Top Young Historians: 34 – Mark Phillip Bradley

Top Young Historians

Mark Phillip Bradley, 45

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor, Department of History, Northwestern University, 2004-present.
Area of Research: Twentieth century U.S. international history and postcolonial Southeast Asian history
Education: Ph.D. History, Harvard University,1995
Major Publications: Bradley is the author of Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam (2000), which won the Harry J. Benda Prize from the Association for Asian Studies, and is co-editor of Truth Claims: Representation and Human Rights (2001). Bradley’s current book projec include The United States and the Twentieth Century Global Human Rights Revolution, a book that explores the history of the contested and contingent meanings of the global human rights revolution in the twentieth century for Cambridge University Press; The Vietnam Wars, an international history of the wars in Vietnam, and Making Sense of the Vietnam Wars: Transnational and International Perspectives, co-editor with Marilyn B. Young, and edited book of several essays that explore the intersection of the transnational and the local in postcolonial Vietnam social and cultural history, both for Oxford University Press.
Awards: Bradley is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
Jean Gimbel Lane Professorship in the Humanities, Northwestern University, 2007-08;
Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship for Recently Tenured Scholars, American Council of Learned Societies, 2005-06;
National Endowment for the Humanities University Faculty Fellowship, 2002-03;
Fellow, Center for Twenty-First Century Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Fall 2003, 2001-02;
American Council of Learned Societies Fellowship (alternative), 2002;
Faculty Research Grant, The University of Chicago, 1997-98;
Fellow, Center for Twentieth Century Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1997-98 (declined);
Undergraduate Teaching Improvement Grant, The University of Wisconsin System, 1996-97;
National Endowment for the Humanities Dissertation Fellowship, 1993-94;
Bernadotte E. Schmidt Grant for Research in the History of Europe, Africa and Asia, American Historical Assocation, 1993;
Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship, 1991-92;
Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1991-1992;
Henry Luce Research Fellowship, Association for Asian Studies, 1991;
Kenneth T. Young Vietnam Research Fellowship, John King Fairbank Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1991;
Sidney J. Weinberg Research Fellowship, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, 1990;
Research Grant, Harry S. Truman Library Institute, 1990;
Abilene Travel Fellowship, The Eisenhower World Affairs Institute, 1990;
Research Grants, Charles Warren Center, Harvard University, Summer 1990 and 1991;
John Anson Kittridge Educational Fund Trust, 1989;
CBS Bicentennial Scholarship, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, 1987-1990;
Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship (Vietnamese), 1990, 1987.
Additional Info:
Formerly Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 2001-2003, Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1995-1997, 1999-2001, and Assistant Professor, Department of History, The University of Chicago, 1997-1999.
Regularly review scholarly monographs and films for American Historical Review, Journal of American History, International History Review, Journal of Asian Studies, H-Net, Pacific Historical Review and Reviews in American History.
Co-Editor, America in the World Series, Cornell University Press. 2006- .
Bradley was the Panel Chair and Discussant, Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations Annual Meeting, June 2005, and the Organization of American Historians Annual Meeting, 2005.

Personal Anecdote

I have come to find the terrain of the global to be a wonderfully open and liberating scholarly space in which to work. If the boundaries of the historical actors with whom I am most concerned are fluid, so too are the boundaries for the international historian as she or he navigates and often crosses geographic, disciplinary and conceptual borders. The insights that can emerge from these transgressive moves have had a profound impact on my research and teaching. This has been especially the case in my current research on the contested meanings of what I term the global human rights revolution of the twentieth century. There are many conceptual challenges in undertaking such a work but one is that the very real emergence of global human rights norms and their protections can sometimes seem abstract and remote. Among the things I want to do with this project is to illuminate the ways in which these larger processes are very much rooted in the everyday actions of local actors. The importance of doing so first emerged for me several years ago when I met the Spanish magistrate Baltasar Garzon and he told me this story.

Late in the day on a Friday in October 1998, Garzon was driving out of Madrid with a friend to meet their families at a country house for the weekend. His friend, as people often do after a long week at work, turned to Garzon at one point in the drive and asked, “So…how was your week?” Garzon pulled off to the side of the road and said, in almost disbelieving tones, “You know, I just faxed an extradition order to the British government against Augusto Pinochet to stand trial in Spain for crimes against humanity.” Until that moment, Garzon said, he hadn’t really absorbed the enormity of the action he had taken. Preoccupied with the mechanics and timing of drafting the arrest warrant -it had to be faxed to London by 5:00 p.m. that Friday- Garzon said he had temporarily lost sight of the larger forces his action could potentially set in motion.

Garzon’s actions were in many ways extraordinary. General Pincohet had come to London earlier in October of 1998 with few worries. While a 1991 report of the Chilean Truth and Reconciliation Commission had carefully documented the gross violations of human rights -literally thousands of cases of torture, assassination, execution and disappearances- that had taken place under the Pinochet regime, Pinochet himself had been given a title of “Senator for Life” that essentially protected him from any moves toward prosecution in Chile. At the international level, prevailing notions of sovereign immunity for heads of state appeared to offer him protection outside of Chile as well. Indeed, Pinochet was so little concerned with the implications of his visit to Great Britain that he hadn’t bothered to obtain a diplomatic passport to enter the county.

But the British government responded to Garzon’s request in ways that Pinochet and few others anticipated. After a series of legal battles, during which Pinochet was placed under house arrest, Britain’s highest court, the Law Lords, ruled that Pinochet did not enjoy immunity from prosecution for human rights abuses and could be extradited to Spain for some, though not all, of the charges made by Garzon. Universal jurisdiction, in the eyes of the Law Lords, trumped notions of sovereign immunity in cases of gross violations of human rights.

What has become known as the Pinochet case speaks to a variety of transformative changes in global apprehensions of human rights. But for me it was the personal dimensions of Garzon’s actions that were most striking and unexpected. The quotidian dimension of Garzon’s efforts to bring Pinochet to justice and his own surprised reaction to them were an invaluable reminder to me that what are often seen as norms and forces operating in a distant transnational space are in fact very much rooted in the acts of individuals who simultaneously share a local and global identity. As we craft new narratives of twentieth century international history, invariably structural forces are a critical part of the story. But so too, although sometimes harder to capture, is the contingency and agency of individual actors that are both shaped by and themselves shape the contours of that narrative.

Quotes

By Mark Philip Bradley

  • “Strikingly, Vietnamese and American perceptions of each other and their imaginings of Vietnam’s postcolonial future drew on a shared vocabulary, but one mediated though external sources and then reproduced and transformed in a variety of Vietnamese and American idioms. The perceptions of the United States and articulations Imagining Vietnam and America JPGof postcolonial Vietnam by Vietnamese revolutionaries were shaped by modernist currents of thought that entered Vietnam through the works of reformers and radicals in China and through the lived experience of French colonial rule. The ensemble of assumptions through which Americans apprehended the Vietnamese, often posed in Social Darwinian, neo-Lamarckian, or Orientalist terms, were a part of the culturally hierarchical discourse that infused the theory and practice of Western imperialism…..From the perspective of Vietnamese and American political elites in the fall of 1945, the subsequent course of Vietnamese-American relations was surely an unimagined contingency. Neither side could have anticipated they would face each other as enemies in 1950 when the colonial war between the French and the Vietnamese was transformed into an arena of the Cold War. Nor could they envision that they would send troops into battle against one another by 1965 as Vietnam became the central Cold War battleground. But as the Cold War came to Vietnam, the overlapping and intertwined meanings accorded to the historical rupture of decolonization in 1945, and the relationship between the colonial past and the postcolonial future, remained central to the subsequent course of Vietnamese-American relations. For both Vietnamese and American policy makers, the largely imagined Vietnam and America that were constructed during the interwar and World War II periods fundamentally shaped the contours of the postcolonial Vietnamese state and its place in the articulation of post-1945 international order.” — Mark Philip Bradley, “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950,” pp. 6-7
  • About Mark Philip Bradley

  • “Mark Bradley’s fine book constitutes cultural history and international relations at its best. His wide reading in Vietnamese, French, and American materials (in a field where sadly few Western scholars can read Vietnamese), provides a landmark in proper method and a major contribution to our understanding of the origins of American-Vietnamese antagonism. In deft and finely written brushstrokes he paints the Vietnamese into the center of a picture heretofore illumed mostly by American stories that only an American would believe. Although much of Professor Bradley’s account covers a long period before the Vietnam War that most Americans know little about, his sensitive analysis will help them to grasp how this ancient, small and superficially weak nation triumphed over the world’s most powerful country. More than that, Imagining Vietnam and America is an important step forward in the field of international history–how to think about the subject, and how to go about doing it. A splendid accomplishment.”– Bruce Cumings, University of Chicago reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Mark Philip Bradley achieves two frequently invoked but rarely realized goals in Imagining Vietnam and America: he places his subject firmly in an international context, and he transcends the tenacious hold of Cold War paradigms on post-1945 historiography. Vietnam ensnared by hot and cold wars is the end, not the beginning, of this complex study of culture and ideas in which the ideals of an imagined America animated Vietnamese revolutionaries even as an imagined Vietnam dictated American policies. This account, which draws on Vietnamese, French, British, and American archives, transforms our understanding not only of Vietnam and the United States, but of the world in which colonized peoples attempted to become modern postcolonial states. Imagining Vietnam and America possesses, in full measure, the virtue of major historical contributions: to instruct and astonish.” — Marilyn B. Young, author of The Vietnam Wars, 1945-1990 reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Based upon an impressive array of Vietnamese, French, and American sources, Imagining Vietnam and America is at once a multiarchival and multicultural history of the early Vietnamese-American relationship. It reminds us that the expectations people hold shape what they make of the experiences they have. It shows how artificial distinctions between domestic and foreign policy can sometimes be. And it reveals how many fresh insights can emerge, even on a familiar topic, when a young, accomplished, and imaginative scholar accords culture an equal status with diplomacy in researching and writing international history.” — John Lewis Gaddis, Yale University reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Bradley. . . draw[s] on Vietnamese-language sources to an extraordinary degree­and in the process turns up information that may surprise many of his American readers. . . . Bradley’s effort to place American?Vietnamese relations in a broader context is welcome.” ­- New York Times Book Review reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “This book is a rare and wonderful thing: a study of United States-Vietnam relations that says new things in new ways. . . . As perceptive a study of the roots of the Vietnam conflict as we are likely to get.” — Journal of American History reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “This insightful book explains better than any work thus far why Americans believed they could replace the French without inheriting the stigma of colonialism and, despite France’s disastrous experience, succeed militarily against the Viet Cong . . . . Those who believe that culture matters in international relations will find much support for their arguments in this brief but significant work.” — Political Science Quarterly reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “This book will stand tall among the many studies examining the relations between the United States and Vietnam.” — American Historical Review reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “[This book] is a pioneering effort. It is the sort of culturally grounded, multi-lingual, multi-archival work, which historians are always babbling about but so few have so far been able to do. We can only hope that it is the beginning of a trend.” — Reviews in American History reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Thoughtful and thought-provoking, Bradley’s book succeeds admirably.”–Cold War History
  • “This is a highly sophisticated work and recommended reading for any serious student of culture, diplomacy, intellectual history, and the making of the postcolonial world.” — Journal of Military History reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “This splendid book calls for a reconsideration of both the international history of the twentieth century and the dynamics of the U.S.-Vietnam conflict by positing a nexus between culture and diplomacy.” — Choice reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Bradley scrupulously analyzes the scholarship of the postcolonial period of Vietnam’s turbulent history and the cataclysmic events that followed.” — Library Journal reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Bradley’s brave attempt to bring the imaginative domain of cultural understanding and its symbolic language to the field of U.S. diplomatic history . . . puts the book in an innovative and exceptional category.” — Journal of Asian Studies reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • “Makes significant contributions to the studies of twentieth-century American foreign relations and (post-) colonialism. . . . A highly insightful book, with impressive depth and reach, based on diligent research in a wide array of sources. Both students and specialists will find it eminently useful.” — Southeast Asian Studies reviewing “Imagining Vietnam and America: The Making of Postcolonial Vietnam, 1919-1950″
  • // <![CDATA[// Posted on Sunday, October 29, 2006 at 7:34 PM

    History Buzz: October 2006

    History Buzz

    By Bonnie K. Goodman

    Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

    October 30, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    ELECTION 2006:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 30/10/1270 – 8th and last crusade is launched
    • 30/10/1697 – Germany signs French/English/Spanish/Neth/Brandenburgs peace treaty ending 9 year War
    • 30/10/1864 – The city of Helena, Montana, is founded after miners discover gold
    • 30/10/1893 – Senate approves repealing Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890
    • 30/10/1896 – Martha Hughes Cannon of Utah becomes 1st female senator
    • 30/10/1905 – “October Manifesto” Russian Tsar Nicholas II grants civil liberties
    • 30/10/1914 – Allied offensive at Ypres (Belgium) begins
    • 30/10/1941 – FDR approves Lend-Lease aid to the USSR
    • 30/10/1954 – US Armed Forces end segregation of races
    • 31/10/0834 – 1st All Hallows Eve (Halloween) observed to honor the saints
    • 31/10/1517 – Luther posts 95 theses on Wittenberg church-Protestant Reformation
    • 31/10/1541 – Michelangelo Buonarroti’s paints “last judgement” in 16th Chapel
    • 31/10/1846 – Donner party, unable to cross the Donner Pass, construct a winter camp
    • 31/10/1918 – Spanish flu-virus kills 21,000 in US in 1 week
    • 31/10/1922 – Benito Mussolini (Il Duce) becomes premier of Italy
    • 31/10/1940 – Battle of Britain: Germany and Britain control of English Channel, ends
    • 31/10/1941 – Prior to US in WW II, Germany torpedoes US destroyer Reuben James
    • 31/10/1963 – Ed Sullivan witnesses Beatles and their fans at London Airport
    • 31/10/1968 – President Johnson orders a halt to all bombing of North Vietnam
    • 01/11/1512 – Michelangelo’s paintings on ceiling of Sistine Chapel, 1st exhibited
    • 01/11/1765 – Stamp Act goes into effect in British colonies
    • 01/11/1783 – Continental Army dissolved; George Washington’s “Farewell Address”
    • 01/11/1800 – 1st president to live in white house (John Adams)
    • 01/11/1861 – Gen George B McClellan made general in chief of Union armies
    • 01/11/1866 – 1st Civil Rights Bill passes
    • 01/11/1878 – Edward Scripps and John Sweeney found Penny Press (Cleveland Press)
    • 01/11/1917 – In WW I, the 1st US soldiers are killed in combat
    • 01/11/1954 – US Senate admonishes Joseph Mccarthy because of slander campaign
    • 01/11/1962 – Cuban missile crisis ends, JFK says USSR is dismantling missile bases
    • 01/11/1983 – Pres Reagan established Dr Martin Luther King Jr holiday
    • 02/11/1772 – Boston: anti-English Committee of Correspondence forms
    • 02/11/1811 – Battle of Tippecanoe: Gen Jackson vs indians
    • 02/11/1824 – Popular presidential vote 1st recorded; Jackson beats J Q Adams
    • 02/11/1852 – Franklin Pierce elected as president of US
    • 02/11/1917 – Balfour Declaration proclaims support for a Jewish state in Palestine
    • 02/11/1948 – Pres Truman re-elected in an upset over Republican Thomas Dewey
    • 02/11/1954 – JS Thurmond is 1st senator elected by write-in vote (SC)
    • 02/11/1962 – JFK announces Cuban missile bases were being dismantled
    • 03/11/1394 – Jews are expelled from France by Charles VI
    • 03/11/1529 – London] 1st sitting of the Reformation Parliament
    • 03/11/1796 – John Adams elected president
    • 03/11/1868 – Ulysses Grant (R) wins presidential election over Horatio Seymour (D)
    • 03/11/1868 – 1st black elected to Congress (John W Menard, Louisiana)
    • 03/11/1883 – US Supreme Court decides Native Americans can’t be Americans
    • 03/11/1883 – US Supreme Court decides Native Americans can’t be Americans
    • 03/11/1936 – President FDR (D) wins landslide victory over Alfred M Landon (R)
    • 03/11/1948 – Chicago Tribune reports: “Dewey beats Truman”
    • 03/11/1964 – LBJ (D) soundly defeats Barry Goldwater (R) for pres
    • 03/11/1970 – Pres Nixon promises gradual troop removal of Vietnam
    • 03/11/1992 – Bill Clinton (D) wins US presidential election over Pres Bush (R)
    • 04/11/1841 – 1st wagon train arrives in California
    • 04/11/1864 – Confederate assault on Johnsonville, Tennessee
    • 04/11/1939 – US allows “cash and carry” arms sales during WW II
    • 04/11/1952 – Eisenhower (R) elected 34th pres beating Adlai Stevenson (D)
    • 04/11/1956 – Israel captures Straits of Tiran and reach Suez Canal Egypt
    • 04/11/1980 – Ronald Reagan (R) defeats Pres Jimmy Carter (D)
    • 05/11/1639 – 1st post office in the colonies is set up in Massachusetts
    • 05/11/1854 – Crimean War: British and French defeat Russian force of 50,000
    • 05/11/1871 – Susan B Anthony arrested in Rochester NY and fined $100 for trying to vote for Ulysses S Grant
    • 05/11/1872 – Ulysses S Grant re-elected US president
    • 05/11/1895 – US state Utah accepts female suffrage
    • 05/11/1912 – Woodrow Wilson (D) defeats Theodore Roosevelt (Prog) and Pres Taft (R)
    • 05/11/1917 – Supreme Court decision (Buchanan v Warley) strikes down Lousiville Ky ordiance requiring blacks and whites to live in separate areas
    • 05/11/1940 – Pres FDR (D) wins unprecedented 3rd term beating Wendell Willkie (R)
    • 05/11/1946 – John F Kennedy (D-Mass) elected to House of Representatives
    • 05/11/1968 – Nixon (R) beats VP Humphrey (D) and George C Wallace for presidency
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Hampton Sides: Cowboys and Indians BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American WestNYT, 10-29-06
    • Hampton Sides: BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American West, First Chapter – NYT, 10-29-06
    • David M. Kennedy on Robert Kagan: Rogue State A pundit argues that the United States has always been an engine of expansion, not a quiet city on a hill. DANGEROUS NATION America’s Place in the World From Its Earliest Days to the Dawn of the Twentieth CenturyWa Po, 10-29-06
    • Jon Wiener on Wolfgang Schivelbusch: Following the leaders Three New Deals Reflections on Roosevelt’s America, Mussolini’s Italy, and Hitler’s Germany, 1933-1939 LAT, 10-29-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Robert Dallek in “WINNING ISN’T EVERYTHING If Dems win, they should take care” Bush Campaigning for Rep.: “It would hurt Republicans if he fights Democrats tooth and nail. You have a failed administration going from bad to worse. That’s the way the public sees it. They want greater balance.” – Chicago Tribune, 10-29-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Robert Kagan, “Dangerous Nation: America’s Place in the World from Its Earliest Days to the Dawn of the Twentieth Century,” Sunday, October 29 at 10:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: American Experience “The Great Fever”, Monday October 30, @ 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :In Search of the Real Frankenstein” Sunday, October 29, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Haunted History of Halloween” Sunday, October 29, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Vampires Secrets”, Sunday, October 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree”, Sunday, October 29, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Witch Hunt,” Monday, October 30, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Special :Voodoo Secrets.,” Monday, October 30, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Engineering an Empire :The Aztecs,” Monday, October 30, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Ramses’ Egyptian Empire,” Monday, October 30, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Vampires Secrets,” Tuesday, October 31, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree, ” Tuesday, October 31, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Haunted History of Halloween :The Haunted History of Halloween” Tuesday, October 31, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Exorcism: Driving Out the Devil” Tuesday, October 31, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man Moment Machine :Alexander the Great and the Devastating Catapult” Tuesday, October 31, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “D-Day: The Lost Evidence :D-Day: The Lost Evidence,” Thursday, November 2, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Shootout :Iwo Jima: Fight to the Death.” Friday, November 3, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History :Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History,” Saturday, November 4, @ 8pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Frank Rich: THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina, #12, (5 weeks on list)- 11-5-06
    • Hampton Sides: BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American West #23 – 11-5-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • James L. Swanson: Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution (HarperCollins Publishers), October 31, 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Mark Halperin: Way to Win: Clinton, Bush, Rove, and the Trade Secrets for Taking the White House in 2008 (Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group), October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • Thomas J. McGuire: The Philadelphia Campaign (Stackpole Books), October 2006
    • Judith Summers: Casanova’s Women: The Great Seducer and the Women He Loved (Bloomsbury USA), November 1, 2006
    • Evan Thomas: Sea of Thunder: Four Commanders and the Last Great Naval Campaign 1941-1945 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • Stanley Weintraub: 11 Days in December: Christmas at the Bulge, 1944 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • David M. Glantz: Red Storm over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (University Press of Kansas), November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    • A. J. Langguth: Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group) November 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Stella Tillyard: Royal Affair: George III and His Scandalous Siblings (Random House Publishing Group), December 2006
    • David Greenberg: Calvin Coolidge: The 30th President, 1923-1929 (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated), December 26, 2006
    • Geoffrey Perret: Commander in Chief: How Truman, Johnson, and Bush Turned a Presidential Power into a Threat to America’s Future (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), February 6, 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, October 29, 2006 at 7:39 PM

    October 23, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 23/10/1684 – Colony Massachusetts under authority of English crown mounted
    • 23/10/1760 – 1st Jewish prayer books printed in US
    • 23/10/1775 – Continental Congress approves resolution barring blacks from army
    • 23/10/1864 – Battle of Westport, Missouri
    • 23/10/1915 – 25,000 women march in NYC, demanding right to vote
    • 23/10/1917 – 1st Infantry division “Big Red One” shoots 1st US shot in WW I
    • 23/10/1947 – NAACP petition on racism, “An Appeal to the World” presented to UN
    • 23/10/1962 – Adlai Stevenson speaks at UN about Cuba crisis
    • 23/10/1973 – Nixon agrees to turn over White House tape recordings to Judge Sirica
    • 23/10/1987 – Robert Bork’s supreme court nomination rejected by US Senate
    • 24/10/1492 – 24 Jews are burned at stake in Mecklenburg Germany
    • 24/10/1861 – 1st US transcontinental telegram is sent (from SF to Wash DC)
    • 24/10/1861 – West Virginia seceded from Virginia
    • 24/10/1939 – Nazi require wearing of star of David
    • 24/10/1945 – UN charter comes into effect
    • 24/10/1948 – Bernard M Baruch introduces term “Cold War”
    • 24/10/1956 – Soviet troops invade Hungary, Imre Nagy becomes PM of Hungary
    • 24/10/1962 – In Cuban missile crisis, the US blockade of Cuba begins
    • 24/10/1973 – Yom Kippur War ends, Israel 65 miles from Cairo, 26 from Damascus
    • 25/10/1492 – Christopher Columbus and ship Santa Maria land in Dominican Republic
    • 25/10/1825 – Erie Canal opens, linking Great Lakes and Atlantic Ocean
    • 25/10/1881 – Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and Clanton engage in “Shootout at OK Corral”
    • 25/10/1923 – Senate committee publishes 1st report on Teapot Dome scandal
    • 25/10/1940 – US Army Gen Benjamin Davis becomes 1st black general
    • 25/10/1951 – Peace talks aimed at ending Korean War resumed in Panmunjom
    • 25/10/1963 – Anti-Kennedy “WANTED FOR TREASON” pamphlets scattered in Dallas
    • 25/10/1983 – US invades Grenada, a country 1/2,000 its population (US Wins)
    • 26/10/1682 – William Penn accepts area around Delaware River from Duke of York
    • 26/10/1749 – Georgia Colony reverses itself and rules slavery is legal
    • 26/10/1774 – 1st Continental Congress adjourns in Philadelphia
    • 26/10/1774 – Minute Men organized in colonies
    • 26/10/1787 – “Federalist Papers” published, calls for ratification of Constitution
    • 26/10/1795 – Pinckney’s Treaty between Spain and US is signed, establishing southern boundary of US and giving Americans right to send goods down Mississippi
    • 26/10/1810 – US annexes western Florida
    • 26/10/1863 – Worldwide Red Cross organized in Geneva
    • 26/10/1881 – Gunfight at OK Corral, in Tombstone, Az
    • 26/10/1900 – After 4 years of work, 1st section of NY subway opens
    • 26/10/1916 – Margaret Sanger arrested for obscenity (advocating birth control)
    • 26/10/1919 – President Wilson’s veto of Prohibition Enforcement Bill is overridden
    • 26/10/1950 – Mother Teresa found her Mission of Charity in Calcutta, India
    • 26/10/1955 – Ngo Dinh Diem proclaims Vietnam a republic with himself as pres
    • 26/10/1962 – Nikita Khrushchev sends note to JFK offering to withdraw his missiles from Cuba if US closed its bases in Turkey offer is rejected
    • 26/10/1962 – JFK warns Russia US will not allow Soviet missiles to remain in Cuba
    • 26/10/1972 – Henry Kissinger declares “Peace is at hand” in Vietnam
    • 26/10/1973 – President Nixon released 1st White House tapes on Watergate scandal
    • 26/10/1994 – Jordan and Israel sign peace accord
    • 27/10/1864 – Siege of Petersburg, VA
    • 27/10/1871 – Boss Tweed (William Macy Tweed), Democratic leader of Tammany Hall, arrested after NY Times exposed his corruption
    • 27/10/1913 – Pres Wilson says US will never attack another country
    • 27/10/1920 – League of Nations moves headquarters in Geneva
    • 27/10/1954 – Pres Eisenhower offers aid to S Vietnam pres Ngo Dinh Diem
    • 27/10/1962 – Black Saturday – Russian nuclear missile crisis in Cuba
    • 28/10/1636 – Harvard University (Cambridge Mass) founded
    • 28/10/1776 – Battle of White Plains; Washington retreats to NJ
    • 28/10/1793 – Eli Whitney applies for a patent on cotton gin
    • 28/10/1858 – Macy’s Dept store opens in NYC
    • 28/10/1863 – Battle at Wauhatchie Georgia: 865 killed or injured
    • 28/10/1864 – Battle at Fair Oaks, Virginia, ends after 1554 casualties
    • 28/10/1867 – Maimonides College in Penns is 1st Jewish college in the US
    • 28/10/1886 – Statue of Liberty dedicated by Pres Grover Cleveland, it is celebrated by 1st confetti (ticker tape) parade in NYC
    • 28/10/1919 – Volstead Act passed by Congress, start prohibition over Wilson’s veto
    • 28/10/1936 – FDR rededicates Statue of Liberty on its 50th anniversary
    • 28/10/1948 – Flag of Israel is adopted
    • 28/10/1949 – Eugenie Anderson is 1st woman US ambassador (to Denmark)
    • 28/10/1962 – Khrushchev orders withdrawal of missiles from Cuba, ending crisis
    • 29/10/1929 – “Black Tuesday,” Stock Market crashes triggers “Great Depression”
    • 29/10/1956 – Israeli paratroopers drop into Sinai to open Straits of Tiran
    • 29/10/1966 – National Organization of Women founded
    • 29/10/1969 – Supreme Court orders end to all school desegregation “at once”
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Andrew Sullivan: Where the Right Went Wrong THE CONSERVATIVE SOUL How We Lost It, How to Get It Back - NYT, 10-22-06
    • Andrew Sullivan: THE CONSERVATIVE SOUL How We Lost It, How to Get It Back , First Chapter – NYT, 10-22-06
    • Hampton Sides: A Real-Life Wild West Show, With Kit Carson as Star BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American West10-11-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Ron Chernow on “A Looking Glass Marie Antoinette, Citoyenne”: :”Never underestimate our historical illiteracy. Unburdened by an existing context through which to view her life, it becomes much easier to see her simply as a captive of the monarchy and a captive of her own celebrity.” – NYT, 10-22-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    • William Brackney: Baptists rejecting modernism, historian tells Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary during the annual Deere Lecture Series – BP News, TN, 10-20-06
    • Jeremy Johnston: Historian says Cody, Roosevelt created ‘friendship’ – Cody Enterprise, WY, 10-17-06
    • Oct. 26, 2006: Elaine Pagels: Religion scholar to speak on early Christian church as part of the Betsy K. McCreight Lecture series, at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, at the Cultural Center – Charleston Gazette, WV, 10-22-06
    • Feb. 23 to 25, 2007: John Gillingham: Camden Conference marks its 20th anniversary, Feb. 23 to 25, 2007, at the Camden Opera House – 8-15-06
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • C-Span2, BookTV: History on Book TV Rodric Braithwaite, Moscow 1941: A City and its People at War, Monday, October 23 at 3:15 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: American Experience “Test Tube Babies”, Monday October 23, @ 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “The Flag-Raisers of Iwo Jima,” Sunday, October 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Inside the Great Battles,” Sunday, October 22, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Unsung Heroes of WWII : Dateline Tarawa: Correspondents from Hell,” Sunday, October 22, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Engineering an Empire :Greece: Age of Alexander,” Monday, October 23, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :The Real Dracula” Monday, October 23, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Mini-Series :Lost Worlds” Tuesday, October 24, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man Moment Machine :Patton and the Desperate Tank Attack” Tuesday, October 24, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Mini-Series :Prophecies, Miracles & Mystics,” Wednesday, October 25, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History in Focus : Flags of Our Fathers,” Thursday, October 19, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Our Generation :Kent State & “Our Generation :The Sexual Revolution” Friday, October 27, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Haunted History of Halloween” Friday, October 27, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Pacific: The Lost Evidence :Pearl Harbor,” Friday, October 27, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past,” Marathon Saturday, October 28, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Quest for Dragons,” Saturday, October 28, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Skeletons on the Sahara,” Saturday, October 28, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :In Search of the Real Frankenstein” Sunday, October 29, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Haunted History of Halloween” Sunday, October 29, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Vampires Secrets”, Sunday, October 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree”, Sunday, October 29, @ 9pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Frank Rich: THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina, #6, (4 weeks on list)- 10-29-06
    • Hampton Sides: BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American West #12 (2 weeks on list) – 10-29-06
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #35 – 10-29-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Antonia Fraser: Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King (Doubleday Publishing), October 24, 2006
    • Thomas Cahill: Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science and Art from the Cults of Catholic Europe (Doubleday Publishing), October 24, 2006
    • Hampton Sides: Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West (Bantam Books), October 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • James L. Swanson: Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution (HarperCollins Publishers), October 31, 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Mark Halperin: Way to Win: Clinton, Bush, Rove, and the Trade Secrets for Taking the White House in 2008 (Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group), October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • Thomas J. McGuire: The Philadelphia Campaign (Stackpole Books), October 2006
    • Judith Summers: Casanova’s Women: The Great Seducer and the Women He Loved (Bloomsbury USA), November 1, 2006
    • Evan Thomas: Sea of Thunder: Four Commanders and the Last Great Naval Campaign 1941-1945 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • Stanley Weintraub: 11 Days in December: Christmas at the Bulge, 1944 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • David M. Glantz: Red Storm over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (University Press of Kansas), November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    • A. J. Langguth: Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group) November 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Stella Tillyard: Royal Affair: George III and His Scandalous Siblings (Random House Publishing Group), December 2006
    • David Greenberg: Calvin Coolidge: The 30th President, 1923-1929 (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated), December 26, 2006
    • Geoffrey Perret: Commander in Chief: How Truman, Johnson, and Bush Turned a Presidential Power into a Threat to America’s Future (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), February 6, 2007
    DEPARTED:
    • Michael A. Ogorzaly: A Life Story Historian waged crusade against bullfighting -
    • Winifred Bennett, Jefferson historian – Pioneer Press, MN, 10-17-06

    Posted on Sunday, October 22, 2006 at 8:22 PM

    October 16, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 16/10/1710 – British troops occupies Port Royal, Nova Scotia
    • 16/10/1781 – Washington takes Yorktown
    • 16/10/1813 – Battle at Leipzig (Napoleon vs Prussia, Austria and Russia)
    • 16/10/1859 – John Brown leads 20 in raid on federal arsenal, Harper’s Ferry, Va
    • 16/10/1861 – Confederacy starts selling postage stamps
    • 16/10/1863 – Grant is given command of Union forces in West
    • 16/10/1916 – Margaret Sanger opens 1st birth control clinic (46 Amboy St, Bkln)
    • 16/10/1940 – Warsaw Ghetto forms
    • 16/10/1943 – Jewish quarter of Rome surrounded by Nazis, they are sent to Auschwitz
    • 16/10/1962 – Cuban missile crisis began as JFK becomes aware of missiles in Cuba
    • 16/10/1966 – Joan Baez and 123 other ani-draft protestors arrested in Oakland
    • 16/10/1973 – Kissinger and Le Duc Tho jointly awarded Nobel peace prize
    • 17/10/1415 – Jewish autonomy in Palestine ends, as Raban Gamliel leaves office
    • 17/10/1469 – Crown prince Fernando of Aragon marries princess Isabella of Castile
    • 17/10/1691 – New royal charter for Massachusetts, now including Maine, Plymouth
    • 17/10/1787 – Boston blacks, petition legislature for equal school facilities
    • 17/10/1808 – Political rights of Jews suspended in Duchy of Warsaw
    • 17/10/1815 – Napoleon arrives in St Helena
    • 17/10/1871 – President Grant suspends writ of habeas corpus
    • 17/10/1894 – Ohio national guard kills 3 lynchers while rescuing a black man
    • 17/10/1945 – Juan Peron becomes dictator of Argentina
    • 17/10/1975 – UN passes resolution saying “Zionism is a form of racism”
    • 17/10/1978 – Pres Carter signs bill restoring Jefferson Davis citizenship
    • 17/10/1986 – Yitzak Rabin forms Israeli government
    • 18/10/1685 – Louis XIV revokes Edict of Nantes, outlaws Protestantism
    • 18/10/1748 – Treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle, ends War of Austrian Succession
    • 18/10/1867 – US takes formal possession of Alaska from Russia ($7.2 million)
    • 18/10/1898 – American flag raised in Puerto Rico
    • 18/10/1945 – Nazi war crime trial opens in Nuremberg
    • 18/10/1962 – JFK meets Russian minister of Foreign affairs Andrei Gromyko
    • 19/10/1765 – Stamp Act Congress met in NY, wrote decl of rights and liberties
    • 19/10/1781 – Cornwallis surrenders at Yorktown at 2 PM; Revolutionary War ends
    • 19/10/1849 – Elizabeth Blackwell becomes 1st woman in US to receive medical degree
    • 19/10/1864 – Approx 25 Confederates make surprise attack on St Albans, Vermont
    • 19/10/1864 – Battle of Cedar Creek, Virginia, Union beats back Conf attackers
    • 19/10/1888 – Moshav Gederah is attacked by Arabs
    • 19/10/1914 – US post office 1st used an automobile to collect and deliver mail
    • 19/10/1951 – Pres Harry S Truman formally ends state of war with Germany
    • 19/10/1960 – Martin Luther King Jr arrested in Atlanta sit-in
    • 19/10/1987 – “Black Monday”-Dow Jones down 508.32, 4« times previous record
    • 20/10/1803 – US Senate ratifies Louisiana Purchase
    • 20/10/1817 – 1st Mississippi “Showboat,” leaves Nashville on maiden voyage
    • 20/10/1818 – 49th parallel forms as border between US and Canada, US and Britain agree to joint control of Oregon country
    • 20/10/1820 – Spain sells part of Florida to US for $5 million
    • 20/10/1864 – Lincoln formaly establishes Thanksgiving as a natl holiday
    • 20/10/1883 – Max Bruch’s “Kol Nidre,” 1st performed
    • 20/10/1903 – US wins disputed boundary between District of Alaska and Canada
    • 20/10/1930 – British White Paper restricts Jews from buying Arab land
    • 20/10/1935 – Mao Tse Tung and his Communist forces ended their “Long March” at Yan’an, in Shaanxi China
    • 20/10/1945 – Supreme Court Justice Geoffrey Lawrence opens trial of Nurenberg
    • 20/10/1957 – Walter Cronkite begins hosting weekly documentary
    • 20/10/1967 – All white fed jury convicts 7 in murder of 3 civil rights workers
    • 20/10/1968 – Jacqueline Kennedy marries Aristotle Onassis
    • 20/10/1973 – US president Nixon fires Watergate accuser Archibald Cox
    • 20/10/1975 – Supreme Court rules teachers could spank their pupils after warning
    • 21/10/1492 – Columbus’ discovers America (Oct 12, 1492 Julian calender)
    • 21/10/1797 – US Navy frigate Constitution, Old Ironsides, launched in Boston
    • 21/10/1879 – Thomas Edison perfects carbonized cotton filament light bulb
    • 21/10/1917 – 1st Americans to see action on front lines of WW I
    • 21/10/1944 – During WW II, US troops capture Aachen, 1st large German city to fall
    • 21/10/1960 – JFK and Nixon clashed in 4th and final presidential debate (NYC)
    • 21/10/1971 – William H Rehnquist and Lewis F Powell nominated to US Supreme Court by Nixon, following resignations of Justices Hugo Black and John Harlan
    • 21/10/1987 – Senate debate begins rejecting Robert Bork’s Supreme Ct nomination
    • 21/10/1997 – Elton John’s tribute to Diana breaks world record, 318 million dist
    • 22/10/1746 – Princeton University (NJ) received its charter
    • 22/10/1836 – Sam Houston inaugurated as 1st elected pres of Republic of Texas
    • 22/10/1861 – 1st telegraph line linking West and East coasts completed
    • 22/10/1906 – 3000 blacks demonstrate and riot in Philadelphia
    • 22/10/1928 – Pres Hoover speaks of “American system of rugged individualism”
    • 22/10/1962 – JFK imposes naval blockade on Cuba, beginning missile crisis, JFK addresses TV about Russian missile bases in Cuba
    • 22/10/1963 – 225,000 students boycot Chicago schools in Freedom Day protest
    • 22/10/1978 – Pope John Paul II installed
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Henry A. Kissinger on Robert L. Beisner: Cold Warrior DEAN ACHESON A Life in the Cold WarNYT, 10-15-06
    • Antonia Fraser: The King’s Bed LOVE AND LOUIS XIV The Women in the Life of the Sun KingNYT, 10-15-06
    • Caroline Weber: The Queen’s Wardrobe QUEEN OF FASHION What Marie Antoinette Wore to the Revolution NYT, 10-15-06
    • David Nasaw: How an ambitious Scottish immigrant rose from hardscrabble roots to the pinnacle of industry ANDREW CARNEGIEWa Po, 10-15-06
    • David Cannadine: How a shy yet ruthless banker made a fortune and showered it on art MELLON An American LifeWa Po, 10-15-06
    • Hampton Sides: A Real-Life Wild West Show, With Kit Carson as Star BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American WestNYT, 10-11-06
    • Karen DeYoung: Tracing Colin Powell’s Journey, Both in and Out of Step With Those Around Him SOLDIER The Life of Colin Powell NYT, 10-10-06
    OP-ED:
    • Bettina Aptheker: My Father the Icon; My Father the Molester Daughter of Communist leader Herbert Aptheker recalls the pain and reconciliation that led to writing about her childhood abuse – LA Times, 10-15-06
    • Eric Alterman: Tony Judt Paying a price for going too far in criticizing Israel? – The Guardian, 10-12-06
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    • Gil Troy: Book follows Clinton from White House to Senate – CTV, 10-10-06
    • Robert Dallek, Clayborne Carson: ‘I Wish I’d Been There…’ – NPR, 10-9-06
    • Walid Phares: Tells Iraqi academics … You need to address your American colleagues on democracy and US efforts – Phareswire.com, 10-10-06
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Joseph Ellis on “Who cares about civil liberties?”: The historical pattern is extremely clear, it does not require some microscopic assessment. And if you look up any of those incidents in a standard college history textbook they will all be described as embarrassments, as regretted moments.” – Boston Globe, 10-15-06
    • Arthur Schlesinger Jr. on “Shooting Bobby”: “JFK was a realist disguised as a romantic; Robert Kennedy was a romantic disguised as a realist. JFK was an ironist, Robert Kennedy was an activist. Their legacies have converged – I think that Robert Kennedy was executing his brother’s legacy.” – The Observer, UK, 10-15-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • PBS: American Experience “Eyes on the Prize”, 16 hour series on the civil rights movement, re-airing Oct. 2, Oct. 9, and Oct. 16 @ 9pm ET – PBS
    • C-Span2, BookTV: After Words: After Words: John Danforth, author of “Faith & Politics: How the Moral Values Debate Divides America and How to Move Forward Together” interviewed by Charles Haynes, senior scholar at The First Amendment Center, Sunday, October 15 at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire,” Sunday, October 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Days That Shook The World : The Rosetta Stone/The Discovery of Tutankhamun’s Tomb,” Monday, October 16, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Engineering an Empire : Greece” Monday, October 16, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : Atlantis” Monday, October 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine : Apollo 13: Triumph on the Dark Side” Tuesday, October 17, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Declassified : The Tet Offensive,” Thursday, October 19, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History in Focus : Flags of Our Fathers,” Thursday, October 19, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Vietnam: On The Frontlines,” Marathon Friday, October 20, @ 2-6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Pacific: The Lost Evidence : Iwo Jima,” Friday, October 20, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Man, Moment, Machine,” Marathon Saturday, October 21, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Nuremberg: Goering’s Last Stand”, Saturday, October 21, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Standing Tall at Auschwitz”, Saturday, October 21, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Auschwitz: The Forgotten Evidence”, Saturday, October 21, @ 11pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Frank Rich: THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina, #7, (3 weeks on list)- 10-22-06
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #11 (10 weeks on list) – 10-22-06
    • Hampton Sides: BLOOD AND THUNDER An Epic of the American West #14 (1 week on list) – 10-22-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Antonia Fraser: Love and Louis XIV: The Women in the Life of the Sun King (Doubleday Publishing), October 24, 2006
    • Thomas Cahill: Mysteries of the Middle Ages: The Rise of Feminism, Science and Art from the Cults of Catholic Europe (Doubleday Publishing), October 24, 2006
    • Hampton Sides: Blood and Thunder: An Epic of the American West (Bantam Books), October 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • James L. Swanson: Lincoln’s Assassins: Their Trial and Execution (HarperCollins Publishers), October 31, 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Mark Halperin: Way to Win: Clinton, Bush, Rove, and the Trade Secrets for Taking the White House in 2008 (Random House Adult Trade Publishing Group), October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • Thomas J. McGuire: The Philadelphia Campaign (Stackpole Books), October 2006
    • Judith Summers: Casanova’s Women: The Great Seducer and the Women He Loved (Bloomsbury USA), November 1, 2006
    • Evan Thomas: Sea of Thunder: Four Commanders and the Last Great Naval Campaign 1941-1945 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • Stanley Weintraub: 11 Days in December: Christmas at the Bulge, 1944 (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group), November 2006
    • David M. Glantz: Red Storm over the Balkans: The Failed Soviet Invasion of Romania, Spring 1944 (University Press of Kansas), November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    • A. J. Langguth: Union 1812: The Americans Who Fought the Second War of Independence (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group) November 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Stella Tillyard: Royal Affair: George III and His Scandalous Siblings (Random House Publishing Group), December 2006
    • David J. Greenberg: Calvin Coolidge: The 30th President, 1923-1929 (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated), December 26, 2006
    • Geoffrey Perret: Commander in Chief: How Truman, Johnson, and Bush Turned a Presidential Power into a Threat to America’s Future (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), February 6, 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 at 8:49 PM | Top
    // ShareThis

    October 9, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 09/10/0768 – Charles the Great and Charlamagne II divide French republic
    • 09/10/1290 – Last of 16,000 English Jews expelled by King Edward I, leaves
    • 09/10/1635 – Religious dissident Roger Williams banished from Mass Bay Colony
    • 09/10/1701 – Collegiate School of Ct (Yale U), chartered in New Haven
    • 09/10/1864 – Battle of Tom’s Brook-Confederate cavalry that harassed Sheridan’s campaign is wipped by Custer and Merrit’s cavalry divisions
    • 09/10/1876 – 1st 2-way telephone conversation, 1st over outdoor wires
    • 09/10/1888 – Washington Monument opens for public admittanc
    • 09/10/1915 – Woodrow Wilson becomes 1st pres to attend a World Series game
    • 09/10/1944 – British PM Winston Churchill arrives in Russia for talks with Stalin
    • 10/10/1802 – 1st non indian settlement in Oklahoma
    • 10/10/1954 – Ho Chi Minh enters Hanoi after French troops pulled out
    • 10/10/1957 – Pres Eisenhower apologizes to finance minister of Ghana, Komla Agbeli Gbdemah, after he is refused service in a Dover, Del, restaurant
    • 10/10/1973 – VP Spiro T Agnew pleads no contest to tax evasion and resigns
    • 10/10/1975 – Israel formally signs Sinai accord with Egypt
    • 10/10/1982 – Pope John Paul II canonizes Rev M Kolbe, who volunteered to die in place of another inmate at Auschwitz concentration camp, a saint
    • 10/10/1995 – Israel begins W Bank pullback, frees hundreds of Palestinian prisoners
    • 12/10/1165 – Rambam reaches Jerusalem
    • 12/10/1285 – 180 Jews refuse baptism in Munich Germany, they are set on fire
    • 12/10/1492 – Columbus arrives in Bahamas [real Columbus Day]
    • 12/10/1692 – Massachusetts Bay discontinues witch trials
    • 12/10/1792 – Columbus Day is 1st celebrated
    • 12/10/1861 – Confederate ironclad Manassas attack Union’s Richmond on Mississippi
    • 12/10/1862 – JEB Stuart completes his “2nd ride around McClellan”
    • 12/10/1871 – Pres Grant condemns Ku Klux Klan
    • 12/10/1892 – Pledge of Allegiance 1st recited in public schools
    • 12/10/1899 – South Africa Boer Republic declares war on England
    • 12/10/1914 – 1st battle at Ypres, begins
    • 12/10/1915 – Theodore Roosevelt criticizes US citzens who identify themselves, with dual nationalities
    • 12/10/1915 – Ford Motor Company manufactures its 1 millionth Model T automobile
    • 12/10/1940 – Hitler begins operation-Seel”we (invasion of England)
    • 12/10/1957 – Canadian Prime Minister Lester Bowles Pearson wins Nobel Peace Prize
    • 12/10/1960 – JFK and Richard Nixon’s 3rd presidential debate
    • 12/10/1963 – Archaeological digs begin at Masada, Israel
    • 12/10/1973 – Nixon nominates Gerald Ford to replace Spiro Agnew as VP
    • 12/10/2002 – Terrorists explode two bombs in Bali’s nightclub district killing 202 and injuring 209 mostly foreign tourists
    • 13/10/1483 – Rabbi Issac Abarbanel starts his exegesis on Bible
    • 13/10/1775 – Continental Congress orders construction of a naval fleet
    • 13/10/1792 – “Old Farmer’s Almanac” is 1st published
    • 13/10/1792 – Washington lays cornerstone of Executive Mansion (White House)
    • 13/10/1812 – Battle of Queenstown Heights, Brit beats US attempt to invade Canada
    • 13/10/1843 – B’nai B’rith founded (NY)
    • 13/10/1845 – Texas ratifies a state constitution
    • 13/10/1864 – Maryland voters adopt new constitution, including abolition of slavery
    • 13/10/1864 – Battle of Harpers Ferry, WV (Mosby’s Raid)
    • 13/10/1864 – Battle at Darbytown Road Virginia (337 casualties)
    • 13/10/1881 – Revival of Hebrew language as Eliezer Ben-Yehuda and friends agree to use Hebrew exclusively in their conversations
    • 13/10/1943 – Italy declares war on former Axis partner Germany
    • 13/10/1988 – Shroud of Turin, revered by many Christians as Christ’s burial cloth, is shown by carbon-dating tests to be a fake from the Middle Ages
    • 14/10/1586 – Mary Queen of Scots goes on trial for conspiracy against Elizabeth
    • 14/10/1774 – 1st Continental Congress is 1st to declare colonial rights (Phila)
    • 14/10/1834 – George Eastman patented paper-strip photographic film
    • 14/10/1912 – Bull Moose Teddy Roosevelt shot while campaigning in Milwaukee
    • 14/10/1938 – Nazis plan Jewish ghettos for all major cities
    • 14/10/1941 – 1st mass deportation of Kowno, Lodz, Minsk and Riga
    • 14/10/1943 – 400 Jews escape in uprising at Sobibor extermination Camp in Poland
    • 14/10/1947 – Dutch Queen Wilhelmina gives golden award to general Eisenhower
    • 14/10/1953 – Ike promises to fire as Red any federal worker taking 5th amendment
    • 14/10/1964 – Martin Luther King Jr wins Nobel Peace Prize
    • 14/10/1966 – 175 US airplanes bomb North Vietnam
    • 14/10/1980 – Pres nominee Ronald Reagan promises to name a woman to Supreme Court
    • 14/10/1982 – Pres Reagan proclaims war against drugs
    • 14/10/1994 – Nobel Prize awarded to Yasser Arafat, Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres
    • 15/10/1655 – Jews of Lublin are massacred
    • 15/10/1789 – 1st presidental tour-George Washington in New England
    • 15/10/1815 – Napoleon Bonaparte exiled on Island of St Helena
    • 15/10/1860 – 11-year-old Grace Bedell writes to Lincoln, tells him to grow a beard
    • 15/10/1866 – Great fire in Quebec destroys 2,500 houses
    • 15/10/1883 – Supreme Court declares Civil Rights Act of 1875 unconstitutional
    • 15/10/1894 – Capt Alfred Dreyfus arrested accused of espionage
    • 15/10/1924 – Pres Coolidge declares Statue of Liberty a national monument
    • 15/10/1939 – Yeshiva of Mir closes after 124 years
    • 15/10/1949 – Billy Graham begins his ministry
    • 15/10/1969 – Vietnam Moratorium Day; millions nationwide protest the war
    • 15/10/1990 – Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev wins Nobel Peace Prize
    • 15/10/1993 – Nelson Mandela and S Afr Pres F W de Klerk awarded Nobel Peace Prize
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Fritz Stern: Can It Happen Here? FIVE GERMANYS I HAVE KNOWNNYT, 10-8-06
    • Fritz Stern: FIVE GERMANYS I HAVE KNOWN, First Chapter – NYT, 10-8-06
    • Gary Mormino: A worthy look at Florida’s raucous history – Ocala.com, FL, 10-8-06
    • John David Smith on Nicholas Lemann: A brief flash of freedom Reconstruction’s night riders used terror to seize liberty from newly freed blacks REDEMPTION: The Last Battle of the Civil WarCharlotte Observer, NC, 10-8-06
    • Larry Burgess: A Gift for the U of R – Press-Enterprise, CA, 10-5-06
    • Ilan Pappe: New book argues that Israel displaced a million Palestinians at founding – Znet, 10-1-06
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    • David Quammen: New Stegner professor to hit the ground running – Montana State University, 10-5-06
    • Caroline Elkins: Wiry and energetic, the Hugo K. Foster Associate Professor of African Studies at Harvard University coils in her chair and speaks with rapid force about her book that recently won the 2006 Pulitzer Prize – Infoshop News, 10-6-06
    • Dr. Kalikinkar Datta and Dr Radharani Choudhury: Rare academicians LOOKING BACK – The Statesman – Kolkata,India, 10-7-06
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Michael Fry on “All aboard the Scotland independence bandwagon”: “I have changed my mind. Devolution has proved to be completely hopeless, if anything making Scotland a worse country rather than a better country. We have to do something different.” – Scotsman, United Kingdom, 10-8-06
    • John Cooper on “Stephen Ambrose in thick of UW fight”: “The chair remains vacant, however, and Wisconsin is not currently trying to fill it. ‘We won’t search for a candidate this school year. But we’re committed to doing it eventually.’ The ostensible reason for the delay is that the university wants to raise even more money, so that it can attract a top-notch senior scholar. There may be another factor as well: Wisconsin doesn’t actually want a military historian on its faculty.” – The Capital Times – Madison,WI, 10-8-06
    • Gil Troy on “STORY of SURVIVAL Elizabeth Edwards talks frankly about her son’s death, breast cancer and the challenges of modern-day politics”: “She’s positioning herself as a role model on the American landscape. She’s positioning herself to be able to go out onto the campaign trail and testify. She can come across as a strong, powerful role model to women.” – Buffalo News, 10-8-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    • Oct. 9, 2006: Douglas W. Bostick will present “The Final Journey of Robert E. Lee” @ the Lee Chapel and Museum in the Lee Chapel auditorium, 3 p.m, Staunton, VA – Staunton News Leader, VA, 9-30-06
    • Oct. 11, 2006: Kathryn Holland Braund: Will speak at Florida Southern College’s Florida Lecture Series on Thursday. She will discuss “Living off the Land: William Bartram’s Description of Late Eighteenth Century Florida Foodways” at 7 p.m. in the William M. Hollis Seminar Room at FSC – The Ledger, FL, 10-8-06
    • Oct. 12, 2006: William J. Cooper, noted historian and author of “Jefferson Davis, American,” will deliver the 5th Annual Vaughn Lecture in the Humanities at Williams Baptist College, October 12, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. in the WBC Chapel – Williams Baptist College News, AR, 9-12-06
    • Oct. 13, 2006:Raymond Callahan: Will talk on the topic of “Why We Remember Winston Churchill” at 1 p.m. in 105 Arsht Hall on UD’s Wilmington campus, 2700 Pennsylvania Ave – UDaily – Newark, DE, 10-4-06
    • Feb. 23 to 25, 2007: John Gillingham: Camden Conference marks its 20th anniversary, Feb. 23 to 25, 2007, at the Camden Opera House – 8-15-06
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • PBS: American Experience “Eyes on the Prize”, 16 hour series on the civil rights movement, re-airing Oct. 2, Oct. 9, and Oct. 16 @ 9pm ET – PBS
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents After Words: Lawrence Otis Graham, author of “The Senator and the Socialite: The True Story of America’s First Black Dynasty” interviewed by Adam Clayton Powell III, director of the Integrated Media Systems Center at the University of Southern California, Sunday, October 8 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “Flight 93,” Sunday, October 8, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Antichrist : Part 1,” Sunday, October 8, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Antichrist : Zero Hour,” Sunday, October 8, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth,” Marathon Monday, October 9, @ 3-6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire, Part 1″ Monday, October 9, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire, Part 2″ Monday, October 9, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Mexican-American War,” Friday, October 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Into the Fire,” Friday, October 13, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Sex in The Bible,” Friday, October 13, @ 9:30pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Where Did It Come From?,” Marathon Saturday, October 14, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Mexican Revolution”, Saturday, October 14, @ 5pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Frank Rich: THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina, #2, (2 weeks on list)- 10-15-06
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #16 – 10-15-06
    • Daniel Mendelsohn: THE LOST A Search for Six of Six Million, #18 – 10-15-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, October 8, 2006 at 8:46 PM | Top
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    October 2, 2006

    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 01/10/1791 – 1st session of new French legislative assembly
    • 01/10/1768 – English troops under general Gauge lands in Boston
    • 01/10/1867 – Karl Marx’ “Das Kapital,” published
    • 01/10/1948 – Calif Supreme Court voids state statue banning interracial marriages
    • 01/10/1958 – Inauguration of NASA
    • 02/10/1187 – Sultan Saladin captures Jerusalem from Crusaders
    • 02/10/1535 – Jacques Cartier discovers Mount Royal (Montreal)
    • 02/10/1833 – NY Anti-Slavery Society organized
    • 02/10/1861 – Former VP John C Breckinridge flees Kentucky
    • 02/10/1870 – Italy annexes Rome and Papal States; Rome made Italian capital
    • 02/10/1967 – Thurgood Marshall sworn in as 1st black Supreme Court Justice
    • 03/10/1789 – Washington proclaims 1st national Thanksgiving Day on Nov 26
    • 03/10/1863 – Lincoln designates last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day
    • 03/10/1922 – Rebecca Felton of Georgia becomes 1st woman in Senate
    • 03/10/1941 – Nazi’s blow up 6 synagoges in Paris
    • 03/10/1942 – FDR forms Office of Economic Stabilization
    • 03/10/1974 – Watergate trial begins
    • 03/10/1990 – East Germany and West Germany merge to become Germany
    • 04/10/1636 – In Massachusetts the Plymouth Colony’s 1st law drafted
    • 04/10/1648 – Peter Stuyvesant establishes Americas 1st volunteer firemen
    • 04/10/1777 – Gen George Washington’s troops attacked British at Germantown Pa
    • 04/10/1854 – Abraham Lincoln made his 1st political speech at Illinois State Fair
    • 04/10/1864 – National black convention meets (Syracuse NY)
    • 04/10/1864 – New Orleans Tribune, 1st black daily newspaper, forms
    • 04/10/1880 – University of California founded in Los Angeles
    • 05/10/1582 – Gregorian calendar introduced in Italy, other Catholic countries
    • 05/10/1796 – Spain declares war on England
    • 05/10/1813 – Battle of Thames in Canada; Americans defeat British
    • 05/10/1862 – Federal fleet occupies Galveston, Texas
    • 05/10/1947 – 1st Presidential address televised from White House-HS Truman
    • 05/10/1953 – Earl Warren sworn in as 14th chief justice of US
    • 05/10/1970 – Quebec separatists kidnap British trade commissioner James Cross
    • 06/10/1683 – 13 Mennonite families from Germany found Germantown Pa (Phila)
    • 06/10/1781 – Americans and French begin siege of Cornwallis at Yorktown; last battle of Revolutionary War
    • 06/10/1944 – Canadians free Austria
    • 06/10/1945 – Gen Eisenhower welcomed in Hague (on Hitler’s train)
    • 06/10/1949 – Pres Truman signs Mutual Defense Assistance Act (for NATO)
    • 06/10/1961 – JFK advises Americans to build fallout shelters
    • 06/10/1973 – Yom Kippur War begins as Syria and Egypt attack Israel
    • 06/10/1976 – Pres Ford says there is “no Soviet domination in Eastern Europe”
    • 06/10/1996 – Bob Dole and Pres Bill Clinton meet in their 1st debate
    • 07/10/1579 – English royal marriage of queen Elizabeth I to duke of Anjou
    • 07/10/1690 – English attack Quebec under Louis de Buade
    • 07/10/1763 – George III of Great Britain issues Proclamation of 1763, closing lands in North America north and west of Alleghenies to white settlement
    • 07/10/1765 – Stamp Act Congress convenes in NY
    • 07/10/1777 – Americans beat Brits in 2nd Battle of Saratoga and Battle of Bemis Hts
    • 07/10/1780 – British defeated by American militia near Kings Mountain, SC
    • 07/10/1868 – Cornell University (Ithaca NY) open
    • 07/10/1886 – Spain abolishes slavery in Cuba
    • 07/10/1944 – Uprising at Birkenau concentration camp, Uprising at Auschwitz, Jews burn down crematoriums
    • 07/10/1960 – 2nd JFK and Richard Nixon debate
    • 07/10/1963 – JFK signs ratification for nuclear test ban treaty
    • 07/10/1991 – Law Professor Anita Hill accuses Supreme nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriat comments to her
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • David Kamp: The Hunger Artists THE UNITED STATES OF ARUGULA How We Became a Gourmet NationNYT, 10-1-06
    • David Kamp: THE UNITED STATES OF ARUGULA How We Became a Gourmet Nation, First Chapter – NYT, 10-1-06
    • THOMAS F. SCHALLER: ‘Whistling Past Dixie’ NYT, 10-1-06
    • Myra MacPherson: The Watchdog “ALL GOVERNMENTS LIE” The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. StoneNYT, 10-1-06
    • Myra MacPherson: “ALL GOVERNMENTS LIE” The Life and Times of Rebel Journalist I. F. Stone, First Chapter – NYT, 10-1-06
    • Paul George: A History Lesson: School’s past captured by historian AUTHOR AND LOCAL HISTORIAN PAUL GEORGE HAS CHRONICLED THE HISTORY OF THE CUSHMAN SCHOOL IN NORTHEAST MIAMI IN A NEWLY PUBLISHED BOOK THAT LOOKS AT THE SCHOOL’S FIRST 80 YEARS – Miami Herald, FL, 10-1-06
    OP-ED:
    • Rashid Khalidi: Unwritten history The challenges of writing Palestinian history reflect the larger challenges facing the Palestinians’ quest for statehood – Boston Globe, 10-01-06
    • Mark A. Noll: Where We Are and How We Got Here 50 years ago, evangelicals were a sideshow of American culture. Since then, it’s been a long, strange trip. Here’s a look at the influences that shaped the movement – Christianity Today, 9-29-06
    • David Nirenberg: What Benedict really said. Paleologus and Us – New Republic, 9-28-06
    PROFILED:
    • Virginia Scharff: UNM Historian Contributes to ‘History Now’ Issue on the American West – UNM Today, NM, 9-27-06
    • Clement Alexander Price: Check Your Misconceptions At The Door: New Film Offers An Eye-Opening Look At New Jersey’s Largest City – R-N Online Campus News, NJ, 9-18-06
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    • Jon D. Levenson: The Case for What ‘Comes as a Shock to Most Jews and Christians Alike’ – NYT, 9-30-06
    • Mark McGowan: What lies beneath the red carpet On the site of the film fest’s new home, archaeologists are digging up Toronto’s fevered history – Globe and Mail, Canada, 9-30-06
    • Jan Gross: ‘Fear’ in postwar Poland – Jerusalem Post, 9-28-06
    • John Kendrick, Marvin Lyons: A 90-year-old imperial mystery continues Is a man buried in a Burnaby graveyard the son of the last czar of Russia? – Globe and Mail, Canada, 9-29-06
    • The Conspiratorial Mind – NY Sun, 9-29-06
    QUOTED:
    • David Garrow on “Scalia Begins Third Decade on Court”: “Scalia may find himself with a new conservative chief justice who agrees with him in the abstract but as a matter of judicial discretion and judicial philosophy believes the court should always pull its punches rather than go to the mat.” – AP, 9-29-06
    • Brad Gregory on “Panel: Pope quote misunderstood ND scholars say reaction to statement shows need for dialogue”: “It seems to me, as a historian of Christianity, (the) decentralized character of the Muslim world is quite unlike the Catholic church. … The Islamic world is more like Protestant Christianity with a huge spectrum of traditions,” which makes communication “much more daunting. ” – South Bend Tribune, IN, 9-30-06
    SPOTTED AND EVENTS CALENDAR:
    • Howard Zinn: “Americans should scrutinize government actions” at U Conn lecture – UConn Advance, CT, 9-29-06
    • Bruce Tapp, Stephen Taafee: Massachusetts School of Law hosts Civil War symposium – Andover Townsman, MA, 9-28-06
    • Randy Buchman: Banquet to honor Defiance historian – Fort Wayne Journal Gazette, IN, 9-29-06
    • Oct. 3, 2006: Thomas Sugrue: Will present “Jim Crow’s Last Stand: Detroit and America’s Unfinished Struggle for Racial Equality,” on Tuesday at the University of Michigan-Dearborn, the free lecture is open to the public and is to be from 6 to 9 p.m. in Room 1500 of the Social Sciences Building on campus – Detroit Free Press, 10-1-06
    • Oct. 6, 2006: Colin A. Palmer: Will give the eighth annual Eric E. Williams Memorial Lecture at Florida International University’s University Park campus in West Miami-Dade as part of the African-New World Studies Program’s Distinguished Africana Scholars Lecture Series on Oct. 6 at 6:30 p.m. on “Eric Williams and the Continuing Challenges of a Diverse Caribbean” – Miami Herald, 9-24-06
    • Oct. 9, 2006: Douglas W. Bostick will present “The Final Journey of Robert E. Lee” @ the Lee Chapel and Museum in the Lee Chapel auditorium, 3 p.m, Staunton, VA – Staunton News Leader, VA, 9-30-06
    • Oct. 12, 2006: William J. Cooper, noted historian and author of “Jefferson Davis, American,” will deliver the 5th Annual Vaughn Lecture in the Humanities at Williams Baptist College, October 12, 2006, at 7:00 p.m. in the WBC Chapel – Williams Baptist College News, AR, 9-12-06
    • Feb. 23 to 25, 2007: John Gillingham: Camden Conference marks its 20th anniversary, Feb. 23 to 25, 2007, at the Camden Opera House – 8-15-06
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTED:
    ON TV:
    • History Channel coming in November 2006: Desperate Crossing: the Untold Story of the Mayflower -
    • PBS: American Experience “Eyes on the Prize”, 16 hour series on the civil rights movement, re-airing Oct. 2, Oct. 9, and Oct. 16 @ 9pm ET – PBS
    • C-Span2, BookTV: Book TV presents In Depth: John Hope Franklin, Sunday, October 1 at 12:00 pm and at 12:00 am – C-Span2, BookTV
    • History Channel: “The Last Days of World War II,” Sunday, October 1, @ 1:30pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Nature’s Fury: Storm of the Century,” Sunday, October 1, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : The Pagans,” Sunday, October 1, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Iran: The Next Iraq?,” Sunday, October 1, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “X Day–The Invasion of Japan,” Monday, October 2, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “USS Bowfin: Pearl Harbor Avenger,” Monday, October 2, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries : The True Story of the Philadelphia Experiment,” Monday, October 2, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “UFO Files : Texas’ Roswell,” Monday, October 2, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : Knights Templar,” Monday, October 2, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth : Giants of Patagonia,” Monday, October 2, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “D-Day to Berlin : The Battle for France,” Wednesday, October 3, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “D-Day to Berlin : The Struggle toward Germany,” Wednesday, October 3, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “D-Day to Berlin : Last Days of the Reich,” Wednesday, October 3, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past : Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle” Thursday, October 5, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past : The Templar Code: The Quest for Templar Treasure,” Thursday, October 5, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: ” Special : High Hitler,” Friday, October 6, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Night of the Long Knives,” Friday, October 6, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Hitler’s Family,” Friday, October 6, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Viking Raiders,” Saturday, October 7, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Nature’s Fury: Storm of the Century”, Saturday, October 7,, @ 5pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Frank Rich: THE GREATEST STORY EVER SOLD The Decline and Fall of Truth From 9/11 to Katrina, #2, (1 week on list)- 10-8-06
    • Thomas E. Ricks: FIASCO The American Military Adventure in Iraq, #13, (9 weeks on list) – 10-8-06
    • Daniel Mendelsohn: THE LOST A Search for Six of Six Million, #16, (1 week on list)- 10-8-06
    • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower, #28 – 10-8-06
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • David Bodanis: Passionate Minds: The Great Love Affair of the Enlightenment, Featuring the Scientist Emilie du Chatelet, the Poet Voltaire, Swordfights, Bookburnings, Assorted Kings, Seditiou, October 3, 2006
    • Gil Troy: Hillary Rodham Clinton: Polarizing First Lady, October 4, 2006
    • Anthony Everitt: Augustus: The Life of Rome’s First Emperor, October 10, 2006
    • Paul Kengor: The Crusader: Ronald Reagan and the Fall of Communism, October 17, 2006
    • Aleksandr Fursenko: Khrushchev’s Cold War: The Inside Story of an American Adversary, October 2006
    • Thomas Keneally: A Commonwealth of Thieves: The Improbable Birth of Australia, October 2006
    • Mark Puls: Samuel Adams: Father of the American Revolution, October 2006
    • Norman J. Goda: Tales from Spandau: Nazi Criminals and the Cold War, October 2006
    • Ronald J. Olive: Capturing Jonathan Pollard : How One of the Most Notorious Spies in American History Was Brought to Justice, October 2006
    • Graeme Fife: The Terror: The Shadow of the Guillotine: France 1792–1794, November 2006
    • Robert M. Collins: Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years, November 2006
    • Adam LeBor: “Complicity With Evil”: The United Nations in the Age of Modern Genocide, November 2006
    DEPARTED:
    • Frederic E. Wakeman Jr: 68; Historian Was Expert on China – LAT, 9-28-06

    Posted on Sunday, October 1, 2006 at 1:29 PM

    Top Young Historians: 33 – Caroline Elkins

    Top Young Historians

    Caroline Elkins, 37

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Hugo K. Foster Associate Professor of African Studies, Department of History, Harvard University, July 2005 to present.
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Harvard University, July 2001 to July 2005.
    Area of Research: Modern Africa, including human rights and British colonial violence.
    Education: Ph. D. History, Harvard University, June 2001.
    Major Publications: Elkins is the author of the 2006 Pulitzer Prize winning Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya (New York: Henry Holt, 2005). Caroline Elkins JPG This book was simultaneously published in Britain and the Commonwealth by Jonathan Cape under the title Britain’s Gulag: The Brutal End of Empire in Kenya; Elkins is the co-editor of Settler Colonialism in the Twentieth Century: Projects, Practices, Legacies, with Susan Pedersen (New York: Routledge, 2005). Elikins is currently working on a book project entitled Twilight: The Decline and Fall of the British Empire that will re-examine the end British colonial rule during the years after World War Two. The research combines archival and oral data in order to integrate perspectives from the metropole and the colonies, and focuses primarily on the nature of British colonialism and the violence and human rights abuses that accompanied retreat.
    Awards: Elkins is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
    Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction, 2006;
    Walter Channing Cabot Fellow, Harvard University, 2005-06;
    Gelber Prizer for Non-Fiction, Finalist, 2006;
    The Economist, Best History Book Selection for Imperial Reckoning, 2005;
    The New York Times, Editors’ Choice, Imperial Reckoning, 2005;
    The Daily Telegraph, Editor’s Choice, Paperback, Britain’s Gulag, 2005;
    Phi Beta Kappa, Honorary Member, Harvard University Chapter, June 2006;
    Carr Center for Human Rights Policy, Fellowship, 2006-07;
    Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Faculty Research Leave Fellowship, spring 2005;
    Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Bunting Fellow, 2003-04;
    J. William Fulbright Fellowship for Kenya (IIE), 1998-1999;
    Social Science Research Council, International Dissertation Research Fellowship, 1998-1999;
    Frank Knox Memorial Fellowship, 1997-1998;
    Krupp Foundation Fellowship in European Studies, 1997-1998;
    Harvard University Derek Bok Award for Teaching Excellence, 1996-1997 and 2000-01;
    Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, Intensive Swahili III, 1995;
    Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship in the Humanities, Woodrow Wilson Foundation, 1994-1995.
    Additional Info:
    Elkins has appeared on a number of television news media shows including; ABC, Radio Australia; Charlie Rose Show, PBS; Tavis Smiley Show, PBS; Here and Now, NPR, “Imperial Reckoning,” Talk of the Nation, NPR, “Pulitzer Winners Describe that Winning Feeling;” Morning Edition, NPR, “Kenya’s Mau Maus Seek Restitution;” BBC World, “Imperial Reckoning;” Here and Now, NPR, “Imperial Reckoning;” BBC, Radio Four, “The Mau Mau Rebellion;” BBC, Five Live; All Things Considered, NPR, “Author Details Harsh British Rule in Kenya.”
    Elkins’s research on detention camps and villagization during the Mau Mau Emergency was the subject of a one-hour film on the BBC, “Kenya: White Terror.” Elkins was a feature of the documentary, as well as a consultant to the project. The documentary was filmed in Kenya and Britain, September/October 2002. It was aired in Britain on 17 November 2002 to an audience of some 1.5 million viewers. It has subsequently been aired on BBC Worldwide several times. It won the International Committee on the Red Cross Award at the Monte Carlos Film Festival in June 2003.
    Founder and Co-director, Kenya Oral History Centre, Nairobi, Kenya. Directing a project aimed at the collection of several thousand life histories of Africans from various ethnic groups who lived through the colonial experience in Kenya. The Center is modeled on similar projects in South Africa and post-WWII Germany, though it is the first of its kind in Kenya. Nearly $100,000 of funding has been drawn primarily from the Kenya Government, Harvard University, Ford Foundation, and the Kenya Human Rights Commission.
    Editorial Board Member, Princeton University Press Series, “Crimes Against Humanity,” August 2005 to present.

    Personal Anecdote

    It was September 2003 and I still remember the feeling of opening my office door for the first time at the Radcliffe Institute where I was beginning my fellowship year. I practically dropped to my knees and wept. The room was spacious with sun streaming in and had an enormous desk with a computer that was the latest in technology. But, those weren’t the reason for my out-of-character moment of emotion. The office was, to take off from someone else’s words, a room of my own. It was away from the teaching and administrative distractions of my department office, and away from the lovable chaos generated by my two young sons, then one and three, at home. When I shut my Radcliffe door, I was alone, joyfully alone with my ideas and my writing.

    And, it was at Radcliffe that I immersed myself in routine. When I write I love routine. I would come at almost precisely the same time day in and day out and leave at the same time. After I put my children to bed, I did the same thing in the evening; on the weekends the same thing. I had a story to tell, and like some athletes, when I’m in my routine, or game, I feel as if I’m in the “zone.” It’s as if I can hear or think of nothing else; instead, I can almost see the words and story in my mind before they unfold on the computer screen. Routine also has other implications. I don’t answer the phone (except for the emergency cell phone number which is given to my sons’ schools), I occasionally answer email, I almost never accept lunch or coffee invitations, I eat the same thing for lunch at my desk (with Imperial Reckoning it was butternut squash soup from Hi-Rise Bakery with a hunk of bread and loads of butter), I wear virtually the same clothes every day, I get my mid-morning and late afternoon coffee at the same time – the list could go on and on. Some might call this compulsive. I like to think of myself as focused!

    Of course, I had every reason to keep my eye on the ball during my time at Radcliffe. I was up for my first review at the end of the academic year, and I had to finish my manuscript. I had also agreed with my publisher to deliver the draft by May of 2004. In other words, the whole book had to be written from start to finish during my year of leave. But, I suspect, with or without these deadlines I would have written the book at the same pace. For me, once I sit down to write I can’t stop. I become so utterly focused that it is simply better for everyone around me to let me finish rather than to drag it out. In the case of writing Imperial Reckoning, it meant making up a lot of time with my family once the book was finished. Fortunately, the writing projects I’ve taken on since then have been smaller – articles, book reviews, and short essays – so I’m cloistered less often in my own world. That said, whether the project is big or small, I’m ruthless with my routine, and, gratefully, I’ve adjusted to thinking and writing without a room of my own.

    Quotes

    By Caroline Elkins

  • “Imperial Reckoning is a piece of historical revisionism that re-examines the nature of the Mau Mau war in Kenya and, with it, the character of Britain’s late colonial empire. For decades variations of the official version of the detention camps and Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain's Gulag in Kenya  JPG Emergency villages pervaded the literature on Mau Mau, albeit with some skepticism. But with Imperial Reckoning, the proverbial dots are connected and what emerges is a story of the mass detention of some 1.5 million Africans under conditions that were nothing short of deplorable. The British forces resorted to tactics such as mass population movements, forced labor, starvation, and various forms of torture to break the Mau Mau adherents of their anti-colonial doctrine. But Imperial Reckoning is much more than just an exposure of British colonial war crimes. It examines the nature of institutions and laws, demonstrating how colonial crimes were not the result of a series of one-offs, but rather embedded in the structures of the colony and its Emergency legislation. To understand the colonial violence occurred during the Mau Mau Emergency we must, as I argue in the book, recognize the weakness of the Kenyan colonial state and its place within a declining empire. Caroline Elkins in “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • About Caroline Elkins

  • “I congratulate Professor Elkins on this extraordinary honor. History can be grueling to reconstruct, even without the hindrance of institutional secrecy; and even the most well-documented findings can fail to regain life when translated to the page. Professor Elkins has researched the Kikiyu detentions with rigor, perseverance, and courage; and she has told this story in ways that few will ever forget.” — William C. Kirby, Edith and Benjamin Geisinger Professor of History and Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences in honor of Caroline Elkinsbeing awarded the Non-Fiction Pulitzer Prize, 2006 for “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “I have read practically all the books written about the Mau Mau. In my view, Ms Elkins book is so far the best researched and the most authoritative account on how the British prosecuted the Mau Mau followers and of the atrocities committed by the British in and outside the concentration camps between 1952-1957…. But for many of us who lived through the Emergency, this is a book which was long overdue. As I read it, I felt as if the whole thing was happening only yesterday. I would hate my children to be ignorant of what it was like to live through the Emergency. Now that the surviving official records have been de-classified let us hope that there will be many other writers laying bare the true picture of this important turning point in the history of Kenya…. I certainly hope that Ms Elkin’s book will be made compulsory reading at the last two years of high school or in the first year at university. – Mr. Gachukia, patron of Kenya Private Schools Association reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya” in “Africa News”
  • “Caroline Elkins has written an important book that can change our understanding not just of Africa but of ourselves. Through exhaustive research in neglected colonial archives and intrepid reporting among long-forgotten Kikuyu elders in Kenya’s Rift Valley, Elkins has documented not just the true scale of a huge and harrowing crime — Britain’s ruthless suppression of the Mau Mau rebellion — but also the equally shocking concealment of that crime and the inversion of historical memory.” — Bill Berkeley, author of The Graves Are Not Yet Full: Race, Tribe and Power in the Heart of Africa reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “On the basis of the most painstaking research, Caroline Elkins has starkly illuminated one of the darkest secrets of late British imperialism. She has shown how, even when they profess the most altruistic of intentions, empires can still be brutal in their response to dissent by subject peoples. We all need reminding of that today.” — Niall Ferguson, Professor of History, Harvard University, and Senior Research Fellow, Jesus College, Oxford reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “In the 1950s, Mau Mau provided the Western world with photographic evidence of what Africa and Africans “were like”: savage, bloodthirsty, and in need of British civilization. Imperial Reckoning shows us how these images neglected to show the brutality and savagery being committed against the Kenyan Kikuyu people detained by the British. Caroline Elkins fills out the images, tells the rest of the story, and corrects the record in this masterful book.” — Henry Louis Gates, Jr., W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Humanities, Harvard University reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “Rarely does a book come along that transforms the world’s understanding of a country and its past by bringing to light buried, horrifying truths and redrawing central contours of its image. With voluminous evidence, Caroline Elkins exposes the long suppressed crimes and brutalities that democratic Britain and British settlers willingly perpetrated upon hundreds of thousands of Africans — truths that will permit no one of good faith to continue to accept the mythologized account of Britain’s colonial past as merely a “civilizing mission.” If you want to read one book this year about the catastrophic consequences of racism, about the cruelty of those who dehumanize others, or about the crimes that ideologically besotted people – including from western democratic countries — can self-righteously commit, Imperial Reckoning is that book.” — Daniel Jonah Goldhagen reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “Given the number and nature of the atrocities that filled the 20th century, the degree of brutality and violence perpetrated by British settlers, police, army and their African loyalist supporters against the Kikuyu during the Mau Mau period should not be surprising. Nor, perhaps, the fact that the British government turned a blind eye, and later covered them up. What is surprising, however, is that it has taken so long to document the whole ghastly story-this is what makes Caroline Elkins’s disturbing and horrifying account so important and memorable.” — Caroline Moorehead reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “Imperial Reckoning is an incredible piece of historical sleuthing. The author has reconstructed the story that British officialdom almost succeeding in suppressing. Her sources are the Mau Mau fighters and sympathizers whom the British detained in concentration camps during the 1950s. Her interviews with the survivors of this British ‘gulag’ are a labor of love and courage-impressive in their frankness and deep emotional content as well as properly balanced between men and women, colonial officials and Mau Mau detainees. Caroline Elkins tells a story that would never have made it into the historical record had she not persevered and collected information from the last generation of Mau Mau detainees alive to bear witness to what happened.” — Robert Tignor, Rosengarten Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, Princeton University reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • “When the British left Kenya in 1963, they built bonfires and burned the meticulous records they kept. Most of these dealt with a period known as “the Emergency,” when the colonial government attempted to stamp out the Mau Mau movement—an inchoate drive for “land and freedom,” notorious for its machete killings—that arose among the Kikuyu, a hill-dwelling farming tribe and Kenya’s largest ethnic group. Elkins, working in archives and traveling throughout Kenya, has undertaken an extraordinary act of historical recovery, to find out what the burned documents would have told us: the British, in their “civilizing mission” to pacify the colony, created a cruel system of detention centers, where interrogations often ended in death. With the moral fervor (and, occasionally, the overreachings) of a prosecutor, Elkins provides potent evidence of how a society warped by racism can descend into an almost casual inhumanity.” — The New Yorker reviewing “Imperial Reckoning: The Untold Story of Britain’s Gulag in Kenya”
  • Posted on Sunday, October 22, 2006 at 8:24 PM

    Top Young Historians: 32 – James McDougall

    Top Young Historians

    James McDougall, 32

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Assistant Professor of History, Princeton University (since Sept. 2004)
    Area of Research: Modern and contemporary history of the Middle East and North Africa, with broader interests in the French colonial empire, the history of Islam since 1700, and colonial and nationalist historiography.
    Education: D.Phil., Oriental Studies, University of Oxford, 2002.
    Major Publications: McDougall is the author of History and the Culture of Nationalism in Algeria, (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge Middle East Studies 24, July 2006).
    James  McDougall JPGHe is also the editor of Nation, Society and Culture in North Africa (London and Portland, Frank Cass, History and Society in the Islamic World 6, May 2003, which was first published as Journal of North African Studies 8,1 (Spring 2003)).
    McDougall is currently working on a number of book projects including: Fragments of empire. Everyday forms of colonialism in France and Africa;
    (Book-length research project in progress) with Julia A. Clancy-Smith, Susan Gilson Miller, Kenneth J. Perkins, Ali Abdullatif Ahmida, and Mohamed el-Mansour A History of the Maghrib, (Cambridge University Press (under contract));
    A History of Algeria, (Cambridge University Press (under contract)).
    Awards: McDougall is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
    Malcolm H. Kerr Dissertation Award (Middle East Studies Association of North America), 2003, Honourable mention.
    Leigh Douglas Memorial Prize (British Society for Middle Eastern Studies), 2003, Honourable mention.
    Leverhulme Trust Special Research Fellowship, 2002-2004.
    EU SOCRATES/ERASMUS research grant, Maison méditerranéenne des Sciences de l’Homme, (CNRS/Université de Provence), Aix-en-Provence, 2000.
    British Academy / UK Arts and Humanities Research Board postgraduate studentships, 1998-2002.
    Honeyman Prize (Best Finalist in Arabic, University of St Andrews), 1998.
    Dudley-Morgan Prize (Best Finalist in French, University of St Andrews), 1998.
    Additional Info:
    McDougall is a member of the editorial committee of Middle East Report and of the editorial board of the MIT Electronic Journal of Middle East Studies He is a board member, American Institute of Maghrib Studies
    He was Junior Research Fellow, the Middle East Centre, St Antony’s College, Oxford, Nov. 2002 – Aug. 2004
    He is also proficient in French, German, Arabic.

    Personal Anecdote

    The woman behind the post office counter at the shop around the corner, who had known my family for a while, was not impressed that I was doing a doctorate in history. I’d just graduated with my first degree and was back at my mum’s house for part of the summer, so it was reasonable for her to ask where I was going to be working now. I said I was going to Oxford to work on the modern history of the Middle East. `So, not going into the real world yet, then’, she said. Or something like that. `Not… the real world’ was what stuck.

    In an important sense, of course, she was right. The professional study of history wasn’t high on the list of useful occupations for most people in the de-industrialized, not yet post-industrial, north-east of England where I grew up. Only a couple of generations previously, the suburb of semi-detached houses where my family lived had been the pithead of a colliery. Most of the town’s coal and other industry (especially, unusually, confectionary) had gone well before the crisis of British heavy industry and it was also saved by being a market town and commuter centre between bigger cities, so the near civil war of the early 1980s when the Thatcher government put down the miners’ strike, and the subsequent social and urban decay, didn’t affect us nearly so badly as they did other parts of the region. Nonetheless, there was a definite residual consensus locally about what counted as real work, what the useful upper limits of education were, and where the boundaries of reality lay, and with the sort of lower middle-class, individualistic aspirations that Thatcher’s children were meant to have (but also, fortunately for me, a romantic fascination for the life of a university that they weren’t), as an adolescent I had a different idea to the locally received one of what the real world might be. But it wasn’t so much my inability to grasp the significance of the persisting norms of an unraveling working class community within which I might, in a different decade, have been able to see myself that made me remember the comment. The point is rather that the real world was precisely what interested me. It was just that the bits of it I most wanted to know were elsewhere.

    As an undergraduate studying languages and literature, textual criticism and hermeneutics seemed like obvious ways of understanding what made worlds real to people, and their application to history seemed to me (despite the fuss this was causing in empiricist Britain) equally obvious as well as fascinating. This didn’t mean disappearing from tangible reality into an immaterial jargonzone. It meant a serious effort to understand modern world, especially colonial, histories and their enduring consequences, the supposed incommensurability of African and Asian (and particularly Islamic) life-worlds and identities with those of ‘the West’, how narratives of the past function publicly to hold people together and drive them apart, how they reinvent for particular purposes things that happened quite differently, how they give new meanings to things people think they already know. It definitely meant figuring out how, in radically different but intensely interconnected places and languages, real people understand their realities.

    One way of starting to do this was teaching second and third generation immigrant children in a Marseille secondary school (teaching was the official excuse; obviously I learned a lot more than I ever taught anyone, including about crowd control and tear gas—don’t get the wrong idea, it was the kids using the tear gas…). So was volunteering for a summer in a Palestinian refugee camp in the West Bank, and getting to know the cities and countryside of France, Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco by foot, taxi, train and bus. But it’s the same thing that I look for in the reading rooms of libraries and archives, and the same thing that has made moving to America, in an otherwise unpropitious time (was that put delicately enough?) a genuinely fascinating experience. The world, especially the one of relations between the two great mythical entities ‘Islam’ and `the West’ in which I’m (among other things) professionally most interested, has become very much more sharply real, and far more grotesquely absurd, in more people’s everyday lives over recent years than I certainly ever wished to see. And many other people, of course, are also more engaged in that real world (in one sense) than I would ever wish to be. I think, now more than ever, that what good historians do gives an infinitely better grasp of it—of the meaning and the falsity, the constructedness and avoidability, of the realities that are being created for us—than do most of the alternatives. What historians do serves other aims, of course, than the public imperatives of action in the world or the community norms of loyalty and acquiescence, and that’s also why it’s important; someone, and not only eventually but urgently, has to explain how any of this could have happened.

    There was a poster common in Oxford windows just before I left for the US (distributed, I think, by the Quakers), that read `I am not at war.’ A refusal to face reality, a determination to avoid `the real world’? Or a courageous and principled insistence on an alternative one? The day after I received the email inviting me to submit my information for a feature on this website, I got a very angry and surprisingly graphic email from someone who’d managed to read an article I’d written as being Islamophobic and racist. (This, to put it mildly, surprised me.) I’ve had hatemail before (also surprisingly—I can’t for the life of me see what makes me worth it), but this was unusually virulent and twisted. It’s one thing to see texts as harboring multiple meanings their authors didn’t (know they) put there, but quite another to make someone’s meanings do a 180-degree backflip through your own set of overriding, obsessive fantasies and suppositions. But his too, unfortunately, is a real enough world. Piecing together the ways that people and communities shape and narrate their reality, with a careful and critical eye to how what really happened ends up meaning a dozen different and contradictory things, seems to me the great challenge to historians in our very bewildering time. And even if I do live in what can only be called the surreal suburban fantasy land of Princeton NJ, the work we do seems to me, at least, quite tangibly, satisfyingly, real.

    Quotes

    By James McDougall

  • “‘The West’ and modernity, after the conquest, are inescapable, pervasive, insidious. But, precisely through their cataclysmic thoroughness, they no longer stand over `the non-West’ as `an absolute and devastating exteriority, nor as an eternal mastery’. To suppose so would merely be to reproduce the old, monologic account of the West’s sovereign agency, the `narcissistic projection of the Western will to power.’ Instead, as Abdelkebir Khatibi puts it, in Asia and Africa `Europe [...] troubles our intimate being, […] inhabits it as a difference, a conglomerate of differences’ through which (i.e., both by means of, and to cope with, which) people in the colonial world themselves  JPG have struggled, acted and spoken. Nationalism did not arise from some ancient and indestructible life-force drawn from inexhaustible, secret wells of perennial Being, `this will-to-be rooted in the depths of time.’ `Authenticity’ did not precede `modernity’. It was an artefact painstakingly created, a doctrine elaborated out of the differences and divisions opened up in the social world, in political order and cultural hierarchy, in conceptions of civilisation and science, in the mapping out of space and time, by the operations of modern, colonial power itself. Algerians, like Indians and Africans, took up their `native status’ and the idioms in which it was defined, and reworked it; la personnalité algérienne, Hindutva, négritude. Established cultural forms and the internalised gaze of the coloniser were refigured together and put back into circulation in new forms, as the authentic past of the nation that pointed the way to its modern future. In a radically reshaped world, such practices seeking anchorage, seeking `the consoling play of recognitions’, all too naturally expressed themselves as authenticity/`originarity’ (asâla), as bearers of inalienable heritage (turâth), as the recovery of the past and the return to it (salafiyya). Historians should see through such cultural artefacts and recognise them for what they are.’ — James McDougall in “History and the Culture of Nationalism in Algeria”
  • “I don’t think it has changed the field. But it has made the public context in which the field exists even more politicized than it already was, and generally not in a productive way. 9/11 caused an enormous amount of attention to be directed toward the region and generated a lot of questions to which a lot of simplistic answers were readily given by commentators of all kinds. To the extent that this attention leads people to inform themselves about the region and about Islam, it’s a good thing. But it has also given renewed credence to a very dangerous set of more or less stereotypical ideas about Islam and Muslim societies, which have now been amplified by the mass media. People who study the Middle East may be a little more in demand than they used to be, but I think it has also become more difficult to articulate a balanced view of the region, of Islam, and of the roles that Western states have had in the region’s history. A public debate lacking historical depth of view is impoverished and open to manipulation. When the public want simple answers to complicated questions, it becomes very difficult to give adequate answers that are necessarily also complex. — James McDougall in a Princeton interview discussing how has 9/11 changed Middle Eastern History
  • About James McDougall

  • “…a work of brilliant originality, empathetically communicated and filled with historical nuggets that not only inform our understanding of the complexity of Algerian identity… but also provide a broader insight into how language, culture and identity pass through dynamic changes under conflicting political arrangements…” — John P. Entelis, Fordham University reviewing “History and the Culture of Nationalism in Algeria”
  • “This collection contains nine diverse essays on aspects of nationhood and culture in countries of the Maghrib – namely, Morrocco, Algeria, Tunisia and Libya Nation, Society and Culture in North Africa JPG– and offers an animated contribution to the study of African society. McDougall’s aim is to bring together a “highly varied array of new research by multinational scholars working on the region’, through which the ‘lived realities’ of North Africans’ immediate historical experiences can be independently and collectively understood…. This collection collection reassures us that present-day culture in the region is neither so skeletal nor so static. This is an excellent introduction to this part of Africa, aimed at a wide audience and with interdisciplinary appeal….In this worthy contribution to Anglophone studies of North Africa, the editor provoes readers to go looking for more.” — Joan Haig, University of Edinburgh reviewing “Nation, Society and Culture in North Africa”
  • “The volume’s lasting contribution lies in the methodological rigour, theoretical focus, and sharp empirical insights provided by this impressive amalgam of mutlinational researchers directing their attention towards the Maghrib’s representation of nationhood. In an age and in a region where political violence, civil unrest, and economic hardships occupy the headlines, close and careful attention in the historic roots of indentity-formation. nation building, and cultural construction as understood and lived by the people themselves are too often lost, ignored, or bypassed. The authors of this volume refocus our attention to the ways in which Maghribis have sought to define their existences through culturally-specific frameworks of analysis that transcend the bounds of colonist constructions and imperialist designs.” — John P. Entelis’s forward in “Nation, Society and Culture in North Africa”
  • Posted on Sunday, October 15, 2006 at 8:13 PM

    History Doyens: Anne Firor Scott

    What They’re Famous For

    Anne Firor Scott, a pioneer historian of American women, is W. K. Boyd Professor Emerita of History at Duke University. Scott joined Duke’s history department in 1961 on a visiting appointment. Nineteen years later she was named William K. Boyd Professor of History and appointed chair of the department. Professot Scott holds the distinction of being the first woman to chair the Duke history department, yet she also stands as the first professor at Duke to include women’s scholarship in her teaching and research. She was educated in her home state at the University of Georgia, as well as at Northwestern University and Radcliffe College. In addition to her tenure at Duke, she has taught at Haverford College and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Anne  Firor Scott JPG Anne Scott is author of The Southern Lady (1970, 1995), One Half the People (with husband Andrew M. Scott), Making the Invisible Woman Visible (1984), Natural Allies: Women’s Associations in American History (1992), Unheard Voices: The First Historians of Southern Women (1993), and most recently, Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware: Forty Years of Letters in Black and White (2006).

    In 1970 her book The Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1830-1930 virtually established the modern study of southern women’s history, and it has never gone out of print. Southern Lady: From Pedestal to Politics, 1820-1920, was one of the first studies in what come to be called “the new women’s history,” and the first to be based on close study of women’s personal documents.

    Since then, Anne Scott has taught at Duke and all over the world, inspiring legions of younger followers to insist on the importance of women in southern history. To honor her eightieth birthday, the Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America held a symposium in 2001 in which a number of scholars paid tribute and Scott reflected on the highlights of her career. In 1987, a group of her former students and colleagues established the Anne Firor Scott Research Fund, an andowment to help support students conducting independent research in women’s history. In the spring of 1989, the Women’s Sudies living group elected to name the domoitory in honor of Professor Scott. In the scholarship fund and the dormitory dedication Anne Scott’s students, friends, and colleagues honored the first professor at Duke to introduce scholarship into the curriculum.

    She has edited several volumes and has published essays, introductions, lectures, and book reviews dealing with the history of American women. She was president of the Organization of American Historians in 1984 and of the Southern Historical Association in 1989. She is an editor of the American Women’s History Series at the University of Illinois Press and has long been an editor for UPA. Scott received the OAH Distinguished Service Award in 2002. She also has served on President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Advisory Council on the Status of Women.

    Personal Anecdote

    Contingency is everything. Being born in 1921, just when women got the right to vote, meant that I grew up in a different world than that of my forbears. As the first born I got the full attention of education minded parents; by the time three brothers came along I had consolidated my position, and assumed the role of all-knowing Big Sister. . Nobody told me, and I didn’t pick up from the environment, the idea that my chances in life would be limited by gender. It did not occur to me to play dumb or the benefit of the males in my class. Of course in high school I got a reputation as a nerd and longed to be popular. No luck There was nothing to do but make good grades.

    College was different. Aspiring to become a foreign correspondent, I joined the mainly male staff of the school newspaper. Some of them invited me to dances and didn’t seem to notice that I was a good student.. I had left my miserable high school years behind me.

    I was 18 when Germany invaded Poland and for the next few years opportunities for women were everywhere. Graduate fellowships, internships in Washington, multiple job offers—it was a heady time to be female. Much as I felt guilty about my friends who were overseas, that didn’t stop me from having a wonderful war. My job on the staff of the National League of Women Voters educated me more than anything up to that time had done. When things closed down after 1945 the genie was out of the bottle. I was not prepared to adopt the feminine mystic or to retire to suburbia. When a young man said “Come marry me and go to Harvard, I took him up on both parts of the invitation. The program in American civilization allowed me to sign up for courses in both history and government and, since there was only one woman on the Harvard faculty, I studied with famous men: Samuel Eliot Morison, Perry Miller, Benjamin Wright Louis Hartz, Oscar Handlin. Only Wright and Handlin paid any serious attention to me but that attention was of the utmost importance. I learned a great deal from Morison, though he hardly recognized my existence, and, studying with Miller I learned to stand up for myself in the face of sometimes bitter sarcasm. Hartz, a convinced Marxist was friendly and a useful gadfly.

    My dissertation began as a study of the progressive era in the South, which in Cambridge was usually viewed as an oxymoron. But Handlin knew better, and encouraged the research. Though I must admit that his theory of mentoring was “sink or swim” pride determined that I would swim. In the end I focused on the southern progressives in Congress of whom there were a good number. Since I tended to have a baby every chapter it was a long process.

    Anne Firor  Scott JPGThe real significance of the dissertation, was that I discovered that the most interesting southern progressives were women. From that insight, in a very long “due course,” grew The Southern Lady, , product of my considerable curiosity about these women of whom hardly anybody seemed to have heard.. There was no model for such a book, and I was often discouraged. My husband, a systematic thinker (which I am not) kept me at it until, finally, in 1970 it emerged in print. I had no notion that the result would be seen as a new way of studying the past, and as inaugurating a major historiographical shift.

    By the time the book came out I had been teaching for a decade. Women were still comparatively rare in history departments in 1957, but the (then) all-male Haverford College took me on for a year; after which we moved to North Carolina and I found a part time job in the UNC History Department. I loved teaching -again in an all-male department. Then we went off to Italy on a Fulbright. -a year worth ten ordinary ones for developing perspective—and in the spring I was astounded by a letter from the chairman of history at Duke inquiring if I could come to teach “until we can find somebody.” Overlooking the implication, I agreed, and came home to begin what turned into a forty year stint in that department.

    By the 1970s women were suddenly “in” both as historical subjects and as potential colleagues. By this accident of timing I had chances to visit or lecture at many institutions here and abroad, an experience which has led me to reflect a great deal about the way we educate people, or think we do. I hope somehow to find the time to put these thoughts in coherent prose before I die.

    The surprising thing—in retrospect—is how one things leads to another , how the resume grows. . . and suddenly, or so it seems, one is a senior person, called on for advice, for mentoring, to preside over this and that learned society, to sit on boards and give advice.

    All this surprised me. Looking back, next to creating a family which is now into the third generation, the most satisfactory part of it all has been teaching -students, adults, grandchildren. Many of the people I have taught are now teachers themselves, and when they come to see me, one and all, what they remember if not so much the substance of what we studied together, but the pedagogy I had learned from my father, who, late in his life, said : “It is said that I am a good teacher, and I do not wish to deny it. But insofar as that is true it is because I never knew the answers, and my students and I have sought them together.” My books will be revised, and eventually remanded to some remote storage in the Library, but I hope my students will have students who have students. . .until global warming finishes us all off.

    Quotes

    By Anne Firor Scott

  • “The eighteenth century, to borrow Bernard Bailyn’s phrase, was not incidentally but essentially different from the present, and many of the elements of that essential difference can be most clearly seen in the lives of women. Colonial history has so long been written in terms of high achievement, of political theory, of Founding Fathers, of economic development, of David-and-Goliath conflict that it is easy to forget how small a part such things played in most individual lives. Seen from the standpoint of ordinary people, the essential theme of the the eighteenth-century experience was not so much achievement as the fragility and chanciness of life. Death was an omnipresent reality. Three children in one family die on a single day from epidemic disease; fathers are lost at sea; adolescents mysteriously waste away; mothers die in childbirth; Making the  Invisible Woman Visible JPGyet life goes on to a constant underlying murmur of “God’s sacred will be done.” In these circumstances, how is the meaning of life perceived? What social structures do people build to sustain the spirit? What, in this context, become the central values? What is the texture of daily life?The life histories of three colonial women give some clues. . .[There follow studies of women from three parts of the early colonies-become-states: Jane Mecom of Boston, Elizabeth Drinker of Philadelphia, and Eliza Lucas Pinckney of Charleston.]

    [The essay concludes] . . . I have tried to learn from the records left by these three women what it was like to be an eighteenth century person. They take us to the heart of daily life: to scenes of childbearing and nerve-racking struggle to keep babies alive, to scenes of mysterious illness and sudden death, of wartime stringencies and dislocations, to the struggle to “git a living” or -at another level—to get rich. Through their eyes we see the chanciness of life, and begin to understand the central role of kinship in providing such security as was possible in a world so filled with uncertainty…” — Anne Firor Scott in “Self-Portraits: Three Women” first published in Uprooted Americans: Essays to Honor Oscar Handlin (Boston: Little Brown,1979 pp 43-76.) (The original book is out of print but the essay can be found in Anne F. Scott, “Making the Invisible Woman Visible” (Champaign, 1984) which is in print)

  • The whole thing began almost by accident. Duke University has consolidated all reunions into onelarge gathering in April, and people all over campus organize events, which they hope will lurealumni to their particular domains. In April 2000 the Women’s Studies Program announced that a handful of faculty, of whom I was one, would be on hand to greet former students. Eight of my former students attended, and lingered long after the appointed hour. They spoke so enthusiastically about this chance to bring me up to date on their doings that in 2001 I let the Alumni Office know that I would be in a certain room on Saturday afternoon of the reunion for a conversation with former students. A single sentence in the fat program included this information. That time forty-nine people showed up. This caught the attention of the organizers who asked me to do it again in 2002 and offered an elegant venue—the Rare Book Room in the Library—and prime time. I thought it might be a good idea to provide a topic for the discussion and came up with “How has the study of history affected your later life?”

    Anne Firor Scott  JPGThe response was overwhelming—ninety people attended. The group varied markedly in age, ranging from a member of the class of 1937 to a couple of students who graduated in 1992. Husbands and wives came—some even bringing their teenage children—and all sorts of careers were represented including doctors, lawyers, social workers, teachers, and volunteer leaders. Only a few professional historians attended.

    The discussion was a bit like the best class one had ever taught: everyone wanted to talk about an amazing variety of things. They wanted to report on the books that they had read, ask for other people’s views, and make speeches. Some even wanted to argue.

    But when it came to the announced question, there were surprises. I don’t quite know now what I expected. I suppose without too much reflection I had assumed that somehow the study of history would tend to make people wiser, more reflective, less dogmatic than their contemporaries who had little knowledge of the past. At the end of the discussion I realized that no generalization is justified.

    All the participants seemed to think that their historical studies had been and still were important to their lives—exactly how these studies were important, however, was not so clear. The libertarian, for example, insisted that studying history would show anybody that the American people had been hoodwinked into accepting the sixteenth amendment. (Murmur around the room: “What was the sixteenth amendment?”) Others had equally firm convictions—not necessarily related to what they had been taught— about the significance of the past. Many people testified to an ongoing desire to read well-written, popular history. Some attendees wanted my opinion about the recent plagiarism scandals. (I tried to be judicious, which might translate as timid.)

    One interesting moment came when I asked my students if they remembered our long and intense discussions about the Great Crash of 1929 and its aftermath. Indeed, they did—and demonstrated the fact. I then asked if that knowledge affected their decisions about investments in the past three years? There was a sudden silence and a good deal of embarrassed head shaking accompanied by murmurs of “Well, I should have remembered.” Nobody, however, testified to having recognized a speculative bubble when it was before their eyes.

    What did I learn from this experience?

    • The “uses of history” are not at all clear cut. People take from the past what they are prepared to understand, and not what some teacher thinks they should understand. Some summon their perception of the past to support whatever they want to do now. Others search for parallels and seek explanations for what is happening at the moment.
    • Good teachers are remembered long after the fact. Names of a few of my colleagues came up over and over. “As Professor X said . . .” was a recurrent phrase.
    • The attendees enjoyed challenging each other and me—they clearly would rather be challenged than entertained.

    As I pondered this experience, I was reminded of an earlier encounter. Last fall the library celebrated my eightieth birthday and invited two former students to speak. One of the speakers, an engineering graduate, had taken several social history courses with me. He was, I should probably note, a top notch student; the best in his class. He told me that the primary sources he had read in my class two decades prior—which dealt with the lives of ordinary people in the rapidly changing society of the early twentieth century—profoundly affected his own life. He works for a major engineering firm in a major American city and has a disabled child. His resources and training are such that he has been able to become a major advocate for such children with his local school board. “Because of what I learned in that course,” he said, “I was able to recognize the number of families with children like mine, who had no voice and no way of making their needs clear to the powers in our town. So I have tried to represent them as well as myself.”

    Although this is only one story it is enough to make any teacher forget all the blue books, all the neglectful or cocky students, all the hard work and occasional frustration. Think well—a few stories like this make it all seem worthwhile. — Anne Firor Scott, “How Has Studying History Affectistorians Affected Your Life?” article in honor of receiving the OAH Lifetime Distinguished Service Award in 2002.

    About Anne Firor Scott

  • “Twenty-five years ago The Southern Lady created a new field of historical inquiry and shaped a generation of southern women historians. What Anne Firor Scott wrote about antebellum and Progressive-era white women-their discontent with subordinate roles, their The Southern  Lady JPGdetermination to find meaning in work, their subversion of patriarchial assumptions-aimed straight at the heart of male-dominated academic scholarship. After the publication of The Southern Lady, antebellum planters and southern Progressives no longer meant simply masters and male reformers but conflicted mistresses and female activists. By tracing tracing white women Progressives from missionary work through the Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) club work, the Consumer League, anti-sweatshop agitation, and interracial cooperation, Scott demonstrated the combined efforts necessary to develop a collective female consciousness….The reprint of The Southern Lady evokes memories. Anne Scott’s spirited grandmother graces the cover of this splendid new edition. In an afterword, the author traces her own work for the League of Women Voters. Her travels for the league brought her into contact with surviving suffragists and national board members. Scott’s association and imterviews with longtime activists produced the most powerful and sustaining effect on her thought. She interviewed Judge Lucy Somerville Howorth, and Howorth’s memories of her mother’s career as a church and WCTU member, and later a suffragist and Mississippi legislator, convinced the author of the recurrent patterm of women’s activism….
    But memory serves another pupose as well. The 1970s generation of scholars remembers that these life histories and the author’s clear and determined purpose strenghtened its resolve to open “[d]oor after door” (p. 104). — Jean E. Freidman, University of Georgia reviewing “The Southern Lady”
  • “A valuable contribution not only to the general field of women’s history, but also to our understanding of one woman historian’s personal and professional odyssey.” — Joan Hoff-Wilson, Women’s Review of Books reviewing ” Making the Invisible Woman Visible”
  • “The splendid ‘Self-Portraits’ is the very best piece she has written and is destined to become a classic. . . . There is real artistry here, as well as real scholarship.” — Linda K. Kerber, author of Women of the Republic reviewing ” Making the Invisible Woman Visible”
  • “One Half the People is a book I use regularly in class because it is the ‘ most succinct way I know to make the point that the suffrage ammendment is not trivial; that it was the result of a long political struggle and a complex philosophical argument. It certainly out to be used in women’s history and in general history courses. Students find the mix of official legal documments (like Supreme Court opinions) and informal ones (like speeches and responses and hearings) teacheable. [It] constitutes the best treatment of women’s fight for the vote.” — Linda K. Kerber reviewing “One Half the People”
  • “This is a greatly needed book, the best available on the topic and indispensable for teaching women’s history. I use it in all my courses, whenever appropriate, and have found students stimulated by it. — Gerda Lerner reviewing “One Half the People”
  • “This brief but authoritative analysis of the woman suffrage movement by an historian and political scientist should be of interest to students and general readers no less than to specialists. Well selected documents illustrate the interpretation in the text and enhance the value of the book as an effective teaching tool. Political historians, too often neglectful of this topic, will find the work highly useful.” — Richard P. McCormick reviewing “One Half the People”
  • “Both an engaging survey of existing scholarship and a plea for additional research….With wry humor and impassioned scholarship Anne Firor Scott teaches us that the the more we are able to learn about…’the more we will understand about the society that has shaped us all.’” — Laurel Thatcher Ulrich reviewing “Natural Allies” in the NYT
  • “Anyone interested in the progressive politics of race and gender in the middle Pauli Murray  and Caroline Ware Forty Years of Letters in Black and White JPGyears of the twentieth century owes a debt of gratitude to Anne Firor Scott for her edition of letters between Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware. The unusual two-sided nature of the volume brings to life two distinguished women intellectuals, one black, the other white, as well as a forty-year friendship based on affection, trust, and a shared commitment to social justice. That friendship saw them through the hazards of the McCarthy era (which adversely affected them both), the civil rights revolution (to which Murray made significant contributions), and the women’s movement, in which each played a leadership role. Perhaps most of all, the letters document the difficulties that even the best educated women had in establishing themselves professionally in these years as well as the fierce determination that enabled Murray and Ware to carve out such singular careers.” — Barbara Sicherman, Kenan Professor Emerita, Trinity College reviewing “Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware Forty Years of Letters in Black and White”
  • “Anne Scott has not only celebrated two remarkable women, one white, the other black, in this edition of their correspondence, but in the process has also underscored her own role as a very distinguished historian of women and of the South.” — John Hope Franklin reviewing “Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware Forty Years of Letters in Black and White”
  • “This intriguing collection of letters, edited by one of our most distinguished American historians, follows the evolving relationship between two very unlikely ‘sisters’ whose friendship doesn’t quite fit any mold we might cast to surround it.” — Barbara Ransby, author of Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision reviewing “Pauli Murray and Caroline Ware Forty Years of Letters in Black and White”
  • “The award recognizes their efforts to create and shape two of the major sub-fields of American history, those being African American history and women’s history. We really view them as pioneers. They have touched the lives, intellectual development and work of a generation of historians, and have truly changed the ways we understand both the past and our present.” — John Dichtl, deputy director of the organization on John Hope Franklin, Gerda Lerner and Anne Firor Scott having been selected as recipients of the Organization of American Historians’ Distinguished Service Award in 2002
  • Basic Facts

    Teaching Positions:
    Haverford College, Haverford, PA, lecturer in history, 1957-58;
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, lecturer in history, 1959-60;
    Anne Firor Scott  JPG Duke University, Durham, NC, assistant professor, 1962-65, associate professor, 1965-70, professor of history, beginning 1971.

    Occasional lecturer, Johns Hopkins Center, University of Bologna, 1960-61,
    Chairperson, North Carolina Governor’s Commission on the Status of Women, 1963-64;
    member of federal Citizens Advisory Council on Status of Women, 1964-68.

    Area of Research:
    American Women’s history, Southern Women’s history

    Education:
    University of Georgia, A.B., 1941;
    Northwestern University, M.A., 1944;
    Radcliffe College, Ph.D., 1949.

    Major Publications:

  • The Southern Lady, (University of Chicago Press, 1970).
  • The American Woman: Who Was She?, (Prentice-Hall, 1970).
  • Women in American Life, Houghton, 1970.
  • (With Andrew M. Scott) One-Half the People, (Lippincott, 1976).
  • Making the Invisible Woman Visible, (University of Illinois Press (Urbana, IL), 1984).
  • (With Suzanne Lebsock) Virginia Women: The First Two Hundred Years, (Colonial Williamsburg Foundation (Williamsburg, VA), 1988).
  • Natural Allies: Women’s Associations in American History, (University of Illinois Press (Urbana, IL), 1991).
  • Editor, Contributor, Joint Author:

  • (Editor) Jane Addams: Democracy and Social Ethics, (Harvard University Press, 1964).
  • (Contributor) Wayne Booth, editor, The Knowledge Most Worth Having, (University of Chicago Press, 1967).
  • (Contributor) Kenneth Underwood, editor, The Church, the University and Social Policy, Volume II, (Wesleyan University Press, 1969).
  • (Editor) What Is Happening to American Women?, (South Atlantic Newspaper Publishers Association, 1970).
  • (Editor) Unheard Voices: The First Historians of Southern Women, (University of Virginia (Charlottesville, VA) (London, England), 1993).
  • (Author of introduction) James Weber Linn, Jane Addams: A Biography, (University of Illinois Press (Urbana, IL), 2000).
  • Contributor to literary journals and popular magazines, including American Heritage.

    Awards and Grants:

    American Association of University Women national fellow, 1956-57;
    National Endowment for the Humanities senior fellow, 1967-68, 1976-77;
    OAH Distinguished Service Award, 2002;
    Elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences class of 2004.

    Additional Info:

    Scott worked for the International Business Machines Corp. (IBM), Atlanta, GA, private secretary, 1941-42;
    League of Women Voters of the United States, Washington, DC, program associate, 1944-47, congressional representative and editor of National Voter, 1951-53.
    The OAH Lerner-Scott Dissertation Prize was given for the first time in 1992 for the best doctoral dissertation in U.S. women’s history. The prize is named for Gerda Lerner and Anne Firor Scott, both pioneers in women’s history and past presidents of the Organization of American Historians.

    Posted on Sunday, October 8, 2006 at 8:17 PM

    Top Young Historians: 31 – Matthew D. Lassiter

    Top Young Historians

    Matthew D. Lassiter, 36

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, and Director of Graduate Studies, Department of History, University of Michigan, 2006-
    Area of Research: 20th century United States, urban/suburban, political, social, Southern, popular culture
    Education: Ph.D., Department of History, University of Virginia, Charlottesville VA, May 1999.
    Major Publications: Lassiter is the author of The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South (Princeton University Press, 2006). Matt  Lassiter JPGListed in the Politics and Society in Twentieth-Century America series, ed. William Chafe, Gary Gerstle, Linda Gordon, Julian Zelizer.
    He is the co-editor of The Moderates’ Dilemma: Massive Resistance to School Desegregation in Virginia (University Press of Virginia, 1998), with Andrew B. Lewis.
    He is currently working on the following projects: The Suburban Crisis: The Pursuit and Defense of the American Dream;
    The End of Southern History, coedited with Joseph Crespino;
    “De Jure/De Facto: The Strange Career of a National Myth,” chapter in The End of Southern History;
    Inventing Family Values: The Crisis of the American Dream in the Seventies,” in Bruce Schulman and Julian Zelizer, eds., in Rightward Bound: Making America Conservative in the 1970s (under contract to Harvard University Press).
    Awards: Lassiter is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including:
    William T. Ludolph, Jr., Junior Faculty Development Award, History Department, University of Michigan, 2003, 2005, 2006;
    Patricia Jane Barrett Faculty Research Award, College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, University of Michigan, 2004;
    National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow, 2001-02;
    Faculty Fellowship Enhancement Award, Rackham School of Graduate Studies and Office of the Vice President for Research, University of Michigan, 2001;
    Southern History Dissertation Fellowship, University of Virginia, 1995-98;
    Class of 1923 Memorial Teaching Award, University of Michigan, 2006. Given annually to recipients among those promoted from assistant professor to associate professor with tenure;
    University Undergraduate Teaching Award, Rackham School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan, 2004-2005. Given annually to two tenure-track faculty for “excellence in teaching at the undergraduate level”;
    Golden Apple Award, University of Michigan, 2004 recipient. Given annually to one faculty member by SHOUT (Students Honoring Outstanding University Teaching). Public lecture in acceptance of award: “Alienation, Apathy, and Activism: American Culture and the Depoliticization of Youth,” Jan. 28, 2004.
    Additional Info:
    Lassiter is the Category Editor, Suburbia Resources, American Political Development—Electronic Classroom, sponsored by the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia, (2003-present).
    He is a referee of book manuscripts for Oxford University Press (6), Duke University Press, University of Virginia Press, Longman Publishers, Arnold Publishers.
    He is a referee of article manuscripts: Journal of American History, American Quarterly, Comparative Studies in Society and History, Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.
    He has made numerous radio appearances on a number of stations including: WFAE (Charlotte, NC), WUNC (Chapel Hill, NC), KUOW (Seattle), WEMU 89.1 (NPR), Michigan Radio (NPR), and Virginia Public Radio.
    Lassiter was also the moderator for the Ann Arbor mayoral candidates debate sponsored by the University’s Urban Planning Department (Nov. 2004).

    Personal Anecdote

    During my second foray onto the job market, I found myself being interviewed for a position in southern history at a certain institution located in a Deep South state. At the time, I was employed as a visiting assistant professor at Bowdoin College in Maine, teaching courses on southern history, the 1960s, and urban/suburban history. Many of my undergraduate students at Bowdoin were from the affluent and overwhelmingly white suburbs outside of Boston, and their stories reminded me a lot of my own upbringing in an affluent and overwhelmingly white suburb located just north of the Atlanta city limits. My recently completed dissertation about civil rights and political transformation in the metropolitan South presented a strong argument against the framework of southern exceptionalism, and it was this thesis that had me in hot water in the interview for a southern history job that I was not even sure I wanted. About three minutes in, I was laying out the claim that political realignment in the South could not be reduced to white backlash against the civil rights movement alone, that the economic rise of the Sunbelt combined with national trends of suburbanization also had played a central role, when a member of the hiring committee cut me off. “You’re wrong,” he said. “I lived through all that, and I know how it happened, and you’re wrong.”

    I had never planned to become a southern historian. I came of age during the 1980s, a child of the late Cold War period and a product of the residentially segregated suburbs, living in a booming section of metropolitan Atlanta where everyone seemed to have arrived from somewhere else. If someone had asked me back then about my impression of the civil rights movement, I would have responded the same way as many of the students whom I have taught at Bowdoin College and the University of Michigan: Alabama, Mississippi, Bull Connor, George Wallace, Klan bombings, “I Have a Dream,” from Deep South racism to national triumph. I took several courses in civil rights and southern history when I was an undergraduate, but it wasn’t until I read about the links between residential segregation and public policy in Kenneth Jackson’s book Crabgrass Frontier that I really began to understand the political culture of my suburban youth. When I started graduate school at the University of Virginia, a couple of years after the Berlin Wall came down, my goal was to specialize in diplomatic history, perhaps combined with political history. A combination of superb graduate school mentors and field-specific funding resources sent me down the path of southern history, however, and I decided to write a dissertation about school desegregation that would excavate the roles of the silent moderates singled out for blame by Martin Luther King Jr. in the “Letter from Birmingham Jail.”

    I began to research the period of massive resistance to the Brown decision, and I initially wrote ten chapters—more than four hundred pages—about events that ultimately took up fewer than one hundred pages in my recently published book. Even before finishing the dissertation, I completely discarded several chapters about the segregated private school movement in the rural and small-town South, including one that cost me several months in South Carolina archives. In my office here in Ann Arbor, I still have a full box of documents about private schools in Mississippi for a chapter never written at all. If I had a genuine epiphany, it happened one evening when I was looking up the New York Times coverage of the end of massive resistance in Jackson, Mississippi. On p. 29, I saw what I was looking for: “School Day Calm in Jackson: 39 Negro Pupils Enter White Classes—Boycott Fails.” On the front page, I found another headline that I did not expect, “275,638 Pupils Stay Home in Integration Boycott,” about a massive white protest against a minimal busing plan in New York City. Now it occurs to me that the excitement of such a discovery is becoming much less likely as microfilmed newspapers become keyword searchable. But at the time, I wrote in my notes: “Why haven’t I heard about this before? What are we supposed to make of this? How should this change the way we think about southern history?”

    I soon recast my dissertation as a study of the grassroots politics produced by residential segregation and suburban sprawl, with close attention to the mobilization of white middle-class homeowners and schoolparents who embraced Richard Nixon’s label of the Silent Majority. I came to believe that cities such as Atlanta and Charlotte should be understood through a national model of suburban politics and metropolitan development, which meant rethinking some of the obsessions of southern history and the blind spots of American history. The two books that I flipped through constantly in writing my own were Kenneth Jackson’s Crabgrass Frontier and Thomas Sugrue’s Origins of the Urban Crisis, each of which has had a much more significant impact on the reintegration of southern and American history than either author probably imagined. The new scholarship on the “long civil rights movement” in the North and West also encouraged my defection from the school of southern exceptionalism, which I believe is central to the “color-blind” mythology of white racial innocence across the nation. And my suburban focus also reflected a personal odyssey, a desire to turn the historical spotlight toward places such as the one in which I grew up in Atlanta, a sense that the popular narrative of racial backlash and political realignment has placed too much blame on working-class whites (South and North) and not enough on the business leaders and white-collar families and government policies that profoundly reshaped the postwar American metropolis.

    Quotes

    By Matthew D. Lassiter

  • During the civil rights showdowns of the late 1960s and early 1970s, white-collar families that claimed membership in the Silent Majority rallied around a “color-blind” discourse of suburban innocence that depicted residential segregation as the class-based outcome of meritocratic individualism rather than the unconstitutional product of structural racism. . . .  JPGMillions of white homeowners who had achieved a residentially segregated and federally subsidized version of the American Dream forcefully rejected race-conscious liberalism as an unconstitutional exercise in social engineering and an unprecedented violation of free-market meritocracy. . . . In response to the civil rights offensive against the structural forces of residential segregation, a grassroots suburban backlash rippled upward into national politics and established powerful and lasting constraints on the integrationist agenda of racial liberalism. The political culture of suburban exclusion and middle-class entitlement forged a resilient bipartisan consensus that ultimately exempted most affluent neighborhoods throughout the nation from any collective responsibility for the government programs that simultaneously developed the postwar metropolis and contained the inner-city ghettoes.” — Matthew Lassiter in “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • “The meritocratic ethos celebrated throughout America’s upper-middle-class suburbs has always contained two central contradictions: the refusal to acknowledge that any historical forces greater than individual accomplishment shaped the spatial patterns of the metropolitan landscape, and the “neighborhood schools” presumption that children of privilege should receive every advantage of the consumer affluence accumulated by their parents instead of competing on an egalitarian playing field. In the era of the Silent Majority, court-ordered busing evoked intense grassroots opposition precisely because the redistributive policy severed the link between residence and education that white suburban families viewed as the consumer reward of a free-market meritocracy–an essentially inalienable middle-class right secured through individual perseverance and paid for by hard-earned taxes. In this sense, the antibusing protests that revolved around “color-blind” justifications and “reverse discrimination” charges resembled the political and philosophical opposition to affirmative action policies much more than the initial southern resistance to the Brown decision, except that for white suburban families the stakes were far higher than in the emerging debates over racial preferences in employment or college admissions. . . . Two-way integration constituted a frontal assault on the consensus among the white middle class that a nice home in a safe and segregated suburban neighborhood served by quality public schools was critical to living the good life and the key to their children’s futures.” — Matthew Lassiter in “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • About Matthew D. Lassiter

  • “Impressively researched, The Silent Majority brings together valuable and wholly new collections of archival material. Many historians pay lip service to the need to draw connections between the grassroots and the leadership, the local scene and national affairs. Lassiter actually does it. With verve and grace, he presents compelling accounts of grassroots mobilizations in Virginia, South Carolina, and Tennessee, and sensitive, detailed case studies of Atlanta and Charlotte. At the same time, he demonstrates how these local, suburban movements both reshaped national politics.” — Bruce Schulman, Boston University reviewing “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • “The Silent Majority stands as a landmark in a new generation of scholarship on the American South. Matthew Lassiter is spot on in his dissection of the myths of de facto segregation, national innocence, and southern distinctiveness. Rejecting a narrative that revolves around individual racism, he shows us how we arrived at our current dilemmas. This book is indispensable reading for anyone seeking to understand how the North and the South have converged around an ‘intractable landscape of racial apartheid’ in which class ideologies and divisions play a central role.” — Jacquelyn Hall, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Director, Southern Oral History Program reviewing “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • “Matthew Lassiter persuasively argues in The Silent Majority that the Republicans gained in the South not because of regional racism but because of the meteoric growth of the Sun Belt suburbs, which created a new class of middle-income, socially moderate and fiscally conservative voters.” — Clay Risen, Atlanta Journal-Constitution reviewing “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • The Silent Majority is a compelling recounting of modern liberalism’s demise and the ascendance of center-right politics. It is based not on Nixonian Southern strategies and stubborn remnants of malign racist thought and deeds, but on the adoption of socially acceptable race-neutral resistance to racial equality, financed by federal initiatives which created white suburbs and encouraged majority black urban cores. This is a breakthough rethinking of established thought, discarding conventional wisdom.” — Julian Bond, Chairman of NAACP reviewing “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • “Matt Lassiter offers a major reinterpretation of the transformation of liberalism and the rise of conservatism in the post-1960s South and in America writ large. He shows how white Southerners, like their Northern counterparts, embraced a rhetoric of color-blindness that gave them cover to build a sprawling, suburban world that reinforced racial inequalities. This provocative, pathbreaking book offers a whole new conceptual map for the reappraisal of Southern history and national political history.” — Thomas J. Sugrue, University of Pennsylvania and author of “The Origins of the Urban Crisis” reviewing “The Silent Majority: Suburban Politics in the Sunbelt South”
  • “Matthew Lassiter, assistant professor of history, is pleasantly surprised as he receives the 14th annual Golden Apple Award during class Dec. 4. Members of the group Students Honoring Outstanding University Teaching (SHOUT) selected him as the winner the previous day based on student nominations. The award “honors those teachers who consistently teach each lecture as if it were their last, and strive not only to disseminate knowledge but to inspire and engage students in its pursuit,” says the SHOUT Web site.The nominations for Lassiter say he is dedicated, inspirational and thought-provoking. “Professor Lassiter has inspired me as no person ever has,” one nomination says. Lassiter received the award while giving instructions to students about evaluating his performance in the class. “Don’t let this skew your evaluations,” he told the students.” — Article from “The University Record Online” in honor of Lassiter being awarded the Golden Apple Award
  • “Prof. Lassiter is very engaging and interesting. It’s not an easy class, but the easy classes are never the interesting ones. He obviously works hard to make his classes good, and it shows.”…
    “This class was AMAZING. He was an excellent professor, the class was interesting and brought up new perspectives from which to view this country. This was a fantastic course.”…
    “Lassiter is engaging and excited about what he is teaching. The lectures are amazing- the information is so clear and he infuses them with humor.”…
    “American suburbia was my absolute favorite class at U of M. Do not miss out on this class; it opens your eyes to *so* many things.”…
    “History of Suburbia is an AWESOME class and Lassiter is the one of the best lecturer’s that I’ve had at U-M. He’s younger and his class is really up to date with current trends. Lassiter is way cool.”…
    “He’s one of the best professors at Michigan. American Suburbia was one of the most intense, eye-opening, amazingly rich classes I’ve taken at U of M. I’m proud to be an alum of that course.”…
    “*awesome* professor, *wonderful* class – really makes you think about your environment and get excited about things. He is very interesting to talk to during office hours, and the lectures are fun.” — Anonymous Students
  • // ShareThisPosted on Sunday, October 1, 2006 at 1:12 PM | Comments (0) | Return

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