History Buzz: March 2008

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

March 24-31,2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • All the Way to the Convention? – History.com
  • Bruce Schulman on “Democratic squabbles could give McCain a boost”: McCain is not anti-immigration, “and he’s even from that part of the world. Actually, the historical odds are pretty good for John McCain, if you think about the 15 presidential elections there have been since the end of World War II, and ask yourself how many times has a Democrat won a majority of the popular vote. The answer is just three, and Al Gore, who lost the election, was one of those three. The other two were Jimmy Carter, narrowly, and Lyndon Johnson’s landslide. John Kennedy, Bill Clinton, Harry Truman, they never won majority of the popular vote.” Republican winners Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush all got between 35 and 40 percent of the Hispanic vote, Schulman said, while the losers, George H.W. Bush and Gerald Ford, got about 20 percent. – San Francisco Chronicle, 3-30-08
  • Julian Zelizer on “Democratic squabbles could give McCain a boost”: The white vote is another wild card. Should Obama win the Democratic nomination, he may struggle with conservative white “Reagan Democrats” much as he has through the primaries, said Julian Zelizer, a historian at Princeton University. Even the war may not prove deadly to McCain’s prospects. “You know, in 1968 the country voted for Nixon, not Humphrey, not an anti-war activist,” Zelizer said. “They went for the hawk to get us out of the war.” – San Francisco Chronicle, 3-30-08
  • John Hope Franklin on “Where Should Conversation on Race Start?”: “We’ve almost come to a position, where at least I can live like a human being without climbing up some back step.” But the incremental change only proves the value of the conversation we’ve long been having and the need to keep having it, he says. Reflecting on Clinton’s race panel, which was derided by critics, Franklin says, “It was clear to me that we couldn’t get very far and we didn’t get very far and I was very much distressed over the way in which the country reacted to what we were trying to do. I think this is a better time.” – AP, 3-30-08
  • Julian Zelizer on “Clinton walks tightrope on strength and emotion”: “It’s not the first time in the campaign she’s tried to humanize herself…. She can’t afford to lose votes because people don’t connect with her.” – Reuter, 3-28-08
  • James Klotter on “Clinton draws a crowd”: “For Kentucky to be in the spotlight during the primary is highly unusual.” Prior to the 1970s most of the nominees were picked at the convention and primaries and caucuses were rare, Klotter said. Since primaries have become more important, most candidates have spent their time and money in larger battleground states, he said. “It’s historically unusual to have a primary of this significance in Kentucky,” he said – State Journal, 3-26-08
  • Jeremy Varon on “In polls, McCain edges ahead of Clinton, Obama”: “McCain wants to do the war right – in a way that’s principled, and that functions as a positive example of the differences between us and the terrorists. This is the way in which people on the left see him as somewhat admirable: because principles seem to matter to him.” – Boston Globe, 3-25-08
  • Robert Dallek on “To Tell or Not? Disclosing Candidate Health Issues”: “The candidates are very leery about letting on to any weakness, any flaws, because they are so afraid that it will bring them down…” – NPR, 3-24-08
  • Ira Berlin on “What Politicians Say When They Talk About Race”: “It’s not an easy subject for black people or white people. As Obama indicated, there are lots of legitimate hurts on both sides. It is extremely easy for people to misspeak. In part because we don’t speak a lot and because we don’t speak a lot you don’t understand the language. People don’t understand where the land mines are. They sometimes use the wrong words or are condescending or seem to be condescending when they’re trying to be honest. It’s easy for people to take offense when the wrong language is used, particularly when they’ve got within them a lot of anger and are looking for someone to beat with a small stick. In those circumstances, it’s often better to say nothing.” – NYT, 3-25-08
  • David Goldfield on “What Politicians Say When They Talk About Race”: “I think he is uniquely positioned because he straddles the racial divide very well. I think some of what he said will resonate. But it’s a gamble.” – NYT, 3-25-08
  • Julian Zelizer on “Obama Edges Clinton in Cash and Spending in February”: “This is a horse race, and it is a close one. Every ad, every appearance, every dollar counts.” – Bloomberg, 3-21-08
  • Julian Zelizer: Comment: How Democrats can lose in November – Reuters, 3-20-08
  • Akhil Reed Amar: Law prof. who often doubles as historian suggests both Clinton and Obama become president! – Slate, 3-21-08
  • Edward J. Blum: Interviewed about Obama and race – Newsweek, 3-19-08
  • Julian Zelizer on “Obama Condemns Pastor’s Remarks, Won’t ‘Disown’ Him”: Obama’s speech fits in with his promise to bring a new perspective to major issues. “He will need to continue to demonstrate to supporters and opponents that he has a different vision for the nation. Candidates must deal with the virtues and vices of their supporters, which sometimes is more difficult than the attacks from their opponents.” – Bloomberg, 3-18-08
BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

  • 03-24-1603 – Queen Elizabeth I died at age 69 after ruling England for more than 40 years.
  • 03-24-1934 – The Philippine Islands in the South Pacific were granted independence by President Franklin D. Roosevelt after nearly 50 years of American control.
  • 03-24-1999 – NATO begins launching air strikes in an attempt to force Serbia to cease hostilities against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo.
  • 03-25-1634 – Maryland was founded by settlers sent by the late Lord Baltimore.
  • 03-25-1894 – Jacob Sechler Coxey and his “army” of unemployed men began their march from Ohio to Washington, DC.
  • 03-25-1911 – A fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. in New York City killed 145 workers.
  • 03-25-1931 – The Scottsboro boys were arrested in Alabama.
  • 03-25-1965 – The 25,000-person Alabama Freedom March to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks, led by Martin Luther King Jr., ended its journey from Selma on the steps of the State Capitol in Montgomery, Ala.
  • 03-26-1945 – The battle of Iwo Jima ended; about 22,000 Japanese troops were killed or captured in the fighting and more than 4,500 U.S. troops were killed.
  • 03-26-1979 – In a ceremony at the White House, President Sadat of Egypt and Prime Minister Begin of Israel signed a peace treaty ending 30 years of war between the two countries.
  • 03-26-1982 – Groundbreaking ceremonies for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial took place in Washington, DC.
  • 03-26-2000 – Vladimir Putin was elected president of Russia.
  • 03-27-1794 – Congress authorizes the construction of six frigates, including the Constitution (Old Ironsides), for the U.S. Navy.
  • 03-27-1866 – President Andrew Johnson vetoed a civil rights bill which later became the 14th amendment.
  • 03-27-1958 – Nikita Khrushchev became Soviet premier and first secretary of the Communist Party.
  • 03-28-1797 – Nathaniel Briggs patented a washing machine.
  • 03-28-1939 – The Spanish Civil War ended.
  • 03-29-1867 – The North America Act was passed by the British parliament, creating the dominion of Canada.
  • 03-29-1951 – Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were found guilty of passing atomic secrets to the Russians and were sentenced to death.
  • 03-29-1971 – Lt. William Calley was convicted of murdering 22 Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai massacre.
  • 03-29-1973 – The last U.S. troops left South Vietnam.
  • 03-30-1856 – The Treaty of Paris was signed, ending the Crimean War.
  • 03-30-1867 – A treaty for the purchase of Alaska from Russia for the sum of $7.2 million, approximately two cents an acre, was submitted to the U.S. Senate.
  • 03-30-1870 – The 15th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution went into effect, guaranteeing the right to vote regardless of race.
  • 03-30-1981 – President Ronald Reagan was shot in the chest by John Hinckley as he left a Washington hotel.
  • 03-31-1492 – Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain expelled Jews who would not accept Christianity.
  • 03-31-1889 – The Eiffel Tower in Paris officially opened.
  • 03-31-1918 – Daylight Saving Time went into effect in the United States.
  • 03-31-1949 – Newfoundland became Canada’s tenth province.
  • 03-31-1959 – The Dalai Lama, fleeing Chinese repression of an uprising in Tibet, arrived at the Indian border and was granted political asylum.
  • 03-31-1968 – President Lyndon Johnson announced that he would not run for re-election
  • 04-01-1789 – Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania was elected the first Speaker of the House of Representatives.
  • 04-01-1933 – The Nazi persecution of Jews began in Germany with a boycott of Jewish businesses.
  • 04-01-1945 – American forces landed on Okinawa during World War II.
  • 04-01-1970 – President Nixon signed a bill into law banning cigarette ads from radio and television.
  • 04-01-1979 – Ayatollah Khomeini proclaimed the establishment of the Islamic Republic of Iran.
  • 04-01-2003 – Pvt. Jessica Lynch was rescued by U.S. commandos in a raid on an Iraqi hospital.
  • 04-01-2004 – President Bush signed the “Laci Peterson” bill making it a separate federal crime to harm a fetus during an attack on the mother.
  • 04-02-1513 – Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de Leon landed in Florida.
  • 04-02-1792 – Congress authorized the first U.S. mint, in Philadelphia.
  • 04-02-1865 – Confederate president Jefferson Davis and most of his cabinet fled the Confederate capital of Richmond, Va.
  • 04-02-1870 – Victoria Claflin Woodhull announced her candidacy for president of the United States.
  • 04-02-1917 – President Woodrow Wilson asked Congress to declare war against Germany.
  • 04-02-1932 – Charles Lindbergh paid a $50,000 ransom for the return of his kidnapped son.
  • 04-02-1982 – Argentina seized the Falkland Islands from Britain
  • 04-02-2005 – Pope John Paul II died.
  • 04-03-1882 – Outlaw Jesse James was shot in the back by Bob Ford, one of his own gang members, reportedly for a $10,000 reward.
  • 04-03-1936 – Bruno Hauptmann was electrocuted for the kidnapping and murder of the Lindbergh baby.
  • 04-03-1948 – President Truman signed the Marshall Plan, which would foster the recovery of war-torn Europe.
  • 04-04-1818 – Congress adopted a U.S. flag with one star for each state.
  • 04-04-1841 – President William Henry Harrison died from pneumonia, one month after his inauguration.
  • 04-04-1945 – The Ohrdruf death camp was liberated from Nazi occupation.
  • 04-04-1949 – The treaty establishing the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was signed.
  • 04-04-1968 – Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated.
  • 04-04-1973 – The ribbon was cut to open the World Trade Center in New York City.
  • 04-05-1614 – Pocahontas married John Rolfe.
  • 04-05-1792 – George Washington cast the first presidential veto.
  • 04-05-1951 – Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were sentenced to death for giving away atomic secrets to the Russians.
  • 04-05-1955 – Winston Churchill resigned as prime minister of Britain.
  • 04-06-1862 – The Battle of Shiloh in the American Civil War began.
  • 04-06-1917 – U.S. declared war on Germany and entered World War I.
  • 04-06-1994 – The presidents of Rwanda and Burundi were killed in a plane crash.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Evan Thomas on Max Hastings: Death in the Pacific RETRIBUTION The Battle for Japan, 1944-45NYT, 3-30-08
  • Max Hastings: RETRIBUTION The Battle for Japan, 1944-45, First Chapter – NYT, 3-30-08
  • Joe Jackson: An act of “biopiracy” 130 years ago enriched England and devastated Brazil THE THIEF AT THE END OF THE WORLD Rubber, Power, and the Seeds of EmpireWaPo, 3-30-08
  • Martin Evans and John Phillips: Algeria’s Dirty Wars After the French tortured the Algerians, the Algerians tortured each other ALGERIA Anger of the DispossessedWaPo, 3-30-08
  • Nicholson Baker: How Good a War? Novelist Nicholson Baker argues that World War II was not inevitable or necessary HUMAN SMOKE The Beginnings of World War II, the End of CivilizationWaPo, 3-30-08
  • Jorg Friedrich: Editor of The Fire says he knew Friedrich’s book would be special – Peter Dimock, at the Columbia University Press Blog, 3-26-08
  • Gordon Wood: American history author seeks to appeal to general public, academics – Deseret News, 3-23-08
  • Matthew Connelly: Says backers of family planning made terrible mistakes – Nicholas Kristof in the NYT Book Review, 3-23-08
  • Tim Weiner: Book on CIA comes under scathing attack – CQ Politics, 3-15-08
  • Nicholson Baker: Novelist turned historian claims Churchill should have negotiated with Hitler – Patrick T. Reardon in the Chicago Tribune, 3-18-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

  • Edward Renehan: Historian charged with stealing Theodore Roosevelt letter – AP, 3-27-08
INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Ron Bryant on “Davis’ bicentennial eclipsed by Lincoln”: “I’ll say it this way – winners write history. We need heroes, we need villains. Lincoln became a hero and Davis a villain.” – Kentucky Kernel, 3-28-08
  • Jo Paoletti on “Prolonged economic pessimism has a silver lining”: “I believe that it is life’s tough and painful experiences that give humans their best perspective into what is truly valuable about existence… That is as true for personal loss such as death as it is for economic loss.” For example, after the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks, families began “nesting” together at home. Residents of New Orleans vowed to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina, and others donated to the cause. Paoletti said some even had positive recollections of family life during the Great Depression. – Baltimore Sun, 3-30-08
  • Edmund Kern on ” Pottermania lives on in college classrooms”: “As a kind of global cultural phenomenon, Harry Potter in a sense is unprecedented. I think movies have been extremely popular around the world, I think that certain music has been extremely popular around the world, but never before has a single literary endeavor caught the attention of so many people.” – CNN, 3-25-08
  • Glenn Williams: Clears up myths about GW’s campaign against Iroquois – The Newsletter of the New York American Revolution Round Table, 3-19-08
  • Craig Canning: Historian says ties between US and China have long been built of trade – Richmond Times-Dispatch, 3-19-08
  • John L. Esposito: Sad that his predictions came true about Iraq War – Middle East Strategy at Harvard (MESH blog), 3-20-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

EXHIBITS:

EXHIBITS:

  • McLean County Museum of History offers look into Lincoln Legacy Starting May 12, students can take a tour to Springfield to learn more about President Abraham Lincoln – Daily Vidette, IL, 3-26-08
CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • April 2, 2008: Margaret Humphreys, the Josiah Charles Trent Professor in the History of Medicine and an associate clinical professor of medicine at Duke University, will speak on “The South’s Secret Weapons: Disease, Environment and the Civil War” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 2, in Giffels Auditorium at the University of Arkansas – University of Arkansas Daily Headlines, AR, 3-27-08
  • April 3, 2008: The Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas will host a panel discussion titled “First Spouses: Changing Roles and Expectations” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 3. Panelists include South Carolina first lady Jenny Sanford; Carl Sferrazza Anthony, an expert and biographer of first families and their political impact; and Paul Boller, a presidential historian. – infozine.com, 3-23-08
  • April 11-13-08: Honestly, how many Abes can there be? Scores of Lincoln impersonators heading to Alton – Belleville News-Democrat, 3-30-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: History This Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War Author: Drew Gilpin Faust – Monday, March 31 @ 5:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: American Experience: “Minik, the Lost Eskimo,” Monday, March 31 @ 8pm ET
  • History Channel: “Andrew Jackson,” Monday, March 31, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :New York: Secret Societies,” Monday, March 31, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC,” Tuesday, April 1, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tsunami 2004: Waves of Death,” Tuesday, April 1, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Quest for the Lost Ark,” Wednesday, April 2, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Garden of Eden,” Wednesday, April 2, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Japan’s Mysterious Pyramids,” Wednesday, April 2, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Achilles Heel,” Thursday, April 3, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces,” Thursday, April 3, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Underground Apocalypse,” Thursday, April 3, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300,” Friday, April 4, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds :City of Armageddon,” Friday, April 4, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battle 360 :The Grey Ghost” Friday, April 4, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “A Global Warning?,” Saturday, April 5, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past :Doomsday 2012: The End of Days,” Saturday, April 5, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “King,” Sunday, March 6, @ 8pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Jonah Goldberg: LIBERAL FASCISM #6 — 11 weeks on list – 4-6-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Gilbert King: The Execution of Willie Francis, March 31, 2008
  • Charles Lane: The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction, April 1, 2008
  • Philip Bobbitt: Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century, April 1, 2008
  • Louis P. Masur: The Soiling of Old Glory: The Story of a Photograph That Shocked America, April 1, 2008
  • Cokie Roberts: Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, April 8, 2007
  • Tony Judt: Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, April 17, 2008
  • Ted Sorensen: Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, May 6, 2008
  • Scott McClellan: What Happened, May 12, 2008
  • William F. Buckley, Jr.: Flying High: Remembering Barry Goldwater, May 12, 2008
  • John Lukacs: Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Dire Warning: Churchill’s First Speech as Prime Minister, May 12, 2008
  • Peter Clarke: The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana, May 13, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: Last Campaign, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
  • Gil Troy: Leading from the Center, June 9, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2008 at 10:25 PM

March 17, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • Democratic race might break pattern of racial history The presence of a major black candidate makes race a natural factor in the Democratic contest – Miami Herald, 3-15-08
  • David Kennedy on “Valley donors’ dream: Clinton, Obama share ticket”: “There is some logic to it. The person is a perceived vote getter,” said Kennedy, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Stanford historian and professor. But even this presidential historian is a bit conflicted over the 2008 Democratic contest. Kennedy himself has given money to both Clinton and Obama, and voted for the latter. “I prefer him, but I would enthusiastically vote for her if she wins the nomination,” he said While Kennedy understands “the great electoral appeal” of having two candidates share the ticket who can win millions of votes and raise hundreds of millions of dollars, he wonders what kind of governing coalition they would make. “It seems to me Hillary Clinton would be temperamentally very uncomfortable as No. 2 when for so long she’s been aiming for the presidency,” he said. “And I think anyone would be uncomfortable of being her vice president because with Bill around you’d be No. 3 or maybe even No. 4 or 5.” – San Jose Mercury News, 3-16-08
BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

  • 17/03/1762 – The first St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York City.
  • 17/03/1776 – British forces evacuated Boston during the Revolutionary War.
  • 17/03/1870 – Wellesley Female Seminary (later Wellesley College) received its charter from the Massachusetts legislature.
  • 17/03/1942 – Gen. Douglas MacArthur became supreme commander of Allied forces in the southwest Pacific theater during World War II.
  • 17/03/1969 – Golda Meir was sworn in as prime minister of Israel.
  • 17/03/2003 – President Bush delivered an ultimatum to Saddam Hussein: leave Iraq within 48 hours or face an attack.
  • 18/03/1584 – Russian czar Ivan IV, or Ivan “The Terrible,” died at age 53.
  • 18/03/1766 – After months of American protests, Britain repealed the Stamp Act.
  • 18/03/1925 – The most violent single tornado in U.S. history, the “Tri-State Tornado,” hit Missouri, Indiana, and Illinois, killing 689 people and injuring 13,000 others.
  • 18/03/1963 – The Supreme Court held in Gideon v. Wainwright that public defenders must be provided for indigent defendants in felony cases.
  • 18/03/1965 – Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov made the first spacewalk.
  • 18/03/1990 – The biggest art theft in U.S. history occurs at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The works, including pieces by Vermeer and Rembrandt, were never recovered.
  • 03-19-1853 – During the Taiping Rebellion in China, the rebels captured Nanking and renamed it T’en-ching (Heavenly Capital).
  • 03-19-1920 – The United States Senate voted down signing the Treaty of Versailles for the second time.
  • 03-19-2003 – Operation Iraqi Freedom is launched with air strikes on Baghdad, the beginning of the war with Iraq (March 20 in Iraq).
  • 03-20-1602 – The Dutch East India Company was established. During its 196-year history, it became one of the world’s most powerful companies.
  • 03-20-1852 – Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Uncle Tom’s Cabin” was published.
  • 03-20-2003 – Ground troops entered Iraq and a second round of air strikes against Baghdad was launched.
  • 03-21-1556 – The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, was burned at the stake as a heretic.
  • 03-21-1804 – The French civil code, the Code Napoleon, was officially put forth.
  • 03-21-1963 – Alcatraz Prison in San Francisco Bay, a harsh maximum security jail which once housed gangster Al Capone, closed.
  • 03-21-1965 – Martin Luther King, Jr., led the start of a civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.
  • 03-22-1765 – The Stamp Act was enacted on the American colonies by Britain.
  • 03-22-1820 – U.S. naval hero Stephen Decatur was killed in a duel with dishonored former Chesapeake captain James Barron.
  • 03-22-1895 – Auguste and Louis Lumiere first demonstrated motion pictures using celluloid film in Paris.
  • 03-22-1972 – Congress approved the Equal Rights Amendment and sent it to be ratified by the states. The amendment would fail to get the required 38 states to ratify it.
  • 03-23-1775 – Patrick Henry declared “Give me liberty, or give me death.”
  • 03-23-1806 – Lewis and Clark began their return journey east.
  • 03-23-1983 – U.S. President Ronald Reagan proposed a space-based missile defense system called the Strategic Defense Initiative or “Star Wars.”
  • 03-24-1603 – Queen Elizabeth I died at age 69 after ruling England for more than 40 years.
  • 03-24-1934 – The Philippine Islands in the South Pacific were granted independence by President Franklin D. Roosevelt after nearly 50 years of American control.
  • 03-24-1999 – NATO begins launching air strikes in an attempt to force Serbia to cease hostilities against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo.
  • 03-25-1634 – Maryland was founded by settlers sent by the late Lord Baltimore.
  • 03-25-1894 – Jacob Sechler Coxey and his “army” of unemployed men began their march from Ohio to Washington, DC.
  • 03-25-1911 – A fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Co. in New York City killed 145 workers.
  • 03-25-1931 – The Scottsboro boys were arrested in Alabama.
  • 03-25-1965 – The 25,000-person Alabama Freedom March to protest the denial of voting rights to blacks, led by Martin Luther King Jr., ended its journey from Selma on the steps of the State Capitol in Montgomery, Ala.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Gordon S. Wood: A sage historian laments the “present-mindedness” of many of his colleagues THE PURPOSE OF THE PAST Reflections on the Uses of HistoryWaPo, 3-16-08
  • Daniel Lord Smail: I Feel Good ON DEEP HISTORY AND THE BRAINNYT, 3-16-08
  • Eric Alterman: What’s Left WHY WE’RE LIBERALS A Political Handbook for Post-Bush AmericaNYT, 3-16-08
  • Gabriela Arredondo: New book spotlights the experiences of Mexicans in Chicago – UC Santa Cruz, CA, 3-17-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Bruce Cumings on “North Korea would be tough to invade Speaker stresses peaceful negotiation “: “It would make [the occupation of] Iraq look like a picnic.”… “We stalemated in Korea, lost in Vietnam and are not winning in Iraq,” Cumings said. Because of this U.S. military history, Cumings said “we need to rethink” how to deal with major military powers.” – LSU The Daily Reveille, 3-12-08
  • Dominick Lizzi: Historian who wrote book about impeached NYS governor reacts to Spitzer scandal – http://capitalnews9.com, 3-11-08
  • John Sharp: Historian says organ not always welcome among Mennonites – http://www.hesston.edu, 3-10-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

  • Daniel Walker Howe: Historian to Receive New-York Historical Society $50,000 Prize and Title of American Historian Laureate – Press Release, 3-11-08
  • British art historian elected grand master of Knights of Malta Source: AP (3-11-08)
  • H-Net celebrates (quietly) 15th anniversary – Wendy Plotkin at H-Net, 2-25-08
WEB SITES:

EXHIBITS:

  • Exhibition Review John Milton at 400 A Giant’s Roaring, Faintly Echoed, New York Public Library – NYT, 3-15-08
SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • March 18, 2008: Eric Goldstein, editor of the American Jewish History journal and associate professor of history and Jewish studies at Emory University, will speak March 18 at the University of Louisville. Goldstein’s talk is entitled “Negotiating the Color Line: Southern Jews, Whiteness and the Rise of Jim Crow.” It will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Ekstrom Library on Belknap Campus. – Louisville Courier-Journal, KY, 3-8-08
  • March 19, 2008: Roy Foster, Carroll Professor of Irish History at the University of Oxford, will deliver a lecture on “The Strange Death of Romantic Ireland” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, in the Niles Gallery of the University of Kentucky Fine Arts Library. – UK News, KY, 3-7-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • PBS: American Experience: “Minik, the Lost Eskimo,” Monday, March 31 @ 8pm ET
  • History Channel: “The Dark Ages,” Tuesday, March 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Dangerous Territory,” Wednesday, March 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Organized Crime: A World History :Colombia,” Wednesday, March 19, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Man, Moment, Machine :Hunting Bonnie & Clyde,” Wednesday, March 19, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files : Alien Engineering,” Thursday, March 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Viking Underground,” Thursday, March 20, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Exodus Decoded,” Friday, March 21, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon,” Friday, March 21, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Bible Code II: Apocalypse and Beyond :Bible Code II: Apocalypse and Beyond” Friday, March 21, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battle 360 :Bloody Santa Cruz” Friday, March 21, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC,” Saturday, March 22, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Quest for the Lost Ark,” Saturday, March 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Protestant Reformation,” Saturday, March 22, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Biblical Disasters,” Sunday, March 23, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Banned from The Bible II,” Sunday, March 23, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crucifixion,” Sunday, March 23, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Charlatan: America’s Most Dangerous Huckster, the Man Who Pursued Him, and the Age of Flimflam Author: Pope Brock – Saturday, March 22 @ 12:00pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: After Words: Carl Cannon co-author of “Reagan’s Disciple: George W. Bush’s Troubled Quest for a Presidential Legacy” interviewed by Bob Schieffer, chief Washington correspondent for CBS News – Saturday, March 22 @ 10:00pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Politics Saviors or Sellouts: The Promise and Peril of Black Conservatism, from Booker T. Washington to Condoleezza Rice Author: Christopher Alan Bracey – Saturday, March 22 @ 11:00pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Jonah Goldberg: LIBERAL FASCISM #3 — 9 weeks on list – 3-23-08
  • Jacob Weisberg: THE BUSH TRAGEDY #13 — 1 week on list – 3-23-08
  • Drew Gilpin Faust: THIS REPUBLIC OF SUFFERING #34 – 3-23-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Susan Nagel: Marie-Therese, Child of Terror: The Fate of Marie Antoinette’s Daughter, March 18, 2008
  • Matthew Parker: Panama Fever: The Epic History of One of the Greatest Engineering Triumphs of All Time: The Building of the Panama Canal, March 18, 2008
  • James Holland: Italy’s Sorrow: A Year of War: 1944–1945, March 18, 2008
  • Russ Hoyle: Going to War: How Misinformation, Disinformation and Arrogance Led America into the Iraqi Quagmire, March 18, 2008
  • James Donovan: A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn – the Last Great Battle of the American West (REV), March 24, 2008.
  • Gilbert King: The Execution of Willie Francis, March 31, 2008
  • Charles Lane: The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction, April 1, 2008
  • Philip Bobbitt: Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century, April 1, 2008
  • Louis P. Masur: The Soiling of Old Glory: The Story of a Photograph That Shocked America, April 1, 2008
  • Cokie Roberts: Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, April 8, 2007
  • Tony Judt: Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, April 17, 2008
  • Ted Sorensen: Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, May 6, 2008
  • Scott McClellan: What Happened, May 12, 2008
  • William F. Buckley, Jr.: Flying High: Remembering Barry Goldwater, May 12, 2008
  • John Lukacs: Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Dire Warning: Churchill’s First Speech as Prime Minister, May 12, 2008
  • Peter Clarke: The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana, May 13, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: Last Campaign, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
  • Gil Troy: Leading from the Center, June 9, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, March 17, 2008 at 10:42 PM

March 3-10, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • The man who made Obama – American Thinker, 3-9-08
  • As Ohio goes, so goes the nation. Sometimes. – Xenia Gazette, OH, 3-8-09
  • Gil Troy: The Comeback Queen – Montreal Gazette, 3-6-08
  • Julian E. Zelizer: Democrats Need to Hear From Florida and Michigan – HuffingtonPost.com, 3-6-08
  • David Greenberg: It’s too early to talk about Hillary’s withdrawal – Slate, 3-5-08
  • Samantha Power: Resigns from Obama campaign after calling Hillary a monster – Chronicle of Higher Ed, 3-7-08
  • Andrew Cayton on “Ohio primary plays key role in Democratic nomination”: “Part of Ohio’s problem is that it doesn’t embody a lot of things that are going right. It’s a state in decline and it’s paying a price for it,” said Andrew Cayton, a history professor at Miami University and author of the book “Ohio: The History of a People.” – Chicago Tribune, 3-4-08
BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

BIGGEST STORIES: Women’s History Month

BIGGEST STORIES: Black History Month

BIGGEST STORIES: Black History Month:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

  • 10/03/1578 – Queen Elizabeth I gives Johan Casimir œ20,000 to aid Dutch rebellion
  • 10/03/1629 – King Charles I dissolved Parliament; he called it back 11 years later
  • 10/03/1681 – English Quaker William Penn receives charter from Charles II, making him sole proprietor of colonial American territory Pennsylvania
  • 10/03/1849 – Abraham Lincoln applies for a patent; only US president to do so
  • 10/03/1862 – US issues 1st paper money ($5, $10, $20, $50, $100, $500 and $1000)
  • 10/03/1864 – Red River campaign LA
  • 10/03/1865 – Battle of Monroe’s Crossroads, NC
  • 10/03/1876 – 1st telephone call made (Alexander Graham Bell to Thomas Watson)
  • 10/03/1969 – James Earl Ray pleads guilty in murder of Martin Luther King Jr
  • 10/03/1972 – 1st black US political convention opens (Gary Indiana)
  • 10/03/1982 – Pres Reagan proclaims economic sanctions against Libya
  • 11/03/1302 – Romeo and Juliet’s wedding day, according to Shakespeare
  • 11/03/1665 – NY approves new code guaranteeing Protestants religious rights
  • 11/03/1789 – Benjamin Banneker with L’Enfant begin to lay out Washington DC
  • 11/03/1861 – Confederate convention in Montgomery, adopts constitution
  • 11/03/1862 – 12] Gen Stonewall Jackson evacuates Winchester Virginia Army of the Potomac. Gen Henry Halleck is named general-in-chief
  • 11/03/1888 – Great blizzard of ’88 strikes NE US
  • 11/03/1941 – FDR signs Lend-Lease Bill (lend money to Britain)
  • 11/03/1942 – 1st deportation train leaves Paris for Auschewitz Concentration Camp
  • 11/03/1954 – US Army charges Senator Joseph McCarthy used undue pressure tactics
  • 11/03/1985 – Mikhail S Gorbachev replaces Konstantin Chernenko as Soviet leader
  • 11/03/2004 – Terrorists explode simultaneous bombs on Madrid’s rail network ripping through a commuter train and rocking three stations, killing 190
  • 12/03/1350 – Orvieto city says it will behead and burn Jewish-Christian couples
  • 12/03/1664 – 1st naturalization act in American colonies
  • 12/03/1860 – Congress accepts Pre-emption Bill: free land in West for colonists
  • 12/03/1888 – The Great Blizzard of ’88 struck the northeastern U.S. (400 die)
  • 12/03/1930 – Mohandas Gandhi began his 200-mile march to protest the British salt tax.
  • 12/03/1933 – President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave the first of his nation-wide “fireside chats” on radio.
  • 12/03/1938 – “Anschluss” took place when Hitler incorporated his homeland of Austria into the Third Reich
  • 12/03/1945 – NY is 1st to prohibit discrimination by race and creed in employment
  • 12/03/1947 – President Truman established the “Truman Doctrine” to aid in the containment of Communism
  • 12/03/1993 – Janet Reno was sworn in as the first female attorney general of the United States.
  • 12/03/2002 – The color-coded terror alert system was unveiled by Homeland Security chief Tom Ridge.
  • 13/03/1639 – Cambridge College was renamed Harvard University.
  • 13/03/1656 – Jews are denied the right to build a synagogue in New Amsterdam
  • 13/03/1852 – “Uncle Sam” cartoon appeared for the first time in N.Y. Lantern weekly.
  • 13/03/1861 – Jefferson Davis signs bill authorizing use of slaves as soldiers
  • 13/03/1868 – The Senate began President Andrew Johnson’s impeachment trial.
  • 13/03/1918 – American Red Magen David (Jewish Red Cross) forms
  • 13/03/1925 – Tennessee passed a bill prohibiting the teaching of evolution in public schools.
  • 13/03/1943 – Failed assassin attempt on Hitler during Smolensk-Rastenburg flight
  • 13/03/1972 – Britain and China resumed full diplomatic relations after 22 years; Britain withdrew its consulate from Taiwan.
  • 14/03/1629 – England granted a royal charter to Massachusetts Bay Colony
  • 14/03/1644 – England grants patent for Providence Plantations (now Rhode Island)
  • 14/03/1689 – Scotland dismisses Willem III and Mary Stuart as king and queen
  • 14/03/1743 – The first town meeting was held in Boston, Massachusetts, at Faneuil Hall.
  • 14/03/1794 – The cotton gin was patented by Eli Whitney.
  • 14/03/1923 – Pres Warren G Harding becomes 1st pres to pay taxes
  • 14/03/1964 – Jack Ruby was found guilty of the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald, alleged assassin of President John F. Kennedy.
  • 14/03/1967 – JFK’s body moved from temporary grave to a permanent memorial
  • 14/03/1990 – The Soviet Congress voted Mikhail Gorbachev into the newly-created and powerful position of president.
  • 14/03/2003 – Start of weekend of protests against war in Iraq that are attended by millions
  • 15/03/44 B.C. – On the “Ides of March,” Julius Caesar was stabbed to death in the senate house by a group of conspirators led by Cimber, Casca, Cassius, and Marcus Junius Brutus.
  • 15/03/1493 – Christopher Columbus returned to Spain after his first visit to the Western Hemisphere.
  • 15/03/1820 – Maine became the 23rd state.
  • 15/03/1917 – Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia, is forced to abdicate his throne (March 2, old style calendar).
  • 15/03/1965 – President Lyndon Johnson asked Congress for legislation guaranteeing every American the right to vote.
  • 16/03/1850 – Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel The Scarlet Letter was published.
  • 16/03/1935 – Adolf Hitler cancelled the military clauses of the Treaty of Versailles.
  • 16/03/1968 – The My Lai massacre occurred in Vietnam.
  • 16/03/1968 – New York Senator Robert Kennedy announced his intention to run for the Democratic presidential nomination.
  • 16/03/1985 – U.S. journalist Terry Anderson was kidnapped in Beirut; he was not released until December 4, 1991 after 2454 days in captivity.
  • 16/03/1988 – Lieutenant Colonel Oliver L. North and Vice Admiral John M. Poindexter of the National Security Council are indicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States for their role in the Iran-contra affair.
  • 17/03/1762 – The first St. Patrick’s Day parade was held in New York City.
  • 17/03/1776 – British forces evacuated Boston during the Revolutionary War.
  • 17/03/1870 – Wellesley Female Seminary (later Wellesley College) received its charter from the Massachusetts legislature.
  • 17/03/1942 – Gen. Douglas MacArthur became supreme commander of Allied forces in the southwest Pacific theater during World War II.
  • 17/03/1969 – Golda Meir was sworn in as prime minister of Israel.
  • 17/03/2003 – President Bush delivered an ultimatum to Saddam Hussein: leave Iraq within 48 hours or face an attack.
  • 18/03/1584 – Russian czar Ivan IV, or Ivan “The Terrible,” died at age 53.
  • 18/03/1766 – After months of American protests, Britain repealed the Stamp Act.
  • 18/03/1925 – The most violent single tornado in U.S. history, the “Tri-State Tornado,” hit Missouri, Indiana, and Illinois, killing 689 people and injuring 13,000 others.
  • 18/03/1963 – The Supreme Court held in Gideon v. Wainwright that public defenders must be provided for indigent defendants in felony cases.
  • 18/03/1965 – Soviet cosmonaut Aleksei Leonov made the first spacewalk.
  • 18/03/1990 – The biggest art theft in U.S. history occurs at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. The works, including pieces by Vermeer and Rembrandt, were never recovered.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Lou Cannon and Carl M. Cannon: The Master Two journalists argue that Bush has failed to learn Reagan’s lessons REAGAN’S DISCIPLE George W. Bush’s Troubled Quest For a Presidential LegacyWaPo, 3-9-08
  • William A. Link: POLITICS | BIOGRAPHY Southern Man Jesse Helms was an archetype. Now is he an artifact? RIGHTEOUS WARRIOR Jesse Helms and the Rise of Modern Conservatism - WaPo, 3-9-08
  • Willie Brown: POLITICS | MEMOIR Crossing (Almost) All the Lines San Francisco’s Willie Brown recalls the joy of politics. BASIC BROWN My Life and Our Times - WaPo, 3-9-08
  • Campaign Watch A BOUND MAN Why We Are Excited About Obama and Why He Can’t Win By Shelby Steele, FREE RIDE John McCain And the Media By David Brock and Paul Waldman, DECLARING INDEPENDENCE The Beginning of the End Of the Two-Party System By Douglas E. Schoen, MILLENNIAL MAKEOVER MySpace, YouTube, And the Future Of American Politics By Morley Winograd and Michael D. Hais - WaPo, 3-9-08
  • Gordon S. Wood: A history of history THE PURPOSE OF THE PAST: REFLECTIONS ON THE USES OF HISTORYWashington Times, 3-9-08
  • Wing-kai To: Then and now: A legacy in Boston Chinatown’s story told in new book Chinese in Boston: 1870-1965Boston Globe, 3-6-08
  • Sally G. McMillen: Finding feminism in 1848 Davidson professor’s readable history chronicles early struggle for rights SENECA FALLS AND THE ORIGINS OF THE WOMEN’S RIGHTS MOVEMENTCharlotte News & Observer, 2-25-08
  • Lou Cannon and Carl M. Cannon: What Would Reagan Do? REAGAN’S DISCIPLE George W. Bush’s Troubled Quest for a Presidential Legacy.NYT, 3-2-08
  • ALAN BRINKLEY on Jacob Weisberg: In Search of Bush THE BUSH TRAGEDYNYT, 3-2-08
  • Jacob Weisberg: THE BUSH TRAGEDY, First Chapter – NYT, 2-1-08
  • Ginor and Remez: Their arguments about USSR role in 6-Day War receiving more support – Mark N. Katz in the Middle East Journal (Vol. 62, #1, Winter 2008), 2-1-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Improved U.S.-Russia relations a ‘possibility’ under Medvedev, says historian: “After several statements concerning Iran and Kosovo and American weapons in Europe were made by the current administration, relations with the United States became not friendly…. So I do not think that this would lead us to good relations with the old administration. Do we have the chance with the new administration? Yes, we do have the chance.”… -
  • Thomas Schwartz: State historian offers new look at Mary Todd Lincoln: “people will see many similarities with things we take for granted today as being general characteristics of a modern woman. But at the time, they weren’t accepted and provoked quite a bit of discussion and comment in private letters, in conversation and in the public media…. I don’t think one needs to ignore her bad behavior at times, she could be a very good hater but it shouldn’t blind us to those things she did to help advance her husband’s career. There are many things about Lincoln that we give him credit for that we need to give her credit for, including the push to become president. She probably wanted it more than he did, not that he didn’t have an inclination and an ambition himself.” – http://www.bnd.com, 3-2-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

WEB SITES:

WEB SITES:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • H.W. Brands: will deliver a series of lectures this week as scholar in residence at Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies – The Grand Rapids Press – MLive.com, MI, 3-9-08
  • March 10, 2008: Bill Tuttle: Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas will host a lecture in honor of the forthcoming retirement of a longtime KU history professor — The first Tuttle Lecture will be delivered by Leon Litwack, a retired professor from the University of California-Berkeley. The lecture, titled “Fight the Power,” will take place at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 10, at the Dole Institute. – http://www.infozine.com, 3-4-08
  • March 18, 2008: Eric Goldstein, editor of the American Jewish History journal and associate professor of history and Jewish studies at Emory University, will speak March 18 at the University of Louisville. Goldstein’s talk is entitled “Negotiating the Color Line: Southern Jews, Whiteness and the Rise of Jim Crow.” It will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium of the Ekstrom Library on Belknap Campus. – Louisville Courier-Journal, KY, 3-8-08
  • March 19, 2008: Roy Foster, Carroll Professor of Irish History at the University of Oxford, will deliver a lecture on “The Strange Death of Romantic Ireland” at 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 19, in the Niles Gallery of the University of Kentucky Fine Arts Library. – UK News, KY, 3-7-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: Politics After Words: Philip Shenon author of “The Commission: The Uncensored History of the 9/11 Investigation” interviewed by Michael Duffy, assistant managing editor of TIME magazine – Monday, March 10 @ 12:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • PBS: American Experience: “Minik, the Lost Eskimo,” Monday, March 31 @ 8pm ET
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC,” Sunday, March 9, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Houdini: Unlocking the Mystery,” Monday, March 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :The Death of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” Monday, March 10, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :Underwater Train Wreck,” Monday, March 10, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Maya Underground,” Monday, March 10, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special : Nazi America: A Secret History,” Tuesday, March 11, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Hunt for John Wilkes Booth,” Wednesday, March 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Conspiracy? :Lincoln Assassination,” Wednesday, March 12, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives :The Civil War: Gettysburg,” Wednesday, March 12, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives :The Civil War: Antietam,” Wednesday, March 12, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The True Story of Charlie Wilson,” Thursday, March 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Fort Knox: Secrets Revealed” Friday, March 14, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels,” Marathon, Saturday, March 15, @ 5-8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe : Beyond the Big Bang,” Saturday, March 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC,” Saturday, March 15, @ 10pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Jonah Goldberg: LIBERAL FASCISM #2 — 8 weeks on list – 3-16-08
  • Jacob Weisberg: THE BUSH TRAGEDY #18 – 3-16-08
  • Drew Gilpin Faust: THIS REPUBLIC OF SUFFERING #34 – 3-16-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Joseph Balkoski: From Beachhead to Brittany, March 10, 2008
  • Paula J. Giddings: Ida: A Sword Among Lions, March 11, 2008
  • Steven Waldman: Founding Faith: Providence, Politics, and the Birth of Religious Freedom in America, March 11, 2008
  • Susan Nagel: Marie-Therese, Child of Terror: The Fate of Marie Antoinette’s Daughter, March 18, 2008
  • Matthew Parker: Panama Fever: The Epic History of One of the Greatest Engineering Triumphs of All Time: The Building of the Panama Canal, March 18, 2008
  • James Holland: Italy’s Sorrow: A Year of War: 1944–1945, March 18, 2008
  • Russ Hoyle: Going to War: How Misinformation, Disinformation and Arrogance Led America into the Iraqi Quagmire, March 18, 2008
  • James Donovan: A Terrible Glory: Custer and the Little Bighorn – the Last Great Battle of the American West (REV), March 24, 2008.
  • Gilbert King: The Execution of Willie Francis, March 31, 2008
  • Charles Lane: The Day Freedom Died: The Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction, April 1, 2008
  • Philip Bobbitt: Terror and Consent: The Wars for the Twenty-First Century, April 1, 2008
  • Louis P. Masur: The Soiling of Old Glory: The Story of a Photograph That Shocked America, April 1, 2008
  • Cokie Roberts: Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, April 8, 2007
  • Tony Judt: Reappraisals: Reflections on the Forgotten Twentieth Century, April 17, 2008
  • Ted Sorensen: Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, May 6, 2008
  • Scott McClellan: What Happened, May 12, 2008
  • William F. Buckley, Jr.: Flying High: Remembering Barry Goldwater, May 12, 2008
  • John Lukacs: Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Dire Warning: Churchill’s First Speech as Prime Minister, May 12, 2008
  • Peter Clarke: The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana, May 13, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: Last Campaign, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
  • Gil Troy: Leading from the Center, June 9, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, March 9, 2008 at 10:51 PM

Top Young Historians: 88 – Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

Top Young Historians

Judy Tzu-Chun Wu, 38

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor, History Department, Ohio State University, 2004-present
Area of Research: Modern U.S. history, Asian Americans, Women, Immigration, the American West, and the 1960s.
Education: Ph.D., U.S. History with secondary field in Chinese History, Stanford University, 1998
Major Publications: Wu is the author of Doctor ‘Mom’ Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity, (University of California Press, 2005). She is currently working on “Radicals on the Road: Third World Internationalism and American Orientalism during the Viet Nam Era,” book project (advanced contract from Cornell University Press for the U.S. and the World Series, Judy Tzu-Chun Wu JPGedited by Mark Bradley and Paul Kramer).
Wu is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, book chapters and reviews including among others: “Journeys for Peace and Liberation: Third World Internationalism and Radical Orientalism during the U.S. War in Viet Nam,” special issue on “Asian American History in Transnational Perspective,” Pacific Historical Review 76:4 (November 2007): 575-584; “From OSU to Amsterdam: Transformative Learning through Community-Based Multi-Media Research,” Talking about Teaching: Essays by Members of the Ohio State University Academy of Teaching (May 2007), pp. 44-48; “‘The Ministering Angel of Chinatown:’ Missionary Uplift, Modern Medicine, and Asian American Women’s Strategies of Liminality,” Asian/Pacific Islander American Women: A Historical Anthology, ed. by Shirley Hune and Gail Nomura, (New York University Press, 2003), pp. 155-171; “Was Mom Chung a ‘Sister Lesbian’?: Asian American Gender Experimentation and Interracial Homoeroticism,” Journal of Women’s History 13:1 (Spring 2001), pp. 58-82, honorable Mention for the 2000-2001 Audre Lorde Prize, given for an outstanding article on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgendered, transsexual, and/or queer history published in English, reprinted in American Dreaming, Global Realities: Rethinking U.S. Immigration History, ed. by Donna Gabaccia and Vicki L. Ruiz (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2006), pp. 379-398, will be reprinted in Unequal Sisters, 4th edition, ed. by Vicki L. Ruiz (forthcoming); “‘Loveliest Daughter of Our Ancient Cathay!’: Representations of Ethnic and Gender Identity in the Miss Chinatown U.S.A. Beauty Pageant,” Journal of Social History 31:1 (September 1997), pp. 5-31; reprinted in Business and Beauty: Commerce, Gender, and Culture in Modern America, ed. by Philip Scranton (Routledge Press, 2001), pp. 278-308, reprinted in Western Women’s Lives: Continuity and Change in the Twentieth Century, ed. by Sandra K. Schackel (University of New Mexico Press, 2003), pp. 389-426.
Awards: Wu is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
Faculty Grant, Mershon Center for International Security Studies, 2007-2008;
Ohio State University Distinguished Diversity Enhancement Award, 2007;
College of Humanities Research Enhancement Grant, Ohio State University, 2007-2008;
Emory University Short Term Fellowship, Robert W. Woodruff Library, Atlanta, Georgia, 2006-2007;
Schlesinger Library Research Support Grant, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Boston, Massachusetts, 2006-2007;
Coca-Cola CDW Faculty Research Grants, Women’s Studies Department, Ohio State University, 2006-2007;
Organization of Chinese Americans, Columbus Chapter, Special Recognitions Award for the OSU Asian American Studies Program for the Winter 2005 series of programs: “A Month of Remembrance: Japanese American Internment in Art and History,” 2006;
Technology Enhanced Learning and Research(TELR) Professional Development Grant, Ohio State University, 2006;
Senior Postdoctoral Fellowship, Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture, University of Chicago, 2005-2006;
Graduate Interdisciplinary Specialization Grant to Develop a Concentration in Asian American Studies, Ohio State University Curriculum Committee of the Council on Research on Research and Graduate Studies, 2005-2006 ;
TELR Research on Research: Student-Faculty ePartnerships Grant, Ohio State University: Genna Duberstein’s documentary and website on Japanese American internment originated as part of the Month of Remembrance/Japanese American Oral history Project, 2005;
Multicultural Center (MCC) Collaborative Programming Grant for the Month of Remembrance, Ohio State University, 2005 ;
Student Affairs Diversity Enhancement Grant for the Month of Remembrance, Ohio State University, 2005;
National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Stipend, 2003;
College of Humanities Seed Grant, Ohio State University, 2002-2004;
Virginia Hull Research Award, Ohio State University, 2002-2003;
Ada Leeke Fellowship, the Margaret Chase Smith Library, 2002;
Audre Lorde Prize, Committee on Lesbian and Gay History, American Historical Association, Honorable Mention, 2002;
Ohio State University Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award, 2002;
College of Humanities Diversity Enhancement Award, Ohio State University, Special Recognition, 2000-2001;
Outstanding Teaching Award, College of Arts and Sciences, Ohio State University, Finalist, 2000-2001;
Special Research Assignment, College of Humanities, Ohio State University, 2000, 2002;
Elizabeth D. Gee Fund for Research on Women, Ohio State University, 1999-2000;
Sidney Pressey Honors Course Enrichment Grant, Ohio State University Honors Center, 1999 and 2000 ;
University Seed Grant, Ohio State University, 1999;
Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellowship, Washington University, 1997-1998, Declined;
Graduate Dissertation Fellowship Award, 1997;
A. W. Mellon Foundation Dissertation Award, 1996-1997;
Albert J. Beveridge Grant, American Historical Association, 1996-1997;
Department Fellowship, Stanford University, 1992-1996;
Graduate Research Opportunity Funds, Stanford University, 1995-1996 ;

Additional Info:
Wu was Visiting Associate Professor, University of Chicago, Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture and History Department in 2005-2006.

Personal Anecdote

I became a historian because I got arrested in college. Or, perhaps I got arrested because I believed in the power of history.

I was born in Taipei, Taiwan and immigrated with my family to Spokane, Washington when I was six years old. I helped my family run a restaurant and then a convenience store until I left to attend college at Stanford University.

When I was a sophomore, I became involved in a campaign to lobby for ethnic studies and ethnic student services. There had been a racially motivated attack against the African American theme dorm at Stanford. I thought such behavior was inappropriate, and it reminded me of the harassment and discrimination that my family experienced in the predominantly white community of Spokane. In response, I became a student activist. I worked with people of varying backgrounds to advocate for more courses that examined race and inequality. We also called for more institutional support for ethnic student service centers so that students of color might feel more at home on the college campus. I believed that if all students were exposed to the diversity of American society, they might learn to treat each other with more respect. Through meetings, petitions, rallies and eventually a protest at the president’s office which led to our arrest, we succeeded in persuading the university administration to hire the first faculties in Asian American Studies, conduct a review of the African American Studies Program, provide more funding and a full-time dean for the Chicano Student Center, and reexamine the eligibility of Native Hawaiians for affirmative action programs. I subsequently decided to major in American Studies so that I might learn more about the history, politics, and culture of the U.S. After completing an honors thesis on the 1960s social movements in San Francisco Chinatown and working at the Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project, I eventually enrolled in the History Ph.D. program at Stanford.

Although these events occurred almost half of my lifetime ago, they remain formative for my intellectual, political, and personal development. Both my research and teaching foreground the analysis of race, gender, class, and nationality in the study of American history. I am particularly interested how categories of social difference and inequality are constructed and intertwined. I also pay close attention to how individuals create meaningful identities and interact with their lived environments. Because my goal is to promote greater understanding of the diversity of American history, I encourage students to think about various ways to study the past and to think about the connections between knowledge gained in the classroom and their experiences in contemporary society.

My current research project is very much influenced by my background as a student activist. In “Radicals on the Road: Third World Internationalism and American Orientalism during the Vietnam Era,” I explore the travels of American peace activists who criticized the U.S. war in Viet Nam. I am particularly interested in how the experiences of being outside of the U.S. and meeting non-Americans shaped the identities and political beliefs of diverse American activists.

My first book, Doctor Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity (University of California Press, 2005) is a biography of a colorful yet largely unrecognized historical figure. Dr. Margaret Chung (1889-1959) was the first known American-born Chinese female physician. She established one of the earliest Western medical clinics in San Francisco’s Chinatown in the 1920s. She also became a prominent celebrity and behind-the-scenes political broker during Sino-Japanese and Second World Wars. During this period, her home was the place to be in San Francisco. Soldiers, movie stars, and politicians gathered there to socialize, to show their dedication to the Allied cause, and to express their affection for their “adopted” mother. Chung’s surrogate sons numbered in the thousands and included well-known figures such as actor Ronald Reagan, Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, and musician Andre Kostelanetz. Chung even used her fictive kinship network to recruit pilots for the Flying Tigers and lobby for the creation of WAVES, the U.S. women’s naval reserve. Because she never married and could not provide a “legitimate” father figure, her “sons” became known as the “Fair-Haired Bastards.” Although Chung publicly adopted a maternal identity, she experimented with her gender presentation and developed romantic relationships with other women, such as writer Elsa Gidlow and entertainer Sophie Tucker. My book capitalizes on Chung’s uniqueness to examine how American race relations, gender roles, and sexual norms shifted over the course of her lifetime.

Quotes

By Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

  • During World War II, Mom Chung’s was the place to be in San Francisco. Soldiers preparing for departure to the Pacific arena of war or on leave from their duties went to eat good comfort food there. They consumed Mom  Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards JPG vast quantities of BBQ ribs, red beans, and chocolate cake, making up for the dreariness of military fare. They swapped stories with each other over drinks at the bar. They also caught glimpses of and actually talked with some of the foremost celebrities of their time: John Wayne, Ronald Reagan, Tennessee Williams, Helen Hayes, Sophie Tucker, Tallulah Bankhead, and many others. At Mom Chung’s, they met prominent politicians and military leaders like Kentucky Senator and future commissioner of baseball “Happy” Chandler and Fleet Admiral of the U.S. Navy Chester W. Nimitz. — Judy Tzu-Chun Wu in “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity”
  • About Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

  • “Engaging and easy to read, the work effectively creates an interesting and accessible narrative of Margaret Chung’s life from extensive research. While Wu successfully excavates Margaret’s life within a larger historical context, Mom Chung herself may have remained the victor in keeping her most intimate thoughts a secret…. Wu’s work makes important contributions in the four fields of Chinese-American, queer, military, and women’s history…. Still, as a comprehensive and nuanced first book on Margaret Chung, Judy Wu’s Doctor Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards undoubtedly lays invaluable groundwork for future scholars who might hope to look even more rigorously at Mom Chung’s intriguing life and her social significance. — Amy Sueyoshi, San Francisco State University reviewing “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity” in the “Journal of American Ethnic History”
  • “Interweaving her remarkable life story with broader historical events, historian Judy Wu narrates a fascinating history of Chung’s meteoric rise from her humble origins as the eldest child of a poor and large Chinese Christian family to her successful career as a surgeon with Hollywood celebrity clients….. The book none the less succeeds because of Wu’s ability to bring together the broader social and cultural histories of Chinese Americans and women in the United States with significant changing local and national events. In particular, Wu’s narration brings new insights into the histories of the Protestant missionary movement, the medical profession and Progressive urban reform by simultaneously applying the analytical lenses of gender, race and sexuality in her reworking of these histories. More importantly, though, the recovery of the remarkable life history of Margaret Chung provides readers with a glimpse into the varied gender, racial and sexual experimentations available to Chinese American women in that period. The chapters dealing with Margaret Chung’s sexual persona and same-sex female relationships particularly offer exciting new scholarship for the fields of the history of sexuality and Asian American studies. — Mary Ting Yi Lui Yale University, reviewing “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity” in
  • “This is a superb study of the life of a remarkable person, Margaret Chung, who was the first female professor and chair of obstetrics in a coeducational medical school and the first woman ever to give a paper at the International Congress of Medicine. She was also one of the first Chinese American women to rise to prominence, socially and politically, in mainstream America. Thanks to recent scholarship, we now know a great deal about the history of Chinese Americans during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. But past historical studies tend to seek to capture the collective profiles of Chinese Americans. Judy Tzu-Chun Wu’s biographical study, therefore, marks a welcome contribution to Chinese American history…. Wu has made an enormously fruitful effort in uncovering and gathering data from a wide range of sources, such as government and nongovernment agencies, archives, and private collection across the nations as well as a long list of oral interviews, many of which were conducted by the author herself. Based on such rich and diverse data, Wu’s book not only gives us a fascinating and detailed account of Chung’s life story but also uncovers critical aspects of her family history. More important, it constitutes an important social and political history, offering important perspectives through which to understand vital issues such as race, gender, and Americanization during the first half of the twentieth century…. Overall, however, this richly contextualized, well-researched, and well-written biography offers not only a multiperspective portrait of the complex experiences of a remarkable Chinese American woman but also valuable insights into early twentieth-century American society. 6 — Yong Chen, University of California, Irvine reviewing “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity” in “The American Historical Review”
  • “Using autobiographical materials and other unpublished papers belonging to Dr. Margaret Chung (1889–1959), correspondence from admirers and friends, and oral histories, and supplementing these with published and archival materials, Judy Wu has done an outstanding job in describing and analyzing the life and times of this unusual woman who is the first known American-born Chinese female physician…. Her “adopted” children brought her fame and prestige, and because of them and Wu, this unusual female professional will not be forgotten. — Sue Fawn Chung, University of Nevada, Las Vegas reviewing “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity” in “The Western Historical Quarterly”
  • “The most socially conscious, rigorously researched celebrity biography to be published by a university press in a long while. Wu’s book transcends the university-syllabi pigeonhole because her scholarship equals the task of essaying its broader topic: the culture of celebrity.” — East Bay Express review of “Mom Chung of the Fair-Haired Bastards: The Life of a Wartime Celebrity”
  • Posted on Sunday, March 16, 2008 at 7:26 PM

    Top Young Historians: 87 – Doug Rossinow

    Top Young Historians

    Doug Rossinow, 41

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, Metropolitan State University, 2002-present
    Area of Research: Modern U.S. History, Political History, Intellectual History, Religious History
    Education: Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University, Department of History, June 1994
    Major Publications: Rossinow is the author of Visions of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008, released December 2007). Nominated for the Merle Curti Prize of the Organization of American Historians, the Ellis Hawley Prize of the Organization of American Historians, and the Bancroft Prize Doug Rossinow  JPG in American History. The Politics of Authenticity: Liberalism, Christianity, and the New Left in America, (New York: Columbia University Press, 1998; paper ed., 1999). Rossinow is the co-editor with Rebecca S. Lowen of The United States Since 1945: Historical Interpretations, (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2006.
    Rossinow is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, book chapters and reviews including among others: “The Radicalization of the Social Gospel: Harry F. Ward and the Search for a New Order, 1898-1936,” Religion and American Culture, Vol. 15, No. 1 (Jan. 2005); “‘The Model of a Model Fellow Traveler’: Harry F. Ward, the American League for Peace and Democracy, and the ‘Russian Question’ in American Politics, 1933-1956,” Peace and Change, Vol. 29, No. 2 (April 2004). Winner of the Peace History Society’s Charles DeBenedetti Prize for Best Article in Peace Studies for 2003 and 2004; “The New Left in the Counterculture: Hypotheses and Evidence,” Radical History Review, No. 67 (Win. 1997); “‘The Break-through to New Life’: Christianity and the Emergence of the New Left in Austin, Texas, 1956-1964,” American Quarterly Vol. 46, No. 3 (Sept. 1994); reprinted in American Radicalism, ed. Daniel Pope (Blackwell, 2001); “Letting Go: Revisiting the New Left’s Demise,” in Paul Buhle and John C. McMillian, eds., The New Left Revisited, (Temple University Press, 2003); “Mario Savio and the Politics of Authenticity,” in Robert Cohen and Reginald E. Zelnik, eds., The Free Speech Movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s, (University of California Press, 2002); “The New Left: Democratic Reformers or Left-Wing Revolutionaries?” in David Farber and Beth Bailey, eds., The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s, (Columbia University Press, 2001); “The Revolution Is about Our Lives: The New Left’s Counterculture,” in Peter Braunstein and Michael William Doyle, eds., Imagine Nation: The American Counterculture of the 1960s and ’70s,(Routledge, 2001).
    Awards: Rossinow is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    Charles DeBenedetti Prize for Best Article in Peace Studies, Peace History Society, 2003-2004;
    Nominated for Excellence in Teaching Award, Metropolitan State University, 2003-2004;
    National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Summer Stipend, 2003;
    Pew Program in Religion and American History, Yale University, Faculty Fellowship, 1995-1996;
    National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, Predoctoral Fellowship, 1991-1992;
    Butler Prize for best research paper by a first-year graduate student, Department of History, Johns Hopkins University, 1990;
    Philip Washburn Prize for best undergraduate history thesis, Harvard University, 1988.
    Additional Info:
    Formerly Chair, Department of History, Religious & Women’s Studies, Metropolitan State University, 2000-2003, and Visiting Assistant Professor of History, The Johns Hopkins University, 1994-1996.
    Rossinow has appeared numerous times as a guest on public radio stations discussing the following topics: the Christian left in America, perfectionism in U.S. history, 1960s radicalism, and Ronald Reagan and America in the 1980s. He has written numerous opinion pieces in a variety of newspapers on topics including: Ronald Reagan and popular memory, the red scare of the 1950s, and the historical lessons of the 2004 presidential campaign.

    Personal Anecdote

    Years ago, when I was a fellow at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, at work on a dissertation on 1960s radicalism, I heavily taxed the interlibrary loan services of the library there. One of the librarians told me at one point, in a confidential tone, that she had been wondering why I was ordering books that could be found only at places like Liberty University-the Lynchburg, Virginia institution founded and led by the Reverend Jerry Falwell.

    I’m an historian of American politics. I never expected to be an historian of religion.

    Actually, I never really did become an historian of religion, in any conventional sense. But I did acquire a lasting interest in the intersection of religion and political dissent-a connection I might have expected to encounter if I had undertaken a study of political radicalism in eighteenth- or nineteenth-century America, but one I did not anticipate exploring so deeply while investigating the political left in post-1945 America. Eventually I managed to compress about one-hundred pages on Christian existentialism down to a single chapter. I decided that was about what the topic deserved in the context of a study of white youth radicalism in Austin, Texas, which eventually took the form of a book, The Politics of Authenticity. However, religion is something that pops up in unexpected places when studying American history. I have continued to explore what I call the prophetic dimension of American political radicalism in twentieth-century America-radical politics typically directed toward very nonreligious ends. And I still teach a course on religion and politics in American history.

    In my new book, Visions of Progress: The Left-Liberal Tradition in America, I’ve moved (for now) away from monographic research and toward a synthetic perspective. One of the things I learned in researching my first book is that radical and reform politics in U.S. history have sometimes had more in common than is usually recalled. The left and liberalism are neither mutually exclusive categories nor (as a Fox News viewer might think) identical categories; they are overlapping categories. I emphasize that American radicals, between 1880 and the present, frequently have done the work of liberalism, trying to realize the liberal ideals of constitutional government, natural rights, and other things, while, during at least some of that period, plenty of liberal reformers took a more critical stance toward American capitalism than recent history would lead us to believe. The prophetic stance is visible, too, but in ironic fashion: consciously religious social criticism was pervasive within American reform as well as among radicals in the Gilded Age, the Progressive Era, and even later; but it became the more exclusive province of radicals during the cold war and after, even though recent American radicals have usually been ardently secular people. Go figure.

    I recently got a message from a student at a seminary in Austin, saying that some folks there are interested in establishing an intentional religious study community. He had read about another such community in the 1950s in The Politics of Authenticity, and wondered if I could send him some documents I had cited in my book. Now I’m glad I held onto those dissertation research files.

    Quotes

    By Doug Rossinow

  • “Liberalism and the left, for all their differences, sprang from common Enlightenment sources, and this ensured that conflicts between liberal reformers and leftist radicals tended to take on a distinctively Visions of Progress The Left-Liberal Tradition in America JPG intimate quality. In fact, from the nineteenth century to the present, although American radicals and reformers criticized each other harshly, their disputes were often-although not always-bounded by bedrock liberal assumptions about the nature of a good society. Left-wing radicals were those who placed extremely high value on equality and who subjected capitalism to severe moral criticism over its allegedly exploitative and dehumanizing aspect. A leftist was not necessarily a socialist. Liberals’ essential commitments were to individual freedom, natural rights, constitutional government, and the sovereignty of ‘the people’-concepts that, not only in the United States but also in world history, linked the anti-government liberalism of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to the welfare-state liberalism of the twentieth century and beyond. As these definitions suggest, the line separating leftists from liberals often was smudged or downright invisible, no matter how often people to either side tried to mark it clearly and impassably….Many of the dissenting forces in American politics were inhabitants of a deep liberal near-consensus-one also broad enough to include many conservative opponents of twentieth-century liberalism and the left.” — Doug Rossinow in “Visions of Progress The Left-Liberal Tradition in America”
  • About Doug Rossinow

  • “Rossinow represents a new generation of historians that offers a fresh perspective on this controversial era. His book is an intricately interwoven tapestry of regional case study, cultural analysis and a rather deft handling of New Left politics that traces the emergence, development, and decline of left-wing radicalism. It is thorough, insightful, and well-written.” — Robert H. Craig, on “The Politics of Authenticity”
  • “A beautifully, elegantly written work, which will change the writing of U.S. history textbooks and the content of lectures in the U.S. history surveys.” — Daniel Horowitz, on “The Politics of Authenticity”
  • “Brilliant….The most persuasive interpretation yet of this particular vision of authenticity, democracy, and individual freedom.” — Sara Evans, on “The Politics of Authenticity”
  • “A search for authenticity in industrial American life”–that’s what historian Rossinow (history, The Politics of Authenticity JPGMetropolitan State Univ.) has identified as the main thrust of the New Left movement that powered the youth-driven political and social revolutions of the 1960s. He argues that the New Left resulted from a reaction to traditional American liberalism, which was seen by New Leftists as “elite-based,” and from the influence of Christian existentialism, which redefined “sin” as “alienation” and “salvation” as “authenticity.” Rossinow meticulously analyzes the interplay of academic politics and Texas state politics on the campus of the University of Texas, Austin, and shows how the New Left formed its organizational structure and ideological basis. This is a carefully researched, creative, and intriguing reinterpretation of American history. — Jack Forman, Mesa Coll. Lib., San Diego
  • “Visions of Progress is an ambitious and brilliant book. Doug Rossinow interprets a broad swath of political and intellectual history in a wonderfully provocative fashion. The book should inspire debates among activists and politicians, as well as among his fellow historians. — Michael Kazin, on “Visions of Progress”
  • “A fresh and highly learned examination of an essential part of U.S. political history; one that offers illuminating insights for students into the important but frequently neglected topic of liberals, leftists, and the tortured relations between the two.” — Eric Alterman, author of “What Liberal Media? and When Presidents Lie,” on “Visions of Progress”
  • “Visions of Progress is a forceful, deeply informed account of left-liberal political thought since the 1880s written from a fresh, appreciative perspective. Tracing his subjects’ common belief in the progressive transformation of capitalist society and the shifting nomenclature of “liberal,” “progressive,” “radical,” and “left” that marked their differences, Rossinow gives us a new map of how liberal and left reformers came together through the 1940s and moved apart thereafter. He makes a persuasive case that the American reform tradition owed its vitality to the cooperation and synergy between its liberal and left wings.” — Dorothy Ross, on “Visions of Progress”
  • “”This instructor epitomized what a good teacher is. He focuses his teaching on the encouragement of critical thinking….He is very respectful of his students and…very humble.”… “The instructor helped you learn and was very passionate about the subject. Mr. Rossinow made you learn, I don’t think anyone could fail with his teaching methods.”… “Doug Rossinow is a master at his subject….He stimulated the class by providing thought provoking questions. His perceptions and thought on this class caused a personal awakening in me and helped me to ‘open’ some of the lost memories transpiring during this important period of history. I respect and admire his opinions regarding the period.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, March 9, 2008 at 11:46 PM

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