History Buzz: August 2007

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
  • Robert Dallek on “When It Comes to Foreign Policy, What Counts as Experience?”: “I think experience is a terribly overrated idea when it comes to thinking about who should become president. Experience helped Richard Nixon, but it didn’t save him, and it certainly wasn’t a blanket endorsement. He blundered terribly in dealing with Vietnam…. That’s why I’m sympathetic to Obama. Does experience count? What really counts is judgment and what kind of judgment you have.” – NYT, 8-26-07
  • Steve Hess on “When It Comes to Foreign Policy, What Counts as Experience?”: “Nixon wandered the world sticking his head in American embassies. But even there, Kissinger gets a heap of credit for what happened during his presidency.” – NYT, 8-26-07
  • Richard Norton Smith on “When It Comes to Foreign Policy, What Counts as Experience?”: “There is this osmosis working for her, that she is seen as an extension of the first Clinton presidency. In lieu of more traditional experience, she benefits as being seen as the third Clinton term. There is an aura of competence about her.” – NYT, 8-26-07
  • Kenneth T. Jackson on “The Next President: Uniformly Civilian?”: “The torch is being passed to a new generation that’s never worn a uniform. It’s a significant change. It means people are now coming of age who are really the post-Vietnam generation.” – Washington Post, 8-23-07
  • Allan Lichtman on “Edwards pins his hopes on Iowa”: “Right now, it is a badly wounded campaign and the wounds have been largely self-inflicted. The paper qualities have been shredded by a poor campaign and dubious personal qualities. Unfortunately, Edwards has been pinned with the charge of hypocrisy — a populist campaign and spokesman for working people with a $400 haircut and a half-million-dollar consulting fee from a corporation foreclosing on Katrina victims. That is hard to overcome once you get pinned with that label.” – Charlotte Observer, NC, 8-23-07
BIGGEST STORIES:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 27/08/1667 – Earliest recorded hurricane in US (Jamestown Virginia)
  • 27/08/1928 – Kellogg-Briand Pact, where 60 nations agree to outlaw war
  • 28/08/0476 – West Roman Empire formally disbands/emperor Romulus August ousted
  • 28/08/1565 – Oldest city in the US, St Augustine Fla, established
  • 28/08/1609 – Henry Hudson, discovers and explores Delaware Bay
  • 28/08/1655 – New Amsterdam and Peter Stuyvesant bars Jews from military service
  • 28/08/1862 – Battle of Groveton, VA (Manassas Plains) [->AUG 19] US7000 CS7000
  • 28/08/1862 – Belle Boyd released from Old Capital Prison in Washington, DC
  • 28/08/1884 – 1st known photograph of a tornado is made near Howard SD
  • 28/08/1916 – Italy declares war against Germany during WW I
  • 28/08/1944 – Last German troops in Marseille surrendered and Toulon cleared
  • 28/08/1963 – Martin Luther King Jr’s “I have a dream speech” at Lincoln Memorial
  • 28/08/1968 – Police and anti-war demonstrators clash at Chicago’s Dem Natl Conven
  • 28/08/2005 – Hurricane Katrina hammers the south eastern United States, especially New Orleans, Louisiana, and coastal Mississippi
  • 29/08/1640 – English King Charles I signed a peace treaty with Scotland
  • 29/08/1756 – England and France meet in war
  • 29/08/1786 – Shay’s Rebellion in Springfield, Mass
  • 29/08/1862 – Battle of Bull Run, VA (Manassas, Gainesville, Bristoe Station)
  • 29/08/1916 – US Congress accept Jones Act: Philippines independence
  • 29/08/1939 – Chaim Weizmann informs England that Palestine Jews will fight in WW II
  • 29/08/1944 – 15,000 American troops liberating Paris march down Champs Elysees
  • 29/08/1945 – Gen MacArthur named Supreme Commander of Allied Powers in Japan
  • 29/08/1957 – Congress passes Civil Rights Act of 1957
  • 29/08/1968 – Democratics nominate Hubert H Humphrey for president (Chicago)
  • 30/08/1563 – Jewish community of Neutitschlin Moravia expelled
  • 30/08/1682 – William Penn left England to sail to New World
  • 30/08/1776 – US army evacuates Long Island/falls back to Manhattan, NYC
  • 30/08/1781 – French fleet of 24 ships under Comte de Grasse defeat British under Admiral Graves at battle of Chesapeake Capes in Revolutionary War
  • 30/08/1843 – 1st blacks participation in natl political convention (Liberty Party)
  • 30/08/1854 – John Fremont issues proclamation freeing slaves of Missouri rebels
  • 30/08/1862 – Battle of 2nd Manassas-Pope defeated by Lee-Battle of Richmond, KY
  • 30/08/1862 – Battle of Altamont-Confederates beat Union forces in Tennessee
  • 30/08/1862 – 2nd Battle of Bull Run – Confederates beat Union
  • 30/08/1945 – Gen MacArthur lands in Japan
  • 30/08/1967 – US Senate confirm Thurgood Marshall as 1st black justice
  • 31/08/1850 – Calif pioneers organized at Montgomery and Clay Streets
  • 31/08/1864 – Atlanta Campaign-Battle of Jonesboro Georgia, 1900 casualties
  • 31/08/1907 – England, Russia and France form Triple Entente
  • 31/08/1914 – Germany defeats Russia (battle at Tannenberg/30,000 Russians die)
  • 31/08/1935 – FDR signs an act prohibiting export of US arms to belligerents
  • 31/08/1963 – “Hot line” between Moscow-Washington, DC installed
  • 01/09/0069 – Traditional date of destruction of Jerusalem
  • 01/09/1267 – Rabbi Moses Ben Nachman establishes a Jewish community in Jerusalem
  • 01/09/1535 – French navigator Jacques Cartier reaches Hochelaga (Montreal)
  • 01/09/1666 – Great London Fire begins in Pudding Lane. 80% of London is destroyed
  • 01/09/1752 – Liberty Bell arrives in Phila
  • 01/09/1807 – Aaron Burr acquitted of charges of plotting to set up an empire
  • 01/09/1836 – Reconstruction begins on Synagogue of Rabbi Judah Hasid in Jerusalem
  • 01/09/1849 – California Constitutional Convention held in Monterey
  • 01/09/1864 – 2nd day of battle at Jonesboro Georgia, about 3,000 casualties
  • 01/09/1864 – Battle of Petersburg VA
  • 01/09/1939 – WW II starts, Germany invades Poland, takes Danzig
  • 01/09/1941 – Jews living in Germany are required to wear a yellow Jewish star
  • 01/09/1941 – Jews living in Germany are required to wear a yellow Jewish star
  • 01/09/1945 – Japan surrenders ending WW II (US date, 9/2 in Japan)
  • 01/09/1962 – UN announces Earth population has hit 3 billion
  • 02/09/1743 – England/Austria/Savoye-Sardinia sign Treaty of Worms
  • 02/09/1752 – Last Julian calender day in US and England (no Sept 3-Sept 13th)
  • 02/09/1796 – Jews of the Netherlands are emancipated
  • 02/09/1870 – Napoleon III surrenders to Prussian armies
  • 02/09/1901 – VP Theodore Roosevelt advises, “Speak softly and carry a big stick”
  • 02/09/1944 – During WW II, George Bush ejects from a burning plane
  • 02/09/1944 – Holocaust diarist Anne Frank was sent to Auschwitz
  • 02/09/1945 – V-J Day; formal surrender of Japan aboard USS Missouri (WW II ends)
  • 02/09/1945 – Ho Chi Minh declares Vietnam independence from France (National Day)
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • AMITY SHLAES: No Free Lunch ‘The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression’NYT, 8-26-07
  • AMITY SHLAES: ‘The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression’, First Chapter – NYT, 8-26-07
  • RAMACHANDRA GUHA: All in the Family India After GandhiNYT, 8-26-07
  • RAMACHANDRA GUHA: India After Gandhi, First Chapter – NYT, 8-26-07
  • John Whiteclay Chambers II on Michael Korda: BIOGRAPHY Hero for Our Times A glowing portrait of Eisenhower’s fairness and pragmatism. IKE An American HeroWaPo, 8-26-07
  • Giles MacDonogh: HISTORY WORLD WAR II The Squall After the Whirlwind A British historian takes Americans to task for their role in the post-World War II occupation. AFTER THE REICH The Brutal History of the Allied OccupationWaPo, 8-26-07
  • Isabella Ginor and Gideon Remez: Russia confirms Soviet sorties over Dimona in ’67 – Jerusalem Post, 8-23-07
  • Book, DVD put spotlight on executions of Sacco and Vanzetti – PopMatters, IL, 8-23-07
  • New Book, Film Explore Sacco and Vanzetti Case – NPR, 8-23-07
  • Christopher Clark: His book is sparking a pro-Prussia movement in Germany – Reuters 8-21-07
  • Anthony Badger: How Liberal Southern Politicians Lost the South – http://dailyheadlines.uark.edu, 8-20-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Daniel Blatman on “Historians dispute Holocaust ‘survivor’ and ‘refugee’ labels”: “The division into two circles is completely political and lacks any historical logic. Some of these refugees came to Israel aged and destitute. There is no doubt that these are people who were hurt by the war and the Nazi period. There is no difference between someone who lived in the ghetto and survived and someone who became a refugee and was exiled to Siberia. Who suffered more cannot be determined.” – Ha’aretz, Israel, 8-20-07
  • The CBS Evening News said, “Historian Douglas Brinkley says there’s no real parallel” between Iraq and Vietnam. Brinkley was shown saying, “You’re not going to be able to sell the lessons of Vietnam being we should have stayed a decade longer.” – U.S. News & World Report, 8-23-07
  • Allan Lichtman on President compares Vietnam, Iraq wars – Boston Globe, 8-22-07
  • Robert Dallek on “Bush calls quick troop pullout a disaster like Vietnam”: “We were in Vietnam for 10 years. … What is Bush suggesting? That we didn’t fight hard enough, stay long enough? That’s nonsense, it’s a distortion.” – Dallas Morning News, 8-22-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
  • Peter Cochrane: Triumph of Democracy with book of the year “Colonial Ambition: Foundations of Australian Democracy” was named The Age Book of the Year – The Age, Australia, 8-24-07
  • Ned Blackhawk: wins prize for best nonfiction book on the Southwest – SMU newspaper, 8-23-07
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • September 11, 2007: Geoffrey Ward: On Tuesday, September 11, at 7 p.m., Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein will host an “American Conversation” with award-winning historian and biographer Geoffrey Ward – Press Release–National Archives, 8-14-07
  • October 4, 2007: Emmanuel K. Akyeampong: IDEAS Boston 2007 – Business Wire, 8-13-07
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : 2007 Chicago Tribune Printers Row Book Fair: Robert Dallek “Nixon and Kissinger” Sunday, August 26 @ 10:35pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : Jeremi Suri: Henry Kissinger and the American Century Sunday, August 26 @ 11:30pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : After Words: Stanley Weintraub, author of “15 Stars: Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall – Three Generals Who Saved the American Century” interviewed by Max Boot, Sunday, August 19 @ 9:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: History Detectives, Monday, August 27 @ 9pm/EDT – PBS
  • History Channel: “Punishment,” Monday, August 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Standing Tall at Auschwitz,” Monday, August 27, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :06 – Rome’s Hidden Empire” Monday, August 27, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Henry VIII’s Mega Structures,” Monday, August 27, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Che,” Tuesday, August 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters :Earthquake in the Heartland,” Tuesday, August 28, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Nature’s Fury: Storm of the Century,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special :Katrina: American Catastrophe,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :’70’s Tech,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Secret U.S. Bunkers,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :’80’s Tech,” Wednesday, August 29, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake,” Thursday, August 30, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :World War I Tech,” Thursday, August 30, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Boneyard :Katrina,” Thursday, August 30, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :Gun Kills of Vietnam,” Thursday, August 30, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :B-2 Bomber,” Friday, August 31, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Human Weapon :Krav Maga of the Israeli Commandos,” Friday, August 31, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The States,” Marathon Saturday, September 1, @ 9am-7pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Nancy Gibbs and Michael Duffy: THE PREACHER AND THE PRESIDENTS #9 (1 week on list) – 9-2-07
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES #11 (6 weeks on list) – 9-2-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #15 – 9-2-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Geoffrey C. Ward: The War: An Intimate History, 1941-1945, (Knopf Publishing Group, September 11, 2007)
  • Andrew Nagorski: Greatest Battle: Stalin, Hitler, and the Desperate Struggle for Moscow That Changed the Course of World War II, (Simon & Schuster Adult Publishing Group, September 18, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 27, 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • Stephen William Berry: House of Abraham: Lincoln and the Todds, A Family Divided by War (Houghton Mifflin Company, November 5, 2007)
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:
Posted on Sunday, August 26, 2007 at 4:57 PM
BIGGEST STORIES:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 08-20-1619 – 1st Black slaves brought by Dutch to colony of Jamestown Virginia
  • 08-20-1781 – George Washington begins to move his troops south to fight Cornwallis
  • 08-20-1864 – 8th/last day of battle at Deep Bottom Run Va (about 3900 casualties)
  • 08-20-1865 – Pres Johnson proclaims an end to “insurrection” in Tx
  • 08-20-1866 – Pres Andrew Johnson formally declares Civil War over
  • 08-20-1896 – Dial telephone patented
  • 08-20-1910 – US supported opposition brings down Madriz in Nicaragua
  • 08-20-1918 – Britain opens offensive on Western front during WW I
  • 08-20-1974 – Pres Gerald Ford, assumes office after Richard Nixon’s resignation
  • 08-21-1321 – 160 Jews of Chincon France, burned at stake
  • 08-21-1831 – Nat Turner slave revolt kills 55 (Southampton County, Virginia)
  • 08-21-1858 – 1st Lincoln-Douglas debate (Illinois)
  • 08-21-1863 – Raid at Lawrence KS by William Quantrill
  • 08-21-1864 – Battle of Summit Point, VA
  • 08-21-1945 – Pres Truman ends Lend-Lease program
  • 08-22-0565 – St Columba reported seeing monster in Loch Ness
  • 08-22-1138 – English defeated Scots at Cowton Moor Banners of various saints were carried into battle which led to being called Battle of the Standard
  • 08-22-1454 – Jews are expelled from Brunn Moravia by order of King Ladislaus
  • 08-22-1642 – Civil War in England began between Royalists and Parliament
  • 08-22-1654 – 1st Jewish immigrant to US, Jacob Barsimson arrives in New Amsterdam
  • 08-22-1762 – 1st female (Ann Franklin) US newspaper editor, Newport RI, Mercury
  • 08-22-1791 – Haitian Slave Revolution begins under voodoo priest Boukman
  • 08-22-1846 – US annexes New Mexico
  • 08-22-1902 – Pres Teddy Roosevelt became 1st US chief executive to ride in a car
  • 08-22-1945 – Vietnam conflict begins as Ho Chi Minh leads a successful coup
  • 08-22-1956 – Pres Eisenhower and VP Nixon renominated by Rep convention in SF
  • 08-22-1975 – Assassination attempt on president Gerald Ford
  • 08-23-1833 – Britain abolishes slavery in colonies; 700,000 slaves freed
  • 08-23-1850 – 1st national women’s rights convention convenes in Worcester Mass
  • 08-23-1866 – Treaty of Prague ends Austro-Prussian war
  • 08-23-1903 – 6th Zionist Congress, Theodor Herzl declares Jewish state
  • 08-23-1914 – Japan declares war on Germany in World War I
  • 08-23-1939 – Molotov-Ribbentrop pact: East Europe divided between Hitler and Stalin
  • 08-23-1942 – Battle of Stalingrad: 600 Luftwaffers bomb Stalingrad (40,000 die)
  • 08-23-1972 – Republican convention (Miami Beach, Fla) renominates VP Agnew but not unanimous-1 vote went to NBC newsman David Brinkley
  • 08-23-1978 – Iranian students occupies Iranian embassy at Wassenaar
  • 08-23-1990 – US begins call up of 46,000 reservists to the Persian Gulf
  • 08-24-0079 – Mt Vesuvius erupts, buries Pompeii and Herculaneum, 15,000 die
  • 08-24-0410 – Rome overrun by Visigoths, symbolized fall of Western Roman Empire
  • 08-24-1349 – Jews
  • 08-24-1349 – 6,000 Jews, blamed for the Plague, are killed in Mainz
  • 08-24-1891 – Thomas Edison patents motion picture camera
  • 08-24-1936 – FDR gives FBI authority to pursuit fascists and communists
  • 08-24-1949 – North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) goes into effect
  • 08-24-1954 – Eisenhower signs Communist Control Act, outlawing the Communist Party, at height of McCarthyism
  • 08-24-1991 – Gorbachev resigns as head of USSR Communist Party
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Robert F. Dalzell Jr. and Lee Baldwin Dalzell: Total Manor Makeover THE HOUSE THE ROCKEFELLERS BUILT A Tale of Money, Taste, and Power in Twentieth-Century AmericaNYT, 8-19-07
  • Jack Kerouac. Edited by Howard Cunnell: On the Road Again ON THE ROAD The Original ScrollNYT, 8-19-07
  • Still Vital, ‘On the Road’ Turns 50 – NYT, 8-19-07
  • John Leland: You Don’t Know Jack WHY KEROUAC MATTERS The Lessons of ‘On the Road’ (They’re Not What You Think) NYT, 8-19-07
  • Susan Jacoby on Ruth R. Wisse: HISTORY DIASPORA What’s Good for the Jews A scholar wrestles with Jewish power and powerlessness JEWS AND POWERWaPo, 8-19-07
  • George Perkovich on Ramachandra Guha: HISTORY: INDIA Big Democracy Appreciating the miracle of India’s triumph over chaos INDIA AFTER GANDHI The History of the World’s Largest DemocracyWaPo, 8-19-07
  • Bruce Watson: Prejudice and Politics: Sacco, Vanzetti and Fear SACCO AND VANZETTI The Men, the Murders and the Judgment of MankindNYT, 8-15-07
  • Howard P. Chudacoff: Child’s Play Has Become Anything but Simple Children at Play: An American HistoryNYT, 8-14-07
  • Howard P. Chudacoff: Children at Play: An American History, First Chapter, (PDF) – NYT, 8-14-07
  • Richard Kluger: Reviewer can’t stand his prose – Richard Brookhiser in the NYT Book Review of Richard Kluger’s Seizing Destiny: How America Grew from Sea to Shining Sea, 8-12-07 –
  • Conrad Black: His apologia for Richard Nixon in new bio – Anthony Holden in the Times Literary Supplement, 8-8-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
  • Rick Perlstein vs. David Horowitz: Who the enemy is – HNN
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Charles Patricoff: History and Morality Demand We Stay in Iraq: “Look at how we helped rebuild Germany and Japan after World War II. Because of the good we did there and are doing in Iraq, I don’t believe we should ever leave Iraq. If we stay and rebuild Iraq, we will demonstrate to the world that we remain the best force for good in the world. More importantly, we as Christians can better influence that region for the Kingdom of God.” – http://www.earnedmedia.org, 8-17-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
  • Thomas Gaehtgens: German art historian to head Getty library – AP, 8-14-07
NEW ON THE WEB:
  • Quintard Taylor: Debuts website devoted to African-American history – AHA Blog, 8-5-07
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • August 23, 2007: Thomas Fleming: 6:30 p.m. Fraunces Tavern for a talk on the Battle of Brooklyn ( This is where the American Revolution starts – Battle Week returns to Brooklyn with muskets blazin’) – 24/7 Arts, Dining and Entertainment, NY, 8-16-07
  • August 25, 2007: James McPherson: Featured at daylong colloquium in Andover, Massachusetts on August 25th – AHA Blog, 5-28-07
  • September 11, 2007: Geoffrey Ward: On Tuesday, September 11, at 7 p.m., Archivist of the United States Allen Weinstein will host an “American Conversation” with award-winning historian and biographer Geoffrey Ward – Press Release–National Archives, 8-14-07
  • October 4, 2007: Emmanuel K. Akyeampong: IDEAS Boston 2007 – Business Wire, 8-13-07
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV :History Isabella Ginor; Gideon Remez: “Foxbats Over Dimona: The Soviets’ Nuclear Gamble in the Six-Day War,” Sunday, August 19 @ 3:15pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Stephen Mansfield: “Ten Tortured Words: How the Founding Fathers Tried to Protect Religion in America…and What’s Happened Since,” Sunday, August 19 @ 7:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : After Words: Stanley Weintraub, author of “15 Stars: Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall – Three Generals Who Saved the American Century” interviewed by Max Boot, Sunday, August 19 @ 9:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: History Detectives, Monday, August 20 @ 9pm/EDT – PBS
  • History Channel: “Targeted : Osama bin Laden,” Monday, August 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Shootout :Battle for Baghdad,” Monday, August 20, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Declassified :The Taliban,” Monday, August 20, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “9/11 Conspiracies :Fact or Fiction” Monday, August 20, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Secret A-Bomb Factories,” Monday, August 20, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Search for Atlantis,” Tuesday, August 21, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :Ships,” Tuesday, August 21, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wild West Tech :Outlaw Tech,” Tuesday, August 21, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Civil War Terror,” Wednesday, August 22, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “USS Constellation: Battling for Freedom,” Wednesday, August 22, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wild West Tech :Law & Order Tech,” Wednesday, August 22, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Henry VIII’s Mega Structures,” Wednesday, August 22, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files :The Pacific Bermuda Triangle,” Wednesday, August 22, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mountain Men,” Thursday, August 23, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Giganto: The Real King Kong,” Thursday, August 23, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :In Search of the Real Frankenstein,” Thursday, August 23, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wild West Tech :Vigilante Tech,” Thursday, August 23, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :The First Dogfighters,” Thursday, August 23, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Our Generation :Woodstock,” Friday, August 24, @ 6:30pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :60’s Tech,” Friday, August 24, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Fort Knox: Secrets Revealed,” Saturday, August 25, @ 10pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES #8 (5 weeks on list) – 8-26-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #17 – 8-26-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:
Posted on Sunday, August 19, 2007 at 4:12 PM
PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
  • David Landes & Jared Diamond: Both Cited by Mitt Romney in interviews – David Brooks in the NYT, 8-10-07
  • Gil Troy on “Rudy Giuliani’s wife seen as liability in run for president”: “Rudy Giuliani is playing an extremely dangerous game. The more he goes on Barbara Walters and talks about them as a couple and them as a team, the more scrutiny there will be and the more of an emphasis there will be from people like [Republican rival] Mitt Romney’s camp in the most subtle of ways on the fact that he’s trying lead a family-values party with a wife who represents a dramatic departure from family values.” – National Post, 8-9-07
BIGGEST STORIES:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 08-13-1608 – John Smith’s story of Jamestown’s 1st days submitted for publication
  • 08-13-1792 – Revolutionaries imprison French royals including Marie Antoinette
  • 08-13-1906 – Black soldiers raid Brownsville Texas
  • 08-13-1961 – Construction on Berlin Wall begins in East Germany (Dark day)
  • 08-14-1765 – Mass colonists challenge British rule by an Elm (Liberty Tree)
  • 08-14-1842 – Seminole War ends; Indians removed from Florida to Oklahoma
  • 08-14-1862 – Lincoln receives 1st group of blacks to confer with US president
  • 08-14-1900 – 2,000 marines land to capture Beijing, ending Boxer rebellion
  • 08-14-1912 – 2,500 US marines invade Nicaragua; US remains until 1925
  • 08-14-1937 – China declares war on Japan
  • 08-14-1942 – Dwight D Eisenhower named commander for invasion of North Africa
  • 08-14-1945 – V-J Day; Japan surrenders unconditionally to end WW II
  • 08-14-1973 – US ends secret bombing of Cambodia
  • 08-15-1534 – Ignatius of Loyola forms society of Jesus/Jesuits
  • 08-15-1620 – Mayflower sets sail from Southampton with 102 Pilgrims
  • 08-15-1824 – Freed American slaves forms country of Liberia
  • 08-15-1867 – 2nd Reform Bill extends suffrage in England
  • 08-15-1870 – Transcontinental Railway actually completed in Colorado
  • 08-15-1944 – Operation Dragoon: Allied troops land in Provence
  • 08-15-1944 – Operation Anvil: Allies land on French Mediterranean sea coast
  • 08-15-1960 – UFO is sighted by 3 California patrolmen
  • 08-15-1969 – Woodstock Music and Art Fair opens in NY State (Max Yasgur’s Dairy Farm)
  • 08-16-1777 – Americans defeat British in Battle of Bennington, Vt
  • 08-16-1858 – Britain’s Queen Victoria telegraphs President James Buchanan
  • 08-16-1861 – Pres Lincoln prohibits Union states from trading with Confederacy
  • 08-16-1863 – Emancipation Proclamation signed
  • 08-16-1961 – Martin L. King, Jr. protests for black voting right in Miami
  • 08-16-1969 – Woodstock rock festival begins in NY
  • 08-17-1590 – John White returns to Roanoke, VA and found no trace of colonist’s he had left there 3 yrs earlier [or Aug 18, 1591]
  • 08-17-1808 – Napoleon asks King Louis for Holland brigade towards Spain
  • 08-17-1862 – Confederate troops under Kirby Smith enter Kentucky
  • 08-17-1870 – Mrs Esther Morris becomes 1st woman magistrate (South Pass, Wyoming)
  • 08-17-1903 – Joe Pulitzer donated $1 million to Columbia U and begins Pulitzer Prizes
  • 08-17-1915 – Mob lynches Jewish businessman Leo Frank in Cobb County, Ga after death sentence for murder of 13-year-old girl commuted to life
  • 08-17-1948 – Alger Hiss denies ever being a Communist agent
  • 08-17-1961 – Building of Berlin Wall begins
  • 08-17-1969 – -18] Hurricane Camille, kills 256 in Miss and Louisiana
  • 08-17-1988 – Republicans nominate George Bush for president
  • 08-18-1564 – Spanish King Philip II joins Council of Trente
  • 08-18-1864 – Petersburg Campaign-Battle of Weldon Railroad day 1 of 3 days
  • 08-18-1914 – Pres Wilson issues “Proclamation of Neutrality”
  • 18/08/1920 – Tennessee ratifies 19th Amendment, guarantees women voting right
  • 08-18-1958 – TV game show scandal investigation starts
  • 08-19-1561 – Mary Queen of Scots arrives in Leith Scotland to assume throne after spending 13 years in France
  • 08-19-1692 – 5 women executed for witchcraft in Salem Mass
  • 08-19-1698 – Russian czar Peter the Great begins term
  • 08-19-1849 – NY Herald reports gold discovery in California
  • 08-19-1934 – Hitler elected Fuhrer (95.7% of German voters)
  • 08-19-1942 – 1st American offensive in Pacific in WW2, Guadalcanal, Solomon Is
  • 08-19-1942 – 4,000 Canadian and British soldiers killed raiding Dieppe, France
  • 08-19-1955 – Hurricane Diane kills 200 and 1st billion $ damage storm (N.E. US)
  • 08-19-1958 – NAACP Youth Council begin sit-ins at Oklahoma City Lunch counters
  • 08-19-1960 – Sputnik 5 carries 2 dogs, 3 mice into orbit (later recovered alive)
  • 08-19-1965 – Auschwitz trials end with 6 life sentences
  • 08-19-1984 – Republican convention in Houston nominates Ronald Reagan for pres
  • 08-19-1988 – Iran-Iraq begin a cease-fire in their 8-year-old war (11 PM EDT)
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • NATHANIEL PHILBRICK on Felipe Fernández-Armesto: God Bless Amerigo AMERIGO The Man Who Gave His Name to AmericaNYT, 8-12-07
  • Karen Abbott: Ladies of the Evening SIN IN THE SECOND CITY Madams, Ministers, Playboys, and the Battle for America’s SoulNYT, 8-12-07
  • Jon Meacham on John Ferling: Faint Echoes How Americans once waged an asymmetrical war against an imperial power ALMOST A MIRACLE The American Victory in the War of IndependenceWaPo, 8-12-07
  • Lesley Chamberlain: Russia’s Castaway Intellectuals in Revolution’s Wake LENIN’S PRIVATE WAR The Voyage of the Philosophy Steamer and the Exile of the Intelligentsia - NYT, 8-8-07
  • Gregory Clark: NYT highlights his theory that accounts for human progress – Nicholas Wade in the NYT, 8-7-07
  • John Lewis Gaddis: Literary Bomb Gets Readers’ Attention – http://www.courant.com, 8-7-07
  • Nancy Isenberg: Excerpt: ‘Fallen Founder’ – NPR, 8-6-07
  • Elizabeth Jacoway: Historian’s look at 1957 LR integration opens family secrets – Pine Bluff Commercial, 8-4-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Andrew Polsky on “Giuliani’s Daughter Signals Obama Support, Backtracks”: “I don’t think that Americans expect anymore that presidential families are all sweetness and light,” he said. “We’ve haven’t had that for quite a long time.” – New York Sun, 8-6-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
NEW ON THE WEB:
  • Quintard Taylor: Debuts website devoted to African-American history – AHA Blog, 8-5-07
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • August 13, 2007: Chattanooga Civil War Round Table Meeting Monday, August 13 Confederate Alabama Colonel William C. Oates is Subject of Meeting – The Chattanoogan, TN, 8-11-07
  • August 25, 2007: James McPherson: Featured at daylong colloquium in Andover, Massachusetts on August 25th – AHA Blog, 5-28-07
  • Sept. 13-15, 2007: Dickinson State University to host symposium on Teddy Roosevelt – Bismarck Tribune, 8-6-07
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : James Patterson “Restless Giant: The United States from Watergate to Bush V. Gore” Monday, August 13 @ 1:00am C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: History Detectives, Monday, August 13 @ 9pm/EDT – PBS
  • History Channel: “Blood Diamonds,” Sunday, August 12, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth : Nature’s Fury: New England’s Killer Hurricane,” Monday, August 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters :Yellowstone Eruption,” Monday, August 13, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Howard Hughes Tech,” Monday, August 13, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :04 – Scotland’s Sin City” Monday, August 13, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire,” Tuesday, August 14, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Big Build :The Fort,” Tuesday, August 14, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wake Island: The Alamo of the Pacific,” Wednesday, August 15, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tora, Tora, Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor,” Wednesday, August 15, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :Train Wreck in Lake Michigan.,” Wednesday, August 15, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Plague,” Thursday, August 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :The Pagans,” Thursday, August 16, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :Knights Templar,” Thursday, August 16, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe :Jupiter: The Giant Planet,” Friday, August 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe :The Inner Planets: Mercury & Venus,” Friday, August 17, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe :The Moon,” Friday, August 17, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe :Mars: The Red Planet,” Friday, August 17, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :The First Dogfighters,” Friday, August 17, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “10 Days That Unexpectedly Changed America :When America Was Rocked.,” Friday, August 17, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “An Alien History of Planet Earth,” Saturday, August 18, @ 1pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files,” Marathon Saturday, August 18, @ 3-5pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES #6 (4 weeks on list) – 8-19-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #16 – 8-19-07
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #19 – 8-19-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, August 12, 2007 at 8:07 PM | Top
// ShareThis

August 6, 2007

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:
  • Richard Reeves on “2008 Hopefuls & Heads Of State”: “personal relationships between leaders are tremendously important. It doesn’t matter if they met [the leaders] before they became president. It’s how they handle relationships when they get there.” – The Gate – National Journal, DC, 8-2-07
BIGGEST STORIES:
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY: This Week in History:

  • 08-06-1787 – Constitutional Convention in Phila begans debate
  • 08-06-1806 – Holy Roman Empire ends; it was neither holy, Roman, nor an empire
  • 08-06-1815 – US flotilla ends piracy by Algiers, Tunis and Tripoli
  • 08-06-1945 – Hiroshima Peace Day-atom bomb dropped on Hiroshima by “Enola Gay”
  • 08-06-1965 – LBJ signs Voting Rights Act, guaranteeing voting rights for blacks
  • 08-06-1990 – UN Security Council votes 13-0 (2 abstensions Cuba and Yemen) to place economic sanctions against Iraq
  • 08-07-1782 – George Washington creates Order of Purple Heart
  • 08-07-1934 – US Court of Appeals upheld lower court ruling striking down govt’s attempt to ban controversial James Joyce novel “Ulysses”
  • 08-07-1942 – 1st American offensive in Pacific in WW2, Guadalcanal, Solomon Is
  • 08-07-1964 – US Congress approves Gulf of Tonkin resolution
  • 08-07-1990 – Desert Shield begins – US deploys troops to Saudi Arabia
  • 08-08-1864 – Red Cross forms in Geneva
  • 08-08-1876 – Thomas Edison patents mimeograph
  • 08-08-1890 – Daughters of American Revolution organizes
  • 08-08-1945 – USSR establishes a communist government in North Korea
  • 08-08-1945 – US, USSR, England and France sign Treaty of London
  • 08-08-1945 – Pres Harry S Truman signs UN Charter
  • 08-08-1953 – US and South Korea initial a mutual security pact
  • 08-08-1968 – Republican convention in Miami Beach nominates Nixon for pres
  • 08-08-1973 – VP Spiro T Agnew says reports he took kickbacks are “damned lies” from govt contracts in Maryland. He vowed not to resign
  • 08-08-1974 – Pres Richard M Nixon announces he’ll resign his office 12PM Aug 9
  • 08-09-1638 – Jonas Bronck of Holland becomes 1st European settler in Bronx
  • 08-09-1842 – US-Canada border defined by Webster-Ashburton Treaty
  • 08-09-1655 – Lord Protector Cromwell divides England into 11 districts
  • 08-09-1673 – Dutch recapture NY from English; regained by English in 1674
  • 08-09-1790 – Columbia returns to Boston after 3 year journey, 1st ship to carry US flag around the world
  • 08-09-1842 – US-Canada border defined by Webster-Ashburton Treaty
  • 08-09-1848 – Barnburners (anti-slavery) party merges with Free Soil Party nominateing Martin Van Buren for president
  • 08-09-1941 – Winston Churchill reaches Newfoundland for 1st talk with FDR
  • 08-09-1974 – Richard Nixon resigns presidency, VP Gerald Ford becomes 38th pres
  • 08-10-0070 – “2nd Temple” of Jews is set aflame (approx)
  • 08-10-1497 – John Cabot tells King Henry VII of his trip to “Asia”
  • 08-10-1831 – Former slave Nat Turner leads uprising against slavery
  • 08-10-1846 – Congress charters “nation’s attic,” Smithsonian Institution
  • 08-10-1941 – FDR and Churchill’s 2nd meeting at Placentia Newfoundland
  • 08-11-1924 – US presidential candidates make 1st film for bio-scoop news
  • 08-11-1941 – FDR and PM Winston Churchill sign Atlantic Charter
  • 08-12-1676 – 1st war between American colonists and Indians ends in New England
  • 08-12-1867 – Pres A Johnson defies Congress suspending Sec of War Edwin Stanton
  • 08-12-1898 – Hawaii formally annexed to US
  • 08-12-1898 – Peace protocol ends Spanish-American War, signed
  • 08-12-1990 – Iraq President Saddam Hussein says he is ready to resolve Gulf crisis if Israel withdraws from occupied territories
  • 08-12-1994 – Stephen G Breyer, sworn in as Supreme Court Justice
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:
  • Michael Beschloss on Stanley Weintraub, Mark Perry: Not the President’s Men 15 STARS Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall: Three Generals Who Saved the American Century PARTNERS IN COMMAND George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and PeaceNYT, 8-5-07
  • Stanley Weintraub: 15 STARS Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall: Three Generals Who Saved the American Century, First Chapter – NYT, 8-5-07
  • John Ferling on Richard Kluger: HISTORY AMERICA The Long Land Grab A Pulitzer-winning social historian recounts America’s rapacious expansion – SEIZING DESTINY How America Grew from Sea to Shining Sea WaPo, 8-5-07
  • Ian Kershaw: HISTORY WORLD WAR II Turning Points A historian examines crucial decisions made during the Second World War FATEFUL CHOICES Ten Decisions That Changed the World, 1940-1941WaPo, 8-2-07
  • Jordana Dym: Politics, Economy, and Society in Bourbon Central America, 1759-1821, From Sovereign Villages to National States: City, State, and Federation in Central America, 1759-1839Skidmore College News, NY, 8-3-07
  • Frederick R. Davis: FSU professor documents work of Carr, “The Man Who Saved Sea Turtles” – Florida State University, 8-1-07
  • TOM SEGEV, ISABELLA GINOR AND GIDEON REMEZ : Six days that shook the world 1967: ISRAEL, THE WAR AND THE YEAR THAT TRANSFORMED THE MIDDLE EAST, FOXBATS OVER DIMONA: THE SOVIETS’ NUCLEAR GAMBLE IN THE SIX DAY WARThe Scotsman, 7-28-07
  • David Greenberg on Jeremi Suri: Oh, Henry! A historian’s examination of Kissinger’s realpolitik worldview HENRY KISSINGER AND THE AMERICAN CENTURYWaPo, 7-26-07
  • Benny Morris: Blasts Tom Segev, Gives Ginor & Remez benefit of the doubt – Benny Morris in a New Republic book review, 7-10-07
  • Robert Higgs: His collected essays praised – Hugh Rockoff, Department of Economics, Rutgers University, at the website of Economic History Services, 7-1-07
  • Isabella Ginor and Gideon Remez: The Soviets’ Nuclear Gamble in the Six-Day War Middle East Forum, 6-6-07
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
FEATURE:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Michael Marrus on “Museum opens doors to Bergson – and debate”: “I would not like to see a situation where various interest groups seeking to establish their own interpretation as canonical can, through the mobilization of opinion and the collection of signatures, see the museum change. Museum professionals should be allowed to do their work professionally, without the kind of pressure that activists are sometimes brilliant at exerting.” – Canadian Jewish News, Canada, 8-3-07
  • Deborah Lipstadt on “Museum opens doors to Bergson – and debate”: “I don’t believe that you change things by petition. You don’t politicize museums, especially a federal museum.” Canadian Jewish News, Canada, 8-3-07
  • Jonathan Sarna on “Museum opens doors to Bergson – and debate”: “I think in retrospect, much more than at the time, we respect the kinds of tactics that the Bergsonites used. Indeed, later on they would become normative tactics of the Jewish community.” – Canadian Jewish News, Canada, 8-3-07
  • Gordon Brown: Says President Bush has great sense of history: “I enjoyed my discussions with him. I think what what I particularly enjoyed about my discussions is his sense of history.” – Interview broadcast on NBC Nightly News, 7-31-07
HONORED, AWARDED, AND APPOINTMENTS:
SPOTTED & SPEAKING EVENTS CALENDAR:
  • August 25, 2007:James McPherson: Featured at daylong colloquium in Andover, Massachusetts on August 25th – AHA Blog, 5-28-07
ON TV: History Listings This Week:

  • C-Span2, Book TV : History 2007 Roosevelt Reading Festival: Gary Scott Smith: “Faith and the Presidency” Sunday, August 5 @ 4:05pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, Book TV : History Sally Denton: “Passion And Principle: John and Jessie Fremont, The Couple Whose Power, Politics, And Love Shaped Nineteenth-Century America” Sunday, August 5 @ 5:00pm C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: History Detectives, Monday, August 6 @ 9pm/EDT – PBS
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :The Seven Wonders,” Sunday, August 5, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :Gun Kills of Vietnam,” Sunday, August 5, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Street Gangs: A Secret History,” Monday, August 6, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :12 – Secret Pagan Underground,” Monday, August, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :07 – Catacombs of Death” Monday, August 6, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Shark Attack 1916″ Monday, August 6, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 500 Years Later,” Tuesday, August 7, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Doomsday 2012: The End of Days,” Tuesday, August 7, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Secrets of the Dollar Bill,” Tuesday, August 7, @7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files : Alien Engineering,” Wednesday, August 8, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special :Meteors: Fire in the Sky,” Wednesday, August 8, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Mysteries on the High Seas,” Wednesday, August, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files :Texas’ Roswell,” Wednesday, August, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds : The Seven Wonders,” Thursday, August 9, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Garden of Eden,” Thursday, August 9, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Mayan Doomsday Prophecy,” Thursday, August 9, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Ancient Monster Hunters,” Thursday, August 9, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :Kamikaze,” Thursday, August 9, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :05 – Rome: The Rise,” Friday, August 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :10 – Beneath Vesuvius,” Friday, August 10, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :11 – Dracula’s Underground,” Friday, August 10, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :09 – Freemason Underground,” Friday, August 10, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights :Desert Aces,” Friday, August 10, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights,” Marathon Saturday, August 11, @ 8-11pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Tim Weiner: LEGACY OF ASHES #5 (3 weeks on list) – 8-12-07
  • Walter Isaacson: EINSTEIN HIS LIFE AND UNIVERSE #11 (16 weeks on list) – 8-12-07
  • Ronald Reagan. Edited by Douglas Brinkley: THE REAGAN DIARIES #21 – 8-12-07
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Woody Holton: Unruly Americans and the Origins of the Constitution, (Hill and Wang, August 7, 2007)
  • David Halberstam: Coldest Winter: America and the Korean War, (Hyperion, September 2007)
  • John Kelin, Praise From a Future Generation: The Assassination of John F. Kennedy and the First Generation Critics of the Warren Report, (Wings Press TX), September 28, 2007
  • Maureen Waller: Sovereign Ladies: The Six Reigning Queens of England, (St. Martin’s Press, September 28, 2007)
  • Rick Atkinson: Day of Battle: The War in Sicily and Italy, 1943-1944, (Henry Holt & Company, Incorporated, October 2, 2007)
  • Benjamin J. Kaplan: Divided by Faith: Religious Conflict and the Practice of Toleration in Early Modern Europe, (Harvard University Press, October 15, 2007)
  • Richard Avedon, The Kennedys: Portrait of a Family, (HarperCollins Publishers), October 23, 2007
  • M. Stanton Evans: Blacklisted by History: The Real Story of Joseph McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies, (Crown Publishing Group, November 6, 2007)
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, August 5, 2007 at 4:22 PM

Top Young Historians: 65 – Tevi D. Troy

Top Young Historians

Tevi D. Troy, 40

After reconsideration this historian & profile have been removed from the Top Young Historian list.

Top Young Historians: 64 – Scott A. Sandage

Top Young Historians

Scott A. Sandage, 43

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor, Department of History, Carnegie Mellon University
Area of Research: Cultural and Nineteenth Century American History.
Education: Ph.D. Department of History, Rutgers University, 1995
Major Publications: Sandage is the author of Born Losers: A History of Failure in America (Harvard University Press, 2005), which was awarded the 34th Annual Thomas J. Wilson Prize, for the best “first book” accepted by Harvard press. The paperback edition was published in 2006; a Japanese translation was released in 2007, and there are forthcoming translations in Chinese and Taiwanese, 2007-2008.
Scott A. Sandage  JPG His abridgement of Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America has just been published by HarperPerennial Modern Classics. His next book project, Half-Breed Creek: A Tall Tale of Race on the Frontier, 1800-1941, focuses on mixed-blood Native Americans to show how family folklore has shaped racial identity in the United States. Sandage is also the author or numerous journal articles and book chapters including: “The Gilded Age,” in A Companion to American Cultural History, ed. Karen Halttunen (London: Blackwell, forthcoming August 2007), and “A Marble House Divided: The Lincoln Memorial, the Civil Rights Movement, and the Politics of Memory, 1939-1963,” Journal of American History, 80 (June 1993): 135-167; reprinted in Reynolds J. Scott-Childress, ed., Race and the Production of Modern American Nationalism (Garland, 1999), 273-311; and Charles Payne and Adam Green, eds., Time Longer than Rope: A Century of African American Activism, 1850-1950 (NYU Press, 2003), 492-535.
Awards: Sandage is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
Elliot Dunlop Smith Award for Distinguished Teaching and Educational Service, Carnegie Mellon University, 2006;
Thomas J. Wilson Prize, for the best first book accepted by Harvard University Press in the calendar year, 2003;
Finalist, Elliot Dunlop Smith Award for Outstanding Educational Service, CMU, 2001;
Outstanding Faculty Member Award 2000-2001, CMU Greek Council;
Dissertation Award, Northeastern Association of Graduate Schools, for best dissertation, 1995-96;
Finalist, Allan Nevins Dissertation Prize, Society of American Historians, 1995-1996;
Louis Pelzer Memorial Award, Organization of American Historians, “Marble House Divided,” best graduate student article, 1993;
Bryant Spann Memorial Prize, Eugene V. Debs Foundation, “A Marble House Divided,” best article on social justice, 1992. National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship, 2007-2008;
Humanities Instructional Software Initiative, Office of Technology for Education, Carnege Mellon, 2001-2002;
J. Franklin Jameson Fellowship in American History, American Historical Association and Library of Congress, 1997-1998;
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, 1998;
CMU Faculty Development Fund, 1997-1999;
Falk Fellowship Fund in the Humanities, CMU, 1996, 2003;
Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in History, Society of Fellows in the Humanities, Columbia University, New York, N.Y., 1995-1996;
Smithsonian Institution Research Fellowship, National Museum of American History, Washington, D.C., 1996;
NEH Dissertation Grant, 1994-1995;
Littleton-Griswold Grant for Research in American Legal History, American Historical Association, 1994;
Mellon-Christian Fellowship in Business and Economic History, Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va., 1993, 1994.
Additional Info:
Sandage is active as a public historian, he has been a consultant to the Smithsonian Institution, the National Archives, the National Park Service, an off-Broadway play, and film and radio documentaries.
In 1999-2000, he chaired a panel of historians to choose an inscription for the wheelchair sculpture belatedly added to the Franklin D. Roosevelt Memorial.
He is co-editor of the “American History and Culture” book series for New York University Press.
His commentaries have appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Industry Standard, and Fast Company Magazine, among other mainstream periodicals.

Personal Anecdote

Three days before HNN informed me of this recognition, an e-mail query arrived from a scholar writing about failure and depression – the emotional kind. Did I have any thoughts on connections between them?

The truth is, such thoughts clouded much of the decade between earning my Ph.D. in 1995 and publishing Born Losers in 2005. Anyone who can count will see that gaping hole in my résumé, and anyone who knows me even distantly will vouch that I was barely seen or heard from for years. In the time span I took writing just one volume, J.R.R. Tolkien wrote all of Lord of the Rings.

Historians remember each other as much by topic as by name. “Whatever happened to that failure guy?” Everybody loved my topic; it had gotten me grants and a good job. Early on, colleagues ribbed me, “If you fail to finish your book, you’ll really have succeeded, right?” When they stopped kidding me entirely, it was no joke anymore.

The life crises of my thirties were no worse than anybody else’s. My 15-year relationship ended, a close friend died young, the puppy I got while writing my dissertation died old. A bewhiskered faculty mentor spun horror stories of promising historians who were denied tenure and now taught 6/6. To paraphrase my dad’s old suppertime rant: somewhere there were starving adjuncts who would just love to have my job.

I found a groovy Jungian shrink who burned incense during sessions – a barefoot hippie chick who helped me a lot, and I went on meds. The book just went on. The longer it took, the worse I felt, the better it had to be. I read somewhere that Niall Ferguson was born on April 18, 1964 – same day and year as I was.

Having created the monster that ate up my thirties, I managed to kill it a few months before turning forty. When my tenure case went through, my college Dean winked about “a last-minute reprieve from the Governor.” People started kidding me again.

My favorite review of Born Losers opened with a blunt acknowledgement that “delays in [the book's] appearance fanned fears that Sandage, like many of his book’s characters, might himself fail in his undertaking.” I did fail, of course, just as anyone who tries to explain the past must fail. I took too long to understand that failure was no excuse for not finishing.

After discussing my depression in an NPR interview about the book, I got a lot of unexpected mail from people with their own failure stories. Evidently, it helped to know that Born Losers was not the work of some ivory professor impressed by his own success.

The foregoing should raise questions about naming me to any “top” list, but I am grateful to be called “young” and happier still to feel that way again. Replying to last week’s query about depression and failure, I thumbed Born Losers and was shocked to discover that I omitted that angle entirely. Go figure.

Quotes

By Scott Sandage

  • Born Losers: A History of Failure in America JPG The promise of America is that nobody is born to lose, but who has never wondered, “Am I wasting my life?” We imagine escaping the mad scramble yet kick ourselves for lacking drive. Low ambition offends Americans even more than low achievement…. Failure conjures such vivid pictures of lost souls that it is hard to imagine a time, before the Civil War, when the word meant “breaking in business” – going broke. How did it become a name for a deficient self, an identity in the red? Why do we manage identity the way we run our businesses – by investment, risk, profit, and loss? — Scott A. Sandage in “Born Losers: A History of Failure in America”
  • About Scott A. Sandage

  • “In this book about the cultural ramifications of economic failure in nineteenth-century America, Sandage has taken on an important and underexamined subject and scrutinized it in inventive ways, using unexpected and largely unmined sources.” — Benjamin Schwarz, Atlantic Monthly
  • Born Losers, admirably concise and formidably researched, is the history of America’s reverse Horatio Algers. Scott A. Sandage, an associate professor of history at Carnegie Mellon University, logged a decade in the library to produce what amounts to an authoritative chronicle of the risks of lending and borrowing in 19th century America (although the book ranges well into the 20th).” — James Grant, “Wall Street Journal”
  • “By examining the lives and careers of a number of businessmen who failed during the 19th century, [Sandage] portrays what we reflexively think of as the darker side of the American dream but what is, in reality, an only slightly exaggerated mirror of the reality with which ordinary people–i.e., thee and me–are fated to contend… For the most part Born Losers is readable, interesting and thoroughly researched…We understand the human side of failure far more keenly than we did a couple of centuries ago, but we still fear it and still believe–against all the evidence–that somehow we can and will escape it.” — Jonathan Yardley, “Washington Post”
  • “In Scott Sandage’s provocative new study, Born Losers, the Carnegie Mellon University professor notes that not long ago, ‘loser’ meant only that a person had lost money or a house. It described an event; it didn’t declare a person completely worthless. His study examines how we came to make that change, how we internalized it and enshrined it in our culture…Sandage has mined a dark, rich vein, and, as in his deeply felt epilogue, he can write with great compassion.” — Jerome Weeks, “Dallas Morning News”
  • “The book presents a convincing argument and is winningly alive to literary parallels–success may be the grand theme of American history, but failures, from Bartleby through Gatsby to Willy Loman, dominate its literature.” — Robert Hanks, “Daily Telegraph”
  • “Drawing on a prodigious amount of research into two centuries of diaries, self-help books, credit reports and legal cases, Sandage paints a portrait gallery of American ‘broken men, down-and-outers, no-accounts, third-raters, small fries, small potatoes,…ne’er-do-wells (and) nobodies.'” — Andrew Stark, “Times Literary Supplement”
  • “Sandage’s book is a rich and fascinating exposition of how failure, once deemed an accident of fortune, has been turned into an ontological category, an explanation of fate based on an essence of the individual, an intangible identity bequeathed at birth. It is a harsh and cruel judgment, usually disguised as condescension or pity. For children and teenagers, it is a taunt–Loser!–that consigns the designee to hell…This is the sort of deeply critical and deeply caring book that is too seldom seen in cultural studies…You cannot come away from this elegant book without a heightened awareness of the devastating costs of the go-ahead mandate for the downsized corporate executive, the bank teller denied a promotion year after year, the college graduate struggling to spring loose of internships to land a real job.” — Christine Stansell, “New Republic”
  • Born Losers is a beautiful piece of writing. Scott Sandage is history’s Dickens; his bleak house, the late nineteenth century world of almost anonymous American men who failed. With wit and sympathy, Sandage illuminates the grey world of credit evaluation, a little studied smothering arm of capitalism. This is history as it should be, a work of art exploring the social cost of our past.” — William S. McFeely, author of “Grant: a Biography”
  • “Here is a feast of historical insight, personal narrative, and literary panache. With his focus on the making of economic failure, Sandage enables us to see and understand 19th century America in an entirely new, provocatively sober way… A fascinating book.” — Michael Kazin, author of “The Populist Persuasion: An American History”
  • “I found Born Losers a confirmation of an old belief that in American history there is a crash in every generation sufficient to mark us with a kind of congenital fear of failure. This is a bright light on a buried strain in the evolution of the United States.” — Arthur Miller
  • “The only person I can think of like Scott Sandage is Robin Williams from Dead Poet’s Society. He is the type of teacher that really understands what it means to teach. We all should be so lucky to have a professor that is knowledgeable and wise as Scott Sandage. His class has been a life-changing experience.”… “Amazing lecturer. Very charismatic and gets the class very involved in discussions. Is always very interested in student input and does his best to make sure that you take away from the course. Try to take a course with him if at all possible.”… “Awesome class! He shows a lot of enthusiasm for what he teaches. One of the most enjoyable classes at CMU.”… “truly inspirational, excellent professor, probably the best at CMU”… “Scott was the best history professor I’ve ever had. His classes are very compelling and always interesting.”… “Brilliant lecturer. Very generous with his time. One of the best professors I’ve ever taken. Highly recommended.”… “fantastic teaching style, and sometimes even brings his dog to class.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, August 19, 2007 at 6:25 PM

    Top Young Historians: 63 – Leslie Butler

    Top Young Historians

    Leslie Butler, 38

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Dartmouth College, Assistant Professor of History.
    Area of Research: American cultural and intellectual history, 19th-century Anglo-American liberalism
    Education: Ph.D., History, Yale University, 1998.
    Major Publications: Butler is the author of Critical Americans: Victorian Intellectuals and Transatlantic Liberal Reform, (University of North Carolina Press, 2007)  which examines a group of liberal intellectuals who sought to remake public life in the second half of the nineteenth century.
    She is the author of numerours book chapters including “Liberal Victorians and Foreign Policy in the Age of Empire,” in Steven Mintz, editor, The Problem of Evil: Race, Slavery, and the Ambiguities of Reform. (University of Massachusetts Press, 2007). “Reconstructions in Intellectual and Cultural Life,” in Thomas Brown, ed., Reconstructions: New Perspectives on the Postbellum United States. (Oxford University Press, 2006); “Investigating the ‘Great American Mystery': Theory and Style in Henry Adams’ Political Reform Moment,” in William Decker and Earl Harbert, eds., Henry Adams and the Need to Know, (University Press of Virginia, 2005). Butler has also written articles and reviews for a number of scholarly journals.
    Butler’s current project tentatively titled “The Political Education of Victorian Women: Gender and Citizenship in Nineteenth-Century Britain and America” focuses on the thought of a group of British and American suffragists, male and female, who held expansive views about the connections between education and democratic citizenship.
    Awards: Butler is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    Reiss Family Faculty Research Grant, Rockefeller Center, Dartmouth, 2006-7;
    Junior Faculty Fellowship, Dartmouth College, 2006-7;
    Research Scholar, Rockefeller Center for the Social Sciences, Dartmouth, 2005-6;
    Intramural Research Grant Program, Michigan State University, 2001;
    Faculty Research Development Grant, James Madison College, M.S.U., 2001;
    American Antiquarian Society, Katherine J. Petersen Fellowship, 1998;
    Massachusetts Historical Society Fellowship, 1998;
    Mrs. Giles Whiting Fellowship in the Humanities, Yale University, 1997-8;
    John D. Rockefeller, 3rd, Fellowship, Program on Non-Profit Organizations, Yale, 1995;
    John F. Enders Fellowship, spring 1995 (for primary research in British archives);
    Beinecke Library Summer Fellowship, 1995;
    Mellon Predissertation Research Grant, summer 1994;
    Yale University Graduate Fellowship, 1991-93.
    Additional Info:
    Formerly Assistant Professor in Humanities, James Madison College, Michigan State, 1998-2003, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Reed College, 1997-98, and was a Graduate Instructor and Newhouse Writing Fellow, Yale University, 1995-97.

    Personal Anecdote

    It is a truth universally acknowledged (or at least it should be) that the longer you live with a project, the more relevant it becomes. This truth was certainly borne out by the project that became my first book.

    I chose to study a group of nineteenth-century liberal critics. These men were ensconced in northeastern universities and media outlets; cosmopolitan enough to be comfortable on both sides of the Atlantic; and sharply critical of the venality of American politics and the shallowness of American culture. Denounced as effeminate cultural elites by their contemporaries (as well as by many historians), they were, in short, the original coastal-dwelling, Europe-loving men.

    I had stumbled onto the topic serendipitously, running into several volumes of their correspondence and writings at a used book sale. Not really even knowing who these figures were, I found myself riveted by their broad-ranging and earnest (if still incomplete) efforts to reconcile their ideal of democratic public life with the often less inspiring reality they saw around them. I could spend years reading this stuff, I thought. And so I did.

    From the moment I began my research in the mid-1990s, I heard echoes in our own political and cultural debates: over campaign finance reform, the media’s proper role in political discussion, and the seriousness of Oprah Winfrey’s book club. Had I published the book according to my (and my publisher’s) original time frame, however, I would have entirely missed out on what would become the most disturbingly salient echo.

    In 2004, as I began a final draft of the book, what had always seemed like a compelling but safely distant episode took on new meaning and urgency. This was the liberals’ dissent from America’s (initially) popular wars of 1846 and 1898 and their insistence on the necessity and even patriotic duty of such wartime dissent. As entertainer/artists like Bill Maher or the Dixie Chicks ran afoul of America’s remarkably enduring patriotic speech codes, James Russell Lowell’s couplet kept rhyming in my head:

    I loved her old renown, her stainless fame

    What better proof than that I loathed her shame.

    Of course, I couldn’t have foreseen any of this back when I first began the project. And I certainly don’t want to be seen here as advocating a disregard for deadlines. My experience simply suggests the importance of choosing a topic that engages your interest for the long haul. What echoes in the future will take care of itself.

    Quotes

    By Leslie Butler

  • “The liberal ideal of democratic politics attempted to combine unprecedented inclusiveness (of African Americans and women) with the elevation of the Critical Americans Victorian Intellectuals and Transatlantic  Liberal Reform JPG individual voter as a reasoning civic participant capable of thinking for himself or herself. … Recent attempts by political theorists to elaborate a discursive or communicative model of politics echo (unconsciously) the Victorian emphasis on speech and discussion as precisely the things that make … democracies democratic. In an era when only about 50% of Americans turn out to vote in presidential elections and much of the media seems set on thwarting rather than facilitating meaningful discussion, we might do well to reinvigorate the Victorians’ insistence on the ‘stimulating’ effect of civic participation as well as on democratic discussion. Though their normative ideal of citizenship may seem either naively optimistic or overly austere, it bespoke a respect for voters as reasoning individuals far removed from the current trends of endless ‘spin’ or deceptive ‘frames.” — Leslie Butler in “Critical Americans Victorian Intellectuals and Transatlantic Liberal Reform”
  • About Leslie Butler

  • “In this important contribution to transatlantic intellectual and cultural history, Leslie Butler skillfully resurrects the ideas of cultivation and cosmopolitanism advanced by Victorian critics long neglected or misunderstood. Joining a chorus of distinguished historians including Daniel Walker Howe, James Turner, and Jonathan Hansen, she demonstrates that these unfairly maligned partisans of liberal democracy battled against slavery and racism, championed women’s rights, and opposed political corruption and imperialism not because they distrusted ‘the people’ but because they wanted their nation to redeem the promise of popular government.” — James T. Kloppenberg, author of “The Virtues of Liberalism” reviewing “Critical Americans Victorian Intellectuals and Transatlantic Liberal Reform”
  • “In this beautifully written and fair-minded book, Leslie Butler overturns a century of debunking to recover, in the liberals of the Victorian era, experience instructive for America today. She demonstrates the continued vitality of her subjects’ reflections on democracy, race, and the role of the media, on party politics, overseas interventions, and, not least, the social responsibility of the arts.” — Daniel Walker Howe, author of “Making the American Self: Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln” reviewing “Critical Americans Victorian Intellectuals and Transatlantic Liberal Reform”
  • “Butler is amazing! She’s extremely knowledgable, thought-provoking, and energetic. She’s now one of my favorite professors and has inspired me to become a history major”…. “Leslie Butler is one of the best professors I have had. Often younger profs compensate for age with condescension, but Butler actually listens to and interacts with us. I feel like she really appreciates our ideas. I never felt like I was just supposed to bask in her wisdom.” — Anonymous Students
  • // <![CDATA[// Posted on Sunday, August 12, 2007 at 8:23 PM

    Top Young Historians: 62 – Daniel J. Cohen

    Top Young Historians

    Daniel J. Cohen, 38

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, Department of History and Art History, and Director of Research Projects at the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University
    Area of Research: Scholar of Victorian European and American intellectual history as well as the history of science who also explores—and tries to influence through theory, software, websites, and his blog—the impact of computing on the humanities.
    Education: Ph.D. in History, Yale University, 1999
    Major Publications: Cohen is the author of Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith. Daniel J.  Cohen JPG (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2007) and co-author of Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2005).
    He has also published articles and book chapters on the history of mathematics and religion, the teaching of history, and the future of history in a digital age in journals such as the Journal of American History, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and Rethinking History, and include: “Reasoning and Belief in Victorian Mathematics,” in Martin Daunton, ed., The Organisation of Knowledge in Victorian Britain (Oxford University Press/The British Academy, 2005); “By the Book: Assessing the Place of Textbooks in U.S. Survey Courses,” Journal of American History 91 (March 2005), among others.
    Cohen is currently working on a book project tentatively entitled Digital Scholarship: Theory & Practice.
    Awards: Cohen is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    George Mason University Faculty Fellowship, 2007-8;
    American Council of Learned Societies Digital Innovation Fellowship, 2006-7 (inaugural recipient);
    George Washington Egleston Prize, awarded for “Symbols of Heaven, Symbols of Man: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Religion,” 1999;
    Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, awarded by the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, 1996-1997 Whiting Dissertation Fellowship winner, 1996;
    Pew Charitable Trusts Fellowship, 1996;
    Mellon Dissertation Research Fellowship, 1996;
    John F. Enders Grant, 1995-1996;
    Yale University Fellowship, 1992-1997;
    Harvard University Fellowship, 1990-1992;
    Zotero 2.0 (zotero.org), funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, $890,000, Lead Primary Investigator, 2006-2008;
    Zotero 1.0 (zotero.org), funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services, $250,000, Co-Primary Investigator, 2006-2007;
    Echo 2 (echo.gmu.edu), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, $700,000, Co-Director, 2004-2008;
    Hurricane Digital Memory Bank (hurricanearchive.org), funded by the Alfred P Sloan Foundation, $250,000, Co-Director, 2006-2008;
    Preserving the Record of the Dot-Com Era, funded by the Library of Congress’s National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program, $143,000 (part of a larger grant to the University of Maryland), Director, 2006-2008;
    Scholarly software for the National Endowment for the Humanities’ EDSITEment project, funded by NEH, $150,000, Co-Director, 2005-2007;
    September 11 Digital Archive (911digitalarchive.org), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, $750,000, Co-Director, 2002-2004;
    Echo: Exploring and Collecting History Online (echo.gmu.edu), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, $720,000, Co-Director, 2001-2004.
    Additional Info:
    At the Center for History and New Media, George Mason University Cohen has co-directed, among other projects, the “September 11 Digital Archive” and “Echo,” and has developed software for scholars, teachers, and students, including the popular Zotero research tool.
    He writes a blog; Dan Cohen’s Digital Humanities Blog: http://www.dancohen.org/

    Personal Anecdote

    To spruce up a nondescript apartment tower that rises a few blocks from my home in Silver Spring, Maryland, the landlords hired a metalworker who spent several days channeling Frank Gehry to create an ambitious but rather impractical porous, upside-down archway in front of the building’s entrance. The new facade has become widely known, or at least widely known in my household, as the “Giant Hammock.” I know this because I live with two discerning architectural critics: my three-year-old twins, Eve and Arlo.

    Eve and Arlo have many other shrewd insights, which they do not hesitate to share with anyone who will listen, as well as many who care not to. After witnessing me say several times that I was “going to work,” followed by a short trip across the room to my computer, they became quite sure that I do not actually work.

    Perhaps they are right. Although I happen to think I work very hard on several fronts at once (writing, teaching, creating scholarly websites and software), given the relative freedom of my schedule compared to others (farmers, bakers, Paris Hilton paparazzi), I try to remind myself often that we academics are extraordinarily lucky.

    And with good fortune comes responsibility. Combined with my kids’ insight that their daddy doesn’t work–“he types”–this sense of responsibility has led me to give away as much as I can. A couple of years ago I decided to start blogging much of what I know, and have since “typed” close to a book’s worth of content on my website. With the exception of my latest book, all of my publications are also freely available online, as are my digital research tools. It’s not all altruism, of course; that which is openly accessible on the Web also spreads the word more widely and rapidly about you and what you care about.

    When I do leave the house and go to the university, I return to questions from Eve and Arlo not about “my work” (already established: Daddy doesn’t work), but about whether I “spoke to Roy” (Rosenzweig, my friend and collaborator at the Center for History and New Media) or “told stories to my students.”

    My kids may not fully comprehend what I do, but they sense that I tell stories not unlike the ones in their picture books, and I try to keep the simplicity of that notion in mind. Because I often write about highly technical topics–the complexity of the twenty-first century digital realm or the nuances of nineteenth-century mathematics–I always put extra effort into my “typing” to avoid jargon or esoteric terms and to make sure that the sum is greater than the parts. If I’m lucky, I’m able to communicate the larger human expression behind a sequence of equations or lines of code.

    Recently I was walking in downtown Silver Spring with Eve and Arlo. Arlo turned to Eve and said, “Look, Eve, it’s the Giant Hammock.” Eve looked carefully at the combination of abstract metal pieces and thought for a moment. She then turned to Arlo and responded, “No, Arlo, I think that’s a sculpture.”

    Quotes

    By Daniel J. Cohen

  • “It is wrong to assume that the purpose of nineteenth-century pure mathematics and the symbolic logic that arose out of it was to construct a completely scientific, secular Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith JPG realm of philosophy…A panoramic examination of [the] writing [of these mathematicians]–not only their mathematical treatises but also their private letters, unpublished works, and even poetry–makes it clear that the creators of symbolic logic and their supporters yearned for a more profound religion than contemporary sects seemed to offer, a religion that did not have its foundation in dogma, liturgy, or ecclesiastical organizations. Mathematical logic would serve God by providing a way to ascend above such human constructions…With the current stereotype of mathematics–dry, abstract, unrelated to larger social concerns–it is easy to forget the earlier divine proclamations about the discipline. Yet the warm-blooded sentiments behind those declarations form an unlikely, but critical, source out of which arose the dispassionate reasoning of modern philosophy and the digital logic at the heart of modern computers.” — Daniel J. Cohen in “Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith”
  • About Daniel J. Cohen

  • “While there is significant mathematics in the book, there are more significant insights into the times and the thinking of the 19th century protagonists who produced the mathematics. The book is a good read. — Barnabas Hughes, O.F.M., Professor Emeritus, California State University, Northridge reviewing “Equations from God: Pure Mathematics and Victorian Faith”
  • “Cohen and Rosenzweig’s book makes accessible the new field of digital history to a wide audience that Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting  the Past on the Web includes K-12 teachers, as well as amateur and professional historians. The power of the text rests with its depth and clarity, though the authors do not downplay the technical aspects required in developing digital history archives, Such technical details are sensibly provided in the appendices. The text is well structured and easy to follow. The introduction illuminates the promise and perils of digital history. Here the authors describe what makes digital history unique, by focusing on the capacity, accessibility, flexibility, diversity, interactivity, and non-linearity of digital historical resources. Importantly, the authors provide wonderful examples of how easy it is to manipulate images and texts in an effort to educate the reader about being critical consumers of information on the web…. Regardless of why one might read this book, it is clear that Cohen and Rosenzweig have advanced the field of digital history, and in many ways have given definition to this emerging field of study.” — David Hicks and John K. Lee reviewing “Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web”
  • :This work represents a practical guide for historians, teachers, archivists, and curators for building web projects. Cohen and Rosenzweig, both directors at the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, provide procedures in order to plan and execute a successful on-line history site…. Digital History is a welcome addition for professionals and enthusiasts who want a comprehensive introduction to the topic. Information specialists will also find the book useful for honing their technical skills, and academic libraries should include this title in their collections.” — Gayla Koerting, The University of South Dakota reviewing “Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web”
  • This book is a thorough, easy-to-understand introduction to the web for historians, as well as for anyone wishing to post any type of historical document on the web. Anyone wishing to develop and construct an online historical work or project will find step-by-step instructions for doing so, from initiating, planning, designing, and digitization, to copyright, interactivity, and more. The authors have a wealth of experience in online historical projects and websites. Cohen is Director of Research Projects at the Center for History and New Media (CHNM) and Assistant Professor of History at George Mason University, while Rosenzweig is the founder and director of CHNM and also serves as Professor of History at George Mason University. Together, the two men build on their decade of experience and expertise at CHNM, where their work has won numerous awards…. All in all, the authors have put together a book that is concise yet complete in content, more practical than scholarly, and aimed particularly towards the amateur historian or the archive/museum just beginning to get started in putting their historical content online. Still, many historians, along with scholars working in the humanities and social sciences, will find this to be a very useful handbook.” — Brad Eden, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, H-HRE (March, 2006) reviewing “Digital History: A Guide to Gathering, Preserving, and Presenting the Past on the Web”
  • “He is an excellent communicator who does not hold himself aloof and actively engages his students.”
    “Dr. Cohen did an excellent job of organizing a tremendous amount of material into themes that made the history relevant and easy to understand.”
    “Dr. Cohen is an exceptional professor who is incredibly bright and knowledgeable. He presented material from a broad range of disciplines. I LOVED the course.”
    “Prof. Cohen was very good at explaining complicated and/or unfamiliar terms and scientific concepts and kind to those of use who were slow to understand them.”
    “An outstanding speaker who encourages participation from all his students, and selects very interesting topics to discuss.”
    “He was always available out of the classroom in order to help me with my paper. You can tell he really loves his students and takes pride in his position.” — Anonymous students
  • Posted on Sunday, August 5, 2007 at 4:30 PM

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