United States said that they had generally “unfavorable” opinions about black Americans. In an ideal world, that number would be zero. But such a world is nowhere to be found, In Czechoslovakia that same year, 49 percent of Czechs had “unfavorable” attitudes toward the Hungarian ethnic minority living within the boundaries of their country. Likewise, 45 percent of West Germans disliked the Turks living in Germany; 54 percent of East Germans regarded Poles negatively; 40 percent of Hungarians frowned on the Romanians who lived among them; and 42 percent of the French disdained Arab immigrants from North Africa. In only two dozen European countries surveyed – Britain and Spain – was the proportion of the majority group less than twice as high as in the United States.America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible JPG Much of the animosity had deep historical roots. In 1991, a third of the Poles still had an “unfavorable” opinion of Jews, for example. Gypsies had the most enemies, with unfavorable rating ranging from a low of 50 percent in Spain to 91 percent in Czechoslovakia. “Ethnic, religious, and racial hatreds are thriving across Europe as the 20th Century draws to an end,” noted two commentators on the study. As the movement toward European union increases the flow of the labor across national boundaries, “the Continent could turn into a tinderbox,” they warned.

    Against this yardstick the racial views of white Americans look remarkably good. But are seemingly tolerant whites simply more hypocritical than Czechs or French? Perhaps they have learned to keep their animus hidden from public view. We think not. Although different ways of framing questions about racial prejudice yield slightly different answers, the bulk of the evidence squares with the 1991 survey results: when it comes to intergroup tolerance, Americans rate high by international standards.” — Stephan Thernstrom and Abigail Thernstrom in “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”

  • “The racial gap in academic achievement is an educational crisis, but it is also the main source of ongoing racial inequality. And racial inequality is America’s great unfinished business, the wound that remains unhealed. Thus, this is a book about education, but it also addresses the central civil rights issue of our time: our failure to provide first-class education for black and Hispanic students, in both cities and suburbs.The black high school graduation rate has more than doubled since 1960. And blacks attend college at a rate that is higher than it was for whites just two decades ago. But the good news ends there. The gap in academic achievement that we see today is actually worse than it was fifteen years ago. In the 1970s and through most of the 1980s, it was closing, but around 1988 it began to widen, with no turnaround in sight.

    Today, at age 17 the typical black or Hispanic student is scoring less well on the nation’s most reliable tests than at least 80 percent of his or her white classmates. In five of the seven subjects tested by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a majority of black students perform in the lowest category — Below Basic. The result: By twelfth grade, African Americans are typically four years behind white and Asian students, while Hispanics are doing only a tad better than black students. These students are finishing high school with a junior high education.

    No  Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning JPG Students who have equal skills and knowledge will have roughly equal earnings. That was not always true, but it is today. Schooling has become the key to racial equality. No wonder that Robert Moses, a luminous figure in the civil rights revolution of the 1960s, is convinced that “the absence of math literacy in urban and rural communities throughout this country is an issue as urgent as the lack of registered Black voters in Mississippi was in 1961.” Algebra, he believes, is “the gatekeeper of citizenship.”

    Literacy, too, is a “gatekeeper,” and the deadline for learning is alarmingly early. “For many students…the die is cast by eighth grade. Students without the appropriate math and reading skills by that grade are unlikely to acquire them by the end of high school…,” a U.S. Department of Education study has concluded.

    Race has famously been called the “American dilemma.” But since the mid-1960s, racial equality has also been an American project. An astonish-ing, peaceful revolution in the status of blacks and the state of race relations has transformed the country. And yet too few Americans have recognized and acknowledged the stubborn inequalities that only better schools can address.

    Even civil rights groups have long averted their gaze from the disquieting reality. “You can have a hunch that black students are not doing as well, but some of this was surprising,” A. V. Fleming, president of the Urban League in Fort Wayne, Indiana, said, as the picture of low black achievement began to emerge in the late 1990s. In Elk Grove, California, an affluent suburb of Sacramento, black parents were shocked, angry, and in tears when they learned of the low test scores of their kids. “People know that this is an important issue, and they don’t know how to talk about it,” said Philip Moore, the principal of the local middle school, who is black himself.

    For too long, the racial gap in academic performance was treated not only by civil rights leaders, but by the media, and even by scholars, as a dirty secret — something to whisper about behind closed doors. As if it were racist to say we have a problem: Black and Hispanic kids, on average, are not doing well in school.

    Suddenly, however, this shamefully ignored issue has moved to the front and center of the education stage. In part, the new attention is simply a response to an altered economic reality. A half century ago, an eighth-grade dropout could get a secure and quite well-paid job at the Ford Motor Company or U.S. Steel. Today, the Honda plant in Ohio does not hire people who cannot pass a test of basic mathematical skills.

    Demographic change, too, has forced Americans to pay attention to an educational and racial catastrophe in their midst. Fifty years ago, Hispanic children were no more than 2 percent of the school population. Today, a third of all American students are black or Latino. In California, Louisiana, Mississippi, New Mexico, and Texas white schoolchildren have become a numerical minority. These numbers, in themselves, drive home the urgency of educating all children.

    The unprecedented sense of urgency is unmistakable in No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the 2001 version of the nation’s omnibus 1965 Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The central aim of the revised statute, as its preamble states boldly, is “to close the achievement gap…so that no child is left behind.” Closing the gap is the core purpose of the legislation — and the test of its eventual success.

    Thus, the act requires all states to test children in grades 3-8 and report scores broken down by race, ethnicity, and other demographic characteristics associated with educational disadvantage. Each group must show significant annual progress. Affluent districts will no longer be able to coast along, hiding their lower-performing black and Hispanic students in overall averages that make their schools look good. A bucket of very cold water has been poured on educators — and particularly those who have been quite complacent. NCLB has been an overdue attention-getter. At a well-attended national meeting on education in September 2002, the audience was asked to name the most important new policy requirement in No Child Left Behind; closing the racial and ethnic achievement gap was the clear winner.

    Indifference to minority children who arrive in kindergarten already behind and continue to flounder is no longer an option for schools. The problem has been acknowledged — and thus must now be addressed. Racial equality will remain a dream as long as blacks and Hispanics learn less in school than whites and Asians. If black youngsters remain second-class students, they will be second-class citizens — a racially identifiable and enduring group of have-nots.” — Abigail Thernstrom and Stephan Thernstrom in “No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning”

  • ” Is America still “segregated”? In our deeply divided national conversation on race, the question endures, and it was raised again last spring by the 50th-anniversary celebrations of Brown v. Board of Education. Did that landmark decision by the Supreme Court promise much and deliver little? The ruling itself spoke only of segregation in the nation’s public schools, but its potential sweep was unmistakable. Officially sanctioned separation of the races, the Justices wrote, had the “detrimental effect” of “denoting the inferiority of the Negro group,” generating “a feeling of inferiority as to their status in the community.” The logic of the decision, if not its words, was thus pertinent to the entire Jim Crow system, from water fountains to hospitals and bus systems, and was indeed rapidly extended to other spheres of public life in the South. The Justices had no magic wand with which to eliminate racism, of course, but in Brown they had declared, in effect, that racial inferiority was an idea whose time was up.It is easy to forget how far we have come over the past 50 years….Today, the typical black youngster attends a school that is only about halfblack- an extraordinary change in a half-century. Or is it? The most curious aspect of the anniversary of Brown last spring was the hand-wringing that accompanied so much of the celebration. Paul Vallas, Philadelphia’s education chief, lamented that “we’re still wrestling with the same issues” today as in 1954. Newsweek opined that “Brown, for all its glory, is something of a bust.” For the Harvard law professor Charles Ogletree, “the evil that Brown sought to eliminate- segregation-is still with us.” His verdict was shared by the Washington Post columnist Colbert King. “Segregation has found its way back-if, indeed, it ever left some schools,” he wrote. “To be sure, today’s racial separation is not sanctioned by law. But in terms of racial isolation, the effect is much the same.”

    …Those who recall what life was like for blacks in the Deep South before Brown v. Board of Education and the 1964 Civil Rights Act should be outraged by the equation of racial imbalance with segregation. The black children who broke the color-line in Jim Crow schools-the children who faced white mobs spewing insults and brandishing sticks-showed extraordinary courage in the face of state-sanctioned racism. Advocates of racially balanced schools are not engaged in a remotely similar fight. In claiming otherwise, they not only rob the civil-rights movement of its achievement, but turn our eyes toward the wrong prize-schools that look right rather than schools in which children, whatever their color, are truly learning. — Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom “Have We Overcome?” Commentary, November 2004

    About Stephan Thernstrom

  • “America in Black and White is lucidly written, rigorously researched, and persuasively argued. On a topic that frequently divides and polarizes, Stephan and Abigail Thernstrom have elevated and enriched the national conversation. America in Black and White looks honestly at the history of American racism while also looking to a more just, cohesive, and ultimate color-blind society. But it does more than that: the Thernstroms make a compelling case for color-blind public policies as the surest route to a society where all individuals are judged on the content of their character, rather than the color of their skin.” — William J. Bennet reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • A benchmark new work turns the accepted history of racial progress in America upside down.” — Tamala M. Edwards, TIME magazine reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “. . . their tough-minded book serves the cause of racial justice. It shows that the issue is not whether black exceptionalism should end. The issue is when.” — Alan Wolfe, The New Republic reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “…A richly factual, rigorously analytical, profoundly humane account of the changing status of black Americans and of black-white relations since the early 1940s.” — Kenneth S. Lynn, The American Spectator reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “What distinguishes America in Black and White is its comprehensiveness: this is the Summa, the Magnum Opus…” — Roger Lane, The Philadelphia Inquirer reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “[America in Black and White] is in a class by itself when it comes to telling and analyzing what has been happening in this country on the racial front over the past two generations.” — Thomas Sowell, Forbes reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “…[The Thernstroms] have written the definitive account of U.S. race relations in our time.” — David Frum, Financial Post reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “…Deeply researched and powerfully argued. . . . America in Black and White is a notable edition to the lengthy shelf of books dealing with contemporary race relations. . . tightly argued, richly documented, provocative book – scholarship of the highest order.” — James Patterson, The Wilson Quarterly reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “Well-written and thoughtful, the book never stoops to the exageration and bombast that plague much of the current debate on race.” — Paul Magnusson, BusinessWeek reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “[America in Black and White's] discussion of race is far more level-headed and useful than anything the president or his recently appointed commission on race has said or is likely to say.” — Walter E. Williams, Parkerburg News reviewing “America in Black and White: One Nation, Indivisible”
  • “THAT a book like this would appear was merely a matter of time. The revived interest in ethnicity required a reference volume, if only to aid students struggling with term papers. But that such a work would come from Harvard, with its imprimatur in the title, might not have been predicted. After all, for most of its existence our senior university held itself aloof from ethnic America, as did most established institutions. All the more reason, therefore, to see how the Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups treats its subjects….Hence the rationale of the Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups. It is not just a book to sit on a reference shelf. Rather it is designed for a broad and varied audience, to be owned and read with pride. In fact, the effort that went into it shows that someone cares. At the same time, motives are always mixed, and never simply manipulative. This volume can also be seen as Harvard’s expression of atonement for having been party to a process that evokes a measure of regret. And this is only fitting: For atonement is a rite with honored ethnic origins. — Andrew Hacker reviewing “HARVARD ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN ETHNIC GROUPS” in NYT

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Positions:
    Winthrop Professor of History, Harvard University, 1981Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute, 1999Chairman, History of American Civilization Program, Harvard University, 1985-1992 Director, Charles Warren Center for the Study of American History, Harvard University, 1980-83, 1986-87;
    Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions, University of Cambridge, 1978-79;
    Professorial Fellow, Trinity College, 1978-79;
    Professor of History, Harvard University, 1973-8l;
    Professor of History, UCLA, 1969-73;
    Senior Associate, Institute of Government and Public Affairs, UCLA, 1969-73;
    Associate Professor of History, Brandeis University, 1967-69;
    Assistant Professor of History, Harvard University, 1966-67;
    Instructor, Harvard-Yale-Columbia Intensive Summer Studies Program Summer, 1966;
    Research Member, M.I.T.-Harvard Joint Center for Urban Studies, 1962-69;
    Instructor in History and Literature, Harvard University, 1962-65.

    Area of Research:
    Social, demographic, and economic history of America; 20th century Social History, immigration, race and ethnicity.

    Education:
    B.S. with highest honors, Northwestern University, 1956
    A.M., History, Harvard University, 1958
    Ph.D., History of American Civilization, Harvard University, 1962

    Major Publications:

  • (with Abigail Thernstrom) No Excuses: Closing the Racial Gap in Learning, (Simon and Schuster, 2003)
  • (with Abigail Thernstrom) America in Black in White: One Nation, Indivisible, (Simon and Schuster, 1997)
  • (with Richard Gill and Nathan Glazer) Our Changing Population, (Prentice-Hall, 1991)
  • A History of the American People, 2 vols., (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1984; revised edition, 1988)
  • The Other Bostonians: Poverty and Progress in the American Metropolis, 1880-1970, Harvard University Press, 1973
  • Poverty, Politics, and Planning in the New Boston: The Origins of ABCD, (Basic Books, 1969)
  • Poverty and Progress: Social Mobility in a l9th-Century City, (Harvard University Press, 1964)
  • Professor Thernstrom and his wife Abigail are writing a co-authored book that reconsiders the concept of de facto segregation.

    Editor, Contributor, Joint Author:

  • Co-editor (with Abigail Thernstrom) Beyond the Color Line: New Perspectives on Race and Ethnicity, (Hoover Institution Press, 2002)
  • Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups, Editor, (Harvard University Press, 1980)
  • Co-editor (with Richard Sennett) Nineteenth Century Cities: Essays in the New Urban History, (Yale University Press, 1969)
  • Co-editor (with Neil Harris and David Rothman) Readings in the History of the United States, 2 vols., (Holt Rinehart Winston, 1969)
  • Awards and Grants:

    The Other Bostonians was awarded the Bancroft Prize in American History and the Harvard University Press Faculty Prize.
    Thernstrom Books JPG The Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups received the American Historical Association’s Waldo G. Leland Prize and the R.R. Hawkins Award of the Association of American Publishers
    America in Black and White received the Caldwell Award from the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy, and was named a “notable book of the year” by the “New York Times”
    No Excuses was named one of “best books of 2003″ by the “Los Angeles Times,” and a 2003 and a “2003 Notable Book” by the American School Board Journal.” No Excuses and were honored with the Peter Shaw Award from the National Association of Scholars. Research grant, John M. Olin Foundation, 1998-99;
    John M. Olin Fellow, 1992-93;
    Research grant, Smith Richardson Foundation, 1990-92;
    Research grant, Rockefeller Foundation, 1975-80;
    Research grant, National Endowment for the Humanities, 1975-1980;
    John S. Guggenheim Fellow, 1969-70;
    Research grant, Mathematical Social Science Board, 1965-68;
    American Council of Learned Societies Fellow for Computer-Oriented Research in the Humanities, 1965-66;
    Research grant, American Philosophical Society, 1964-65;
    Samuel S. Stouffer Fellow, Joint Center for Urban Studies, 1961-62;
    Frederick Sheldon Travelling Fellow, 1959-60;
    Woodrow Wilson Fellow, 1956-57;

    Additional Info:

    Thernstrom’s professional activities include: National Council on the Humanities, 2002;
    Society of American Historians Editorial Board, Journal of Interdisciplinary History, 1970; Editorial Board, Journal of Family History, 1976; Editorial Board, Journal of American Ethnic History, 1981-97; Editorial Board, Labor History, 1970-75;
    Co-editor, Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Modern History book series, Cambridge University Press, 1980;
    Co-editor, Harvard Studies in Urban History series, Harvard University Press, 1972;
    Co-editor, Documentary History of American Cities series, New Viewpoints Press, 1975-78;
    Thernstrom JPG Co-editor, Perspectives in American History, 2nd series, 1984-86;
    Committee Member, Citizens’ Initiative on Race and Ethnicity, 1999-2001;
    Board of Directors, National Association of Scholars, 1990-97;
    Board of Advisors, National Association of Scholars, 1997;
    Consultant, U.S. Civil Rights Commission studies of “The Economic Progress of Black Men in America” and “The Economic Status of Americans of Asian Descent”;
    Panel Member, Committee to Review National Standards in U.S. History, Council on ‘ Basic Education, 1995;
    Planning Committee, National Assessment of Educational Progress, 1994 Assessment in U.S. History Textbook Advisory Committee, Education for Democracy Project, 1986-88;
    History Area Committee, Foundations of Literacy Project, National Assessment of Learning, 1985-87;
    Executive Board, Immigration History Society, 1983-88;
    Board of Directors, Social Science Research Council, 1977-78.

    Posted on Sunday, September 17, 2006 at 7:17 PM

    Top Young Historians: 29 – Jeremi Suri

    Top Young Historians

    Jeremi Suri, 34

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, University of Wisconsin-Madison.
    Area of Research:
    Education: Ph.D. in history, 2001, Yale University
    Major Publications: Suri is the author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Détente (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2003) Jeremi Suri JPGrecipient of the 2003 Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award.; Arabic Language Edition of Power and Protest (Beirut: Al Hiwar Athaqafi, 2005); Indian Edition of Power and Protest (New Delhi: Viva Books Private Limited, 2005); Henry Kissinger and the American Century (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, forthcoming 2006) and The Global Revolutions of 1968 (New York: W.W. Norton, forthcoming 2006).
    Awards: Suri is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
    2006 Class of 1955 Distinguished Teaching Award from the University of Wisconsin;
    2004 Dorothy and Hsin-Nung Yao Teaching Award from the University of Wisconsin;
    2004-2007 Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer;
    2003 Phi Alpha Theta Best First Book Award;
    2001 John Addison Porter Prize for the best dissertation in the humanities, Yale University;
    2001 Hans Gatzke Prize for the best dissertation in international history, Yale University.
    Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Interdisciplinary Workshop Grant, administered through the Center for the Humanities, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2006-2007;
    Vilas Associateship, University of Wisconsin, 2005-2007;
    Collaborative Research Grant, Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy (WAGE) University of Wisconsin, 2005-2008;
    Innovation and Development Grant, International Institute, University of Wisconsin, 2005;
    National Fellowship, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 2003-2004;
    Research Travel Grant, German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD), 2004;
    Faculty Travel Grant, Center For European Studies, University of Wisconsin, 2003-2004;
    Rockefeller Archives Center Research Grant, 2004;
    Postdoctoral Fellowship, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University, 2000-2001;
    United States Institute for Peace Research Fellowship, 1999-2000;
    Jacob K. Javits United States Department of Education Doctoral Fellowship, 1994-1998;
    A. Bartlett Giamatti Yale University Graduate Fellowship, 1996-1998;
    Yale Center for International and Area Studies Dissertation Fellowship, 1998-1999;
    Smith Richardson Dissertation Fellowship in International Studies, 1998-1999;
    Friends of Princeton University Library Manuscript Research Fellowship, 1998;
    Yale International Studies Summer Travel Grant, 1997;
    Ohio University Contemporary History Institute Russia Travel Grant, 1996;
    Stanford University Undergraduate Research and Travel Grant, 1994;
    Harvard University John M. Olin Fellowship in International Studies, 1999-2000, declined by recipient;
    Fellowship in Public Affairs, Miller Center, University of Virginia, 2000-01, declined by recipient.
    Additional Info:
    Suri has had op-ed articles published in “The Seoul Times,” “Washington Times,” “San Francisco Chronicle,” and the “Wisconsin State Journal.”
    Founder and editor (with Professor Sven Beckert) of Princeton University Press scholarly book series on “America in the World” and Editor, Encyclopedia of the Cold War (London: Routledge, forthcoming 2007), section on ideas, concepts, and institutions, and on the Editorial Board, Cambridge Dictionary of Modern World History (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2007).
    He is also a Senior Fellow, Center for World Affairs and the Global Economy, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

    Personal Anecdote

    Writing contemporary international history is often a strange experience. Sometime it feels more like a Woody Allen movie than a traditional scholarly existence. Here is a slice in the life of the new book project that I am completely on Henry Kissinger and the American Century.

    In the spring of 2004 I received an email message from a name I did not recognize with the following subject line: “Message from Dr. Kissinger.” I was working on a book about the man, but I had never communicated with him. One of my crazy history colleagues must be pulling my leg, I thought. I was wrong. It turned out that the all-knowing Dr. K found out about my project, read my prior book, and wanted to meet me. I needed his instruction, he obviously thought.

    “I will meet Dr. Kissinger whenever he would like,” I responded to his assistant’s inquiry. No playing hard to get for me. We met at his Park Avenue office in New York a month later. There was no small talk. For an hour-and-a-half he grilled me on my research and “how I could know” what I had written. We argued and I lost every point of dispute. “Why am I arguing with the man who negotiated with Mao,” I wondered halfway through this surreal experience. Suri and Kissinger JPGWhen he was finished, Kissinger dismissed me with the words: “You just don’t understand what it is like to make policy.” Okay, I thought, but that is a very convenient excuse for your controversial actions. Nice cop-out, Henry.

    Kissinger asked me about my future research for my book about him. “I am taking my family to your hometown of Fuerth, Germany this summer,” I explained. “Why on earth are you doing that?” he responded. “I want to understand your early years and the social history that influenced your policies.” “You will learn nothing about me in Fuerth,” he growled. “It means nothing to me.”

    I dragged the family to Germany anyway. On the Monday of my second week in the city’s Jewish archive, the main research supervisor told me that Kissinger was making a private visit to town with his brother, Walter. She only knew because her friend worked at the local press agency — the only press agency told about this visit. I immediately surmised that Kissinger would visit the old family apartment, in the old Jewish ghetto, that I had examined in prior days. I bolted for the neighborhood and spent about 3 hours sitting on the stoop, stalking the man. “So this is what I got a Ph.D. for,” I thought. “Maybe I should have chosen a more respectable profession — like the law.”

    Kissinger arrived, finally, in a Mercedes with his brother and the mayor. He recognized me immediately and exclaimed, “What are you doing here.” I had 3 hours to plan my response. “I am researching you, Dr. Kissinger. You know, I have my own back channels.”

    That moment broke the ice. Since then, we have met for extended discussions on numerous occasions. He remains manipulative and controlling. He does not really sit for interviews. Kissinger and I have, however, developed a working relationship that has provided me with important insights — some favorable, some critical — about his background, his development, and his historical legacy. He probably will not like my book, but I feel much more confident in my ability to write about him because of our relationship.

    You see, Woody Allen was right. Ninety percent of life is about showing up. Sometimes that means answering email; sometimes it requires sitting on a stoop.

    Quotes

    By Jeremi Suri

  • People of all kinds are now looking beyond the boundaries of the nation-state to understand the world around them. The end of the Cold War, the Internet, and the economic turbulence of the 1990s have raised public awareness about “globalization.” Environmental and human rights activism has inspired more attention to common interests across cultures. Most shocking, the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 and the subsequent “war on terrorism” have encouraged a sense of shared danger among the members of diverse societies.To help us comprehend what it means to think globally, scholars have begun to conceptualize history in these terms as well. By examining how states, peoples, and cultures interacted with one another in the past, we surely gain some leverage on understanding the present. To see globalization as a historic phenomenon is to recognize that the new technologies of our day are not necessarily the primary forces behind the interdependence of economies, the interpenetration of cultures, and, perhaps most worrying, the internationalization of terrorism. Studying the 1960s and détente in global terms reveals how ideas, institutions, and personalities transcended national boundaries before the Internet or the “war on terrorism.

    Power and Protest  JPG The Cold War, more than anything else, created a remarkable conjuncture among societies in the 1960s. Nuclear dangers elicited common fears of annihilation. International competition contributed to the growth of state-run bureaucracies. This was especially true for universities, which expanded in nearly every society to accommodate both a larger population of young citizens and state demands for more advanced technical training. Cold War rhetoric about capitalism and communism inspired rising expectations that, by the late 1960s, produced a common sense of disillusionment among culturally diverse men and women.

    To see the period in these terms, and détente’s function as counterrevolution, requires a global perspective that looks across national boundaries and within societies at the same time. It demands attention to various kinds of relationships: social, cultural, political, and diplomatic. To isolate one kind of interaction from another, simply re-creates the provinciality of national history on a wider geographical terrain. Understanding moments of global conjuncture, like the 1960s, calls for an international history that treats power as both multicultural and multidimensional. This involves following the interactions of ideas, institutions, and personalities at many levels. It also leads one to examine how policies, like détente, evolved from truly diverse, and often unintended, influences.

    An international history of this kind allows one to re-think many issues that animate historians and other fellow travelers in our global age. Analyzing power in multicultural and multidimensional terms adds to our understanding of human interactions. It also enriches the ways we remember the 1960s and the decade’s legacy for the twenty-first century. — Jeremi Suri in “Power and Protest: Global Revolution and the Rise of Detente”, 262-63.About Jeremi Suri

  • “Suri’s portrayal of detente as counterrevolution is a brilliant rendition of the new diplomatic history. Linking social, demographic, and cultural developments to international politics and diplomacy, Suri shows how domestic protest inspired American, Russian, Chinese, French, and German leaders to collude with one another to stabilize their societies and preserve internal order. This bold and provocative book vividly illuminates the connections between domestic and international politics.” — Melvyn P. Leffler, University of Virginia reviewing “Power and Protest”
  • “This book heralds the emergence of a newly ambitious agenda in international history, Suri ingeniously links the domestic upheavals that convulsed so many societies in the 1960s with the emergence of the international regime known as detente, giving persuasive weight to his conclusion that “foreign policy is also social policy.” Drawing on prodigious research in American and European sources, Suri suggests that common features powerfully shape the lives of all modern states, regardless of their particular demographic, institutional, or ideological configurations. An impressive, original achievement.” — David M. Kennedy, Stanford University reviewing “Power and Protest”
  • “Power and Protest is superb in every respect–imaginatively conceived and elegantly written. This is the most ambitious attempt I have ever seen to explicate the meaning of the cultural revolution of the 1960s and its aftermath. I find the argument provocative and on the whole persuasive. Disparate events usually presented in separate national histories are conceptually connected in what may be seen as the first truly global history of that turbulent decade. This is a most important study that will have an electrifying effect on scholarship and, one hopes, on political leaders everywhere who seem to be grappling with the question of reform versus stalemate both domestically and externally. — Akira Iriye, Harvard University reviewing “Power and Protest”
  • “In the community of ‘sixties scholars,’ virtually all of us at one time or another have nodded sagely in agreement with the assertion that to truly understand the decade, one would need to undertake a comparative international history. In “Power and Protest,” Jeremi Suri boldly goes in the direction toward which the rest of us merely feebly gesture, and makes a singular contribution to our understanding of the 1960s in world history.” — Maurice Isserman, co-author of “America Divided: The Civil War of the 1960s” reviewing “Power and Protest”
  • “Jeremi Suri has liberated us from the rigid formalism of “comparative history” to the more satisfying concept of “international history.” His fresh look at the 1960s links the elite world of diplomacy and international politics to shared, underlying social and cultural experiences, transcending national and class boundaries, to reveal a more complex, richer view of that unsettling moment. Suri’s work is ambitious, but he delivers with thoughtful, pioneering, and rigorous analysis. Here is history on a grand scale.” — Stanley I. Kutler, author of “Wars of Watergate: The Last Crisis of Richard Nixon” reviewing “Power and Protest”
  • “This man is on the forefront of American Historical perspective. He is incredibly informative, helpful, friendly, and approachable. Probably one of the most pertinant classes at UW-Mad today.”… “love his lectures…. they sound like speeches and debates, they are great, interesting and easy to follow. He’s a very very very intelligent guy.”… “Friendly and intelligent.”… “Wonderful man–very entertaining and interested in what he is teaching.”… “The best prof I have had here at Madison. He is truly concerned about students, fair with homework, and gives lively/substantive lectures. Absolutely one of a kind!!!!!” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, September 10, 2006 at 3:49 PM

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