Top Young Historians: 51 – David J. Silverman

Top Young Historians

David J. Silverman, 36

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, George Washington University, Washington, D.C., 2003-Current
Area of Research: Early American, American Indian, and Revolutionary American History
Education: Ph.D. in History, Princeton University, 2000
Major Publications: Silverman is the author of Faith and Boundaries: Colonists, Christianity, and Community among the Wampanoag Indians of Martha’s Vineyard, 1600-1871, David J.  Silverman JPG (Cambridge University Press, 2005). He has published several essays relating to that project, including “Indians, Missionaries, and Religious Translation: Creating Wampanoag Christianity on Seventeenth-Century Martha’s Vineyard,” which won the Lester J. Cappon award for best article of 2005 in the William and Mary Quarterly. Silverman is currently working on Brothertown: American Indians and the Problem of Race, (Cornell University Press), about the development of American Indian race consciousness in the colonial and early national periods told through the histories of the multitribal, Christian Indian communities of Brothertown and New Stockbridge.
Awards: Silverman is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
American Council of Learned Societies Oscar Handlin Fellowship. Grant for the 2007- 2008 academic year toward the book project, Brothertown;
Winner of the Lester J. Cappon Award for best article of 2005 in the William and Mary Quarterly;
American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellow. Grant for one month of research at the American Antiquarian Society toward the book project, Brothertown. Summer 2005;
Elected member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 2004;
New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Grant for eight weeks of research at the Massachusetts Historical Society, Connecticut Historical Society, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Rhode Island Historical Society, and Mystic Seaport Museum, toward the book project, Brothertown. Summer 2003;
Phillips Fund for the Study of Ethnohistory, American Philosophical Society. Grant for research at the Hamilton College archives and the Wisconsin Historical Society, toward the book project, Brothertown. Summers of 2003 and 2004;
Mellon Post-Dissertation Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 2002, year-long residential research fellowship, toward the book project, Faith and Boundaries;
Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, essay prize for “Deposing the Sachem to Defend the Sachemship: Indian Land Sales and Native Political Structure on Martha’s Vineyard, 1680-1740.” Spring 2001;
Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. 1999-2000;
W. B. H. Dowse Fellowship. The Center for the Study of New England History. Grant of $1,000 for one month of research at the Massachusetts Historical Society. Fall 1998.
Additional Info:
Silverman has previously been a lecturer at Princeton University and Assistant Professor at Wayne State University.
Silverman also comments frequently on television, and has been seen on NOVA (Pocahontas Revealed), History Channel (Desperate Crossing: The Untold Story of the Mayflower), and CNN (Wolf Blitzer Reports, on the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian).

Personal Anecdote

Two overlapping goals have shaped my writing on American Indian history: first, I strive to explore American Indian lives at the local level with the kind of detail and sophistication that we normally associate with social histories of Euro-American communities; secondly, I wish to consider how Native peoples’ distinct cultures shaped their experiences without slighting the influence of their participation in an expansive colonial world. The problem, of course, is to find the sources to meet my ends. Fortunately, in my two book projects (the second of which is in progress), I’ve managed to stumble across uncommonly rich archives pertaining to some fascinating Native communities. My first book on the Wampanoag Indians of Martha’s Vineyard extended from my chance decision to canvass the island’s repositories during a rainy vacation day. In the county courthouse and the local historical society, I discovered volume upon volume of land deeds, court dockets, estate inventories, merchant account books, and other records related to and sometimes written by the island Wampanoags, occasionally in the Wampanoag language. These materials, supplemented by an equally rich cache of off- island missionary writing, allowed me to trace the Wampanoags’ religion, social life, politics, and economic practices in the context of their experiences with colonialism over a three hundred year period. Currently, I’m researching the emergence of Indian race consciousness in the early American Northeast through the stories of the multitribal, Christian Indian communities of Brothertown and Stockbridge. This work rests predominantly on writings by those Indians’ own leaders, including such figures as the Mohegans Samson Occom and Joseph Johnson, and the Mahican Hendrick Aupaumut. We Indian historians often pride and chide ourselves that we have to work twice as hard as most of our colleagues, but we (or at least I) rarely pass on the opportunity to mine a generous archive.

Much to my surprise, the most gratifying part of my work has involved exchanges with modern day Indian communities. I began research on my first book by contacting the Education Director of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah. She, in turn, put me in touch with tribal elders and other historically-minded Wampanoags to discuss my findings in light of the tribe’s own traditions. As we grew more comfortable with each other–and after I learned some hard lessons about the community’s protocols–we touched on an ever expanding list of sensitive yet essential historical issues, including Wampanoag Christianity, Wampanoag land loss, Wampanoags and alcohol, and especially exogamous marriages and their effects on Wampanoag claims to Indian identity. I received quite an education during these gatherings. The elders raised questions that I never would have considered, exposed me to alternative ways of reading my data, and taught me profound lessons about their connections to the past and to each other. Along the way, I made friendships with a handful of Wampanoag people that have enriched my personal and professional lives.

Most of my work among the Wampanoags took place on their turf, but the highlight of our relationship for me came when a Wampanoag Tribal Council member visited my undergraduate class on Colonial North America to discuss contemporary Indian decolonization efforts. Before launching his talk, he explained that the knowledge he was about to share had been handed down to him from his Wampanoag ancestors and that therefore he wished to begin by singing them an honor song. And so he did, drumming and chanting so loud that the dean across the hall probably fell out of his chair. The only comment I could muster was that the university’s namesake, George Washington, must have been spinning in his grave. I’ll consider my work, including my collaborations with Native people, successful if he continues his rotation.

Quotes

By David J. Silverman

  • Martha’s Vineyard’s unique history emerged from favorable conditions for Indian-English coexistence and the bold, innovative people who capitalized on them. Faith and Boundaries JPGIt might seem no surprise that its model for inter-cultural peace and Indian survival was not replicated elsewhere, given that model’s contingence upon so many discrete events and personalities. However, this tiny eccentric island teaches a broad lesson about the meeting of peoples in early America by revealing the transcendent power of faith run aground the nefarious shoals of race. European settlers knew that Christianity could bring disparate human populations to terms with one another . . . . What they did not know at the onset of their American venture were the limits of their Christian convictions when dealing with peoples of another complexion . . . . It was the failure of Christian brotherhood that taught Wampanoags about the racial boundaries between them and neighboring whites. Fortunately, the faith also empowered the Wampanoags to write those boundaries onto the Vineyard landscape to safeguard parts of their culture and homeland. — David J. Silverman in “Faith and Boundaries: Colonists, Christianity, and Community among the Wampanoag Indians of Martha’s Vineyard, 1600-1871″
  • About David J. Silverman

  • “Faith and Boundaries is one of the best books on New England’s Indian history and a vital contribution to the literature of contact and community survival in early America.” — William and Mary Quarterly reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “Faith and Boundaries is one of the finest books to appear in some time about Southern New England Indians.” American Indian Culture and Research Journal reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “This elegantly written, exhaustively researched book deserves a wide readership and is sure to have a lasting impact on our understanding of the role of Christianity in early American Indian history.” — Journal of Ecclesiastical History reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “Faith and Boundaries is a fine addition to the growing number of New England ‘town studies’ that focus on Indian communities. Silverman…shows how Indian managed to survive on the margins of New England society, and his book in an important and well-researched contribution to the literature.” — The New England Quarterly reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “David J. Silverman has written a compelling and original history of the Wampanoag Indians of Martha’s Vineyard using extensive archival research, personal interviews with contemporary Wampanoag residents of Martha’s Vineyard, and a firm grasp of the secondary scholarship available on the Algonquian peoples of New England…[He] uses his sources expertly, reconstructing individual lives and experiences to paint a far more complex picture of Indian life on the island than has hitherto been available.” — The Journal of American History reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “This book provides a comprehensive and well-written analysis of the American Indian communities of southern New England and their critical engagement with the British colonial world… The book has an epic quality…. As a student of both James Axtell and John Murrin, Silverman is uniquely positioned to treat both sides of the colonial encounter well, and he succeeds in fully integrating American Indian history into the broad sweep of the Atlantic world.” — American Historical Review reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “Professor Silverman is the most professional, engaging teacher I have ever had the pleasure of studying with. He comes to class each time with a prepared lecture that is interesting, funny and makes you care about the subject as much as he does. Made me remember why I love studying history.”…
    “Rockin’ class- this teacher is always there at 7:50 a.m w/ a cup of starbucks and a joke. *interesting fact* our good teacher was once a historical re-in-actor at Colonial Williamsburg. he also impersonates historical figures. the “southern” colonial voice reminds me of Us. Sam (the rooster cartoon character).”…
    “AWESOME Prof – loves the subject, loves to teach, and loves his students (but in a good way).”… “I’ve never heard a better lecturer in my life.”… “My favorite professor EVER. Knows his stuff and wants you to learn it, too. Very passionate and personable. I wish I could take more classes with him!”… “Silverman is awesome!! he loves teaching, and loves talking about history, and he’ll answer any questions.”…
    “Silverman gives wonderful lectures. He uses accents to quote historic figures and brings history to life!”…”Great class! the lectures were at 8am & I always went. he made them so interesting that i actually stayed awake.”… “Great professor, seems to be a very nice and helpful man”… “Silverman is the best professor I had this semester. Best lectures ever, and his accents are fabulous.” — Anonymous Students
  • // <![CDATA[// ShareThisPosted on Sunday, April 29, 2007 at 8:10 PM

    , 36

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, George Washington University, Washington, D.C., 2003-Current
    Area of Research: Early American, American Indian, and Revolutionary American History
    Education: Ph.D. in History, Princeton University, 2000
    Major Publications: Silverman is the author of Faith and Boundaries: Colonists, Christianity, and Community among the Wampanoag Indians of Martha's Vineyard, 1600-1871, David J.  Silverman JPG (Cambridge University Press, 2005). He has published several essays relating to that project, including "Indians, Missionaries, and Religious Translation: Creating Wampanoag Christianity on Seventeenth-Century Martha's Vineyard," which won the Lester J. Cappon award for best article of 2005 in the William and Mary Quarterly. Silverman is currently working on Brothertown: American Indians and the Problem of Race, (Cornell University Press), about the development of American Indian race consciousness in the colonial and early national periods told through the histories of the multitribal, Christian Indian communities of Brothertown and New Stockbridge.
    Awards: Silverman is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    American Council of Learned Societies Oscar Handlin Fellowship. Grant for the 2007- 2008 academic year toward the book project, Brothertown;
    Winner of the Lester J. Cappon Award for best article of 2005 in the William and Mary Quarterly;
    American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellow. Grant for one month of research at the American Antiquarian Society toward the book project, Brothertown. Summer 2005;
    Elected member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, 2004;
    New England Regional Fellowship Consortium. Grant for eight weeks of research at the Massachusetts Historical Society, Connecticut Historical Society, New England Historic Genealogical Society, Rhode Island Historical Society, and Mystic Seaport Museum, toward the book project, Brothertown. Summer 2003;
    Phillips Fund for the Study of Ethnohistory, American Philosophical Society. Grant for research at the Hamilton College archives and the Wisconsin Historical Society, toward the book project, Brothertown. Summers of 2003 and 2004;
    Mellon Post-Dissertation Fellow at the American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, Mass. 2002, year-long residential research fellowship, toward the book project, Faith and Boundaries;
    Colonial Society of Pennsylvania, essay prize for "Deposing the Sachem to Defend the Sachemship: Indian Land Sales and Native Political Structure on Martha's Vineyard, 1680-1740." Spring 2001;
    Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship. Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation. 1999-2000;
    W. B. H. Dowse Fellowship. The Center for the Study of New England History. Grant of $1,000 for one month of research at the Massachusetts Historical Society. Fall 1998.
    Additional Info:
    Silverman has previously been a lecturer at Princeton University and Assistant Professor at Wayne State University.
    Silverman also comments frequently on television, and has been seen on NOVA (Pocahontas Revealed), History Channel (Desperate Crossing: The Untold Story of the Mayflower), and CNN (Wolf Blitzer Reports, on the Smithsonian Museum of the American Indian).

    Personal Anecdote

    Two overlapping goals have shaped my writing on American Indian history: first, I strive to explore American Indian lives at the local level with the kind of detail and sophistication that we normally associate with social histories of Euro-American communities; secondly, I wish to consider how Native peoples' distinct cultures shaped their experiences without slighting the influence of their participation in an expansive colonial world. The problem, of course, is to find the sources to meet my ends. Fortunately, in my two book projects (the second of which is in progress), I've managed to stumble across uncommonly rich archives pertaining to some fascinating Native communities. My first book on the Wampanoag Indians of Martha's Vineyard extended from my chance decision to canvass the island's repositories during a rainy vacation day. In the county courthouse and the local historical society, I discovered volume upon volume of land deeds, court dockets, estate inventories, merchant account books, and other records related to and sometimes written by the island Wampanoags, occasionally in the Wampanoag language. These materials, supplemented by an equally rich cache of off- island missionary writing, allowed me to trace the Wampanoags' religion, social life, politics, and economic practices in the context of their experiences with colonialism over a three hundred year period. Currently, I'm researching the emergence of Indian race consciousness in the early American Northeast through the stories of the multitribal, Christian Indian communities of Brothertown and Stockbridge. This work rests predominantly on writings by those Indians' own leaders, including such figures as the Mohegans Samson Occom and Joseph Johnson, and the Mahican Hendrick Aupaumut. We Indian historians often pride and chide ourselves that we have to work twice as hard as most of our colleagues, but we (or at least I) rarely pass on the opportunity to mine a generous archive.

    Much to my surprise, the most gratifying part of my work has involved exchanges with modern day Indian communities. I began research on my first book by contacting the Education Director of the Wampanoag Tribe of Aquinnah. She, in turn, put me in touch with tribal elders and other historically-minded Wampanoags to discuss my findings in light of the tribe's own traditions. As we grew more comfortable with each other--and after I learned some hard lessons about the community's protocols--we touched on an ever expanding list of sensitive yet essential historical issues, including Wampanoag Christianity, Wampanoag land loss, Wampanoags and alcohol, and especially exogamous marriages and their effects on Wampanoag claims to Indian identity. I received quite an education during these gatherings. The elders raised questions that I never would have considered, exposed me to alternative ways of reading my data, and taught me profound lessons about their connections to the past and to each other. Along the way, I made friendships with a handful of Wampanoag people that have enriched my personal and professional lives.

    Most of my work among the Wampanoags took place on their turf, but the highlight of our relationship for me came when a Wampanoag Tribal Council member visited my undergraduate class on Colonial North America to discuss contemporary Indian decolonization efforts. Before launching his talk, he explained that the knowledge he was about to share had been handed down to him from his Wampanoag ancestors and that therefore he wished to begin by singing them an honor song. And so he did, drumming and chanting so loud that the dean across the hall probably fell out of his chair. The only comment I could muster was that the university's namesake, George Washington, must have been spinning in his grave. I'll consider my work, including my collaborations with Native people, successful if he continues his rotation.

    Quotes

    By David J. Silverman

  • Martha's Vineyard's unique history emerged from favorable conditions for Indian-English coexistence and the bold, innovative people who capitalized on them. Faith and Boundaries JPGIt might seem no surprise that its model for inter-cultural peace and Indian survival was not replicated elsewhere, given that model's contingence upon so many discrete events and personalities. However, this tiny eccentric island teaches a broad lesson about the meeting of peoples in early America by revealing the transcendent power of faith run aground the nefarious shoals of race. European settlers knew that Christianity could bring disparate human populations to terms with one another . . . . What they did not know at the onset of their American venture were the limits of their Christian convictions when dealing with peoples of another complexion . . . . It was the failure of Christian brotherhood that taught Wampanoags about the racial boundaries between them and neighboring whites. Fortunately, the faith also empowered the Wampanoags to write those boundaries onto the Vineyard landscape to safeguard parts of their culture and homeland. -- David J. Silverman in "Faith and Boundaries: Colonists, Christianity, and Community among the Wampanoag Indians of Martha's Vineyard, 1600-1871"
  • About David J. Silverman

  • "Faith and Boundaries is one of the best books on New England's Indian history and a vital contribution to the literature of contact and community survival in early America." -- William and Mary Quarterly reviewing "Faith and Boundaries"
  • "Faith and Boundaries is one of the finest books to appear in some time about Southern New England Indians." American Indian Culture and Research Journal reviewing "Faith and Boundaries"
  • "This elegantly written, exhaustively researched book deserves a wide readership and is sure to have a lasting impact on our understanding of the role of Christianity in early American Indian history." -- Journal of Ecclesiastical History reviewing "Faith and Boundaries"
  • "Faith and Boundaries is a fine addition to the growing number of New England 'town studies' that focus on Indian communities. Silverman...shows how Indian managed to survive on the margins of New England society, and his book in an important and well-researched contribution to the literature." -- The New England Quarterly reviewing "Faith and Boundaries"
  • "David J. Silverman has written a compelling and original history of the Wampanoag Indians of Martha's Vineyard using extensive archival research, personal interviews with contemporary Wampanoag residents of Martha's Vineyard, and a firm grasp of the secondary scholarship available on the Algonquian peoples of New England...[He] uses his sources expertly, reconstructing individual lives and experiences to paint a far more complex picture of Indian life on the island than has hitherto been available.” — The Journal of American History reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “This book provides a comprehensive and well-written analysis of the American Indian communities of southern New England and their critical engagement with the British colonial world… The book has an epic quality…. As a student of both James Axtell and John Murrin, Silverman is uniquely positioned to treat both sides of the colonial encounter well, and he succeeds in fully integrating American Indian history into the broad sweep of the Atlantic world.” — American Historical Review reviewing “Faith and Boundaries”
  • “Professor Silverman is the most professional, engaging teacher I have ever had the pleasure of studying with. He comes to class each time with a prepared lecture that is interesting, funny and makes you care about the subject as much as he does. Made me remember why I love studying history.”…
    “Rockin’ class- this teacher is always there at 7:50 a.m w/ a cup of starbucks and a joke. *interesting fact* our good teacher was once a historical re-in-actor at Colonial Williamsburg. he also impersonates historical figures. the “southern” colonial voice reminds me of Us. Sam (the rooster cartoon character).”…
    “AWESOME Prof – loves the subject, loves to teach, and loves his students (but in a good way).”… “I’ve never heard a better lecturer in my life.”… “My favorite professor EVER. Knows his stuff and wants you to learn it, too. Very passionate and personable. I wish I could take more classes with him!”… “Silverman is awesome!! he loves teaching, and loves talking about history, and he’ll answer any questions.”…
    “Silverman gives wonderful lectures. He uses accents to quote historic figures and brings history to life!”…”Great class! the lectures were at 8am & I always went. he made them so interesting that i actually stayed awake.”… “Great professor, seems to be a very nice and helpful man”… “Silverman is the best professor I had this semester. Best lectures ever, and his accents are fabulous.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, April 29, 2007 at 8:10 PM

    History Buzz: April 2007

    History Buzz

    By Bonnie K. Goodman

    Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

    April 30, 2007

    PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
      Presidential Campaign 2008 Watch

    • Are we ready for a woman president? U.S. lags rest of world in putting women in positions of real political power – San Francisco Chronicle, 4-29-07
    BIGGEST STORIES:
    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

    • 04-30-1803 – France sold Louisiana and adjoining lands to the United States as part of the Louisiana Purchase.
    • 04-30-1812 – Louisiana became the 18th state in the United States.
    • 04-30-1939 – U.S. commercial television made its official debut at the New York World’s Fair.The signal was transmitted from the Empire State Building.
    • 04-30-1945 – Adolf Hitler and his newly married mistress Eva Braun committed suicide.
    • 04-30-1975 – The Vietnam War ended with South Vietnam’s surrender to North Vietnam.
    • 04-30-2003 – Libya accepted responsibility for the 1998 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland.
    • 05-01-1707 – The Act of Union joined England and Scotland to form Great Britain.
    • 05-01-1931 – The Empire State Building opened in New York City. At 102 stories, it would be the world’s tallest building for the next 41 years.
    • 05-01-1941 – Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane, considered by many the greatest film ever made, premiered in New York.
    • 05-01-1948 – The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) was established with Kim Il Sung as president.
    • 05-01-1960 – The Soviet Union shot down an American U-2 reconnaissance plane over Soviet territory.
    • 05-01-2003 – President Bush made a speech aboard an aircraft carrier proclaiming “major combat operations in Iraq have ended.”
    • 05-02-1945 – The Soviet Union announced the fall of Berlin.
    • 05-02-1955 – Tennessee Williams won the Pulitzer Prize in Drama for Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.
    • 05-02-1994 – Nelson Mandela was victorious in South Africa’s first multiracial election.
    • 05-02-1997 – The Labour Party’s Tony Blair became Prime Minister of Britain, ending 18 years of conservative rule. At 44, he was the youngest prime minister in 185 years.
    • 05-03-1937 – Margaret Mitchell won the Pulitzer Prize in fiction for Gone With the Wind.
    • 05-03-1948 – The Shelley v. Kraemer Supreme Court decision stated that it is unconstitutional for a court to enforce a restrictive covenant which prevents people of a certain race from owning or occupying property.
    • 05-03-1979 – Margaret Thatcher became the first woman elected prime minister of England.
    • 05-03-2001 – The United States, a member of the UN Human Rights Commission since its inception, lost its seat. It would be restored the following year.
    • 05-04-1626 – Peter Minuit landed in Manhattan, which he later bought for $24 worth of cloth and brass buttons.
    • 05-04-1886 – The Haymarket Square riot broke out as a result of a labor demonstration.
    • 05-04-1932 – Public Enemy Number One, Al Capone, was jailed for tax evasion.
    • 05-04-1961 – Civil rights activists, called “freedom riders,” left Washington, DC for New Orleans.
    • 05-04-1970 – Four Kent State University students were shot down by National Guard members during an anti-Vietnam War demonstration.
    • 05-04-1998 – The Unabomber, Ted Kaczynski, was sentenced to four life terms plus 30 years for his series of bombings that killed three and injured 23.
    • 05-05-1809 – Mary Kies of South Killingly, Conn., became the first woman to be granted a patent. The patent was for the rights to a technique for weaving straw with silk and thread.
    • 05-05-1821 – Napoleon Bonaparte died on the island of St. Helena.
    • 05-05-1891 – Carnegie Hall (then known as Music Hall) opened in New York City. Peter Tchaikovsky was the guest conductor.
    • 05-05-1925 – John Scopes was arrested in Tennessee for teaching Darwinism.
    • 05-05-1961 – Alan Shepard became the first American in space.
    • 05-05-2004 – Pablo Picasso’s “Boy with a Pipe” became the most expensive painting ever sold.
    • 05-06-1882 – Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act over President Chester A. Arthur’s veto.
    • 05-06-1889 – The Universal Exposition opened in Paris, marking the completion and dedication of the Eiffel Tower.
    • 05-06-1937 – The German airship Hindenburg blew up and burst into flames at Lakehurst, N.J.
    • 05-06-1941 – Dictator Joseph Stalin became the premier of Russia.
    • 05-06-1999 – Scotland elected its first separate parliament in three centuries.
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • John Lukacs: Who Put the ‘Cold’ in Cold War? GEORGE KENNAN A Study of CharacterNYT, 4-29-07
    • John Lukacs: GEORGE KENNAN A Study of Character, First Chapter – NYT, 4-29-07
    • Hermione Lee: Portrait of a Lady EDITH WHARTONNYT, 4-29-07
    • George F. Kennan: Subject of a short biography by John Lukacs – National Interest, 4-26-07
    • Hermione Lee: An American Original A comprehensive life of Edith Wharton, the sharp-eyed chronicler of high society EDITH WHARTONWaPo, 4-29-07
    • Darrin M. McMahon on Jennifer Michael Hecht: Ah, the Good Life A historian’s skeptical view of how we find satisfaction in life THE HAPPINESS MYTH Why What We Think Is Right Is Wrong: A History of What Really Makes Us HappyWaPo, 4-29-07
    • Andrew Schocket: Corporations part of U.S. ‘policy DNA,’ says BGSU historian – Press Release — Bowling Green, 4-25-07
    • Robert Dallek: Bush compared with Nixon & Kissinger – NYT, 4-24-07
    OP-ED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Fredrik Logevall quoted in “Iraq War Called Riskier Than Vietnam”: He hears the argument frequently from both supporters and opponents of the Iraq war, but he doesn’t buy it, because it rests on predictions rather than facts. Although both conflicts were “wars of choice” that frustrated and angered Americans, Vietnam caused far more death and destruction, he said. “It’s hard to see how it’s worse at present,” he concluded. – Free Internet Press, NY, 4-29-07
    • Andrew J. Bacevich on “Iraq War Called Riskier Than Vietnam”: “Those who argue about Iraq being worse than Vietnam tend to make those worst-case assumptions.” – Free Internet Press, NY, 4-29-07
    SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
    • Award-winning historian Michael Beschloss will deliver the commencement address at Lafayette College and receive an honorary Doctor of Letters degree – The Express Times, PA, 4-26-07
    ON TV: History Listings This Week:

    • C-Span2, Book TV : Walter Isaacson, Einstein: His Life and Universe on Sunday, April 29 at 8:00 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, Book TV : Encore Booknotes: David Halberstam, The Fifties on Monday, April 23 at 2:00 am C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: The American Experience: “The Mormons” Monday, April 30, 2007 at 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “Countdown to Armageddon :Countdown to Armageddon.” Sunday, April 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Antichrist :Part 1″ Sunday, April 29, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Organized Crime: A World History :Russia.” Monday, April 30, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Organized Crime: A World History :China.,” Monday, April 30, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Organized Crime: A World History :Colombia,” Monday, April 30, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :01 – Hitler’s Underground Lair,” Monday, April 30, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :King Tut: Secrets Revealed,” Monday, April 30, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Atlantis: New Revelations,” Tuesday, May 1, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :The Real Temple of Doom.,” Tuesday, May 1, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Mysteries on the High Seas,” Tuesday, May 1, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine :Hunting Bonnie & Clyde.,” Tuesday, May 1, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Vandals,” Wednesday, May 2, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Saxons,” Wednesday, May 3, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Pirate Tech,” Wednesday, May 2, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Deep Sea Salvage,” Wednesday, May 2, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Special :Eighty Acres of Hell,” Thursday, May 3, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Horrors at Andersonville Prison: The Trial of Henry Wirz,” Thursday, May 3, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Guns of the Civil War,” Thursday, May 3, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Spider-Man Tech,” Thursday, May 3, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Night of the Long Knives,” Friday, May 4, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Julius Caesar’s Greatest Battle,” Friday, May 4, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Dogfights :10 – Hunt for The Bismarck,” Friday, May 4, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels” Marathon, Saturday, May 5, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Sherman’s March,” Saturday, May 5, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Quest for Dragons,” Saturday, May 5, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The States :03 – New York, Louisiana, Oregon, New Mexico, Vermont,” Saturday, May 5, @ 10pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #1 (2 weeks on list) – 5-6-07
    NEW ON THE WEB:
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Peter Heather: The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians, (Oxford University Press), May 2007
    • Nancy Isenberg: Fallen Founder: The Life of Aaron Burr, (Penguin Group (USA)), May 10, 2007
    • Jean Edward Smith, FDR, (Random House Publishing Group), May 15, 2007
    • Robert Service: Comrades!: A History of World Communism, (Harvard University Press), May 15, 2007
    • Kieran Doherty: Sea Venture: Shipwreck, Survival, and the Salvation of the First English Colony in the New World, (St. Martin’s Press), May 15 2007
    • Susan Dunn: Dominion of Memories: Jefferson, Madison, and the Decline of Virginia, (Perseus Publishing), May 2007
    • Ronald Reagan: The Reagan Diaries, (HarperCollins Publishers), May 22, 2007
    • Elizabeth Drew: Richard M. Nixon: The 37th President, 1969-1974, (Times Books), May 28, 2007
    • Kevin P. Spicer: Antisemitism, Christian Ambivalence, and the Holocaust (Indiana University Press), May 28, 2007
    • Gabor Boritt (Editor): Slavery, Resistance, Freedom, (Oxford University Press, USA), June 2007
    • William C. Davis: Virginia at War 1862 (Editor) (University Press of Kentucky), June 2007
    • Jack Valenti: This Time, This Place: My Life in War, the White House, and Hollywood, (Crown Publishing Group), June 5, 2007
    • Steve Vogel: The Pentagon: A History, (Random House Publishing Group), June 5, 2007
    • Amity Shlaes: The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, HarperCollins Publishers, June 12, 2007
    • Orville Vernon Burton: The Age of Lincoln, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), June 12, 2007
    • Brian K. Bugge: The Mystique of Conspiracy: Oswald, Castro, and the CIA, (Provocative Ideas), June 28, 2007
    • Kathryn C. Statler: Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam, (University Press of Kentucky) July 28, 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, April 29, 2007 at 9:46 PM

    April 23, 2007

    BIGGEST STORIES:
      Ken Burns: PBS clarifies that Burns won’t re-cut ‘The War’ – WaPo, 4-19-07

    • Ken Burns: Library of Congress, PBS, and Ken Burns Team Up to Gather Oral Histories – AHA Blog, 4-19-07
    • Ken Burns: Agrees To Expand Documentary – WaPo, 4-18-07
    • Ken Burns: Hispanic filmmaker to join Burns’ ‘The War’ – AP/MSNBC, 4-17-07
    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 04-23-1616 – Playwright William Shakespeare died in Stratford-on-Avon, England.
    • 04-23-1969 – Sirhan Sirhan was sentenced to death (later reduced to a life sentence) for the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy.
    • 04-23-2004 – The U.S. resumed diplomatic relations with Libya.
    • 04-24-1800 – Library of Congress was established.
    • 04-24-1898 – Spain declared war on the U.S..
    • 04-24-1915 – Turks began deportation of Armenians that led to the massacre of between 600,000 and 1.5 million Armenians.
    • 04-24-1916 – The Easter Rebellion begins in Dublin, Ireland. Although unsuccessful, the uprising was an important symbolic event leading to the establishment of the Republic of Ireland.
    • 04-24-1953 – Winston Churchill was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II.
    • 04-25-1901 – New York became the first state to require license plates on cars.
    • 04-25-1915 – British, Australian, and New Zealand forces landed at Gallipoli.
    • 04-25-1928 – The first seeing eye dog was presented to Morris S. Frank.
    • 04-25-1945 – Delegates met in San Francisco to organize the United Nations.
    • 04-25-1953 – The Francis Crick and James Watson article describing the double helix of DNA is published in the magazine Nature.
    • 04-25-1992 – Islamic forces took over most of Kabul, Afghanistan after the Soviet-controlled government collapsed.
    • 04-25-2003 – The Georgia legislature voted to scrap the “Confederate flag” design from its state flag.
    • 04-26-1607 – Colonists land at Cape Henry, Va., They would found Jamestown the next month.
    • 04-26-1865 – John Wilkes Booth, Lincoln’s assassin, was surrounded by federal troops in a barn in Virginia. He was shot and killed, either by the soldiers or by his own hand.
    • 04-26-1937 – The German Luftwaffe (air force) destroyed the Spanish town of Guernica.
    • 04-26-1986 – The worst nuclear power plant accident in history occurred at Chernobyl, near Kiev, U.S.S.R.
    • 04-26-1994 – The first multi-racial elections were held in South Africa.
    • 04-26-2000 – Vermont Governor Howard Dean signed the nation’s first bill allowing same-sex couples to form civil unions.
    • 04-27-1521 – Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan was killed in a fight with natives of the Philippines.
    • 04-27-1865 – The worst steamship disaster in the history of the United States occurred when there was an explosion aboard the Sultana; more than 1,400 people were killed.
    • 04-28-1788 – Maryland became the 7th state in the United States.
    • 04-28-1789 – Fletcher Christian led the mutiny aboard the British ship Bounty against Captain William Bligh.
    • 04-28-1945 – Benito Mussolini was executed.
    • 04-28-2004 – The Abu Ghraib prison abuse scandal first comes to light when graphic photos of U.S. soldiers physically abusing and humiliating Iraqi prisoners were shown on CBS’s 60 Minutes II.
    • 04-29-1429 – Joan of Arc entered the city of Orléans. She would end its months-long siege and would become known as the “Maid of Orléans.”
    • 04-29-1916 – The Easter rebellion in Ireland ended with the surrender of Irish nationalists.
    • 04-29-1945 – American soldiers liberated the Dachau concentration cam
    • 04-29-1992 – A Los Angeles jury acquitted four police officers accused of beating Rodney King. Massive rioting and looting ensued.
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Marilyn Nissenson: Tabloid Queen THE LADY UPSTAIRS Dorothy Schiff and The New York PostNYT, 4-22-07
    • David Cannadine on Lynne Olson: Their Finest Hour How a group of upstart Tories toppled Neville Chamberlain TROUBLESOME YOUNG MEN The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power And Helped Save EnglandWaPo, 4-22-07
    • The Blind Prisoner How a Polish noble survived World War II when other prisoners of war didn’t MICHELANGELO IN RAVENSBRUCK One Woman’s War Against the NazisWaPo, 4-22-07Walter Isaacson on John Lukacs: Cold War Realist GEORGE KENNAN A Study of Character WaPo, 4-22-07
    • Amanda Vaill on Virginia Rounding: Mother Russia A new book focuses on the personal life of the magnificent 18th-century empress CATHERINE THE GREAT Love, Sex,and Power WaPo, 4-22-07
    • Maya Jasanoff on Lynn Hunt: Revolutionary Thought How “all men were created equal” became “self-evident” INVENTING HUMAN RIGHTS A History WaPo, 4-22-07
    • David O. Stewart: The Long Hot Summer and the More Perfect Union THE SUMMER OF 1787: The Men Who Invented the Constitution NYT, 4-20-07
    • Robert Dallek: Parsing the Nixon and Kissinger Pas de Deux Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in PowerNYT, 4-17-07
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    • Robert Satloff: A ‘Righteous’ Honor for an Arab Who Saved Jews – NPR, 4-19-07
    • New Set of MLK Papers Sparks Controversy – NPR, 4-7-07
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
    ON TV:
    • C-Span2, Book TV : History on Book TV: Michael Lerner, “Dry Manhattan: Prohibition in New York City” on Sunday, April 22 at 12:00 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, Book TV : After Words: After Words: David Pietrusza, author of “1920: The Year of the Six Presidents” interviewed by Ann Compton on Saturday, April 21 at 9:00 pm and Sunday, April 22 at 6:00 pm and at 9:00 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, Book TV : Public Lives: Debby Applegate, “The Most Famous Man in America: The Biography of Henry Ward Beecher” on Sunday, April 22 at 4:25 pm and Monday, April 23 at 12:45 am C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: The American Experience: “Summer of Love” Monday, April 23, 2007 at 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “Sherman’s March” Sunday, April 22, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Hunt for the Lost Ark” Monday, April 23, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :The Real Sin City: Sodom & Gomorrah,” Monday, April 23, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Ramses’ Egyptian Empire,” Monday, April 23, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Braveheart’s Scotland,” Monday, April 23, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Hitler’s Supercity,” Monday, April 23, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Knights Templar,” Monday, April 23, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :04 – Scotland’s Sin City,” Monday, April 23, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Atlantis: New Revelation,” Monday, April 23, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Cities of the Underworld,” Monday, April 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Exorcism: Driving Out the Devil,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Witch Hunt,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :The Real Dracula,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :The Alaskan Oil Pipeline,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :15 – Machines of The East,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man Moment Machine :Alexander the Great and the Devastating Catapult,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Caligula: Reign of Madness,” Tuesday, April 24, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Unsheathed,” Wednesday, April 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Franks,” Wednesday, April 25, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Lombards,” Wednesday, April 25, @ 3pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Engineering An Empire :The Persians,” Wednesday, April 25, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :04 – Scotland’s Sin City,” Wednesday, April 25, @ 11pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History : Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History,” Thursday, April 26, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Tales of the FBI :The Bureau vs. the Klan,” Thursday, April 26, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Shootout :Tet Offensive,” Thursday, April 19, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Special :Boneyard: Where Machines End Their Lives,” Thursday, April 26, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers : Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers,” Friday, April 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Legacy of Al Capone,” Friday, April 20, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Dogfights :11 – Dogfights of the Middle East,” Friday, April 28, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man Moment Machine :Patton and the Desperate Tank Attack,” Friday, April 28, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Mega Movers” Marathon, Saturday, April 29, @ 1-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Dogfights: The Greatest Air Battles,” Saturday, April 29, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Sherman’s March,” Saturday, April 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The States :02 – Texas, Massachusetts, Arkansas, Iowa, Delaware,” Saturday, April 29, @ 10pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #1 (1 week on list) – 4-29-07
    • Michael B. Oren: POWER, FAITH, AND FANTASY #33 – 4-29-07
    NEW ON THE WEB:
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Taylor Branch: Book on Bill Clinton Emerges From 8 Years of Tapes – NYT, 3-21-07
    • Jonathan M. Elukin: Living Together, Living Apart: Rethinking Jewish- Christian Relations in the Middle Ages, (Princeton University Press), April 2007
    • Philip Morgan: The Fall of Mussolini: Italians and the War, 1940-1945, (Oxford University Press), April 2007
    • Richard Croker: The Boomer Century 1946-2046: How America’s Most Influential Generation Changed Everything, (Springboard Press), April 2007
    • R. Emmett Tyrrell: The Clinton Crack-Up: The Boy President’s Life After the White House, (Nelson Current), April 2007
    • Stephen F. Hayes: Cheney: A Revealing Portrait of America’s Most Powerful Vice President, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Michael Stephenson: Patriot Battles: How the War of Independence Was Fought (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Saul Friedlander: Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945, Vol. 2, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 10, 2007
    • Georgina Howell: Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Lynne Olson: Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Robert Dallek: Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 24, 2007
    • Orville Vernon Burton: The Age of Lincoln, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), June 2007
    • Gabor Boritt (Editor): Slavery, Resistance, Freedom, (Oxford University Press, USA), June 2007
    • William C. Davis: Virginia at War 1862 (Editor) (University Press of Kentucky), June 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Saturday, April 21, 2007 at 8:54 PM

    April 16, 2007

    BIGGEST STORIES:
    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
    • 04-16-1746 – The Jacobite uprising in England ends when Charles “Bonnie Prince Charlie” Stuart is defeated by the Duke of Cumberland.
    • 04-16-1917 – Lenin returned to Russia after 10 years in exile in Switzerland.
    • 04-16-1947 – Financier Bernard Baruch coined the term “cold war” in a speech in South Carolina.
    • 04-16-1972 – China sent President Nixon two giant pandas as a gift.
    • 04-17-1790 – Benjamin Franklin, U.S. patriot, diplomat, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence, died in Philadelphia.
    • 04-17-1895 – The Sino-Japanese War ended with the signing of the Treaty of Shimonoseki.
    • 04-17-1961 – Supported by the U.S. government, 1,500 exiles made the unsuccessful Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba.
    • 04-17-1969 – Sirhan Sirhan was convicted for the murder of Robert F. Kennedy.
    • 04-17-1970 – The Apollo 13 astronauts safely splashed down after their near-disastrous flight.
    • 04-17-1975 – Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge, ending the five year Cambodian war.
    • 04-18-1775 – Paul Revere rode from Charlestown to Lexington to warn Massachusetts colonists of the arrival of British troops during the American Revolution.
    • 04-18-1906 – The Great San Francisco Earthquake destroyed over 4 sq mi. and killed over 500 people.
    • 04-18-1978 – The U.S. Senate voted to hand over the Panama Canal to Panamanian control on Dec. 31, 1999.
    • 04-18-2002 – Afghanistan’s former king, Mohammad Zahir Shah, returned after 29 years in exile.
    • 04-19-1775 – The “shot heard around the world” was fired. Colonial Minute Men took on British Army regulars at Lexington and Concord, Mass., starting the American Revolution.
    • 04-19-1824 – Lord Byron died of a fever while helping the Greeks fight the Turks.
    • 04-19-1882 – Naturalist Charles Darwin, developer of the theory of evolution, died.
    • 04-19-1933 – The United States went off the gold standard.
    • 04-19-1943 – The Warsaw ghetto uprising began, one of the first mass rebellions against the Nazis.
    • 04-19-1993 – The siege at Waco, Texas, ended when FBI moved into the Branch Davidian compound with tear gas and cult members set fire to the compound killing over 80 people.
    • 04-19-1995 – The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, Okla., was destroyed by a car bomb. 168 people, including 19 children were killed in the worst terrorist attack in U.S. history up to that time.
    • 04-19-2005 – Germany’s Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI.
    • 04-20-1769 – Ottawa Indian chief Pontiac murdered.
    • 04-20-1841 – The first detective story, Edgar Allen Poe’s Murders in the Rue Morgue was published.
    • 04-20-1971 – The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the practice of busing for racial desegregation.
    • 04-20-1999 – Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold went on a shooting spree at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. 14 students (including the shooters) and 1 teacher were killed; 23 others were wounded.
    • 04-21-1836 – Texan army under Sam Houston defeated Mexicans in the Battle of San Jacinto.
    • 04-21-1918 -Baron Manfred von Richthofen, the notorious World War I German flying ace known as the “Red Baron,” was killed in action.
    • 04-21-1975 – South Vietnamese President Nguyen Van Thieu resigned.
    • 04-21-1995 – Timothy McVeigh was arrested in connection with the Oklahoma City bombing.
    • 04-22-1500 – Pedro Alvares Cabral discovered Brazil and claimed it for Portugal.
    • 04-22-1509 – Henry VIII became king of England.
    • 04-22-1864 – Congress authorized the inscription “In God We Trust” on coins minted as U.S. currency.
    • 04-22-1889 – The land rush in Oklahoma began when it was opened to settlers.
    • 04-22-1970 – The first Earth Day was observed.
    • 04-22-1994 – Richard M. Nixon died of a stroke at the age of 81.
    • 04-22-2000 – Armed immigration agents took Elian Gonzalez from the Miami home of his relatives to reunite him with his father.
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • Edward L. Ayers on Heather Cox Richardson: Inventing the American Mainstream A historian finds the roots of today’s politics in the post-Civil War era WEST FROM APPOMATTOX The Reconstruction of America After the Civil WarWaPo, 4-15-07
    • Hanne Blank: Virgin Territory Is virginity a real condition or was it invented to control women and their sexuality? – VIRGIN The Untouched History WaPo, 4-15-07
    • Chandra Manning: How Civil War soldiers saw slavery From the beginning, men on both sides regarded it as the reason they were fighting, says an impressive history What This Cruel War Was Over Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil WarPhiladelphia Inquirer, PA, 4-15-07
    • Robert James Maddox: In new book he and others take on the Hiroshima revisionists – Press Release for the Hiroshima in History: The Myths of Revisionism, ed. Robert James Maddox, 4-11-07
    • Historians criticized for writing the book, “How Green Were the Nazis?” – Alex Beam in the Boston Globe (4-10-07)
    • Matthew Sutton: Book by Oakland University historian and a PBS show examine a 20th-Century evangelist’s visual appeal and vast power – Detroit Free Press, 3-31-07
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Titus Brown on “Robinson affected American society Ballplayer’s efforts led to changes across the country”: “Robinson created a sort of picture that all society should be integrated. That’s why we could see a shifting and changing in society in the mid-1950s. Breaking the color barrier did say, ‘Maybe it’s not so bad that you can have an African- American athlete participate in the so-called American sport. I think people started to rethink it after they saw Robinson.” – MLB.com, 4-14-07
    • Julius Thompson on “Robinson affected American society Ballplayer’s efforts led to changes across the country”: “If you break down barriers in one field, it directly impacts others, particularly economic, political and social. So for me, it had implications in all these other areas in advancing civil rights and general human rights in the United States and other countries.” – MLB.com, 4-14-07
    • Warren M. Billing on “Judge-judging commission keeps busy”: John Fournet “really grew into his black robes once he got on the bench in the 1930s. He became one of the foremost advocates in the country for judical reforms. By the time he retired in 1970, the Louisiana Supreme Court was one of the most efficient, well-managed in the nation.” – AP, 4-15-07
    • Robert Friedel on “Night, light: Bulb faces a dim future But don’t flip the switch just yet, even as technology pursues more energy- and cost-efficient forms to brighten our world”: “It’s pretty hard to imagine a world without electric light. In a sense, Edison’s technology spread astonishingly quickly. The electric lights spread more quickly than the digital computer did. We think of the computer accelerating technological change, but, in fact, when it comes to important stuff, not just the marvel of the iPod, the electric light moved much more rapidly.” – Orlando Sentinel, FL, 4-14-07
    SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
    • Alan Brinkley: Historian Gets Rock Star Treatment at MHS – Larchmont Gazette, NY, 4-12-07
    • Mary Beth Norton: Historian speaks about Salem witch trials – http://www.knoxnews.com, 4-6-07
    • May 2, 2007: James McPherson, Pulitzer prize-winning Civil War historian to speak at Vanderbilt University at 4:30 p.m. in Ingram Hall, is titled “When Will This Cruel War Be Over? The Failure of Peace Negotiations, 1864-1865.” – Vanderbilt University News, TN, 4-4-07
    • April 16, 2007: Pulitzer Prize-Winner Richard Ford at Depauw University for Crain Lecture – DePauw University, IN, 3-23-07
    • April 17, 2007: Peter Gay: To Deliver Klutznick Lecture at Northwestern University – http://www.juf.org, 3-26-07
    • April 18, 2007: Outstanding efforts honored with Heritage Awards the evening’s lecture will be presented by Mark David Hall, a professor at George Fox University’s Department of History and Political Science, Salem Oregon -
    • April 29, 2007: Jerry Apps: The Two Rivers Historical Society invites members and the public to take a look at “The Lighter Side of Life in the Country” during its annual meeting and “hoedown,” starting at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 29, at the Lighthouse Inn, 1515 Memorial Drive, Two Rivers – Herald Times Reporter, WI, 4-12-07
    • Harvey Mansfield: Picked to deliver the 2007 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities – Website of the National Endowment for the Humanities, 3-22-07
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
    ON TV:
    • C-Span2, Book TV : 2007 Abraham Lincoln Institute Symposium Panel Discussion at Sunday, April 15 at 11:10 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: The American Experience: “Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple” Monday, April 16, 2007 at 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy” Sunday, April 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Fort Knox: Secrets Revealed” Sunday, April 15, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The True Story of Alexander the Great,” Monday, April 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :The Real Dracula,” Monday, April 16, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :The Aztecs: Of Blood and Sacrifice,” Monday, April 16, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Lost Empire of Genghis Khaan,” Monday, April 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Cities of the Underworld,” Monday, April 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past : Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle,” Tuesday, April 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Earth’s Black Hole,” Tuesday, April 17, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :Great Lakes Ghost Ship,” Tuesday, April 16, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :The Other Nostradamus,” Tuesday, April 16, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine :JFK & the Crisis Crusader,” Tuesday, April 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Unsheathed,” Wednesday, April 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Is Shattered,” Wednesday, April 18, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Other Tragedy at Pearl Harbor,” Wednesday, April 18, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine :Doolittle’s Daring Raid.,” Wednesday, April 18, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The True Story of Killing Pablo,” Thursday, April 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Heroes Under Fire :Escape from Liberia,” Thursday, April 19, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Shootout :Tet Offensive,” Thursday, April 19, @ 6pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Tunnels of Vietnam.,” Thursday, April 19, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Countdown to Armageddon,” Friday, April 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Special: Sodom and Gemorrah,” Friday, April 20, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :The Holy Grail,” Friday, April 20, @ 5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Lost Evidence :19 – Battle of Berlin,” Friday, April 20, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Band Of Brothers” Marathon, Saturday, April 21, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Jonestown Paradise Lost,” Saturday, April 21, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The States :01 – California, North Carolina, Kansas, New Hampshire, West Virginia,” Saturday, April 21, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Sex in the Civil War,” Saturday, April 21, @ 11pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN #24 – 4-22-07
    NEW ON THE WEB:
    EXHIBITIONS:
    • “The White House Meets the Bulldozer:” A traveling exhibit from the White House Historical Association, on display through April 22 at the Greensboro Public Library gallery. The exhibit covers the Truman restoration. – Greensboro News Record, NC, 3-17-07
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Taylor Branch: Book on Bill Clinton Emerges From 8 Years of Tapes – NYT, 3-21-07
    • Jonathan M. Elukin: Living Together, Living Apart: Rethinking Jewish- Christian Relations in the Middle Ages, (Princeton University Press), April 2007
    • Philip Morgan: The Fall of Mussolini: Italians and the War, 1940-1945, (Oxford University Press), April 2007
    • Richard Croker: The Boomer Century 1946-2046: How America’s Most Influential Generation Changed Everything, (Springboard Press), April 2007
    • R. Emmett Tyrrell: The Clinton Crack-Up: The Boy President’s Life After the White House, (Nelson Current), April 2007
    • Stephen F. Hayes: Cheney: A Revealing Portrait of America’s Most Powerful Vice President, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Michael Stephenson: Patriot Battles: How the War of Independence Was Fought (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Saul Friedlander: Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945, Vol. 2, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 10, 2007
    • Georgina Howell: Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Lynne Olson: Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Robert Dallek: Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 24, 2007
    • Orville Vernon Burton: The Age of Lincoln, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), June 2007
    • Gabor Boritt (Editor): Slavery, Resistance, Freedom, (Oxford University Press, USA), June 2007
    • William C. Davis: Virginia at War 1862 (Editor) (University Press of Kentucky), June 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, April 15, 2007 at 6:58 PM

    April 9, 2007

    BIGGEST STORIES:
    HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

    • 04-02-1513 – Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon landed in Florida.
    • 04-02-1792 – Congress authorized the first U.S. mint, in Philadelphia.
    • 04-02-1865 – Confederate president Jefferson Davis and most of his cabinet fled the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va.
    • 04-02-1870 – Victoria Claflin Woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States.
    • 04-02-1917 – President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress to declare war against Germany.
    • 04-02-1932 – Charles Lindbergh paid a $50,000 ransom for the return of his kidnapped son.
    • 04-02-1982 – Argentina seized the Falkland Islands from Britain
    • 04-02-2005 – Pope John Paul II died.
    • 04-03-1882 – Outlaw Jesse James was shot in the back by Bob Ford, one of his own gang members, reportedly for a $10,000 reward.
    • 04-03-1936 – Bruno Hauptmann was electrocuted for the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby.
    • 04-03-1948 – President Truman signed the Marshall Plan, which would foster the recovery of war-torn Europe.
    • 04-04-1818 – Congress adopted a U.S. flag with one star for each state.
    • 04-04-1841 – President William Henry Harrison died from pneumonia, one month after his inauguration.
    • 04-04-1945 – The Ohrdruf death camp was liberated from Nazi occupation.
    • 04-04-1949 – The treaty establishing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was signed.
    • 04-04-1968 – Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated.
    • 04-04-1973 – The ribbon was cut to open the World Trade Center in New York City.
    • 04-05-1614 – Pocahontas married John Rolfe.
    • 04-05-1792 – George Washington cast the first presidential veto.
    • 04-05-1887 – Anne Sullivan makes the breakthrough to Helen Keller by spelling “water” in the manual alphabet.
    • 04-05-1951 – Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were sentenced to death for giving away atomic secrets to the Russians.
    • 04-05-1955 – Winston Churchill resigned as prime minister of Britain.
    • 04-06-1862 – The Battle of Shiloh in the American Civil War began.
    • 04-06-1896 – First modern Olympic Games opened in Athens, Greece.
    • 04-06-1917 – U.S. declared war on Germany and entered World War I.
    • 04-06-1994 – The presidents of Rwanda and Burundi were killed in a plane crash.
    • 04-07-1862 – Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the Confederates at the battle of Shiloh.
    • 04-07-1913 – 5,000 suffragists march to the Capitol in Washington, D.C. , seeking the vote for women.
    • 04-07-1927 – U.S. secretary of commerce Herbert Hoover’s Washington speech was seen and heard in New York in the first long-distance television transmission.
    • 04-07-1948 – The World Health Organization, a UN agency, was founded.
    • 04-07-1994 – Hutu extremists in Rwanda began massacring ethnic Tutsis and politically moderate Hutus. In 100 days of killing, an estimated 800,000 are murdered.
    • 04-08-1513 – Ponce de León claimed Florida for Spain.
    • 04-08-1913 – The 17th Amendment was ratified, requiring the direct election of U.S. senators by popular vote rather than by the state legislators.
    • 04-08-1935 – The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was approved by Congress to help alleviate joblessness during the Great Depression.
    • 04-08-1946 – The League of Nations assembled for the last time.
    • 04-09-1731 – Robert Jenkins’s ear was cut off, sparking the War of Jenkins’s Ear between Spain and England.
    • 04-09-1865 – Gen. Robert E. Lee surrendered to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House.
    • 04-09-1942 – American and Philippine troops on Bataan were overwhelmed by Japanese forces during World War II. The “Bataan Death March” began soon after.
    • 04-09-1959 – NASA announced the selection of America’s first astronauts, including Alan Shepard and John Glenn.
    • 04-09-1963 – Winston Churchill became the first honorary U.S. citizen.
    • 04-09-1992 – Former Panamanian ruler Manuel Noriega was convicted of drug and racketeering charges.
    • 04-09-2003 – American Marines pulled down Saddam Hussein’s statue in Baghdad after U.S. commanders declared his rule ended.
    • 04-10-1790 – The U.S. patent system was formed.
    • 04-10-1866 – The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) was chartered.
    • 04-10-1912 – Titanic set sail on its fateful voyage.
    • 04-10-1970 – Paul McCartney announced the official split of the Beatles.
    • 04-10-1974 – Israeli prime minister Golda Meir announced her resignation.
    • 04-10-1998 – The Northern Ireland “Good Friday Accord” was reached.
    • 04-11-1814 – Napoleon was exiled to the island of Elba.
    • 04-11-1899 – The treaty ending the Spanish-American War took effect.
    • 04-11-1945 – Allies liberated Buchenwald concentration camp.
    • 04-11-1951 – President Harry Truman fired General Douglas McArthur.
    • 04-11-1968 – President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the 1968 Civil Rights Act.
    • 04-11-1979 – Ugandan dictator Idi Amin was overthrown.
    • 04-11-1981 – President Ronald Reagan returned to the White House after he was shot in an assassination attempt.
    • 04-12-1861 – The Civil War began when Fort Sumter was attacked.
    • 04-12-1862 – James J. Andrews led the raiding party that stole the Confederate locomotive “The General,” inspiring the 1926 Buster Keaton movie.
    • 04-12-1945 – President Franklin Roosevelt died.
    • 04-12-1961 – Soviet cosmonaut Yuri A. Gagarin became the first human in space and also the first human to orbit the earth in a spacecraft.
    • 04-12-1999 – Arkansas federal judge Susan Webber Wright found President Clinton in contempt of court for lying about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky.
    • 04-13-1598 – The Edict of Nantes gave religious tolerance to the Huguenots in France.
    • 04-13-1964 – Sidney Poitier became the first African American to win the Academy Award for best actor.
    • 04-13-1970 – Apollo 13 announced “Houston, we’ve got a problem,” when an oxygen tank burst on the way to the Moon.
    • 04-13-1975 – Civil War began in Lebanon when gunmen killed 4 Christian Phalangists who retaliated by killing 27 Palestinians.
    • 04-14-1775 – Benjamin Rush was among those who founded the first American antislavery society.
    • 04-14-1828 – Noah Webster copyrighted the first edition of his dictionary.
    • 04-14-1860 – The first pony express rider reached his destination of San Francisco. He left St. Joseph, Mo., on April 3.
    • 04-14-1865 – Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth.
    • 04-14-1912 – Titanic hit the iceberg that would sink her the next morning.
    • 04-15-1861 – In response to the attack on Fort Sumter three days earlier, President Abraham Lincoln declared a state of insurrection and called out Union troops.
    • 04-15-1912 – Titanic sank off the coast of Newfoundland on its maiden voyage after it struck an iceberg.
    • 04-15-1920 – A paymaster and guard were murdered in Braintree, Mass. Sacco and Vanzetti were accused of the crime.
    • 04-15-1945 – Nazi concentration camp Bergen-Belsen was liberated by Canadian and British forces.
    IN THE NEWS:
    REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
    • JEFFREY FELDMAN: Framing the Debate, First Chapter – NYT 4-8-07
    • JEFFREY FELDMAN: Magic Words Framing the DebateNYT 4-8-07
    • Kevin Boyle on Elliot Jaspin: Ethnic Cleansing, American Style A reporter explores forgotten expulsions of blacks from their hometowns BURIED IN THE BITTER WATERS The Hidden History of Racial Cleansing in America WaPo, 4-8-07
    • Joseph J. Ellis on Hugh Brogan: Democracy’s Prophet How a young 19th-century French aristocrat grasped America’s character ALEXIS DE TOCQUEVILLE A LifeWaPo, 4-1-07
    • James T. Campbell on Karolyn Smardz Frost, Mary Kay Ricks: Bound for Freedom Celebrating the courage and ingenuity of the Underground Railroad – WaPo, 4-1-07
    • Robert Dallek: New book says Kissinger kept Nixon in the dark on Yom Kippur War – Reuters, 4-2-07
    • Morton Smith: Did the late historian make-up a fake “secret gospel”? – Peter Steinfels in the NYT, 3-31-07
    OP-ED:
    PROFILED:
    INTERVIEWED:
    FEATURE:
    QUOTED:
    • Frederick Kagan Says US is undermining the Mahdi militia: “Sure, those guys are going to get out of the line of fire. They’ll wait and see what happens and then design a way to come back and attack the U.S. position with tactics more favorable to them.We have not been allowing (the al-Mahdi Army) to lay low. We have been picking off the leaders in their senior organization. We have established a joint security station. That means we are operating on their home turf and tripping their networks.” – Fox News, 3-26-07
    • Bruce Cumings: U.S. historian says Korean unification unlikely while Kim Jong-il is in power – Yonhap News, South Korea, 3-27-07
    SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
    HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
    ON TV: History Listings This Week:

    • C-Span2, Book TV : Book TV presents James McPherson “This Mighty Scourge: Perspectives on the Civil War” at Sunday, April 8 at 7:00 pm and Monday, April 9 at 2:00 am C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, Book TV : Book TV presents William Marvel “Mr. Lincoln Goes to War” at Sunday, April 8 at 8:00 pm and Monday, April 9 at 3:00 am C-Span2, BookTV
    • C-Span2, Book TV : Book TV presents Presidential Biography Panel with David Greenberg, “Calvin Coolidge”; Ira Rutkow, “James Garfield”; and Sean Wilentz, “Andrew Jackson” at Sunday, April 8 at 10:25 pm C-Span2, BookTV
    • PBS: The American Experience: “Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple” Monday, April 16, 2007 at 9pm ET – PBS
    • History Channel: “Jesus of Nazareth” Sunday, April 8, @ 11am-7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Banned from The Bible Part 1 and 2″ Sunday, April 8, @ 7pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Banned from The Bible II” Sunday, April 8, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Breaking Vegas,” Monday, April 9, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Dead Reckoning :Tracings in Blood,” Monday, April 9, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Lost Treasures of the Copper Scroll,” Monday, April 9, @ 9pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Mayan Doomsday Prophecy,” Monday, April 9, @ 10pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Street Gangs: A Secret History,” Tuesday, April 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “The Big House :Attica Prison,” Tuesday, April 10, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Special :Meteors: Fire in the Sky,” Tuesday, April 10, @ 8pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Civil War Terror,” Wednesday, April 11, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Investigating History :Billy the Kid,” Wednesday, April 11, @ 4pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Inside the Volcano,” Thursday, April 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Walt Disney World,” Friday, April 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Dpgfights” Marathon, Saturday, April 14, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
    • History Channel: “Tora, Tora, Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor,” Saturday, April 14, @ 5pm ET/PT
    SELLING BIG (NYT):
    • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN #34 – 4-15-07
    NEW ON THE WEB:
    • U.S. Intellectual History blog: The editors of the weblog post news and information, short essays, book reviews and provocative conversation-starting questions, all in the area of U.S. intellectual history. – http://www.us-intellectual-history.blogspot.com
    EXHIBITIONS:
    • “The White House Meets the Bulldozer:” A traveling exhibit from the White House Historical Association, on display through April 22 at the Greensboro Public Library gallery. The exhibit covers the Truman restoration. – Greensboro News Record, NC, 3-17-07
    FUTURE RELEASES:
    • Taylor Branch: Book on Bill Clinton Emerges From 8 Years of Tapes – NYT, 3-21-07
    • Jonathan M. Elukin: Living Together, Living Apart: Rethinking Jewish- Christian Relations in the Middle Ages, (Princeton University Press), April 2007
    • Philip Morgan: The Fall of Mussolini: Italians and the War, 1940-1945, (Oxford University Press), April 2007
    • Richard Croker: The Boomer Century 1946-2046: How America’s Most Influential Generation Changed Everything, (Springboard Press), April 2007
    • R. Emmett Tyrrell: The Clinton Crack-Up: The Boy President’s Life After the White House, (Nelson Current), April 2007
    • Stephen F. Hayes: Cheney: A Revealing Portrait of America’s Most Powerful Vice President, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Michael Stephenson: Patriot Battles: How the War of Independence Was Fought (HarperCollins Publishers), April 3, 2007
    • Saul Friedlander: Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945, Vol. 2, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 10, 2007
    • Georgina Howell: Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Lynne Olson: Troublesome Young Men: The Rebels Who Brought Churchill to Power and Helped Save England, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), April 17, 2007
    • Robert Dallek: Nixon and Kissinger: Partners in Power, (HarperCollins Publishers), April 24, 2007
    • Orville Vernon Burton: The Age of Lincoln, (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), June 2007
    • Gabor Boritt (Editor): Slavery, Resistance, Freedom, (Oxford University Press, USA), June 2007
    • William C. Davis: Virginia at War 1862 (Editor) (University Press of Kentucky), June 2007
    DEPARTED:

    Posted on Sunday, April 8, 2007 at 3:21 PM

    Top Young Historians: 50 – Alan L. McPherson

    Top Young Historians

    Alan L. McPherson, 36

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate professor, Howard University, 2004-present
    Area of Research: U.S. foreign relations; U.S.-Latin American relations; resistance to U.S. power.
    Education: Ph.D., History, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2001
    Major Publications: McPherson is the author of Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations (Harvard University Press, 2003), which won the A. B. Thomas Award for Alan L. McPherson JPG Best Book of the Year from the Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies and was named Outstanding Academic Title for 2004 by Choice Magazine. He has since published three more books. The first, Intimate Ties, Bitter Struggles: The United States and Latin America since 1945 (Potomac Books, 2006) is a concise, up-to-date narrative with primary documents. The second is an edited volume titled Anti-Americanism in Latin America and the Caribbean (Berghahn Books, 2006). The third, co-edited with Ivan Krastev, is titled The Anti-American Century (Central European University Press, 2007).
    He is presently at work on Occupation and Resistance: The United States in Latin America, 1912-1934, on resistance to U.S. occupations in the Caribbean and Central America from 1912 to 1934. This second project takes him to various U.S. archives and to France, England, Nicaragua, and the Dominican Republic.
    Awards: McPherson is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    Yankee No! awarded A. B. Thomas Award for Best Book, Southeastern Council on Latin American Studies, 2005. Yankee No! named 2005 Outstanding Academic Title by Choice Magazine. Course Development Grant, Howard University, 2007;
    Fulbright Fellowship, Dominican Republic, 2006 Fulbright lecturer, Dominican History, UASD, Dominican Republic, 2006;
    Humanities Research Grant, Howard University, 2005-2006;
    Grant to enhance History Department’s multimedia, Howard University, 2004;
    Research Grant, University of Florida, Gainesville, 2004;
    Research Grant, Herbert Hoover Library, Iowa, 2004;
    Research Grant, Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, New York, 2004;
    New Faculty Research Grant, Howard University, 2003-2005;
    Travel Grant, Fund for Academic Excellence, Howard University, 2003;
    International Affairs Program, Howard University, 2002;
    Research Grant, Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Texas, 2001;
    Three Mellon Travel Awards, Duke-UNC Latin American Studies Program, for national and international travel, 2000;
    Dissertation Fellowship, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada for Research in U.S., Panama, and Dominican Republic, 1999-2001;
    Matching Grant, Social Science Research Council, 1999-2000;
    Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship to cover tuition and health care, Department of Education, 1999-2000;
    Research Grant, John F. Kennedy Library, Massachusetts, 1999;
    Mowry Award from UNC History Department for summer research, 1999;
    Research Assistantship, UNC History Department, 1998-1999;
    Mowry Award, UNC History Department and Tinker Field Research Grant from UNC Institute for Latin American Studies for travel to Cuba, 1998;
    Finalist, Outstanding Teaching Assistant, UNC History Department, 1997;
    International Predissertation Fellowship, Social Science Research Council for Research and training in U.S., Nicaragua, Panama, and the Dominican Republic and workshops in Lima, Peru, and Scottsdale, Arizona, 1997-1998.
    Additional Info:
    McPherson has also appeared as a commentator on television and has published op-ed pieces and refereed book chapters and articles in The Americas, the Latin American Research Review, Diplomatic History, the Brown Journal of World Affairs, Diplomacy and Statecraft, and Gender and History. He has written over a dozen book reviews and has presented at over two dozen national and international conferences ranging from Prague, Budapest, and Beirut to San Juan, Veracruz, and Santo Domingo.
    He has also been a television panelist, for “This is America with Dennis Wholey,” PBS-TV. Topic: “America Today: Historical Perspectives.” Aired first, live, on 11/23/2002.

    Personal Anecdote

    My path to the study of Latin American resistance to U.S. power has involved following the tensions of identity, personally and intellectually.

    I grew up Québécois, attending French-language schools through my undergraduate years and preparing for a journalism career. Suddenly I turned toward U.S. history and crossed the border for graduate degrees. Why I chose to do so remains somewhat of a mystery. To me, Canada was-and still is-an inviting, multicultural, egalitarian society, and the United States in contrast loomed as a dangerous, divided, unequal behemoth. Yet it was this turmoil in a land of virtuous ideals, recognized in the writings of U.S. historians such as Richard Hofstadter, Gary Nash, and Daniel Boorstin, that steered me south. Though these writers came from widely different political persuasions, their accessible, democratic sensibilities gave me hope. The clash of identities within U.S. nationalism made for vibrant academic traditions.

    In my adoptive country, I migrated back toward intellectual equilibrium by choosing to study how foreigners saw the United States. I was fascinated by anti-Americanism, a concept that offers a window into the tensions of global and national identities. There were the tensions within Latin America’s perceptions of the northern neighbor, what I have termed its ambivalence, a mixture of attraction and repulsion often acting simultaneously on the Latin American consciousness and forcing it to compartmentalize emotions and choose battles carefully. Tensions equally marked U.S. national identity when facing anti-Americanism: wanting to known “why they hate us” but refusing to change the behaviors that spurred that hate.

    All of this was before 9/11. I published Yankee No! in 2003 but had done the bulk of the research before that terrible event. That day recast the relevance of a topic that was headed for obscurity. Soon, however, I realized that the so-called ready audience for anti-Americanism studies was perhaps not so ready. Publishers were more than willing to take it on as a topic, and so were most colleagues, conference organizers, and students. Yet there was skepticism, mostly from those who wondered if anti-Americanism was a “useful category of analysis.” Even the U.S. government seemed of two minds. On one hand, it held conferences on foreign perceptions and graciously invited me to a few of them. On the other, the Bush White House, engaging in modern-day McCarthyism, included anti-Americanism among the many topics that would not be funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities-a decision that meant years of blacklisting for me.

    Through it all, I remain optimistic that an audience will always exist for what “they” have thought of “us” and why it mattered. Now engaged in a study of Latin American resistance to U.S. military occupations from 1912 to 1934, I hope to continue to produce a usable past. More important, I have found a good fit between historian and history. Being an insider-outside in the United States has forced me to confront my assumptions and know myself better, and I hope that U.S. citizens can use foreign criticisms in the same way, not to “bash America” or defend it “right or wrong” but to engage in a dialogue with the world about who they are and why they matter.

    Quotes

    By Alan L. McPherson

  • The alarm, anger, and soul-searching that followed September 11 stirred familiar Yankee No! JPG ghosts. In the decade or so starting in the mid-1950s, U.S. readers had surely felt similar emotions as they read the following headlines: “How Deep ‘Hate-America,’” “Why Is America Misunderstood?” “Anti-Americanism Sweeps World,” “Do They Like Us?” and “Why Do They Hate Us?” . . . . In the first half of the 1960s, there were more assaults on U.S. embassies and libraries abroad-one measure of anti-Americanism-than in the previous sixty years combined. . . . [T]he U.S. response to anti-Americanism revealed U.S. national identity: idealist, universalist, and exceptionalist. It suggested a uniquely Yankee way of approaching negative foreign public opinion. Anti-Americanism and U.S. responses to it exhibited then, as they do now, recurring patterns that went to the heart of U.S. relations with the outside world. — Alan L. McPherson in “Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • About Alan L. McPherson

  • “This timely, deeply researched, analytically rigorous, and handsomely written study probes the many anti-Americanisms that have bedeviled U.S. relations with Latin America. Why do they hate us?’ is an urgent question today. McPherson impressively demonstrates that it has profound historical roots that can inform caring policymakers eager to prevent global violence.” — Thomas G. Paterson, author of Contesting Castro reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “Alan McPherson has not only made a valuable contribution to the literature on U.S.-Latin American relations but, more importantly, he has provided a superb analysis of anti-Americanism by identifying its variability, its ambivalence, and the U.S. resilience in confronting the challenge during the critical years framed in this book. In his sophistication and in his writing he demonstrates all the attributes of a seasoned historian.” — Lester D. Langley, author of The Americas in the Modern Age reviewing “Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “McPherson examines the years from 1958 to 1966, when anti-Americanism was a prominent theme in inter-American diplomacy, to deliver a helpful reminder that anti-Americanism is not a new phenomenon nor a product only of the Middle East– and that it has been confronted quite effectively in the past, at least when its sources were sought out and taken seriously. He provides several vivid case studies, starting with the attacks on Vice President Richard Nixon in Caracas and continuing on to Cuba, Panama, and the Dominican Republic. Together, these examples show the variability and ambivalence of anti-Americanism; they also emphasize the importance of U.S. policies that respond to its challenges rather than dismissing it as a cynical invention of alienated elites…This well-written and balanced book should be required reading in the White House, in Langley, and around Foggy Bottom.” — Foreign Affairs reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “[Yankee No!] makes a singular contribution to our understanding of a generally neglected aspect of inter-American relations. It represents a bold attempt to add a cultural dimension to diplomatic history. The current upsurge in anti- Americanism across the globe in the wake of the Iraq war makes its appearance most timely.” — Philip Chrimes, International Affairs reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “This is a book that should be read by everyone interested in foreign relations, not merely historians specializing in the field but others in the academy and general public. Latin America has always been the testing ground for the development of U.S. foreign policies, and McPherson admirably takes these case studies and demonstrates the nature of anti-Americanism, one that bears a striking resemblance to the current global phenomenon.” — Kyle Longley, American Historical Review reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “[McPherson's] understanding of Latin American anti-Americanism and the U.S. response is more complex and has more analytical depth than any previous study. The book is extremely well researched in both U.S. archival and Spanish-language sources, and combines a rich discussion of U.S. foreign policy through three presidential administrations, with a sophisticated attention to larger domestic historical processes in both the United States and Latin America.” — David Sheinin, International History Review reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “Exquisitely timed…McPherson’s scrupulous historical account and subtle treatment of inter-American relations illuminates the dilemmas and complexities posed by the multiple variants of anti-Americanism. His superb study can help interpret contemporary political realities and the strains and challenges of managing global affairs in a decidedly unipolar world…McPherson treats ‘anti-Americanism’ precisely as it deserves to be treated–seriously, carefully, and with great sophistication.” — Michael Shifter, Georgetown Journal of International Affairs reviewing ” Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “The urgency of Alan McPherson’s excellent book increases daily during these tumultuous and sanguinary times. The United States would do well to heed his conclusion, that ‘arrogance in the face of aggression eventually produce[s] more aggression’… Yankee No! is a timely call to form a new genre of scholarly inquiry into the global phenomenon of anti-Americanism, which has not been treated widely heretofore.” — Eric Roorda, Hispanic American Historical Review reviewing” “Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • “McPherson expertly extends the field of U.S. foreign relations into social and cultural history. In his analysis of U.S. relations with Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Panama, he deftly avoids the trap of writing international history solely with the ‘view from Washington’ perspective. I unequivocally recommend it.” — Stephen Rabe, author of “Eisenhower and Latin America reviewing” “Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations”
  • Posted on Monday, April 16, 2007 at 5:55 PM

    Top Young Historians: 49 – Jocelyn H. Olcott

    Top Young Historians

    Jocelyn H. Olcott, 36

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of History at Duke University.
    Assistant Professor, Department of History, Duke University, September 2002 —
    Area of Research: The history of women’s activism and political change in post-revolutionary Mexico.
    Education: Doctor of Philosophy, history, Yale University, 2000
    Major Publications: Olcott is the author of Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico (Duke University Press, 2005), Jocelyn H. Olcott JPG and one of the editors of Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico, Jocelyn Olcott, Mary Kay Vaughan, and Gabriela Cano, eds. (Duke University Press, 2006). Olcott is currently working on a number of book projects; The Greatest Consciousness-Raising Event in History: Transnational Feminism and the 1975 International Women’s Year Conference; Sing What the People Sing: Concha Michel and the Cultural Politics of Mexican Maternalism; and Modern Love: Development Schemes and the Politics of Motherhood in Twentieth-Century Mexico
    Awards: Olcott is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of History, Duke University, 2006-2007;
    Center for the U.S. and the Cold War, New York University, Fall 2007;
    Grierson-Bain Travel Grant, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, March 2006;
    Duke University, Institute for Critical U.S. Studies Course Development Award, June 2005;
    Center for Instructional Technology, Duke University Instructional Technology Innovation Grant, “Voices from the North Carolina Latino Community,” Grant co-author and participant, September 2004 — ;
    Duke University Arts and Sciences Council Faculty Research Grant, July 2004;
    Duke University Latino Studies Course Development Award, September 2002;
    Donald D. Harrington Faculty Fellowship, University of Texas, Austin, September 2001— May 2002;
    Junior/Senior/General Faculty Research Award, California State University, Fullerton, June — August 2001;
    Mrs, Giles Whiting Dissertation Fellowship in the Humanities, October 1998—September 1999;
    Fulbright-García Robles Grant, Fulbright-IIE, January—October 1998;
    Henry Hart Rice Research Fellowship, Yale Center for International and Area Studies, January—August 1998;
    International Pre-Dissertation Fellowship, Social Science Research Council, September 1995—August 1996;
    Summer Research Grant, Yale Center for International and Area Studies, June—August 1995;
    Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship, US Department of Education, September 1994—May 1995;
    University Fellowship, Yale University, September 1993—May 1995 and September 1996—May 1998;

    Additional Info:
    Formerly an Assistant Professor, California State University, Fullerton, August 2000 — July 2002.

    Personal Anecdote

    I started college at a moment when Latin American Studies distinguished itself for its insistence on simultaneous engagement with both scholarship and politics. With its emphasis on Marxist paradigms, Latin American history centered on how power operates at the point of a gun or at the edge of poverty. I enjoyed the opportunity to work with scholars whose stature in the field I recognized only later: Miguel Centeno, Arcadio Díaz Quiñones, and, especially, the late Michael Jiménez. My luck held through graduate school, arriving during a brief window when both Gil Joseph and Emilia Viotti da Costa were training students. If there are shortcomings in my scholarship, I certainly can’t chalk it up to inadequately illustrious role models in my field!

    I began research in Mexico as an undergraduate working on a senior thesis. In my own Pudd’nhead Wilson fashion, I stumbled on a trove of documents in the national archive: 1930s registrations of Women’s Leagues for Social Struggle. It was my first time in Mexico City, and I was unaccustomed to the ways that this revolutionary language and practice pervaded the political culture. I took photos of every march along the Calle 5 de Mayo and every hunger strike on the main plaza – I had never seen such intense political mobilization. I ended up writing about women in the Mexican textile and garment industries but remained fascinated by those women’s leagues and convinced they were clear evidence of authentic revolutionary consciousness.

    After considering several other dissertation projects – every seminar seemed to raise compelling new research possibilities – I returned to studying these organizations as a window onto the gender politics of postrevolutionary Mexico. Mexico’s revisionist historiography had transformed my understanding of them; I now saw them as the imposition of a manipulative, consolidating regime. However, further research and reading pulled me toward what has emerged as a postrevisionist assessment: that the Mexican revolution did generate an atmosphere and a political infrastructure that, no matter how cynically motivated, allowed ordinary people to mobilize and make demands on the state in an unprecedented fashion. Using the language of revolutionary citizenship, women activists demanded radical transformations in their own labor conditions: the acquisition of mechanized corn mills; access to potable water; and the installation of schools, health clinics, and childcare facilities. While Mexican historiography has tended to concentrate on postrevolutionary land reform and labor legislation, it was the changes in the conditions of reproductive labor that revolutionized women’s lives.

    My repeated readings, mis-readings, and re-readings of this evidence drove home the importance of cultivating relationships with Mexican scholars who could help me develop more informed understandings of the materials I encountered. After completing my PhD, I received generous support from Yale’s Center for Latin American and Iberian Studies to initiate what has developed into the International Network for the Study of Mexican Gender History. Since the initial conference in 2001, we have organized three more conferences – another in the U.S. and two in Mexico – published three edited volumes, and developed a truly international network of scholars working in this area. Dozens of scholars from Mexico, the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. have dedicated countless hours to this project, which now involves scholars from the undergraduate level to the most esteemed senior faculty. It has been incredibly exciting to experience a field exploding in the way Mexican gender studies has.

    Quotes

    By Jocelyn H. Olcott

  • “Observers on all sides of the [Mexican] “woman question” assumed that the encounter between “women” and “politics” would have Revolutionary  Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico JPG some identifiable effect similar to two solid objects colliding. … Embedded within these deliberations lay the unspoken question of what these two categories – “women” (or, more often, the singular “woman”) and “politics” (also singular, la política) – meant in everyday practice. At a moment witnessing the international emergence of the “new woman” and the “modern girl,” along with welfare states and fascist-style corporatism, the definitions of women and of politics remained far less distinct, less solid, than contemporary observers implied. Interactions between women and politics more closely resembled a roughly choreographed dance than a collision. Most participants recognized certain moves; those less schooled in the political arts might misstep but still draw nearer to their objectives. Dancers changed partners and at times moved to entirely different rhythms.” — Jocelyn H. Olcott in “Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico”
  • About Jocelyn H. Olcott

  • “Jocelyn Olcott’s book combines impressive original research, lucid exposition, and keen insight. Three valuable case studies offer broad comparative analysis informed by telling details, examples, and anecdotes. Above all, the book successfully blends innovative women’s history with big, old, unresolved questions about popular mobilization, state-building, and the rise and fall of Cardenismo.” — Alan Knight, author of “The Mexican Revolution” reviewing “Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico”
  • “This book is extraordinarily important as a work of feminist political history. It’s a breathtakingly ambitious tour of Mexican women’s movements and feminist politics that will stand as a model for future histories of Latin American feminism and state formation.” — Heidi Tinsman, author of “Partners in Conflict: The Politics of Gender, Sexuality, and Labor in the Chilean Agrarian Reform, 1950–1973″ reviewing “Revolutionary Women in Postrevolutionary Mexico”
  • Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico  JPG “This anthology touches on a wide range of themes: female colonels in the revolution, machismo applied with scissor snips in Mexico City, the cinematographic treatment of indigenous women, divorce in conservative circles, women’s education, the construction of new families, labor-union life, rationalized sex, activism among women in Catholic and rural organizations, and sexism in the Popular Front. Despite the variety, the book offers a complex, coherent panorama, energetically distancing itself from generalizations. It is well known that God, the devil, and attentive readers are in the details.” — Carlos Monsiváis, from the foreword of “Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico”
  • “This path-breaking book fundamentally changes our view of the Mexican Revolution as a man-made affair. The women who struggled against patriarchal authority as workers, teachers, feminist activists, soldiers, peasants, students, and mothers come alive in these pages—as do their adversaries. The chapters brilliantly mesh theoretical analysis with fine-grained historical accounts of gendered challenges to Mexico’s social order. This book’s importance reaches far beyond the Mexican case as it grapples with universal questions of authority, gender, and revolution.” — Elizabeth Dore, author of “Myths of Modernity: Peonage and Patriarchy in Nicaragua” reviewing “Sex in Revolution: Gender, Politics, and Power in Modern Mexico”
  • “Excellent professor. Extremely intelligent. Accessible to students.”… “Wonderful professor – very interesting and easy to talk to. Gives great feedback on writing and is helpful with term papers. I would definitely recommend taking a class of hers.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, April 8, 2007 at 2:29 PM

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