History Buzz: May 2008

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

May 26, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • David Greenberg: An Obama-Clinton ticket could work – Slate, 5-22-08
BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 05-26-1521 – Martin Luther’s writings were banned by the Edict of Worms.
  • 05-26-1868 – President Andrew Johnson avoided conviction for impeachment charges of “high crimes and misdemeanors” by one vote.
  • 05-26-1940 – Allied troops began the massive naval evacuation of troops from Dunkirk, France, during World War II.
  • 05-26-2003 – Rwandans voted to approve a new constitution that instituted a balance of power between Hutu and Tutsi.
  • 05-27-1647 – The first recorded execution of a witch reportedly took place in Massachusetts when Achsah Young was hanged.
  • 05-27-1703 – St. Petersburg was founded by Czar Peter the Great.
  • 05-27-1936 – The Queen Mary left England on its maiden voyage, arriving in France four hours later.
  • 05-27-1937 – Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco opened.
  • 05-27-1941 – British ships sank the German battleship Bismarck off the coast of France, resulting in the loss of 2,300 lives.
  • 05-27-1996 – After a year and a half of bloodshed, Russian President Boris Yeltsin met with the leader of the Chechen rebels and negotiated a cease-fire.
  • 05-27-1999 – Slobodan Milosevic was indicted by the International War Crimes Tribunal at the Hague for crimes against humanity.
  • 05-28-1754 – Lieutenant Colonel George Washington begins the Seven Years’ War
  • 05-28-1863 – Robert Gould Shaw, leading the first northern all-black regiment, leaves Boston for the Civil War.
  • 05-28-1918 – U.S. troops score victory at Cantigny
  • 05-28-1937 – Golden Gate Bridge opens
  • 05-28-1940 – Belgium surrenders unconditionally
  • 05-28-1969 – U.S. troops abandon “Hamburger Hill”
  • 05-28-1987 – Mathias Rust, a 19-year-old pilot from West Germany, landed his private plane in Moscow’s Red Square. He was arrested and sentenced to four years in a labor camp, but was released after just one.
  • 05-28-2003 – Pres. Bush signed a $350 billion tax cut into law; the third largest tax cut in U.S. history.
  • 05-29-1780 – Tarleton gives “quarter” in South Carolina
  • 05-28-1765 – Patrick Henry bitterly denounced the Stamp Act in the Virginia House of Burgesses.
  • 05-28-1790 – Rhode Island became the 13th state in the United States, the last of the original colonies to ratify the Constitution.
  • 05-29-1843 – Fremont begins his second western expedition
  • 05-29-1848 – Wisconsin became the 30th state in the United States.
  • 05-29-1864 – Union troops reach Totopotomoy Creek, Virginia
  • 05-29-1865 – President Andrew Johnson issues general amnesty for all Confederates
  • 05-29-1917 – John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Mass.
  • 05-29-1942 – Jews in Paris are forced to sew a yellow star on their coats
  • 05-29-1942 – Bing Crosby recorded his version of “White Christmas.” It would go on to sell over 30 million copies.
  • 05-29-1988 – Reagan arrives in Moscow for summit talks
  • 05-29-1990 – Boris Yeltsin was elected president of the Russian republic by the parliament.
  • 05-30-1431 – Joan of Arc was burned at the stake as a heretic.
  • 05-30-1536 – King Henry VIII of England married his 3rd wife, Jane Seymour, 11 days after he had his 2nd wife, Anne Boleyn executed.
  • 05-30-1806 – Patriot and future President Andrew Jackson kills Charles Dickinson in a duel
  • 05-30-1861 – Union troops occupy Grafton, Virginia
  • 05-30-1862 – Confederates evacuate Corinth, Mississippi
  • 05-30-1864 – Confederates attack at Bethesda Church, Virginia
  • 05-30-1922 – The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, was dedicated by Chief Justice William Howard Taft.
  • 05-31-1775 – Mecklenburg Resolutions reject the power of the British in North Carolina
  • 05-31-1790 – The first U.S. Copyright Law was enacted, protecting books, maps, and other original materials.
  • 05-31-1859 – Big Ben goes into operation in London
  • 05-31-1889 – Heavy rains caused the South Fork Dam to collapse, sending 20 million tons of water into Johnstown, Pa. Over 2,200 people were killed and the town was nearly destroyed.
  • 05-31-1911 – The hull of the Titanic was launched in Belfast. At the ceremony, a White Star Line employee claimed, “Not even God himself could sink this ship.”
  • 05-31-1962 – Former Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel.
  • 05-31-2004 – Alberta Martin, 97, one of the last widows of a U.S. Civil War veteran, died. She had married Confederate veteran William Martin in 1927 when she was 21 and he was 81.
  • 06-01-1792 – Kentucky became the 15th state in the United States.
  • 06-01-1796 – Tennessee became the 16th state in the United States.
  • 06-01-1958 – General Charles De Gaulle became the premier of France.
  • 06-01-1980 – Cable News Network (CNN) debuted.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Linda Bridges and John R. Coyne Jr.: In Search of Buckley Through two new books, a view of William F. Buckley’s transideological conservatism FLYING HIGH Remembering Barry Goldwater, STRICTLY RIGHT William F. Buckley Jr. and the American Conservative MovementNYT, 5-25-08
  • J. PETER SCOBLIC: Never Mind the ‘Neo’ J. Peter Scoblic asserts that conservatism – not neoconservatism – is the true impetus behind Bush foreign policy ‘U.S. vs. Them’ How a Half Century of Conservatism Has Undermined America’s SecurityNYT, 5-25-08
  • BONNIE YOCHELSON and DANIEL CZITROM: The Other Half A new look at the groundbreaking journalism and advocacy of Jacob Riis’ Rediscovering Jacob Riis’ Exposure Journalism and Photography in Turn-of-the-Century New YorkNYT, 5-25-08
  • Ruth Brandon: Poor, Obscure, Plain and Little’ GOVERNESS The Lives and Times of the Real Jane EyresNYT, 5-25-08
  • Heather Cox Richardson on Walter A. McDougall: HISTORY | UNITED STATES The American Character A historian argues that self-deception is a constant in U.S. history The American Civil War Era, 1829-1877WaPo, 5-25-08
  • H.W. Brands on Matthew Parker, Adam Clymer: The Great Divide How the Panama Canal was carved out of a continent — and what it meant PANAMA FEVER The Epic Story of One of the Greatest Human Achievements of All Time — The Building of the Panama Canal, DRAWING THE LINE AT THE BIG DITCH The Panama Canal Treaties and the Rise of the Right WaPo, 5-25-08
  • Ginger Strand: HISTORY An Unnatural Wonder The world’s largest waterfall is sublime and sullied, fake and beautifully real INVENTING NIAGARA Beauty, Power, and LiesWaPo, 5-25-08
  • Joseph Needham: The biography by Simon Winchester oversimplifies Chinese history – Jonathan Dresner at Froginawell.et, 5-21-08
  • Hugh Trevor-Roper: Eminent historian debunks Scottish history as largely fabrication – Times (UK), 5-18-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • Smart as a Whip Can Indiana Jones teach kids about history? – Slate, 5-22-08
QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Michael Gannon on “War e-mails offer immediacy, but sacrifice eloquence”: “Every new means of communication limits a historian’s ability to pull together the truth of a particular event,” said Michael Gannon, a retired University of Florida history professor who has written extensively about World War II. “And now with e-mail, we’re in a particularly precarious position.” – St Petersburg Times, 5-25-08
  • R .J. Q. Adams, a professor of history at Texas A.& M. University and an expert on Britain on “”: “It was one thing to redraw the lines of Europe. It was another thing to give up a piece of the empire. He would have drawn the line there.” – NYT, 5-25-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: Ronald Reagan: An American Hero Author: Nancy Reagan – Monday, May 25 @ 5:30pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Understanding America: The Anatomy of an Exceptional Nation Authors: Peter Schuck; James Wilson – Monday, May 26 @ 8:30am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Dear First Lady: Letters to the White House Author: Dwight Young and Margaret Johnson – Monday, May 26 @ 6:00pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History 1776 Author: David McCullough – Monday, May 26 @ 6:30pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Indiana Jones and the Ultimate Quest,” Sunday, May 25, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest”, Marathon, Monday, May 26, @ 2pm – 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC,” Monday, May 26, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Clash of the Cavemen,” Monday, May 26, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Hunt for John Wilkes Booth,” Tuesday, May 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Conspiracy? :Lincoln Assassination,” Tuesday, May 27, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives :The Civil War: Antietam,” Tuesday, May 27, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wild West Tech :Vigilante Tech,” Tuesday, May 27, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crucifixion,” Wednesday, May 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds,” Wednesday, May 28, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Bible Code: Predicting Armageddon,” Wednesday, May 28, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Behind The Da Vinci Code,” Wednesday, May 28, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Blood Diamonds,” Thursday, May 29, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ben Franklin,” Friday, May 30, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution :06 – Forging an Army,” Friday, May 30, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution :07 – Treason & Betrayal,” Friday, May 30, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution :08 – The War Heads South,” Friday, May 30, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Pirate Tech,” Friday, May 30, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Shockwave,” Marathon, Saturday, May 31, @ 2pm – pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Indiana Jones and the Ultimate Quest,” Saturday, May 31, @ 5pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Cokie Roberts: LADIES OF LIBERTY #11 — (6 weeks on list)- 6-1-08
  • Ted Sorensen: COUNSELOR #13 — (1 week on list)- 6-1-08
  • Tony Horwitz: A VOYAGE LONG AND STRANGE #18 – 6-1-08
  • Kenneth C. Davis: AMERICA’S HIDDEN HISTORY #27 – 6-1-08
  • Rick Perlstein: NIXONLAND #29 – 6-1-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Thurston Clarke: The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and the 82 Days that Inspired America, May 27, 2008
  • Amity Shlaes: Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression (Reprint), May 27, 2008
  • Patrick J. Buchanan: Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War: How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Michael Dobbs: One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War, June 3, 2008
  • Yuan-Tsung Chen: Return to the Middle Kingdom: One Family, Three Revolutionaries, and the Birth of Modern China, June 3, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
  • Gavin Menzies: 1434: The Year a Magnificent Chinese Fleet Sailed to Italy and Ignited the Renaissance, June 3, 2008
  • Robert F. Dorr: Hell Hawks!: The Untold Story of the American Fliers Who Savaged Hitler’s Wehrmacht, June 15, 2008
  • Robert Dallek: Harry S. Truman (REV), September 2, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 at 12:08 AM

May 19, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • Allan Lichtman on “Push for ‘dream team’ accelerates; Will Obama pick Clinton as running mate?” – “These are professionals – They know how to do this.” … “Why not?” asks Lichtman, who argues it would keep her in the limelight and set her up for a run in 2012 if Obama loses to Republican John McCain this fall, as long as the party doesn’t blame her. “What a wonderful message to have such an envelope-pushing ticket. It sends a signal that anyone can be part of the American dream.” – CanadianPress, 5-18-08
  • Stephen Hess on “Push for ‘dream team’ accelerates; Will Obama pick Clinton as running mate?” – “The first rule of picking a vice-president is do no harm. They make no difference anyway. Who actually votes for the vice-president?… “There are a lot of perfectly acceptable candidates for him. It’s not like he has to take her. And she brings Bill along. It’s just plain awkward. There’s no need to complicate things…. Could you really imagine a Democrat at this point losing New York or California?” – CanadianPress, 5-18-08
  • Professor L. Jacobs Knows Obama Better Than Anyone in Minnesota: “For squirrelly academics, this is a whole new ballgame. We’re used to being ignored and not recognized. There’s a much broader public awareness of elections and debates and discussion.” – Bloomberg, 5-15-08
  • Michael Beschloss on “Professor L. Jacobs Knows Obama Better Than Anyone in Minnesota”: “This is the year where it is very important for us to understand this process. It can only be a good thing that political scientists, who’ve spent their whole careers studying important aspects of it, are able to give us the benefit of their wisdom.” – Bloomberg, 5-15-08
  • Dorris Kearns Goodwin: “Professor L. Jacobs Knows Obama Better Than Anyone in Minnesota”: “There are moments in time when the echoes of the past really can serve to help.” – Bloomberg, 5-15-08
  • Zing! An Old Weapon Gathers Dust Today’s scripted and choreographed negative campaigns just aren’t in the same league as the let ‘er rip oratory of old – National Journal Magazine, 5-17-08
BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 05-19-1536 – Anne Boleyn, the second wife of King Henry VIII, was beheaded.
  • 05-19-1588 – The 130-ship-strong Spanish Armada set sail for England; it was defeated in August.
  • 05-19-1643 – The colonies of Massachusetts Bay, Plymouth, Connecticut, and New Harbor met to form the New England Confederation.
  • 05-19-1921 – Congress passed the Emergency Quota Act, establishing national quotas for immigrants.
  • 05-19-1935 – British author and soldier, T. E. Lawrence, also known as “Lawrence of Arabia,” died from injuries sustained in a motorcycle crash.
  • 05-19-1962 – Marilyn Monroe sang “Happy Birthday” to president John F. Kennedy.
  • 05-19-1992 – The 27th Amendment to the Constitution, which prohibited Congress from giving itself midterm pay raises, went into effect.
  • 05-19-1994 – Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died in New York.
  • 05-20-1506 – Christopher Columbus died in Spain.
  • 05-20-1861 – North Carolina voted to secede from the Union.
  • 05-20-1927 – Charles Lindbergh began the first solo nonstop transatlantic flight, departing from Long Island aboard the Spirit of Saint Louis.
  • 05-20-1932 – Amelia Earhart took off from Newfoundland to become the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.
  • 05-20-1961 – A mob attacked a busload of “freedom riders” in Montgomery, Ala., setting the bus on fire.
  • 05-20-1996 – In a 6-3 vote, the Supreme Court rejected a Colorado measure banning laws that protect homosexuals from discrimination.
  • 05-20-2002 – East Timor became the newest nation.
  • 05-21-1542 – Spanish explorer Hernando De Soto died while searching for gold on the banks of the Mississippi River.
  • 05-21-1881 – Clara Barton founded what became the American Red Cross.
  • 05-21-1927 – Charles Lindbergh became the first person to fly across the Atlantic (from New York to Paris) in his monoplane, The Spirit of St. Louis.
  • 05-21-1932 – Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean (from Newfoundland to Ireland).
  • 05-21-1956 – The first hydrogen bomb to be dropped by air exploded over the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific.
  • 05-21-1989 – In Hong Kong, approximately one million people took to the streets to show their support for students protesting for democratic reforms in China’s Tiananmen Square.
  • 05-22-1455 – The first battle in the 30-year War of Roses took place at St. Albans.
  • 05-22-1761 – The first life insurance policy in the United States was issued in Philadelphia.
  • 05-22-1849 – Abraham Lincoln received patent number 6469 for his floating dry dock.
  • 05-22-1947 – Harry S. Truman’s Doctrine brought aid to Greece and Turkey to combat the spread of Communism.
  • 05-22-1972 – Richard Nixon arrived in Moscow, becoming the first U.S. president to visit the Soviet Union.
  • 05-22-2003 – The UN Security Council approved a resolution lifting the economic sanctions against Iraq and supporting the U.S.-led administration in Iraq.
  • 05-23-1430 – Joan of Arc was captured by the Burgundians and subsequently sold to the English.
  • 05-23-1788 – South Carolina became the 8th state in United States.
  • 05-23-1830 – The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad began the first passenger service in the United States.
  • 05-23-1873 – The North West Mounted Police force was formed in Canada. It would later be known as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
  • 05-24-1911 – The New York Public Library, at the time the largest marble structure ever built in the United States, was dedicated by President Taft in New York City after 16 years of construction.
  • 05-24-1844 – Samuel Morse transmitted the first telegraph message, in which he asked, “What hath God wrought?”
  • 05-24-1883 – The Brooklyn Bridge, linking Manhattan and Brooklyn in New York City, opened to traffic.
  • 05-24-2000 – Israeli troops pulled out of Lebanon after 18 consecutive years of occupation.
  • 05-24-2001 – Vermont senator James Jeffords quit the Republican Party and became an Independent, giving Democrats control of the Senate.
  • 05-25-1787 – The Constitutional Convention convened in Philadelphia under the leadership of George Washington, in order to establish a new U.S. government.
  • 05-25-1925 – John Scopes was indicted for teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution.
  • 05-25-1979 – The worst air disaster in U.S. history (excluding the Sept. 11 attacks) occurred when a DC-10 crashed at Chicago’s O’Hare airport, killing over 270 people.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • DOUGLAS BRINKLEY on Sean Wilentz: The Long Shadow THE AGE OF REAGAN A History, 1974-2008NYT, 5-18-08
  • Robert Kagan: THE RETURN OF HISTORY AND THE END OF DREAMSNYT, 5-18-08
  • Paula J. Giddings: IDA: A SWORD AMONG LIONS Ida B. Wells and the Campaign Against LynchingNYT, 5-18-08
  • Philip L. Fradkin: That Stegner Fellow Wallace Stegner and the American WestNYT, 5-18-08
  • Philip L. Fradkin: Wallace Stegner and the American West, First Chapter – NYT, 5-18-08
  • Gary Scharnhors: Locomotive in Petticoats KATE FIELD The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American JournalistNYT, 5-18-08
  • Ted Widmer on Ted Sorensen: Kennedy’s Voice JFK and the glamour of words COUNSELOR A Life at the Edge of HistoryWaPo, 5-18-08
  • David Greenberg on Robert Schlesinger: Tribe of Scribes An account of the people who wrote the words that we remember as presidential WHITE HOUSE GHOSTS Presidents and Their Speechwriters - WaPo, 5-16-08
  • Fergus M. Bordewich: Washington was built largely by slaves and con men WASHINGTON The Making of the American CapitalWaPo, 5-16-08
  • Jim Steinmeyer: A writer who challenged science with the world’s weirdness CHARLES FORT The Man Who Invented the Supernatural & THE BOOK OF THE DAMNED The Collected Works of Charles FortWaPo, 5-18-08
  • Peter S. Onuf: The Mind of Thomas JeffersonRed Orbit, 5-18-08
  • Germaine Greer: Says Shakespeare’s wife was smart and he loved her – Chronicle of Higher Ed, 5-16-08
  • Steven J. Keillor: The ‘other Keillor’ stirs the pot in latest history books – http://crookstontimes.com, 5-8-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • Happy Birthday, Jeff Davis: Local celebration kicks off Saturday, May 24, 2008 – Vicksburg Post, 5-18-08
  • Upstate NY fort to commemorate anniversary of 1758 battle – AP, 5-17-08
QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Ned C. Landsman on “Nearly Lost, 17th-Century Papers Are Restored”: From the native point of view, it has no more significance than any other ritual. It was not an absolute.” – NYT, 5-18-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • May 21, 2008: The Appalachian Pathways Luncheon Series turns to politics with a May 21 luncheon program presented by Appalachian State University history professor Dr. Karl Campbell who will discuss his book “Senator Sam Ervin: The Last of the Founding Fathers.” – Appalachian State University, NC, 5-2-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: After Words: “Ladies of Liberty” by Cokie Roberts, interviewed by Pat Schroeder – Monday, May 19 @ 3:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Indiana Jones and the Ultimate Quest,” Sunday, May 18, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Viking Underground,” Monday, May 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :10 – Beneath Vesuvius,” Monday, May 19, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :A-Bomb Underground,” Monday, May 19, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :New York: Secret Societies,” Monday, May 19, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Katrina,” Monday, May 19, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hillbilly: The Real Story,” Monday, May 19, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Houdini: Unlocking the Mystery,” Tuesday, May 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked,” Tuesday, May 20, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :’80’s Tech,” Tuesday, May 20, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :90’s Tech,” Tuesday, May 20, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights of the Future,” Tuesday, May 20, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Banned from The Bible II,” Wednesday, May 21, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Wrath Of God :Buffalo Blizzard: Seige and Survival,” Wednesday, May 21, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Wrath Of God :Blizzards: Whiteout!,” Wednesday, May 21, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Wrath Of God :Snowbound: The Curse of the Sierra,” Wednesday, May 21, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Dark Ages,” Thursday, May 22, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Vandals,” Thursday, May 22, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Barbarians II :Saxons,” Thursday, May 22, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The True Story of the Screaming Eagles: The 101st Airborne,” Friday, May 23, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History of the Joke,” Saturday, May 24, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Quest for the Lost Ark,” Saturday, May 24, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Underground Apocalypse,” Saturday, May 24, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Maya Underground,” Saturday, May 24, @ 11pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Cokie Roberts: LADIES OF LIBERTY #6 — (4 weeks on list)- 5-25-08
  • Tony Horwitz: A VOYAGE LONG AND STRANGE #12 — (2 weeks on list)- 5-25-08
  • Kenneth C. Davis: AMERICA’S HIDDEN HISTORY #15 — (2 week on list)- 5-25-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Daniel Mark Epstein: The Lincolns: Portrait of a Marriage, May 20, 2008
  • James Rosen: Strong Man: John Mitchell and the Secrets of Watergate, May 20, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and the 82 Days that Inspired America, May 27, 2008
  • Amity Shlaes: Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression (Reprint), May 27, 2008
  • Patrick J. Buchanan: Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War: How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Michael Dobbs: One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev, and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War, June 3, 2008
  • Yuan-Tsung Chen: Return to the Middle Kingdom: One Family, Three Revolutionaries, and the Birth of Modern China, June 3, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
  • Gavin Menzies: 1434: The Year a Magnificent Chinese Fleet Sailed to Italy and Ignited the Renaissance, June 3, 2008
  • Robert F. Dorr: Hell Hawks!: The Untold Story of the American Fliers Who Savaged Hitler’s Wehrmacht, June 15, 2008
  • Robert Dallek: Harry S. Truman (REV), September 2, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, May 19, 2008 at 12:04 AM

May 12, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • Allan Lichtman: Obama shifts sights to McCain and the general election – Christian Science Monitor, 5-12-08
  • Julian Zelizer on “What went wrong for Clinton?”: “The Obama campaign was strategically shrewd. They saw how the caucus system worked and they saw how this proportional voting system worked, where they could lose (a state) and still win delegates…. If you took away the caucuses, she would have won. It’s very puzzling.” – AFP, 5-9-08
HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 05-12-1870 – Manitoba became a province of Canada.
  • 05-12-1932 – The body of Charles and Anne Lindbergh’s kidnapped baby was found.
  • 05-12-1937 – Britain’s King George VI was crowned at Westminster Abbey in London.
  • 05-12-1949 – The Soviet blockade that prompted the Berlin airlift was ended.
  • 05-12-1970 – Harry A. Blackmun was confirmed as a Supreme Court justice.
  • 05-12-2002 – Former president Jimmy Carter became the first U.S. president (in or out of office) to visit Fidel Castro’s Cuba.
  • 05-13-1568 – Mary Queen of Scots was defeated at the Battle of Langside and immediately fled to North England.
  • 05-13-1846 – The United States formally declared war on Mexico after several days of fighting.
  • 05-13-1938 – Louis Armstrong and his orchestra recorded the New Orleans’s jazz classic, When the Saints Go Marching In, on Decca Records.
  • 05-13-1940 – Winston Churchill gave his first speech as prime minister: “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat.”
  • 05-13-1981 – Pope John Paul II was shot and wounded by Mehmet Ali Agca as he drove through a crowd in St. Peter’s Square, Rome.
  • 05-14-1796 – Edward Jenner administered the first smallpox vaccine to 8-year-old James Phipps.
  • 05-14-1804 – The Lewis and Clark expedition set out from St. Louis.
  • 05-14-1904 – The Olympic Games were held in the United States for the first time, in St. Louis, Missouri.
  • 05-14-1948 – British rule in Palestine came to an end as The Jewish National Council proclaimed the State of Israel. Within hours, Israel was under attack from Arab forces.
  • 05-14-1955 – The Warsaw Pact was signed by the Soviet Union and seven other Communist bloc countries. It finally dissolved in 1991.
  • 05-14-1973 – Skylab, the United States’ first space station, was launched into orbit.
  • 05-15-1862 – The U.S. Department of Agriculture was created by an act of Congress.
  • 05-15-1911 – The Standard Oil Company, headed by John D. Rockefeller, was ordered dissolved by the Supreme Court, under the Sherman Antitrust Act.
  • 05-15-1918 – The first air mail route in the U.S. was established between New York and Washington, DC, with a stop at Philadelphia.
  • 05-15-1972 – Alabama Governor George Wallace was shot and crippled as he campaigned for the presidency.
  • 05-15-1988 – The Soviet Union began to withdraw its estimated 115,000 troops from Afghanistan.
  • 05-16-1770 – Marie Antoinette married the future King Louis XVI of France.
  • 05-16-1868 – The first ballot on one of 11 articles of impeachment in the U.S. Senate failed to convict President Andrew Johnson.
  • 05-16-1929 – The first Academy Awards were given on this night. The term, Oscars, was not used to describe the statuettes given to actors and actresses until 1931.
  • 05-16-1991 – Queen Elizabeth II became the first British monarch to address the United States Congress.
  • 05-16-1997 – President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire ended 32 years of autocratic rule when rebel forces led by Laurent Kabila expelled him from the country.
  • 05-17-1792 – The New York Stock Exchange was established when a group of 24 brokers and merchants met by a tree on what is now Wall Street and signed the Buttonwood Agreement.
  • 05-17-1875 – The first Kentucky Derby was held at Churchill Downs, in Louisville, Kentucky.
  • 05-17-1954 – The Supreme Court ruled unanimously against segregation in schools in Brown v. Board of Education.
  • 05-17-1973 – Televised Watergate hearings opened, headed by North Carolina senator Sam Ervin.
  • 05-17-1987 – An Iraqi warplane attacked the U.S.S. Stark in the Persian Gulf, killing 37 American sailors and wounding 62.
  • 05-17-1997 – Laurent Kabila declared himself president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Rick Perlstein: Bring Us Apart NIXONLAND The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America.NYT, 5-11-08
  • Rick Perlstein: NIXONLAND The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of America, First Chapter – NYT, 5-11-08
  • Up Front, Rick Perlstein: NIXONLAND The Rise of a President and the Fracturing of AmericaNYT, 5-11-08
  • Cokie Roberts: AMERICAN HISTORY Power Behind the Throne Cokie Roberts describes a time when women in high places practiced dinner-table diplomacy LADIES OF LIBERTY The Women Who Shaped Our Nation - WaPo, 5-11-08
  • Cokie Roberts: LADIES OF LIBERTY The Women Who Shaped Our Nation, First Chapter – WaPo, 5-11-08
  • Alan Taylor: Historian roasts journalist Richard Kluger for mistakes in a new book Seizing Destiny: How America Grew from Sea to Shining SeaAlan Taylor in the New Republic, 5-7-08
  • Jonathan Spence: Highlighted by NYT editors as serious China scholar – NYT Book Review, 5-4-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Doug Wead, a former aide to President George H.W. Bush and author of a book on presidents’ kin on “Bush’s Daughter Says ‘I Do’ at Ranch”: “I know the president and I know the family and I think they pulled it off. What I mean when I say ‘pulled it off’ is that they were successful in keeping it a private event.” – AP, 5-11-08
  • Sean Wilentz on “Bob Dylan’s ‘girl on the album cover’ paints a portrait of folk revival years”: “People will always identify Suze as the girl on the album cover, and she’s lived with this since 1963, but that’s not the reason to read her book. She evokes a time and place out of which a good deal of contemporary American culture sprang. It was a time of great freedom, when people were figuring out what they want to be, but freedom is scary.” – LAT, 5-9-08
  • Margaret MacMillan on Things not to learn from history: “It’s a funny thing. In many ways, people know less and less about the past. But the political leaders say, ‘History tells us we must do this.’ So we really do need a good understanding of history to know that Iraq is not exactly like Germany in the 1930s.” – Source: Toronto Star (5-3-08)
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • May 21, 2008: The Appalachian Pathways Luncheon Series turns to politics with a May 21 luncheon program presented by Appalachian State University history professor Dr. Karl Campbell who will discuss his book “Senator Sam Ervin: The Last of the Founding Fathers.” – Appalachian State University, NC, 5-2-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Panel Discussion on the political career of Melvin Laird with Dale Van Atta, author of “With Honor,” Jeremi Suri, author of “Henry Kissinger and the American Century,” and George Herring author of “America’s Longest War” Authors: George Herring; Jeremi Suri; Dale Van Atta – Sunday, May 11 @ 4:00pm ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Douglass and Lincoln: How a Revolutionary Black Leader and a Reluctant Liberator Struggled to End Slavery and Save the Union Authors: Paul Kendrick; Stephen Kendrick – Monday, May 12 @ 4:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: History Summits: Six Meetings That Shaped the Twentieth Century Author: David Reynolds – Monday, May 12 @ 11:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “Tougher In Alaska :Gold Mining,” Sunday, May 11, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Clash of the Cavemen,” Sunday, May 11, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels :Engineering Disasters,” Monday, May 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Prophecies from Below,” Monday, May 12, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Targeted :Osama bin Laden,” Tuesday, May 13, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: ” Declassified :The Taliban,” Tuesday, May 13, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Rome: Engineering an Empire,” Wednesday, May 14, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire,” Wednesday, May 14, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest :America’s Loch Ness Monster,” Wednesday, May 14, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives :Loch Ness: Great Monster Mystery,” Wednesday, May 14, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Plague,” Thursday, May 15, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :Ancient Computer?,” Thursday, May 15, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :Galen, Doctor to the Gladiators,” Thursday, May 15, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :Heron of Alexandria,” Thursday, May 15, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Ship of Gold,” Thursday, May 15, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries :Ancient New York,” Thursday, May 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries :Devil’s Island: Hell on Earth,” Thursday, May 15, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Samurai,” Friday, May 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Comanche Warriors,” Friday, May 16, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Clash of the Cavemen,” Saturday, May 17, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Days on Earth,” Saturday, May 17, @ 8pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Cokie Roberts: LADIES OF LIBERTY #6 — (4 weeks on list)- 5-18-08
  • Kenneth C. Davis: AMERICA’S HIDDEN HISTORY #13 — (1 week on list)- 5-18-08
  • Jonah Goldberg: LIBERAL FASCISM #35 – 5-18-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Scott McClellan: What Happened, May 12, 2008
  • William F. Buckley, Jr.: Flying High: Remembering Barry Goldwater, May 12, 2008
  • John Lukacs: Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Dire Warning: Churchill’s First Speech as Prime Minister, May 12, 2008
  • Peter Clarke: The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana, May 13, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: Last Campaign, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

  • D. T. Whiteside: Historian of mathematics whose prodigious work on Newton’s papers astonished the scholarly world (Obit.) – Independent (UK), 5-3-08

Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 at 12:05 AM

May 5, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Primary Season Election Results – NYT
  • William Chafe on “What a way to choose”: “Questions of character and personality … matter so much, because they are the ultimate decision points for most Americans.” – News & Oberserver, NC, 5-4-08
  • Glenda Gilmore on “What a way to choose”: “Elections are like picking a pig in a poke. We can never know what crisis a president will face, so we focus on character as a way of trying to predict their behavior…. People would rather vote for the skunk they know.” – News & Oberserver, NC, 5-4-08
  • Robert Dallek on “First Lady Fine Line Clinton’s Working to Claim Credit for Prosperity Without Shouldering Blame for Errors”: “Robert Dallek, a historian who supports Obama, said voters would base their decision more on what the presidential candidates are saying today than their past experiences. “Nobody thinks of the first lady as having huge responsibility for major decisions on foreign policy or domestic policy…. She has had tremendous visibility, people know her name, and that gave her a real leg up, a fast start.” – The Washington Independent, 5-4-08
  • Myra Gutin on “First Lady Fine Line Clinton’s Working to Claim Credit for Prosperity Without Shouldering Blame for Errors”: “Part of what many of us are feeling with regard to her time as first lady and her claims of experience have to do with the ambiguous nature of being first lady. “There’s no job description, and most first ladies carve out their own niche. In Hillary’s case, that was quite a niche… I don’t know why she didn’t focus on her experience as a senator. She has been a very good senator. I would have said, just go with that, rather than get involved with all of the stuff as first lady.”- The Washington Independent, 5-4-08
BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

On This Day in History….

  • 05-05-1809 – Mary Kies of South Killingly, Conn., became the first woman to be granted a patent. The patent was for the rights to a technique for weaving straw with silk and thread.
  • 05-05-1821 – Napoleon Bonaparte died on the island of St. Helena.
  • 05-05-1891 – Carnegie Hall (then known as Music Hall) opened in New York City. Peter Tchaikovsky was the guest conductor.
  • 05-05-1925 – John Scopes was arrested in Tennessee for teaching Darwinism.
  • 05-05-1961 – Alan Shepard became the first American in space.
  • 05-05-2004 – Pablo Picasso’s “Boy with a Pipe” became the most expensive painting ever sold.
  • 05-06-1882 – Congress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act over President Chester A. Arthur’s veto.
  • 05-06-1889 – The Universal Exposition opened in Paris, marking the completion and dedication of the Eiffel Tower.
  • 05-06-1937 – The German airship Hindenburg blew up and burst into flames at Lakehurst, N.J.
  • 05-06-1941 – Dictator Joseph Stalin became the premier of Russia.
  • 05-06-1999 – Scotland elected its first separate parliament in three centuries.
  • 05-07-1915 – The British ocean liner Lusitania was sunk by a German submarine in World War I off the coast of Ireland.
  • 05-07-1945 – Germany unconditionally surrendered to the allies in Rheims, France.
  • 05-07-1954 – The 56-day-long battle of Dienbienphu ended with Ho Chi Minh’s forces defeating the French, signaling the end of French power in Indochina.
  • 05-07-1992 – The 27th Amendment to the Constitution, prohibiting mid-term Congressional pay raises, was ratified.
  • 05-08-1794 – Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, the father of modern chemistry, was guillotined during the Reign of Terror.
  • 05-08-1902 – Mount Pelee on Martinique erupted, destroying the town of St. Pierre, and killing 40,000 people.
  • 05-08-1945 – V-E Day marks the European victory of the Allies in World War II.
  • 05-09-1914 – Mother’s Day became a public holiday.
  • 05-09-1926 – Explorers Richard E. Byrd and Floyd Bennett flew over the North Pole.
  • 05-09-1936 – Fascist Italy annexed Ethiopia.
  • 05-09-1994 – The South African parliament chose Nelson Mandela as president.
  • 05-09-2004 – Chechnya’s Moscow-backed leader, Akhmad Kadyrov, was killed in a bombing. Six others were killed and another 60 wounded.
  • 05-10-1775 – Ethan Allen and his Green Mountain Boys captured Fort Ticonderoga from the British.
  • 05-10-1863 – Confederate General Stonewall Jackson died after being accidentally shot by his own troops.
  • 05-10-1869 – The United States’ first transcontinental railroad was completed with a ceremony in Promontory Point, Utah.
  • 05-10-1924 – J. Edgar Hoover became director of the FBI.
  • 05-10-1940 – Winston Churchill succeeded Neville Chamberlain as British prime minister.
  • 05-10-1994 – Nelson Mandela was sworn in as South Africa’s first black president.
  • 05-11-1858 – Minnesota became the 32nd state in the United States.
  • 05-11-1894 – The Pullman Strike began.
  • 05-11-1949 – Siam changed its name to Thailand.
  • 05-11-1960 – Israeli agents captured Nazi Adolf Eichmann in Argentina.
  • 05-11-1973 – Charges against Daniel Ellsberg for his role in the Pentagon Papers case were dismissed.
  • 05-11-2003 – 91% of Lithuanian voters opted to join the European Union—the first former Soviet nation to do so.
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Lou Cannon on William F. Buckley Jr., John W. Dean and Barry M. Goldwater Jr.: COVER REVIEW | POLITICS Goldwater Revisited The conservative icon wanted government out of the boardroom — and the bedroom. FLYING HIGH Remembering Barry Goldwater, PURE GOLDWATERWaPo, 5-4-08
  • Rick Perlstein on Mickey Edwards: POLITICS Gone Astray Republicans took power and let go of their principles, a stalwart conservative argues. RECLAIMING CONSERVATISM How a Great American Political Movement Got Lost — And How It Can Find Its Way Back - WaPo, 5-4-08
  • Kevin Phillips on Sean Wilentz: THE AGE OF REAGAN A History, 1974-2008 – WaPo, 5-4-08
  • Benny Morris: Endless War 1948 A History of the First Arab-Israeli WarNYT, 5-4-08
  • Tony Horwitz: In Love With the History Our Teachers Never Told Us A Voyage Long and StrangeNYT, 4-30-08
  • Luc van Dongen: Historian exposes secret wartime refugees – http://www.swissinfo.ch, 4-23-08
  • Howard Zinn: Now he’s got a comic book – http://www.mediabistro.com, 4-30-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • Veronica Buckley: Biographer fooled by 1998 work of French academic – Guardian, 4-29-08
QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • H. W. Brands on “What a way to choose”: “In those first days, he astonished people by his intuitive grasp of what the nation needed emotionally,” said Brands, whose biography of FDR is to be published in the fall. “What made him a great president was not his mastery of issues but his unexpected ability to connect with people.” – News & Oberserver, NC, 5-4-08
  • Killings of Armenians in Ottoman Empire ‘genocide,’ says American historian – Turkish Daily News, 4-25-08
HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • May 21, 2008: The Appalachian Pathways Luncheon Series turns to politics with a May 21 luncheon program presented by Appalachian State University history professor Dr. Karl Campbell who will discuss his book “Senator Sam Ervin: The Last of the Founding Fathers.” – Appalachian State University, NC, 5-2-08
  • May-September 2008: Elizabeth Brand Monroe, Deborah A. Lee, Lectures Showcase Leesburg’s History for 250th Anniversary – WaPo, 1-18-08
  • David Zabecki: Hooks up with Stephen Ambrose Tours / Zabecki will lead the 14-day tour to visit historic World War II sites in Gdansk, Krakow, Warsaw and Berlin from May 16-30, 2008.- Press Release–Stephen Ambrose Tours, 1-10-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • C-Span2, BookTV: For Love of Politics: Bill and Hillary Clinton – The White House Years Author: Sally Bedell Smith – Monday, May 5 @ 4:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Politics Against the Tide: How a Compliant Congress Empowered a Reckless President Author: Lincoln Chafee – Monday, May 5 @ 6:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • C-Span2, BookTV: Politics Women for President: Media Bias in Eight Campaigns Author: Erika Falk – Monday, May 5 @ 7:00am ET – C-Span2, BookTV
  • History Channel: “The Lincoln Assassination,” Monday, May 5, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :Secret Soviet Bases,” Monday, May 5, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld :08 – New York,” Monday, May 5, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake,” Tuesday, May 6, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters :Yellowstone Eruption,” Tuesday, May 6, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters :West Coast Tsunami,” Tuesday, May 6, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Stalking Jihad,” Wednesday, May 7, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Big America,” Thursday, May 8, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Dangerous Territory” Thursday, May 8, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Return of the Pirates,” Friday, May 9, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “True Caribbean Pirates,” Friday, May 9, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces,” Saturday, May 10, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Dogfights of the Future,” Saturday, May 10, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300,” Saturday, May 10, @ 10pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Cokie Roberts: LADIES OF LIBERTY #4 — (3 week on list)- 5-11-08
  • Philip Bobbitt: TERROR AND CONSENT #35 – 5-11-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Ted Sorensen: Counselor: A Life at the Edge of History, May 6, 2008
  • Scott McClellan: What Happened, May 12, 2008
  • William F. Buckley, Jr.: Flying High: Remembering Barry Goldwater, May 12, 2008
  • John Lukacs: Blood, Toil, Tears, and Sweat: The Dire Warning: Churchill’s First Speech as Prime Minister, May 12, 2008
  • Peter Clarke: The Last Thousand Days of the British Empire: Churchill, Roosevelt, and the Birth of the Pax Americana, May 13, 2008
  • Thurston Clarke: Last Campaign, May 27, 2008
  • John S. Eisenhower: Zachary Taylor: The 12th President, 1849-1850, May 27, 2008
  • Paul Finkelman (Editor): Congress and the Emergence of Sectionalism: From the Missouri Compromise to the Age of Jackson, May 28, 2008
  • Shane O’Sullivan: Who Killed Bobby?, June 3, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

  • Charles Tilly: 78, Writer and a Social Scientist, Is Dead – NYT, 5-2-08
  • William W. Warner, Chesapeake Bay Author, Dies at 88 – NYT, 4-30-08

Posted on Monday, May 5, 2008 at 12:53 AM

Top Young Historians: 92 – Kevin Mattson

Top Young Historians

Kevin Mattson, 41

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Connor Study Professor of Contemporary History, Ohio University
Area of Research: Modern American History, American Social and Cultural History, American Social Thought, American Political History and Thought
Education: Ph.D., Department of History, University of Rochester, 1994
Major Publications: Mattson is the author of the forthcoming Malaise: How Jimmy Carter Defined a Decade in a Speech that Should Have Changed America, (Bloomsbury USA, 2009); Rebels All!: A Brief and Critical History of the Postwar Conservative Mind,  (Rutgers University Press, forthcoming, 2008); Upton Sinclair and the Other American Century, (Wiley, 2006); When America Was Great: The Fighting Faith of Liberalism in Post-War America, (Routledge, 2004; reissued as 2nd edition paperback with new preface in 2006); Engaging Youth: Combating the Apathy of Young Americans toward Politics, (Century Foundation, 2003); Intellectuals in Action: The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism, 1945-70, (Pennsylvania State University Press, 2002); Creating a Democratic Public: The Struggle for Urban Participatory Democracy During the Progressive Era, (Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998).
He is the editor of Liberalism for a New Century, co-edited with Neil Jumonville, (University of California Press, 2007); Steal This University!: The Rise of the Corporate University and the Academic Labor Movement, co-edited with Benjamin Johnson and Patrick Kavanagh, (Routledge, 2003); Democracy’s Moment: Reforming the American Political System for the 21st Century, co-edited with Ronald Hayduk (Rowman and Littlefield, 2002), and An Introduction to Mary Parker Follett’s The New State, with prefaces by Benjamin Barber and Jane Mansbridge, (Pennsylvania State University Press, 1998).
Mattson is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, book chapters and reviews including among others: “The Rise of Postmodern Conservatism,” in American Thought and Culture in the 21st Century, ed. Martin Halliwell (Edinburgh University Press, forthcoming). “What’s to Fear: the American Right, Anti-Intellectualism, and the Academic Bill of Rights,” in Stephen Aby, ed., The Academic Bill of Rights Debate, (Praeger, 2007); “Liberalism and Democracy: A Troubled Marriage,” in Liberalism for a New Century (2007). “John Kenneth Galbraith and Post-War Liberalism in America,” in Capitalism and its Culture, Edited by Nelson Lichtenstein (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006); “Why We Should Be Reading Reinhold Niebuhr Now More than Ever: Liberalism and the Future of American Political Thought,” The Good Society, Volume 14, 2005; “Christopher Lasch and the Perilous Travels of American Liberalism,” Polity, April 2004. “The Challenges of Democracy: James Harvey Robinson, the New History, and Adult Education for Citizenship,” the Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era, Winter, 2003; “The Historian as a Social Critic: Christopher Lasch and the Uses of History,” The History Teacher, Winter, 2003: “Between Despair and Hope: Revisiting Studies on the Left,” in You Didn’t Have to Be There: The New Left Reappraised, edited by Paul Buhle and John McMillian (Temple University Press, 2003).
He has written for the New York Times Book Review, the Nation, the American Prospect, Commonweal, the Baffler, the Common Review, the Washington Post Book World, Academe, and other publications.
Awards: Mattson is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
Affiliated Scholar, Center for American Progress, Summer, 2006-Present;
Rush Rhees Fellowship, University of Rochester, 1990-1994: Tuition and full-time stipend for graduate studies.
Additional Info:
Formerly Associate Director, The Walt Whitman Center for the Culture and Politics of Democracy, Rutgers University (New Brunswick, NJ), 1995-2001; Professor of American History for the Clemente Course in the Humanities, Bard College (New Brunswick, NJ), 1998-2001; Adjunct Professor and Advisor of Liberal Arts, Rutgers University, 1998-2001, and Part-Time History Professor at University of Rochester, Rochester Institute of Technology, and Monroe Community College (Rochester, NY), 1994-5.
Mattson has been interviewed by numerous media outlets, including NPR (Chicago, Boston, and Wisconsin); Public Television; Canadian Broadcasting; Fox News; German Television; Nation Radio; Tony Trupiano Show; New York Times, plus newspapers and magazines, both American and international.
Mattson was also a Consultant and Interviewed for “The Progressive Era,” a “Bill Moyers’s Journal” Show on PBS, 2007-8; Consultant, “A Time For Greatness” (about the 1960 Presidential Election) , 2005-Present; Consultant, Carnegie Corporation of New York: Wrote report on youth and political participation and then assessed proposals for projects in this area (2000-2001); Consultant, Open Society Institute (OSI), 1998, reviewed programs dedicated to American political reform and campaign finance.

Personal Anecdote

I’ll admit it: I didn’t always want to be a historian. In fact, I’m not sure when the idea of becoming one crossed my mind. Neither of my parents were historians or academics. I hated high school so much I thought I’d never go to college and didn’t go immediately. And still to this day when college students tell me that they want to become historians, I get suspicious and uneasy (OK, part of that’s because I know the realities of the job market).

In fact, I started life as a “citizen,” or more accurately, as a political activist, and I still think that’s a part of who I am. In high school, I helped form a student organization called the Student Union to Promote Awareness (which had the clumsy acronym, SUPA). That’s where I got most of my education on a variety of political issues (we organized after-school forums) and where I learned how to write (newsletters, flyers, the usual stuff an activist writes). I continued with that work after high school, forming a city-based youth organization that worked on a variety of political issues and that eventually had other chapters across the nation. Pretty soon, though, I realized that I didn’t know that much about American politics or how we became the country that we did.

Still, when I eventually attended college, I didn’t major in history but in social and political thought with a minor in historical studies. But I was trending towards history. And when I had to decide on graduate school, I thought history was the freest and most open of the academic disciplines. For what is not history?

When I finally got out of college, I was still teetering between activism and graduate studies in history. I threw in my applications and got accepted at the University of Rochester. But before packing my bags, I took a job as a community organizer.

Here’s where things turned really strange. The first day I worked for this organization, I was taken out for training by a young woman who seemed wired with energy. She took me into one of the worst housing projects in Brooklyn. There she proceeded to walk me through her rounds, carrying with her a clipboard and literature. At one point, she kicked in a door to the stairway of a particularly nasty building. “Gotta do that,” she said to me, “because sometimes there’s a drug deal going on and you don’t want to be shot so you have to give warning.” People wouldn’t open doors for her, so she had to shout into their apartments. And when we got to the highlight of the evening – a meeting organized to discuss what needed to be done to improve the elevators in the building – I looked around a big room with only four people there, including myself and this young activist, plus two residents who weren’t sure why they were there. Afterwards, she told me that she thought it would be good if an act of violence was taken against her so that she could learn the realities of what it meant to be poor and a victim. I was stunned.

The weirdest part was this: This young activist had just dropped out of the same history program I had just applied to. This too: her advisor would become my advisor.

I knew at that moment my mind was made up: I was going to graduate school and study to become a historian. But I was still animated by the world of activism and politics that I left behind and that I still remained engaged in. And I think that my writing still revolves around the questions I learned to ask as an activist. I’m reminded of George Orwell’s classic essay on “Why I Write.” He included in his list of reasons “political purpose – using the world ‘political’ in the widest possible sense.” I think that way too, as I think all of my work centers around broad political questions about democracy, citizenship, political philosophy, and how these themes intersect with American history.

Quotes

By Kevin Mattson

  • “We are the party of ideas.” – President George W. BushThese words rolled off the lips of a man who calls himself a “gut player.” A man who when asked by the Rebels All!: A Short History of the Conservative Mind in Postwar  America JPG conservative journalist Tucker Carlson back in 1999 to name a weakness said, “Sitting down and reading a 500-page book on public policy or philosophy or something.” A man who later shocked people and made headline news by reading a book by French existentialist Albert Camus. A man who toned down his prep school roots and campaigned as a Texas populist and who, in the words of one journalist, “has been quick about cracks about intellectuals and criticisms of institutions like his own alma mater, Yale University.” A man whose own speechwriter called him “uncurious and as a result ill-informed.” A man famous for mispronouncing words and looking flummoxed when off-script at press conferences. This president – a man who many describe as the most anti-intellectual president in postwar America – said he led a party of ideas.

    Odd? Not necessarily.

    The book goes on to describe why this is not so strange as it might seem – why conservative ideas are charged with a certain anti-intellectual tinge. — Kevin Mattson in “Rebels All!: A Short History of the Conservative Mind in Postwar America”

    About Kevin Mattson

  • “Ultimately Mattson challenges readers to reconsider contemporary conceptions of democracy that view citizens as consumers, and he contributes to contemporary discussions of ways to invigorate democratic practice. Highly recommended for all readership levels.” — Choice reviewing “Creating a Democratic Public The Struggle for Urban Participatory Democracy during the Progressive Era”
  • “In an era of quickening concern about citizenship and community in contemporary America, we have a lot to learn from the community-building activities of Progressive Era reformers. Kevin Mattson’s instructive account of their successes and failures is a timely contribution.” — Robert D. Putnam, Harvard University reviewing “Creating a Democratic Public The Struggle for Urban Participatory Democracy during the Progressive Era”
  • “The Progressive Era was filled with the rhetoric of democracy, but in recent years historians have found the meaning of progressivism rather in various hierarchies of power. Kevin Mattson’s considerable accomplishment in this fine book is to recover the era’s emergent democratic public and its localized activities, from adult education to political meetings. Mattson’s openly committed history is important for its more complicated rendering of progressive democracy, for its elaboration of a lively public culture, and for the encouragement it offers to the project of participatory democracy.” — Thomas Bender, New York University reviewing “Creating a Democratic Public The Struggle for Urban Participatory Democracy during the Progressive Era”
  • “Kevin Mattson’s book recovers one of the most important moments in the history of genuinely democratic reform in American history. A major contribution to the rethinking of progressivism, this book also offers a usable past to those struggling in the present to render our politics and culture more democratic.” — Robert Westbrook, University of Rochester reviewing “Creating a Democratic Public The Struggle for Urban Participatory Democracy during the Progressive Era”
  • “Kevin Mattson’s book will be welcomed by historians for the complications it introduces into our understanding of an important period of dissent and reform and by those who continue to struggle for a more democratic America for its unsentimental account of their inheritance.” — Robert Westbrook, University of Rochester reviewing “Intellectuals in Action The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism, 1945-1970″
  • “By recovering the political ideas and commitments of this important group of left intellectuals working as intellectuals, he invites contemporary intellectuals into a workshop of political change. At a moment when liberalism again seems exhausted, it is a timely and important book.” — Thomas Bender, New York University reviewing “Intellectuals in Action The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism, 1945-1970″
  • “A novel and revealing view of the early New Left as democratic intellectuals in search of a public.” — Leon Fink, University of Illinois at Chicago reviewing “Intellectuals in Action The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism, 1945-1970″
  • “Kevin Mattson’s new book is a superb and inspiring account of the sixties as a moment of public intellectual engagement. Mattson interprets New Left debates as continuous with earlier debates about the meaning of American democracy and the possibilities of a radical liberalism. His book is more than a history. For it seeks to remind us of the strengths and limits of New Left discourse so as to inform our own democratic engagements in the present.” — Jeffrey C. Isaac, Indiana University reviewing “Intellectuals in Action The Origins of the New Left and Radical Liberalism, 1945-1970″
  • Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 at 12:20 AM

    Top Young Historians: 91 – Micki McElya

    Top Young Historians

    Micki McElya, 36

    Basic Facts

    Teaching Position: Assistant Professor of History, University of Connecticut, August 2008 -
    Assistant Professor of American Studies, University of Alabama, August 2003 – August 2008
    Area of Research: 20th Century U.S., History of Women and Gender, History of Sexuality, Cultural History, Race and Representation, the U.S. South, Visual Culture, Memory, Feminist and Queer Theories
    Education: Ph.D., Department of History, New York University, 2003
    Major Publications: McElya is the author of Clinging to Mammy: The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2007) winner of the 2007 Myers Center Outstanding Book Award, Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights. She is currently working on “Flesh Trades: Capitalism, Prostitution, and Anti-Slavery Politics, 1820 to the Present.”
    McElya is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, book chapters and reviews including among others: “Painter of the Right: Thomas Kinkade’s Political Art” in Thomas Kinkade: The Artist in the Mall, Alexis L. Boylan, ed. (Durham: Duke University Press, forthcoming); “Commemorating the Color Line: The National Mammy Monument Controversy of the 1920s,” in Monuments to the Lost Cause: Women, Art and the Landscape of Southern Memory, Cynthia Mills and Pamela Simpson, eds. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2003); “Trashing the Presidency: Race, Class and the Clinton-Lewinsky Affair,” in Our Monica, Ourselves: The Clinton Affair and the Public Interest, Lauren Berlant and Lisa Duggan, eds. (New York: NYU Press, 2001).
    Awards: McElya is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
    2007 Myers Center Outstanding Book Award for Clinging to Mammy, Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights, Boston, MA;
    Newberry Library Short-Term Resident Fellowship for Individual Research, Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois, Summer 2005;
    Univeristy of Alabama: Research Advisory Council Grant, Summer 2006;
    Faculty Development Grant, Spring 2005;
    New York University: Prize Teaching Fellow, Department of History, 2002-03;
    Warren Dean Dissertation Fellow, Dept. of History, Spring 2002;
    Penfield Fellowship, Department of History, Fall 2001;
    Margaret Brown Fellowship, Department of History, 2000-01 Summer Predoctoral Fellowship, Graduate School of A & S, 2000;
    Summer Research Grant, Department of History, 1998.

    Personal Anecdote

    I was a pretty awful student in college. I skipped a bunch of classes and toured through several majors, eventually declaring in History because I had taken more courses in the subject than any other and I wanted to graduate on time. In the fall of my senior year, I took the required, but dreaded, methodologies course that had a reputation for being both difficult and boring. Yet at midterm, with the jolting suddenness and impact of a body blow, I realized that I had to become a historian when we read Said’s Orientalism and then the first volume of Foucault’s History of Sexuality. I can recall that class and those few weeks with great clarity, for it was the moment everything— everything—changed for me. It was no longer possible to see the world in the same way, to take school and my privilege for granted, or to understand the archives, history, and history-making as anything less than deeply political. With this new understanding of power and the transformative possibilities of engaged scholarship, I was drawn not only to graduate but on to graduate school and to work on identity, political culture, and memory.

    My first book began as a dissertation on the attempt by the United Daughters of the Confederacy to erect a memorial to “the faithful colored mammies of the South” in Washington, D.C., in 1923 and the furious controversy that ultimately (and thankfully) stopped it. This history is included in the book, which is a wider examination of the incredible hold the idea of the mammy has had on American culture, politics, and imaginations across the twentieth century to the present day. It explores why this particular story about slavery, the South, gender, race, and sexuality has been so durable and what this has meant for women in the U.S. and for national and local politics, what it says about historical memory and its effects, and the scope of resistance to these images within black freedom struggles.

    My continued interest in the way the U.S. has, or has not, reckoned with the history of slavery and its impacts upon contemporary experience and political economies threads through my current research. My next book is a study of the rhetorics of slavery and abolition in American anti-prostitution campaigns from the antebellum period to the dawn of the twenty-first century. With a focus on politics and popular culture and organized around three historical moments—antebellum reform and abolitionism, the Progressive-Era “white slavery” panic, and current activism to end global sex trafficking—I hope this book will make important contributions to the histories of feminism, prostitution, capitalism, and racial formation.

    A required course changed my life. As a teacher now, my primary aim is to disrupt tendencies toward passive learning, jar students’ assumptions about their environments and historical knowledge, and to ignite their critical vision and sense of the moral urgency of studying U.S. history and culture. I believe the ability to historicize— meaning not only to contextualize and assess development over time, but also to recognize dominant narratives and the workings of power—is a necessary skill for leading a thoughtful and engaged life, in and out of the classroom.

    Quotes

    By Micki McElya

  • The myth of the faithful slave lingers because so many white Americans have wished to live in a world in which African Americans are not angry over past and present injustices, a world in which white people were and are not complicit, in which the injustices themselves—of slavery, Jim Crow, and ongoing structural racism—seem not to exist at all. The mammy figure affirmed their wishes. The narrative of the faithful slave is deeply rooted in the American racial imagination. It is a story of our national past and political future that blurs the lines between myth and memory, guilt and justice, stereotype and individuality, commodity and humanity….  W.E.B Du Bois famously predicted in 1903 that the twentieth century would be defined by “the problem of the color line.” This book examines how that line was drawn and violently maintained through stories of interracial affection and faithful slavery, and how it was given shape in fantasies about black women who crossed it. It also explores the diversity of black activisms that have challenged, and at times, strategically affirmed this version of black womanhood and history, and to what ends. The problem of the color line, with its animating faithful slave narratives, has persisted into the twenty-first century. If we are to reckon honestly with the history and continued legacies of slavery in the United States, we must confront the terrible depths of desire for the black mammy and the way it still drags at struggles for real democracy and social justice. — Micki McElya in “Clinging to Mammy The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America “
  • About Micki McElya

  • Few American icons have been as comforting or as destructive as the black mammy. If lynching was the brutal face of white supremacy, Aunt Jemima and her ilk were the face of the white fantasy of harmonious race relations. With exceptional scholarly craft, McElya reveals the distortions, hardships, and tragedy that the smiling face and jovial demeanor of the mythic black mammy were intended to obscure. This book signals the arrival of a talented new historian. — W. Fitzhugh Brundage, author of “The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory” reviewing “Clinging to Mammy The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America “
  • Americans loved Aunt Jemima and their mammies. There is no more powerful and damaging popular symbol in American culture than the faithful slave in all its manifestations. McElya’s sensitive, surprising, and enlightening book will make readers wonder at how desperate white America was to believe that slaves were loyal and content. This book is painfully marvelous scholarship that should reach a broad readership. — David Blight, author of “Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory” reviewing “Clinging to Mammy The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America “
  • McElya’s powerful blend of cultural and political history illuminates the ways twentieth-century white Southerners tried to maintain their historic privilege while denying the violence of their past. Following the trajectory from Aunt Jemima to Ronald Reagan’s “welfare queen,” Clinging to Mammy traces white Americans’ efforts to define, coerce and reap the benefits of African American women’s labor while maintaining a firm grip on political power. — Jane Dailey, author of “Before Jim Crow: The Politics of Race in Postemancipation Virginia” reviewing “Clinging to Mammy The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America “
  • McElya shows vividly how “mammy” serves as a perfect archetype for analyzing cultural politics of race and gender, and how they changed. She gives us parlor theatrics, courtroom drama, legislative debate, and movement politics. This is a wonderfully expansive book. — Scott A Sandage, author of “Born Losers: A History of Failure in America” reviewing “Clinging to Mammy The Faithful Slave in Twentieth-Century America “
  • “If only every tacher was like her.”… “Always willing to meet with students, very understanding, makes material intersting. Overall, my favorite instructor in my 3 years at UA.”… “She is an excellent professor ,and willing to take time with her students to help them better understand what she is teaching.”…” Dr. McElya is one of the few teachers at the University who genuinely cares about her students’ progress in the class. Very honest and understanding person.” — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 at 12:08 AM

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