History Buzz: July 2007

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

July 23, 2007

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
  • Martin Kramer: Joins Giuliani Campaign – Sandstorm, the blog of Martin Kramer, 7-17-07
  • Carl Sferrazza Anthony: A historian of America’s first ladies, believes that without anyone paying much attention, Bill Clinton has been playing such a role in public and providing insight into what his potential tenure as “First Gent” would be like. Anthony points out that, while the U.S. has yet to elect a woman president, other countries have had women presidents and prime ministers. But the men who have pioneered the first spouse role were not themselves former presidents. – AP, 7-20-07
BIGGEST STORIES:
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 07-23-1829 – William Burt patented a forerunner of the typewriter.
  • 07-23-1885 – Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th president of the United States, died at Mount McGregor, N.Y., at age 63.
  • 07-23-1914 – Austria and Hungary issued an ultimatum to Serbia after the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand, precipitating World War I.
  • 07-23-1945 – Vichy government leader Marshal Henri Petain went on trial for treason.
  • 07-23-1952 – Revolution erupted in Egypt as the military took power in a bloodless coup. The following year the monarchy was abolished and, for the first time since the pharaohs, Egypt was again ruled by Egyptians.
  • 07-24-1847 – Brigham Young and the first members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) arrived at the Great Salt Lake.
  • 07-24-1862 – Martin Van Buren, the eighth president of the United States, died in Kinderhook, N.Y.
  • 07-24-1866 – Tennessee became the first Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union.
  • 07-24-1937 – Charges against five black men accused of raping two white women in the Scottsboro case were dropped.
  • 07-24-1974 – The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that President Richard Nixon had to turn over White House tapes to the Watergate special prosecutor.
  • 07-25-1946 – The United States tested the first underwater atomic bomb at Bikini Atoll.
  • 07-25-1952 – Puerto Rico became a commonwealth of the United States.
  • 07-25-1978 – The world’s first test-tube baby, Louise Joy Brown, was born in Lancashire, England.
  • 07-25-1984 – Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space.
  • 07-26-1788 – New York became the 11th state in the United States.
  • 07-26-1847 – Liberia became Africa’s first republic.
  • 07-26-1908 – The Office of the Chief Examiner, which in 1935 became the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), was created.
  • 07-26-1947 – President Harry S Truman signed the National Security Act, creating the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
  • 07-26-1952 – Argentina’s first lady, Eva Peron, died in Buenos Aires at age 33.
  • 07-26-1952 – King Farouk I of Egypt abdicated after a coup led by Gamal Abdal Nasser.
  • 07-26-1953 – Fidel Castro was among a group of rebelling anti-Batistas who unsuccessfully attacked an army barracks.
  • 07-27-1861 – Union general George B. McClellan was put in command of the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War.
  • 07-27-1953 – An armistice was signed ending the Korean War.
  • 07-27-1974 – The House Judiciary Committee voted to impeach Richard Nixon for obstructing justice in the Watergate case.
  • 07-27-1995 – The Korean War Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC.
  • 07-27-1996 – A pipe bomb exploded in an Atlanta park during the Olympic Games.
  • 07-28-1540 – King Henry VIII of England’s chief minister, Thomas Cromwell, was executed and Henry married his fifth wife, Catherine Howard.
  • 07-28-1750 – The great baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach died.
  • 07-28-1794 – Robespierre, one of the leading figures of the French Revolution, was sent to the guillotine.
  • 07-28-1821 – Peru declared its independence from Spain.
  • 07-28-1868 – The 14th Amendment to the Constitution, which established the citizenship of African Americans and guaranteed due process of law, was ratified.
  • 07-28-1914 – Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, precipitating the start of World War I.
  • 07-28-1932 – Herbert Hoover ordered Douglas MacArthur to evict the Bonus Marchers from their camps.
  • 07-28-2002 – Nine Pennsylvania coal miners were rescued after 77 hours of being trapped in a mine shaft.
  • 07-29-1890 – Artist Vincent van Gogh died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound in Auvers, France.
  • 07-29-1958 – President Eisenhower signed the congressional act that created the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was authorized by Congress.
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Tim Weiner: Counter Intelligence LEGACY OF ASHES The History of the CIANYT, 7-22-07
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES The History of the CIA, First Chapter – NYT, 7-22-07
  • David Wise on Tim Weiner: Covert Action Has the CIA ever been good at intelligence gathering? LEGACY OF ASHES The History of the CIAWaPo, 7-22-07
  • Frederick Taylor: What Goes Up . . . How a notorious symbol divided a city and its residents THE BERLIN WALL A World Divided, 1961-1989WaPo, 7-22-07
  • Robert Dallek: How he handles Nixon in Nixon and Kissinger book – Michael Nelson in the Chronicle of Higher Education (CHE), 7-20-07
  • Tom Segev: Six-Day War, in Revisionist History, Was Provoked by Israelis – Bloomberg News, 7-19-07
  • Jeffrey Wasserstrom: New Essay Collection Takes a Nuanced Look at Modern China – Ascribe, 7-17-07
  • Eric Arnesen on Jack Beatty: Revising the revisionists Re-examining political and economic corruption during the Gilded Age Age of Betrayal: The Triumph of Money in America, 1865-1900Chicago Tribune, 7-14-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
  • Saul Friedlander: Holocaust historian seeks the whole story – LAT, 7-15-07
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Robert Allen on “Bill would make site of WWII explosion into a national park”: “Anyone who was close enough to see what happened didn’t survive. It was the worst home-front tragedy of World War II.” – AP, 7-20-07
  • Neville Kidd: Memorial a betrayal of Anzacs, says historian: “It is a travesty to the memory of nearly 2000 soldiers killed at Fromelles…. such a disgrace that the NSW Government is not prepared to add the name of our worst battle where so many Australians were slaughtered by a top German force…. Waves of soldiers mown down by machine-guns have been betrayed by bureaucrats who can’t be bothered making a simple change to the memorial.” – Sydney Morning Herald, 7-19-07
  • David Bercuson on “Homefront has more angst than usual”: “I think they’re out of step, generally speaking, when it comes to foreign-policy questions, out of step in the sense that they tend to be more cautious, they tend to come down more on the side of not using military forces. Part of it is that as a minority in this country that feels it has been burned in the past on major questions of national defence, it’s not in its own interest to support a vigorous, proactive military policy.” – National Post, Canada, 7-16-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
EXHIBITIONS:
  • Paul Hutton: Billy the Kid Still Rides in New Mexico – VOA, 7-14-07
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Kim MacQuarrie: “The Last Days of the Incas”, Sunday, July 23 @ 9:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : After Words: Larry Berman, author of “Perfect Spy: The Incredible Double Life of Pham Xuan An – Time Magazine Reporter & Vietnamese Communist Agent” interviewed by Robert Kaiser, Sunday, July 23 @ 10:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers,” Monday, July 23, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :12 – Secret Pagan Underground,” Monday, July 23, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :13 – Underground Bootleggers” Monday, July 23, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : Da Vinci & the Code He Lived By,” Tuesday, July 24, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine :Galileo & the Sinful Spyglass,” Tuesday, July 24, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Return of the Pirates,” Wednesday, July 25, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :Secret Underwater Caves,” Wednesday, July 25, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Mysteries on the High Seas,” Wednesday, July 25, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Gold Mines,” Wednesday, July 25, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files :Texas’ Roswell,” Wednesday, July 25, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Dangerous Territory,” Friday, July 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special :Rogue Waves,” Friday, July 27, @ 4pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #8 (14 weeks on list) – 7-29-07
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #12 (8 weeks on list) – 7-29-07
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES #13 (1 week on list) – 7-29-07
  • Michael Beschloss: PRESIDENTIAL COURAGE, #21 – 7-29-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Kathryn C. Statler: Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam, (University Press of Kentucky) July 28, 2007
  • Richard B. Frank, MacArthur: A Biography, (Palgrave Macmillan), July 28, 2007
  • Woody Holton: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, (Hill and Wang, August 7, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2007 at 5:49 PM

July 16, 2007

LADY BIRD JOHNSON (1912-2007): Lady Bird JPG

Lady Bird JPG
Lady Bird JPG

  • Lady Bird Johnson Tribute Site
  • PBS NewsHour – Lady Bird Johnson
  • Michael Beschloss: historian Michael Beschloss reflected on her life and legacy on the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. (mp3) – PBS NewsHour, 7-13-07
  • Lewis L. Gould: Remembering Lady Bird Johnson First Lady Recalled as Charming, Media Savvy and Deeply Connected to Nature – WaPo, 7-12-07
  • Robert A. Caro: “She conducted herself, often in the most difficult circumstances, with a graciousness and dignity and total devotion to her husband that was heroic.”… “She already had this dignity, no matter how he yelled at her, but she transformed herself from the shy young woman afraid of speaking in public into the poised, dignified, gracious first lady the American people would come to admire in later years. It’s an act of willpower and heroism that is very thrilling.” – WaPo, 7-12-07
  • Gil Troy: “She went one step further than her heroine and role model Eleanor Roosevelt by being more intimately involved in the president’s day to day life and political career. If Eleanor Roosevelt showed just how influential a first lady could be in advancing her own concerns, Lady Bird Johnson demonstrated just how influential a first lady could be in shaping and selling the president’s agenda…. She pushed him to invoke themes of self-sacrifice and patriotism, to work in references to World War II and to blame Congress squarely for failing to fund the Vietnam war properly. This intervention typified ‘Bird’s’ great influence and her role in protecting Lyndon and trying to position him on the grand historical stage.” – NPR, 7-12-07
BIGGEST STORIES:
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:
  • 07-16-1790 – The District of Columbia was established as the seat of the United States government.
  • 07-16-1918 – Russia’s Czar Nicholas II and his family were executed by the Bolsheviks.
  • 07-16-1945 – The first atomic bomb was tested in Alamogordo, N.M.
  • 07-16-1951 – J. D. Salinger’s novel Catcher in the Rye was published.
  • 07-16-1969 – Apollo 11 took off on the first manned flight to the moon.
  • 07-16-1979 – Saddam Hussein became president of Iraq.
  • 07-16-1999 – John F. Kennedy, Jr., his wife Carolyn Bessette, and her sister Lauren, died in a plane crash near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts.
  • 07-17-1821 – Spain ceded Florida to the United States.
  • 07-17-1898 – Spain surrendered to the United States at Santiago, Cuba, ending the Spanish-American War.
  • 07-17-1917 – The British royal family changed its name from the House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor amid anti-German senitment during World War I.
  • 07-17-1945 – President Harry Truman, Soviet leader Joseph Stalin and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill meet at the opening of the Potsdam Conference.
  • 07-17-1955 – Disneyland opened in Anaheim, Calif.
  • 07-17-1975 – The American Apollo and Soviet Soyuz spacecraft linked up for the first time.
  • 07-17-1998 – The last Russian Czar Nicholas II was buried 80 years after he and his family were executed by the Bolsheviks.
  • 07-18-0064 – A great fire began that ultimately destroyed most of Rome. The emperor Nero blamed it on Christians and began the first Roman persecution of them.
  • 07-18-1936 – The Spanish Civil War began.
  • 07-18-1947 – President Harry S. Truman signed the Presidential Succession Act.
  • 07-19-1848 – The first women’s rights convention, called by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Lucretia C. Mott, was held in Seneca Falls, New York.
  • 07-19-1870 – The Franco-Prussian war began.
  • 07-19-1941 – Winston Churchill was the first to use the two-finger “V is for Victory” sign.
  • 07-19-1984 – Geraldine Ferraro became the first woman nominated for the vice-presidency by a major political party.
  • 07-19-1993 – President Clinton announced the “Don’t ask, don’t tell” policy regarding gays in the military.
  • 07-20-1810 – Colombia declared independence from Spain.
  • 07-20-1881 – Fugitive Sioux Indian leader Sitting Bull surrendered to federal troops.
  • 07-20-1951 – King Abdullah I of Jordan was assassinated.
  • 07-20-1960 – Sirima Bandaranaike of Sri Lanka (then Ceylon) became the world’s first woman prime minister.
  • 07-20-1969 – Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong was the first man to walk on the Moon.
  • 07-20-1985 – Treasure hunters found the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Atocha, which sank off the coast of Key West, Fla., in 1622 during a hurricane. The ship contained over $400 million in coins and silver ingots.
  • 07-21-1861 – Confederate forces won victory at Bull Run in the first major battle of the Civil War.
  • 07-21-1873 – The first train robbery west of the Mississippi was pulled off by Jesse James and his gang.
  • 07-21-1925 – In the “Monkey Trial,” John T. Scopes was found guilty of violating Tennessee state law by teaching evolution.
  • 07-21-1949 – The U.S. Senate ratified the North Atlantic Treaty.
  • 07-21-1970 – The Aswan High Dam was opened in Egypt.
  • 07-21-1998 – Astronaut Alan Shepard died.
  • 07-21-2002 – WorldCom filed for bankruptcy, the largest bankruptcy in U.S. history.
  • 07-22-1796 – Cleveland, Ohio, was founded by Gen. Moses Cleaveland.
  • 07-22-1933 – Wiley Post became the first person to fly solo around the world.
  • 07-22-1934 – John Dillinger was shot to death outside Chicago’s Biograph Theater.
  • 07-22-1937 – Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “court packing” scheme was rejected by the U.S. Senate.
  • 07-22-1975 – Congress restored Confederate general Robert E. Lee’s U.S. citizenship.
  • 07-22-2003 – Saddam Hussein’s sons, Uday and Ousay, were killed in a firefight.
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Carl Bernstein, Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.: Good Hillary, Bad Hillary A WOMAN IN CHARGE The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton HER WAY The Hopes and Ambitions of Hillary Rodham Clinton. - NYT, 7-15-07
  • Carl Bernstein: A WOMAN IN CHARGE The Life of Hillary Rodham Clinton, First Chapter – NYT, 7-15-07
  • Jeff Gerth and Don Van Natta Jr.: HER WAY The Hopes and Ambitions of Hillary Rodham Clinton, First Chapter – NYT, 7-15-07
  • Tom Segev: Peace for Land 1967 Israel, the War, and the Year That Transformed the Middle EastNYT, 7-15-07
  • Molly O’Neill, ed: The Gastronomical We – AMERICAN FOOD WRITING An Anthology With Classic RecipesNYT, 7-15-07
  • Bill Clinton: Mastering the Presidency (By Nigel Hamilton) The Seat-of-the-Pants Presidency Bill Clinton’s first term was a shaky enterprise – WaPo, 7-15-07
  • The Conviction of Richard Nixon: The Untold Story of the Frost/Nixon Interviews (By James Reston Jr.) Trial by Television – WaPo, 7-15-07Cheney: The Untold Story of America’s Most Powerful And Controversial Vice President (By Stephen F. Hayes) American Enigma A journalist attempts to plumb the depths of our secretive vice president – WaPo, 7-15-07
  • Tim Weiner: Beschloss says NYT reporter has written solid history of CIA – NYT Book Review, 7-12-07
  • Paul Moon: Historian Wades Into Auckland Treaty Claim Controversy – http://www.scoop.co.nz, 7-10-07
  • John Agresto: Mugged by reality in Iraq – David Forsmark at frontpagemag.com, 7-10-07
  • Oliver Pollak: Collaborates on history of the University of Nebraska – Press Release–UNO, 7-10-07
  • Ian Kershaw: Ten Decisions That Changed the World, 1940-1941 – Max Boot in the NYT Book Review 7-8-07
  • Gunter Grass: Friend John Irving in front page NYT Book Review praises his honesty about Nazi connections – NYT Book Review, 7-8-07
  • Tim Weiner: NYT reporter pens history of CIA – Seattle Times, 7-6-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Timothy Naftali: “I’m a historian. I can’t sugar-coat things. History is messy, dramatic, exciting. There are good people and bad people and that’s what makes it interesting. You have to tell history with the bark off.”
  • Linda Colley on “Windows Open on Royal Family’s Wealth”: “What is different about Britain, its particular accident, is that it was a winner in the wars and, unlike other European states, it kept its monarchy and kept its residual state of glory and stature, this carapace of splendor. They have not yet become neutered.” – NYT, 7-15-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINT-MENTS:
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
ON TV:
  • C-Span2, Book TV : After Words: Tim Weiner author of “Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA” interviewed by David Ignatius, Sunday, July 15 @ 9:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Is Forged,” Monday, July 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Unsheathed,” Monday, July 16, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Gestapo :The Sword Is Shattered,” Monday, July 16, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :11 – Dracula’s Underground,” Monday, July 16, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :12 – Secret Pagan Underground” Monday, July 16, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Digging For The Truth :Search for King David,” Monday, July 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Garden of Eden,” Monday, July 16, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hell: The Devil’s Domain,” Tuesday, July 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Sharp Shooters,” Wednesday, July 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power,” Thursday, July 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Other Tragedy at Pearl Harbor,” Thursday, July 19, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Tunnels of Vietnam,” Thursday, July 19, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Cotton,” Thursday, July 19, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Star Wars: The Legacy Revealed,” Friday, July 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Our Generation :Apollo 11: The Moon Landing,” Friday, July 20, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Our Generation :Motown,” Friday, July 20, @ 6:30pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake,” Saturday, July 21, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Cults: Dangerous Devotion,” Saturday, July 21, @ 10pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #7 (7 weeks on list) – 7-22-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #8 (13 weeks on list) – 7-22-07
  • Michael Beschloss: PRESIDENTIAL COURAGE, #13 (9 weeks on list) – 7-22-07
  • Carl Bernstein: A WOMAN IN CHARGE: THE LIFE OF HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, #17 – 7-22-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Kathryn C. Statler: Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam, (University Press of Kentucky) July 28, 2007
  • Richard B. Frank, MacArthur: A Biography, (Palgrave Macmillan), July 28, 2007
  • Woody Holton: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, (Hill and Wang, August 7, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, July 15, 2007 at 9:23 PM

July 9, 2007

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
    • Fred Thompson Aided Nixon on Watergate – AP, 7-7-07
    • Michael Beschloss on “Divorce not a political deal-breaker”: “If candidates can’t bear up under full disclosure, they have no business being in politics.” – Contra Costa Times, 7-5-07
  • Presidential Campaign 2008 Watch

BIGGEST STORIES:
  • Felipe Fernandez-Armesto: Whatever Happened to the Investigation of His Arrest for Jaywalking by the Atlanta police? – HNN Staff, 7-5-07
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 07-09-1816 – Argentina formally declared independence from Spain.
  • 07-09-1850 – Zachary Taylor, the 12th president of the U.S., died after only 16 months in office.
  • 07-09-1872 – The doughnut cutter was patented by John F. Blondel of Thomaston, Me.
  • 07-09-1896 – William Jennings Bryan delivered his “cross of gold” speech at the Democratic National Convention.
  • 07-09-1900 – The British Parliament proclaimed that as of Jan. 1, 1901, the six Australian colonies would be united at the Commonwealth of Australia.
  • 07-09-1974 – Former U.S. chief justice Earl Warren died in Washington, DC.
  • 07-09-2002 – Baseball’s All-Star Game ended in a tie after 11 innings. Both sides had run out of pitchers.
  • 07-10-1890 – Wyoming became the 44th state in the United States.
  • 07-10-1940 – The Battle of Britain began.
  • 07-10-1951 – Armistice talks to end the Korean War began at Kaesong.
  • 07-10-1973 – The Bahamas became independent from Great Britain.
  • 07-10-1985 – The Coca-Cola Company announced that it was bringing back the original Coke and calling it Coca-Cola Classic.
  • 07-10-1991 – President Bush lifted economic sanctions against South Africa.
  • 07-10-1991 – Boris Yeltsin was sworn in as Russia’s first elected president.
  • 07-10-2003 – Spain opened its first mosque (in Granada) since the Moors were expelled in 1492.
  • 07-11-1533 – Pope Clement VII excommunicated England’s King Henry VIII.
  • 07-11-1804 – Former vice president Aaron Burr fatally wounded former secretary of the treasury Alexander Hamilton in a duel. Hamilton died the following afternoon.
  • 07-11-1864 – Confederate general Jubal A. Early and his troops attacked Washington, DC. They retreated the next day, ending the Confederate threat to occupy the capital.
  • 07-11-1914 – Babe Ruth made his major league baseball debut as a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox.
  • 07-11-1977 – The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his work to advance civil rights.
  • 07-11-1995 – The United States and Vietnam established full diplomatic relations.
  • 07-12-1543 – England’s King Henry VIII married his sixth and last wife, Catherine Parr.
  • 07-12-1690 – Protestant William of Orange defeated Roman Catholic James II at the Battle of the Boyne in Ireland.
  • 07-12-1862 – Congress authorized the Medal of Honor.
  • 07-12-1984 – Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale became the first major-party candidate to choose a woman as a running mate when he announced his choice of Geraldine Ferraro.
  • 07-13-1793 – French revolutionary Jean Paul Marat was stabbed to death in his bath by royalist sympathizer Charlotte Corday.
  • 07-13-1863 – The draft riots, protesting unfair conscription in the Civil War, began in New York City.
  • 07-13-1865 – P. T. Barnum’s American Museum, which had featured Tom Thumb and the original Siamese twins Chang and Eng, was destroyed by fire.
  • 07-13-1930 – The first World Cup soccer competition began in Montevideo, Uruguay.
  • 07-13-1943 – The Battle of Kursk, the largest tank battle in history—involving some 6,000 tanks, 2,000,000 troops, and 4,000 aircraft—ended in German defeat.
  • 07-13-1977 – A 25-hour blackout hit New York City, engendering widespread rioting and looting.
  • 07-13-2003 – Iraq’s interim governing council was inaugurated.
  • 07-14-1789 – The storming and destruction of Bastille marked the beginning of the French Revolution.
  • 07-14-1798 – Congress passed the Sedition Act, making it a crime to publish false, scandalous, or malicious writing about the U.S. government.
  • 07-14-1881 – Billy the Kid was shot by Sheriff Pat Garrett in New Mexico.
  • 07-14-1921 – In one of the most controversial cases in U.S. history, anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were convicted of two murders and sentenced to death.
  • 07-14-1933 – In Germany, all political parties except the Nazi party were outlawed.
  • 07-14-1946 – Dr. Spock’s Common Sense Book of Baby & Child Care was published.
  • 07-14-1958 – A military coup overthrew the monarchy in Iraq, killing King Faisal II. General Abdul Karim Kassem becomes Iraq’s leader.
  • 07-15-1870 – Georgia became the last of the Confederate States to be readmitted to the Union.
  • 07-15-1918 – The Second Battle of the Marne began during World War I.
  • 07-15-1948 – John J. Pershing, whose leadership in World War I earned him the title General of the Armies of the United States, died in Washington, DC.
  • 07-15-1975 – The Russian Soyuz and the U.S. Apollo launched. The Apollo-Soyuz mission was the first international manned spaceflight.
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Stephen Hess on “‘Scooter’ Libby move helps seal Bush’s Iraq legacy”: “It closes one chapter of the sort of life-draining issue of George W Bush and Iraq. It’s totally in keeping with everything he’s done up to now, including his sense of loyalty to his people.” — Reuters, 7-3-07
  • David Greenberg on the Nixon Library: “Everybody who visited it, who knew the first thing about history, thought it was a joke. You didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.” – LAT, 7-8-07
  • Howard Zinn: Why we fly the flag – Boston Globe, 7-8-07
  • Theodore Roszak, William Seraile, Michael Kazin: Historians say where they were during the summer of love, 40 years ago – From a survey of 17 academics conducted by the Chronicle of Higher Ed, 7-2-07
  • Bill Gammage: Aussie historian lashes out at Turkey for putting a road through a cemetery for war dead – http://canberra.yourguide.com.au, 7-1-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
NEW ON THE WEB:
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Joan Quigley “The Day The Earth Caved In: An American Mining Tragedy” @ Sunday, July 8 at 11:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :07 – Catacombs of Death,” Sunday, July 8, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Amazon Adventures,” Monday, July 9, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :George Washington Bridge,” Monday, July 8, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :09 – Freemason Underground,” Monday, July 8, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :11 – Dracula’s Underground” Monday, July 8, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree,” Monday, July 8, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Big America,” Tuesday, July 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Investigating History :Billy the Kid,” Tuesday, July 10, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Statue of Liberty,” Tuesday, July 10, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : Rome: Engineering an Empire,” Wednesday, July 11, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :The Chrysler Building,” Wednesday, July 11, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History.,” Thursday, July 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Empire State Building,” Thursday, July 12, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Churchill’s Secret Bunkers,” Thursday, July 12, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights,” Marathon Friday, July 13, @ 2-6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The World Trade Center: Rise and Fall of an American Icon,” Friday, July 13, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :Kamikaze,” Friday, July 13, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights: The Greatest Air Battles,” Saturday, July 14, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Cities Of The Underworld :01 – Hitler’s Underground Lair,” Saturday, July 14, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :10 – Beneath Vesuvius,” Saturday, July 14, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :11 – Dracula’s Underground,” Saturday, July 14, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :04 – Scotland’s Sin City,” Saturday, July 14, @ 11pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #5 (6 weeks on list) – 7-15-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #8 (12 weeks on list) – 7-15-07
  • Michael Beschloss: PRESIDENTIAL COURAGE, #11 (8 weeks on list) – 7-15-07
  • Carl Bernstein: A WOMAN IN CHARGE: THE LIFE OF HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, #20 – 7-15-07 >
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Bill Yenne: Rising Sons: The Japanese-American GIs Who Fought for the United States in World War II, (St. Martin’s Press, July 10, 2007)
  • Kathryn C. Statler: Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam, (University Press of Kentucky) July 28, 2007
  • Richard B. Frank, MacArthur: A Biography, (Palgrave Macmillan), July 28, 2007
  • Woody Holton: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, (Hill and Wang, August 7, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, July 8, 2007 at 9:27 PM

July 2, 2007

AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE DAY:
  • Dinesh D’Souza: Ten Great Things About America – AOL, 7-1-07
PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
    • Cal Jillson on “McCain’s Run For Presidential Candidacy In Trouble”: “He is crosswise to conservatives on immigration, and the people who were most excited about him in 2000 – the moderate Republicans – are mad at him on Iraq. The political base is just not there for him in nearly the same way it was in 2000, and he’s eight years older.” – NEWSPost India, 6-18-07
  • Presidential Campaign 2008 Watch

BIGGEST STORIES:
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 07-02-1881 – President James Garfield was shot by Charles Guiteau; he died on Sept. 19.
  • 07-02-1890 – Congress passed the Sherman Antitrust Act.
  • 07-02-1937 – Amelia Earhart and her co-pilot Fred Noonan disappeared over the Pacific Ocean while attempting to fly around the world.
  • 07-02-1964 – President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 into law.
  • 07-02-1976 – In Gregg v. Georgia, the Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty was not inherently cruel or unusual.
  • 07-03-1608 – Samuel de Champlain founded the city of Quebec.
  • 07-03-1775 – Commander in chief George Washington took command of the Continental Army at Cambridge, Mass.
  • 07-03-1863 – The Battle of Gettysburg ended.
  • 07-03-1890 – Idaho became the 43rd state in the United States.
  • 07-03-1930 – The U.S. Veterans Administration was created by Congress.
  • 07-03-1962 – Jackie Robinson became the first African-American to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame.
  • 07-03-1962 – Algeria became independent after 132 years of French rule.
  • 07-04-1776 – The U.S. declared independence from Great Britain.
  • 07-04-1826 – Former presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson both died.
  • 07-04-1831 – Former president James Monroe died.
  • 07-04-1884 – The Statue of Liberty was presented to the United States in Paris.
  • 07-04-1895 – Katharine Lee Bates published America the Beautiful.
  • 07-04-1939 – Lou Gehrig, stricken with ALS, made his farewell at Yankee Stadium.
  • 07-04-1976 – The United States celebrated its bicentennial.
  • 07-05-1811 – Venezuela became the first South American country to declare independence from Spain.
  • 07-05-1865 – William Booth formed the Salvation Army in London, England.
  • 07-05-1946 – Larry Doby signed with the Cleveland Indians, becoming the first African American player in the American League.
  • 07-05-1954 – Elvis Presley recorded “That’s All Right,” his first commercial record.
  • 07-05-1975 – Cape Verde became independent after 500 years of Portuguese rule.
  • 07-05-1975 – Arthur Ashe became the first black man to win a Wimbledon singles title when he defeated Jimmy Connors.
  • 07-05-1996 – Dolly, the first sheep cloned from adult cells, was born.
  • 07-06-1535 – Sir Thomas More was beheaded after refusing to join Henry VIII’s Church of England.
  • 07-06-1885 – Louis Pasteur successfully treated a patient with a rabies vaccine.
  • 07-06-1942 – Anne Frank and her family sought refuge from the Nazis in Amsterdam.
  • 07-06-1944 – A fire caused by inept fire-eaters in the main tent of the Ringling Brothers Circus in Hartford, Conn., killed over 160 people.
  • 07-06-1957 – Althea Gibson won the Wimbledon women’s singles tennis title. She was the first black person to win the event.
  • 07-07-1456 – Twenty-five years after her execution, Pope Calixtus III annulled the heresy charges brought against Joan of Arc.
  • 07-07-1846 – Commodore John D. Sloat occupied Monterey and declared California annexed to the United States.
  • 07-07-1898 – The United States annexed Hawaii.
  • 07-07-1946 – Italian-born Mother Frances Xavier Cabrini was canonized, becoming the first American saint.
  • 07-07-1981 – President Ronald Reagan nominated Sandra Day O’Connor for the Supreme Court.
  • 07-07-2005 – 52 people were killed and hundreds injured in London when terrorists bombed subways and a bus.52 people were killed and hundreds injured in London when terrorists bombed subways and a bus.
  • 07-08-1776 – The first public reading of the Declaration of Independence was given in Philadelphia, Pa.
  • 07-08-1777 – Vermont became the first colony to abolish slavery.
  • 07-08-1889 – The Wall Street Journal began publication.
  • 07-08-1950 – General Douglas MacArthur was named commander-in-chief of the United Nations forces in Korea.
  • 07-08-1958 – The Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) awarded the first official gold album. It was for the Oklahoma soundtrack.
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Marcus Mabry: Madame Secretary TWICE AS GOOD Condoleezza Rice and Her Path to Power NYT, 7-1-07
  • COVER REVIEWS: AMERICANA Born on the Fourth of July Three books look to the past for clues to our nation’s future – WaPo, 7-1-07
  • Cullen Murphy: COVER REVIEWS AMERICANA All Hail America? ARE WE ROME? The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of AmericaWaPo, 7-1-07
  • Jon Meacham on William W. Freehling: Before the Cannon Fired A scholar examines the forces and people that helped start the Civil War THE ROAD TO DISUNION Volume II: Secessionists Triumphant, 1854-1861WaPo, 7-1-07
  • Fergus M. Bordewich on Beverly Lowry: A Woman Called Moses The legendary exploits of a heroine who went from bondage to bravery HARRIET TUBMAN Imagining a Life
  • Saul Friedlander: Challenges the view that the Holocaust was simply the result of bureaucrats doing what they were told – Richard Evans in the NYT Book Review, 6-24-07
  • Gil Troy on Patrice Higonnet: History as an extended blog post – newsobserver.com, 6-17-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Michael Klarman: Doubts Court ruling on schools will have much effect–says not even Brown did: “Just as Brown produced massive resistance in the South and therefore had little impact on desegregation for a decade, this decision is going to be similarly inconsequential. This affects only the tiny percentage of school districts that use race to assign students, and even in those districts, like Louisville and Seattle, it won’t be consequential because there are so many opportunities for committed school boards to circumvent it.” – NYT, 7-1-07
  • Gil Troy on “Attacks replace issues; politics turns poisonous”: “American politics has always had a nasty side, but there’s a sense that it has a darker edge, has become more venomous, because it’s pumped out 24/7. Now it’s all nastiness, all the time…. People have always used foils in politics. Through their excesses, Limbaugh, O’Reilly and Coulter provide liberals with made-to-order caricatures of what they consider the worst aspects of the Republicans; Franken and Olbermann are the perfect liberal foils for Republicans. They feed off each other, sadly distorting our politics.” – newsobserver.com, 7-1-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
NEW ON THE WEB:
  • Holly Cowan Shulman: Exploring Digital History – A new blog through the Virginia Center for Digital History on history and documentary editing and the electronic media.
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Joseph Wheelan “Invading Mexico: America’s Continental Dream And The Mexican War, 1846-1848,” @ Sunday, July 1 at 8:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Jules Witcover “Very Stange Bedfellows: The Short And Unhappy Marriage Of Richard Nixon And Spiro Agnew,” @ Sunday, July 1 at 11:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “The States” Marathon, Monday, July 2, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Star Wars: The Legacy Revealed” Monday, July 2, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Star Trek: Beyond the Final Frontier,” Monday, July 2, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents” Marathon, Tuesday, July 3, @ 2-6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution” Marathon, Wednesday, July 4, @ 10am-11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Eats: History on a Bun,” Thursday, July 5, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Eats :Ice Cream,” Thursday, July 5, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files” Marathon, Friday, July 6, @ 2-6:30pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Band Of Brothers” Marathon, Saturday, July 7, @ 1:30-8pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #2 (5 weeks on list) – 7-08-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #7 (11 weeks on list) – 7-08-07
  • Michael Beschloss: PRESIDENTIAL COURAGE, #9 (7 weeks on list) – 7-08-07
  • Carl Bernstein: A WOMAN IN CHARGE: THE LIFE OF HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON, #14 (3 weeks on list) – 7-08-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Bill Yenne: Rising Sons: The Japanese-American GIs Who Fought for the United States in World War II, (St. Martin’s Press, July 10, 2007)
  • Kathryn C. Statler: Replacing France: The Origins of American Intervention in Vietnam, (University Press of Kentucky) July 28, 2007
  • Richard B. Frank, MacArthur: A Biography, (Palgrave Macmillan), July 28, 2007
  • Woody Holton: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, (Hill and Wang, August 7, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, July 1, 2007 at 6:41 PM

Top Young Historians: 61- Edward P. Kohn

Top Young Historians

Edward P. Kohn, 38

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Assistant Professor Bilkent University, Ankara, Turkey (2003-), Acting Chair (January-July 2007), Department of American Culture and Literature.
Area of Research: Twentieth century U.S. history and history of U.S. foreign relations, diplomatoc history.
Education: Ph.D. in History, McGill University, Montréal, Canada, May 2000.
Major Publications: Kohn is the author of This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903 (McGill-Queen’s University Press, December 2004), Edward P. Kohn  JPG He currently working on a new book manuscript tentively entitled A Hot Time in the Old Town: Theodore Roosevelt, William Jennings Bryan, and New York’s Killer Heat Wave of 1896.
Kohn is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles including: “A Necessary Defeat: Theodore Roosevelt and the New York Mayoral Election of 1886,” New York History, Spring 2006; “Crossing the Rubicon: Theodore Roosevelt, Henry Cabot Lodge, and the 1884 Republican National Convention,” Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, 5, 1, January 2006; and “‘The Member from Michigan’: The Political Isolation and Unofficial Diplomacy of John Charlton, 1892-1903,” Canadian Historical Review, June 2001.
Awards: Kohn is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
Fulbright Scholarship February-November 1991: Renowned international scholarship for study abroad. Completed Master’s degree in New Zealand.
Robert Vogel Award Received: April 2002: Proud to be first recipient of annual award from History Students’ Association recognizing “excellence in teaching.”
Additional Info:
Formerly Assistant Professor, Department of History, McGill University, 2000-03.
Kohn has written for the popular media including Canada’s Globe and Mail; He has appeared on NTV/CNBC-e for a live, one-on-one studio interview on American presidential election and Turkish-American relations (3 November 2004); On CNN Turk as a member of panel at Turkish-American Association’s “Election Watch 2004,” discussing U.S. presidential elections and the candidates’ campaign strategies (2 November 2004), and gave various Television/Radio interviews to Montreal media commenting on start of war in Iraq (March 2003).

Personal Anecdote

I still do not think I have become used to the very flexible concept of “time” in academics. Perhaps because historians regularly deal with decades and centuries, this seems even more pronounced in our craft. My dissertation advisor had an almost Zen-like attitude toward deadlines, viewing them as artificial restraints on the thinking process. “You also need time for reflection,” he told me early on, probably not knowing that my “reflection” took the form of video games, movies, and Simpsons re-runs. As it turned out, though, my seven years of dissertation work was speedy compared to others. Getting my dissertation published as a book took another four years, as the publisher was forced to wait on funding decisions. One result is that I am still reading new reviews of my book, based on words I wrote nearly ten years ago. This reflects the long delay also in getting articles or book reviews published in journals. Recently I wrote a fairly stern letter to the editors of a journal I had submitted an article to, pointing out that I had not heard anything from them in nearly a year. I received an apologetic reply informing me that the both the editor and assistant editor had recently died!

The result is that most of us in this profession have several works in “the pipeline” at once: a new project, a work under consideration at a journal, another work undergoing final revisions, and something just about to appear. I am not sure how many other occupations force an individual to plan their projects over several years – perhaps civil engineers building a dam. I try to make sure my graduate students understand that, with the common piece of advice that our occupation is a marathon, not a sprint. With undergraduates, time management is a constant juggling act, and poses pedagogical problems to the instructor. On the one hand, in a class of two hundred you can not really have students handing in papers when they feel like it, and a fair deadline is a necessary leveler. On the other hand, I am keenly aware at all times that my class is not the center of their 18- to 22-year-old universe. I am in competition for students’ time and attention with several other professors, extracurricular activities, and their busy social lives. Thus, when asked for more time by a student (and I am much more sympathetic to “I ran out of time,” than “A distant relative I have not seen in 15 years died”), I try to be flexible to a point.

And managing my own time is one reason I entered academics. If I wanted to work nine-to-five, I would have worked in a bank. Time away from the desk, or out of the office, is a necessary part of any creative or intellectual process. My advisor was essentially correct: an historian needs time to reflect, mull, cogitate – to leave all the facts at the back of one’s mind and wait for inspiration. During my Ph.D. work I came up with more ideas walking my dog than sitting at my desk. As Emerson said…. But I guess I will finish this later – the Simpsons is on.

Quotes

By Edward P. Kohn

  • America’s rise to world power This Kindred  People JPG status and the Anglo-American rapprochement…forced Americans and Canadians to adapt to the new international reality. Emphasizing their shared language, civilization, and forms of government, many English-speaking North Americans drew upon Anglo-Saxonism to find common ground. Americans and Canadians often referred to each other as members of the same “family” who shared the same “blood.” As many of the events leading to the rapprochement had a North American context, Americans and Canadians often drew upon the common lexicon of Anglo-Saxon rhetoric to undermine the old rivalries and underscore their shared interests. — Edward P. Kohn in “This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903″
  • About Edward P. Kohn

  • This Kindred People is an excellent study of Canadian-American relations. It discusses in great detail the Canadian perspective of developments of the North American continent. One of its great strengths is in showing the growth in Canadian national maturity as feelings of patriotism, self-interest and nationalism emerged. Furthermore, Kohn’s book teaches a great deal, not only of Canadian-British relations, but also Anglo-American relations. The transformation of perception on the British Empire among American public– this significant shift from “anglophobia” to “kindred relations” that took place in a relatively short period in the U.S. seems to be neglected in the scholarly literature.” — Justyna Bartkiewicz, Polish Academy of Sciences reviewing “This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903″
  • “What does this book offer that such authors as Carl Berger, Charles S. Campbell, and C. P. Stacey did not? First, it offers a twenty-first-century impression of the era and an up-to-date bibliography. Second, it rightly emphasizes the perception of kinship among Britons, Americans, and Canadians. Many Canadians came to regard the United States not simply as another country (like Germany) that promoted its perceived interests…. Kohn agrees that any infatuation with family was finite, especially in the United States and United Kingdom. The administrations of Cleveland, William McKinley, and Theodore Roosevelt welcomed any Canadian or British support, but they did not offer diplomatic trade-offs…. Kohn accepts these points but suggests that the perceived family connection rendered improved Anglo-American relations more salable to the British electorate, with repercussions for Canada. — Graeme S. Mount, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Canada, reviewing in “The Journal of American History” “This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903″
  • “Much in Kohn’s discussion is valuable. His examination of the Anglo-Saxon idea amplifies understanding of an important dimension of the rapprochement: no previous consideration of these events has explored that dimension so extensively. It also does much to explain how essentially interest-driven actions could be made to seem matters of the highest morality and rectitude. The richness and variety of the material adduced is a particular strength: readers will find in these pages an especially textured demonstration of the manner in which notions of cultural and racial community were assembled and put to work in a highly politicized setting…. This interesting book is informative in terms of its main themes and provides a useful reminder of the measure in which relations among states and nations count… Readers will learn much. — Allan Smith, University of British Columbia reviewing in “The American Histprical Review” “This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903″
  • “In This Kindred People, Edward P. Kohn admirably summarizes the Anglo-American rapprochement that took place between the Venezuela Crisis of 1895 and the settlement of the Alaska Boundary in 1903, and discusses the complicating and complicated role that Canada played in that evolving relationship. This is territory well trodden by diplomatic historians, but Kohn adds a new dimension to an old account by exploring ‘a nexus of intellectual and diplomatic history.’… Kohn deserves praise, however, for his effective use of eight political cartoons. All come from Canadian newspapers – then as now, ‘Canadian-American relations’ loomed larger in Canada than America. Kohn uses the cartoons as evidence, rather than simply as decorations…. Kohn persuades that Anglo-Saxonism underpinned both us and British imperialism, international ventures in which Canada and Canadians participated more than vicariously before, and long after, 1903.” — John Herd Thompson, Department of History, Duke University, reviewing in “University of Toronto Quarterly” “This Kindred People: Canadian-American Relations and the Anglo-Saxon Idea, 1895-1903″
  • “Great lectures, interesting readings, I love how excited he gets about history.”… “Encourages his students to stop by and chat about The Simpsons…love him!”… “The best prof at McGill, bar-none. Entertainment as well as information.”… “He’s a rising star in the History dep’t.”… “One of the best teachers in a very strong department”… “An EXCELLENT professor; his lectures are entertaining and informative.”… “An incredible lecturer. He knows his stuff and is really enthusiastic about the material.”… “Best prof at McGill… his lectures were amazing, he kept me interested the entire time.” — Anonymous Students
  • “I can’t BELIEVE McGill let Prof. Kohn go. The best teacher or prof I have ever had in my life. Unending enthusiasm, humor, and knowledge! I wasn’t bored for a single second the entire semester – not even one! What is my degree worth wo/ profs like him”…. “Professor Kohn was simply the best professor at McGill University. His enthusiasm for history was breathtaking. McGill made one of its worst mistakes by letting him go.”… “Kohn is one of the best teachers at McGill. Unfortunately…students somewhere else will have the pleasure of being taught by this enthusiastic and effective professor.”… “Professor Kohn rocks! He dominates all professors. And McGill can hardly claim to be a top rated university without him.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, July 22, 2007 at 6:23 PM

    Top Young Historians: 60 – Thomas S. Kidd

    Top Young Historians

    Thomas S. Kidd, 35

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, Baylor University
    Area of Research: Eighteenth-century North America, particularly the history of evangelicalism
    Education: Ph.D. in History, The University of Notre Dame, August 2001
    Major Publications: Kidd is the author of The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism (Yale University Press, 2004), his forthcoming book Thomas S. Kidd  JPG will be published later this year The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America, (Yale University Press, 2007) Kidd is also working on The Great Awakening: A Brief History with Documents, to be published by Bedford Books, and books titled American Christians and Islam (contract with Princeton University Press) and A Christian Sparta: Evangelicals, Deists, and the Creation of the American Republic (contract with Basic Books). He has also published numerous articles in The William and Mary Quarterly, The New England Quarterly, Church History, and Religion and American Culture. He is also the author of several book chapters including the forthcoming “Evangelicalism in New England from Mather to Edwards,” in Kenneth Stewart, ed., Continuities in Evangelical History: Interactions with David Bebbington (InterVarsity Press).
    Awards: Kidd is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 2006-07 [supports Awakenings: The First Generation of American Evangelical Christianity] Louisville Institute Summer Stipend, 2006;
    Council for Christian Colleges & Universities Initiative Grant to Network Christian Scholars, 2006-08;
    Baylor University Research Committee Grants, 2004-05, 2005-06;
    Baylor University Young Investigators Development Program Grant, 2005-06;
    Baylor University Summer Stipend, 2005;
    National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, 2004;
    Baylor Horizons/Lilly research grants, 2003, 2007-08;
    Baylor University Graduate Student Association Outstanding Professor Award, 2006;
    Voted Baylor University 2004-05 Faculty Member of the Year, Baylor University Student Government;
    Invited participant, National Endowment for the Humanities, Chairman’s Forum on Colonial American History, April 2004. Selected for the Young Scholars in American Religion Program, class of 2004-05, sponsored by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture, Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis;
    Faculty member of the month, North Russell residence hall, Baylor University, February 2004;
    Chosen to represent Baylor University in both the 2003 and 2004 National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend competition (one of two faculty members selected);
    Graduate Teaching Fellowship, University of Notre Dame (2000-01), with full tuition scholarship, stipend, and adjunct professorship in the History Department and University Writing Program;
    Full Tuition Scholarship and Stipend, History Department, University of Notre Dame (1996-2000);
    Full Tuition Scholarship and Stipend, History Department, Clemson University (1994-96);
    Graduated Cum Laude with Senior Departmental Honors, Political Science Department, Clemson University (May 1994);
    Presidential Scholarship, Clemson University (1990-94).
    Additional Info:
    Formerly Adjunct Professor, Bethel College, Mishawaka, IN (1998), and was an graduate instructor at University of Notre Dame (2001-02).

    Personal Anecdote

    Generally speaking, I think historians tend to write articles and books that are too cautious. While it remains advisable to do dissertations that are fairly narrow, the habits ingrained in us during graduate school often carry over into our maturing careers. Academic and trade publishers want to do business with people willing to take on big, ambitious subjects.

    I came into graduate school wanting to write something about religion in colonial New England, having been smitten by the writings of Perry Miller. I gravitated toward the period after the Glorious Revolution partly due to an interest in the connection between Puritanism and evangelicalism, and partly because historians widely recognized the period from 1690 to 1740 as the chief neglected era in colonial New England studies. But I also came to view the dissertation, which became my first book The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism, as a prelude to a bigger project on the First Great Awakening, which is due out later this year.

    Just last week I found myself answering the same question I have answered many times since committing to the Great Awakening book: “what are you going to say new about the First Great Awakening?” I’m not going to give my answer here, but only want to suggest that this type of question may reflect professional nervousness about taking on a seminal historical topic researched by many other writers. One of the advantages of tackling the First Great Awakening, undoubtedly, is that no “standard” book exists on the subject (just hosts of excellent biographies and regional studies). But I have found that bringing a new perspective to the primary sources has not been difficult. If anything, novelty has probably been inevitable.

    There are always new sources to mine that other historians have ignored or dismissed. The best of the neglected sources for me is the diary of radical evangelical itinerant Daniel Rogers. This generally legible diary is probably the largest single-author archival source related to the revivals of the early 1740s. I can remember reading it and calling my wife, excitedly laughing as I told her the exotic stories I was finding there. (You can read more about Rogers in the book, or in an article I published on him in the March 2007 issue of The Journal of the Historical Society.)

    The other reason that a new approach to this old subject seems inevitable is my unique perspective, shaped by my background and experience of recent history. Could living through 9/11 and the presidency of George W. Bush not color my view of the religious past? It changes the kinds of questions I ask, particularly about religion and politics, and the varied effects that evangelicalism produces in society.

    Don’t hesitate to take on history’s classic subjects. Thinking big about future writing projects will make things easier for you professionally, but it will also help us craft a more useable past for our reading publics.

    Quotes

    By Thomas S. Kidd

  • “The The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism JPG most interesting question in the first generation of American evangelicalism was what kind of movement it would become. How socially radical would it be? Would it tolerate the dramatic mystical experiences of laypeople? Would it reaffirm traditional boundaries set by race, class, gender, education, and age? Or would it lead to a substantially new egalitarianism for those who embraced the idea of individuals’ equality before God? The struggle over these questions played out chiefly between moderate and radical evangelicals, not between Old Lights and New Lights.” — Thomas S. Kidd in “The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America” (Yale University Press, 2007).

    (Cover of Professor Kidd’s first book “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism”)

  • About Thomas S. Kidd

  • “An informed and much-needed synthesis of the events that comprise the ‘Great Awakening.’ Judiciously describes evangelical efforts from Nova Scotia to Georgia over the entire eighteenth century and demonstrates the centrality of these revivals to an understanding of the American mind. Kidd’s book will become the standard introduction to its subject.” — Philip F. Gura, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reviewing “The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America”
  • “There is much to praise in this book. Kidd is a first-rate researcher who has read widely in primary sources. He is also a clear, entertaining writer who is able to create memorable portraits of historical characters.” — Catherine A. Brekus, University of Chicago reviewing “The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America”
  • “Well researched, clearly written and authoritatively argued. There is no book of comparable breadth, either chronologically or geographically.” — Mark Noll, University of Notre Dame reviewing “The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America”
  • “Sound in its scholarship, cogent in its arguments, and creative in its historical reconstruction, this book is a first-rate contribution to both American religious history and the early history of New England.” — Mark Noll, Wheaton College reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “A valuable contribution to resolving the puzzle over New England’s religious culture after 1689.” — Richard P. Gildrie, American Historical Review reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “[A] well crafted study, which makes a solid contribution to the literature on Puritanism and its transformation.” — Howard A. Barnes, History: Reviews of New Books reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “[Kidd's] arguments are cogent and persuasive, and help to explain a transitional stage in the theological culture in New England.” — Alex Kish, Virginia Quarterly Review reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “Kidd’s portrait of Yankee evangelicals should keep his book in shops and on college syllabi for many years to come.” — Timothy A. Milford, The Catholic Historical Review reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “Kidd writes with clarity and develops the narrative with the apt citation of numerous illuminating primary sources. . . . Offers a fresh and compelling case that explains important moments and developments in New England before the Great Awakening. Yale University Press is to be commended for producing such a delightful edition of such an interesting and rewarding text.” — Michael McClenahan, The Journal of Religion reviewing “The Protestant Interest: New England after Puritanism “
  • “Class was very stimulating, Dr. Kidd is a great guy”… “Really nice guy, interesting lectures”… “”genuinely enthusiastic about Colonial history”…”charismatic and energetic”…”a passion for history which inspires you to learn as much as possible”…”truly concerned that his students learn & care about the material.”… “Personality, availability, knowledge of subject, passion for the subject” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, July 15, 2007 at 7:00 PM

    Remembering Lady Bird Johnson, 1912-2007

    LADY BIRD JOHNSON (1912-2007): Lady Bird JPG

    Lady Bird JPG
    Lady Bird JPG

    • Lady Bird Johnson Tribute Site
    • PBS NewsHour – Lady Bird Johnson
    • Michael Beschloss: historian Michael Beschloss reflected on her life and legacy on the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. (mp3) – PBS NewsHour, 7-13-07
    • Lewis L. Gould: Remembering Lady Bird Johnson First Lady Recalled as Charming, Media Savvy and Deeply Connected to Nature – WaPo, 7-12-07
    • Robert A. Caro: “She conducted herself, often in the most difficult circumstances, with a graciousness and dignity and total devotion to her husband that was heroic.”… “She already had this dignity, no matter how he yelled at her, but she transformed herself from the shy young woman afraid of speaking in public into the poised, dignified, gracious first lady the American people would come to admire in later years. It’s an act of willpower and heroism that is very thrilling.” – WaPo, 7-12-07
    • Gil Troy: “She went one step further than her heroine and role model Eleanor Roosevelt by being more intimately involved in the president’s day to day life and political career. If Eleanor Roosevelt showed just how influential a first lady could be in advancing her own concerns, Lady Bird Johnson demonstrated just how influential a first lady could be in shaping and selling the president’s agenda…. She pushed him to invoke themes of self-sacrifice and patriotism, to work in references to World War II and to blame Congress squarely for failing to fund the Vietnam war properly. This intervention typified ‘Bird’s’ great influence and her role in protecting Lyndon and trying to position him on the grand historical stage.” – NPR, 7-12-07

    Top Young Historians: 59 – Judith Surkis

    Top Young Historians

    Judith Surkis, 37

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate professor of history, and of history and literature, Harvard University
    Area of Research: Modern French cultural and intellectual history, as well as the history of gender, sexuality, and empire.
    Education: Ph.D. in History and Certificate in Women’s Studies, Cornell University, June 2001
    Major Publications: Surkis is the author of Sexing the Citizen: Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920 (Cornell University Press, 2006), which Judith Surkis  JPG examines how masculine sexuality was central to the making of republican citizenship and social order. Her new book project, Scandalous Subjects: Policing Indecency in France and French Algeria, 1830–1930, explores how cultural debates about sexual scandals constituted and regulated the distinction between public and private in nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century France.
    Surkis’s other publications include “Enemies Within: Venereal Disease, and the Defense of French Masculinity Between the Wars,” in C. Forth and B. Taithe, eds., French Masculinities (forthcoming).
    Awards: Surkis is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    Jan Thadeus Teaching Prize, History and Literature, 2005;
    Nancy L. Buc Fellow, Pembroke Center for Research and Teaching on Women, Brown University, 2003-2004;
    Bowmar Research Assistantship to Prof. D. LaCapra, 1999-2000;
    Einaudi Center for International Studies, Research Grant, 1997-98;
    Fulbright Research Grant, France, 1996-1997;
    Mary K. Sibley, Phi Beta Kappa Research Grant, France, 1996-97;
    Council of European Studies, Pre-Dissertation Grant, Summer 1995;
    Einaudi Center for International Studies, Travel Grant, Summer 1995;
    Einaudi Center Western Societies Travel Grant, Summer 1995;
    Mellon Fellowship in the Humanities, 1993-1994;
    Phi Beta Kappa, elected 1992;
    Albert Arnold Bennett, Class of 1872 Award, Brown University, 1992.
    Additional Info:
    Surkis co-chairs the Colloquia in Intellectual and Cultural History at Harvard’s Center for European Studies and the Seminar on Gender and Sexuality at the Humanities Center.

    Personal Anecdote

    I am part of the last generation of grad students to research my dissertation at the “old” Bibliothèque nationale in Paris. With its intricately domed ceiling in forged iron, the reading room was a masterpiece of modern nineteenth-century architecture. Initially built to be rational and efficient, the library I encountered operated according to elaborate rituals. With repetition, these rites, which at first appeared arcane to the American researcher, became a cherished and comforting daily routine.

    For those of us used to grazing in an endless frontier of open stacks, the first challenge was learning how to get a place and how to order a book. Entry into the luminous Salle Labrouste was conditional upon an interview; being admitted felt like belonging to a select club. Even when granted permission, securing a seat was not easy, as the limited number of spots- some 360 in all- were in high demand. A late arrival could mean waiting an hour- or more- for one to become available. This intervening time, if often frustrating, also created camaraderie; the wait was also an initiation into the unique temporality and sociability of the “B.N.”

    Upon entry, a rigid plastic tablet, inscribed with a seat number, had to be delivered to the librarians who surveyed the readers from the back of the room. They exchanged this card for another, smaller one with a barcode, which could then- finally- be used to request books. The order duly dispatched, another wait was in store. Seated at my place, reviewing notes from the day before, I would eagerly anticipate the librarians who would serve up the day’s reading from off their loaded book cart. With the inner workings of the stacks well hidden, this conveyance of volumes directly to my place felt almost magical and certainly luxurious. Whether I had ordered a tome of Kantian philosophy, a pulp novel, or a handbook of military hygiene, the texts were treated with an equal measure of at times incongruous respect when they were set in front of me.

    This attitude reflected my own approach to historical inquiry, one in which very different sorts of works coincide. In these august surroundings and with such attentive handling, the most minor text seemed worthy of consideration. Here was a concrete experience of the legitimating work of the library itself. My history of how sexuality shaped the meaning and modality of French citizenship at the end of the nineteenth-century found support and sustenance here- and not just because Michel Foucault used to work in the “hemicycle” of the reading room.

    The library offered a genuine intellectual and social community. As a destination for scholars from all over, this “national” institution was, in fact, a genuinely cosmopolitan space. The relationships I developed there confirmed my interest in French history. I pursued my studies not because I was particularly passionate about things French (as much as I enjoyed lunching in the nearby Palais Royal), but because of my interest in a set of questions about the historical relationship between democracy and sexual difference and about the political meanings of masculinity. In the library, I met colleagues with whom I exchanged myriad ideas over the bad coffee machine coffee in the stone courtyard off the rue Richelieu. Here, perhaps for the first time in Paris, I felt at home.

    Quotes

    By Judith Surkis

  • Debates about how best to form male citizens in the Third Republic did not presume that men were SEXING THE CITIZEN JPG automatically capable of simultaneously acceding to both autonomy and social attachment. Masculinity, like citizenship itself, required schooling. As a result, these at times competing and contradictory pedagogical endeavors understood the masculinity tautologically conferred on men by their status as citizens to be contingent and unstable. This volatility is revealed most clearly in educators’ discussions of men’s sexuality. Such discussions, I contend, condensed wider concerns about the difficult articulation of the citizen’s freedom and his social responsibilities. They implicitly framed arguments about the extent and limits of democracy itself. In appealing to conjugality as the framework in which men’s desire could be at once expressed and contained, policy makers and social reformers reconciled their libratory and regulatory projects. At the same time, they figured men and women’s difference and sexual complementarity as fundamental to a harmonious social and political order. — Judith Surkis in “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″
  • About Judith Surkis

  • “In this closely argued, intelligent, and original book, Judith Surkis gives the notion of ‘sexual politics’ an exciting new meaning. Male sexuality, Surkis argues, was central to the stabilization of political authority in the French Third Republic. Through promotion of heterosexual marriage, French republican educators and officials were able to anchor wider debates about moral and social order, and thus promote their political agendas. Male sexuality became a source of disorder, a problem to be solved, but also, when contained and controlled through marriage, the foundation of republican politics. Surkis makes a major contribution to the study of masculinity by viewing it as both a highly unstable ‘speculative unity’ and a powerful regulatory norm. With its impressive mix of political, cultural and intellectual history, as well as the history of gender and sexuality, Sexing the Citizen is destined to become a ‘big book’ across many different fields.” — Mary Louise Roberts, University of Wisconsin-Madison reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″
  • “Judith Surkis argues forcefully that the conjugal couple was (and perhaps remains) the core of the French republican vision of society. This is a lucid and highly original work on the construction of masculinity in Third Republic France.” — Jan Goldstein, University of Chicago
  • “This fabulous book shows just how much fantasies and worries about heterosexual masculinity-its frequently fragile and unstable nature, its excesses, and all-too-often inchoate aims-shape fundamental assumptions about citizenship and national identity. It is a brilliant demonstration of the significance of sex for politics.” — Dagmar Herzog, Graduate Center, City University of New York, author of “Sex after Fascism: Memory and Morality in Twentieth-Century Germany” reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″
  • “Sexing the Citizen is theorized history at its very best. Judith Surkis shows us-in concrete and subtle ways-how French notions of masculinity were arrived at, what problems and contradictions they contained and sought to resolve, and what ends they served.” — Joan Wallach Scott, author of Gender and the Politics of History reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″
  • “Sexing the Citizen is a theoretically informed cultural history of the making of citizenship in France during the Third Republic. Judith Surkis’s historical research is thorough, her coverage of the literature expert, and her mastery of primary materials evident. She combines astute readings of parliamentary sessions, legal trials, medical journals, and ‘high’ intellectual history.”-Carolyn J. Dean, Brown University, author of “The Fragility of Empathy after the Holocaust” reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″
  • Judith Surkis has made an important contribution in identifying the pervasive effort to construct or reconstruct the republican citizen in the decades prior to the First World War. Most importantly she has clearly demonstrated the centrality of gender in this effort. Masculinity was essential to the concept of citizen, but this masculinity was not stable. It contained aspects potentially dangerous to the individual, the republic, and society. Politicians, academics, and reformers identified marriage as the necessary complement to the autonomous individual, joining him to productive and reproductive social relations. Surkis makes clear that women played an indispensable role in this construction of the citizen but that their actual situations as women and individuals were rarely addressed. Judith Surkis has added significantly to our understanding of republicanism, how gender structures central modern political concepts, and how masculinity is a constructed identity. — Judith F. Stone, Western Michigan University reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″ in H-France
  • Let me conclude by praising an aspect of this valuable book that is not always present in much contemporary cultural history. I refer to the luminous, profoundly nuanced textual readings that compose the bulk of this book. Those who have always admired intellectual history as it is practiced by the great masters of the form, such as Surkis’ teacher Dominic LaCapra, will find this book a worthy exemplar of the genre, though it is also much more than that. Even when one does not agree with Surkis’ readings, the arguments are advanced with exceptional clarity and persuasiveness and with an eye to the alternative readings that must be confronted. Explication de texte will never die so long as it is in such capable hands. This book fills an important lacuna in the gender history of the Third Republic. — Robert A. Nye, Oregon State University reviewing “SEXING THE CITIZEN Morality and Masculinity in France, 1870–1920″ in H-France
  • “An extraordinary professor. Very, very approachable. I felt like she really cared about teaching us the material, and she seems to be genuinely interested in her students. The lectures have to be fast-paced given the quantity of content…The organization of the lectures is much appreciated (esp. for a theory professor!). The climate of her class is wonderful: inviting, fun, intellectually engaging.”… “Judith Surkis is splendidly intelligent and very, very smart. Her mind is extraordinary. She presents very carefully-researched lectures and very interesting arguments. She is energetic, enthusiastic, and full of ideas. She is also friendly and informal and not intimidating.”… “Prof. Surkis is a really wonderful seminar leader- who effectively provokes her students to come out and challenge the readings in classroom discussion. She maintains a good balance of leading discussion and allowing discussion to take its own path in the students’ hand. Prof. Surkis also has an amazingly complex understanding of the course material and has clearly read, researched, and thought extensively about each of the readings. I have a lot of respect for her as an academic and as a professor.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, July 8, 2007 at 9:44 PM

    Top Young Historians: 58 – Edward G. Gray

    Top Young Historians

    Edward G. Gray, 42

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor, Department of History, Florida State University
    Area of Research: U.S. history, Native American history, and the history of colonial North America
    Education: Ph.D., History, Brown University, 1996
    Major Publications: Gray is the author of The Making of John Ledyard: Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler Edward Gray JPG (Yale University Press, 2007); New World Babel: Languages and Nations in Early America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1999). He is also the Co-editor with Norman Fiering of The Language Encounter in the Americas, 1492-1800 (Berghahn Books, 2000; paperback, 2001), and is also the editor of Colonial America: A History in Documents (Oxford University Press, 2003). Gray is currently working on a new project about the political radical Tom Paine and his quest to build an iron bridge.
    Gray is also the author of numerous journal articles and book chapters including: “Island Hopping: Early American History in the Wider World,” Journal of American History, to appear in a special 2008 forum, “The State of Early America”; “Visions of Another Empire: John Ledyard, an American Traveler Across the Russian Empire, 1787-1788,” The Journal of the Early Republic 24:3(Fall, 2004), and “Cultures of Invention: Exploring Tom Paine and his Iron Bridge in the Digital Age,” Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society 115:2 (2006), among others.
    Awards: Gray is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    National Endowment for the Humanities, Faculty Fellowship, 2004-2005;
    Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship, The Huntington Library, San Marino California, 1998-1999;
    Dissertation Writing Fellowship, Brown University, 1994-95;
    Mellon Resident Research Fellowship, American Philosophical Society, 1994;
    J.M. Stuart Research Fellowship, The John Carter Brown Library, 1993-94.
    Additional Info:
    Gray formerly taught at Roosevelt University, Chicago, Illinois, and Depaul University, Chicago, Illinois. Gray is the editor of “Common-place The Interactive Journal of Early American Life” http://www.common-place.org/.

    Personal Anecdote

    It is hard to imagine myself as either a “young” or a “top” historian. I’ll spare you the false modesty r.e. the “top” bit. But the young feels like a stretch. I note that 42 (I’ll be 43 on the first of September) places me among the longer-in-the-tooth cohort of Top Young Historians. But, as the old adage says, age is a state of mind and I feel old. For nine months of the year, I spend my days among people who were born during Reagan’s last term. They greet my references to R.E.O. Speedwagon and Earth Shoes with silence. And while my pop culture awareness was once a point of pride, it is now a source of embarrassment (witness the R.E.O. reference). Much of this is because I have spent the last twenty some odd years becoming a historian. And I will tell you, it has been a long slog. There was the whole grad. school part–wherein it was said of my prelim performance: “Gray’s not fast on his feet, but he did well enough to pass.” There was the three-year job hunt, during which time I discovered that strange species of performance art: the job talk. Then there was the tenure track. In the midst of it all, marriage, children, mortgage, and, yes, life insurance.

    Nothing makes you feel old like a life insurance policy. I got mine a few years ago, after our second child was born. With the possible exception of a cemetery plot, there is nothing one can buy that is so directly connected to mortality. Most things we buy because–so we are told–they help us live better. We are told the same about life insurance–it is about peace of mind. But the fact is we buy life insurance to die better. Life insurance is a wager on your mortality; and when you look at the age charts that explain your premiums; when you go for the physical–conducted by the insurance company’s non-partisan physician (no best-case scenarios here); when you contemplate just how much you–your self, your total being, mind body and all the rest–are worth, you cannot help but thinking that the grim reaper is not far off. Good luck and G*d Speed.

    As I filled out all the paper work for my policy, I found myself thinking there is something very peculiar about this human practice of placing monetary value on life. And I could not help wondering how all this came to be. How have we all come to embrace the idea that a life can somehow be given a price? Have Americans always treated life insurance as just another mundane thing to be purchased? How has the idea of valuing a human life for insurance purposes related to other historical practices–slavery, for instance? By the time I got to the doctor’s office, I was beginning to think I was on to something.

    After being probed and prodded, I rushed home to scavenge material on the history of life insurance and what I found was that, in its earliest forms, life insurance had very little to do with the insured. Instead, it was usually an instrument–essentially a wager–purchased by third parties on some individual’s life. One could purchase a policy on a business associate, a debtor, an artist or craftsperson, or on an entirely random mortal about to go to war, sail the globe, or do some other hazardous thing. Because many believed this all made death profitable, it was outlawed in most European countries until the nineteenth century. England was the notable exception because the English regarded all lives, save that of the monarch, as a species of property (not even the most nimble legal contortion could allow subjects to claim property rights over sovereigns).

    The next thing I knew, I was telling people about a book I planned to write on the history of the valuation of human life. Funny how these things happen. I guess, in the end, the sheer randomness of it all makes me feel kind of old as well. I have not come to my research interests through a subtle understanding of scholarship’s cutting edge. I have come to them rather like an old antiquarian, prowling dingy used book stores and kitsch- cluttered second-hand shops in search of those bits and pieces of the past that remind me that the world is a very interesting place, and I’d better get back to studying it before my time runs out.

    Quotes

    By Edward G. Gray

  • In Ledyard’s lifetime, empire as he knew it grew anachronistic and, indeed, was directly attacked by his revolutionary countrymen. But in most of the places Ledyard lived and traveled the rumble of revolution was faint. The Making of John Ledyard JPG At times, he eagerly identified himself as a citizen of the new United States and used that putative status in conjunction with his exotic experiences to gain access to European elites. But that identification, it turns out, had little real meaning for Ledyard. He advocated elements of revolutionary ideology–especially its hostility to the staid, corrupt institutions of old Europe and its faith in reason and in the universality of human nature. But he was never a revolutionary. His destiny, as he came to understand it, was too dependent on that old hierarchical, paternalistic way of thinking, unapologetic in its elitism and energized by a prevailing assumption that what was good for a select few . . . was good for all, whether the colonized peoples of the South Pacific or the ordinary seamen who sailed Captain Cook’s ships. Although the American revolutionaries attacked this older vision of empire . . . they did not, of course, destroy it. For momentum is a powerful force in history, and at the time of Ledyard’s death in early 1789 he still lived in a world dominated by old empire. To understand Ledyard, then, is not to understand him as the apostle of some kind of new revolutionary order. Rather, it is to understand him as a man thoroughly bound to an old imperial order, albeit one at the beginning of its end. — Edward G. Gray in “The Making of John Ledyard Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler”
  • About Edward G. Gray

  • “Daring, ambitious, and theatrical, John Ledyard seems to step out of a great eighteenth-century novel into this vivid and revealing history. Following Ledyard’s clues, Edward Gray draws readers through a compelling and global story of ambition, adventure, and empire.” — Alan Taylor, author of “The Divided Ground: Indians, Settlers, and the Northern Borderland of the American Revolution” reviewing “The Making of John Ledyard Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler”
  • “This is no standard biography. Instead, Gray uses Ledyard’s experience and writings to get at what life was like in the various places that the Connecticut-born traveler lived or visited.” Peter C. Mancall, author of “Hakluyt’s Promise: An Elizabethan’s Obsession for an English America” reviewing “The Making of John Ledyard Empire and Ambition in the Life of an Early American Traveler”
  • “Ledyard’s career opens up the entire world, in the most literal sense. His is a really grand story, one that transcends all sorts of conventional boundaries.” — Edward Countryman, Southern Methodist University
  • “Gray [covers] a vast range of very diverse material, much of it unknown and unread by modern scholars. . . . “– Anthony Pagden, The Johns Hopkins University reviewing “New World Babel: Languages and Nations in Early America”
  • “A substantial contribution to American intellectual history and to our understanding of how white presumptions shaped the attitudes toward Indian language and culture.” — Kenneth Cmiel, University of Iowa reviewing “New World Babel: Languages and Nations in Early America”
  • “This man is incredibly brilliant. You’d be doing yourself a disservice to not take his class. He loves American History.”… “This class was really good. As long as you take notes and write the papers you’re good. He’s a really nice guy too. good class.”… “I took a class with him like 4 years ago and I loved it!! He taught with such passion and clarity. I felt like it was story time when I was in his class b/c his lectures just flowed. I am finally taking an upper level class with him next semester and I am very excited. If you have the chance, take ANY of his classes!”… “He is extremely knowledgable and willing to help students. He is extremely fair and it is completely worth taking his class. I am going out of my way to take his class next semester.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, July 1, 2007 at 7:53 PM

    %d bloggers like this: