History Buzz: October 2008

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

October 27, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008:

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES: Halloween

  • John Demos: At Halloween: Every witch way to Salem – Boston Herald, 10-26-08
  • John Demos “Historian examines witch hunts past and present “: “Connecticut would have been the leader in witch hunting if it hadn’t been for Salem,” historian John Demos told a full house the Windsor Historical Society. – Windsor Journal, 10-23-08
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 25/10/1492 – Christopher Columbus and ship Santa Maria land in Dominican Republic
  • 25/10/1825 – Erie Canal opens, linking Great Lakes and Atlantic Ocean
  • 25/10/1881 – Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday and Clanton engage in “Shootout at OK Corral”
  • 25/10/1923 – Senate committee publishes 1st report on Teapot Dome scandal
  • 25/10/1940 – US Army Gen Benjamin Davis becomes 1st black general
  • 25/10/1951 – Peace talks aimed at ending Korean War resumed in Panmunjom
  • 25/10/1963 – Anti-Kennedy “WANTED FOR TREASON” pamphlets scattered in Dallas
  • 25/10/1983 – US invades Grenada, a country 1/2,000 its population (US Wins)
  • 26/10/1682 – William Penn accepts area around Delaware River from Duke of York
  • 26/10/1749 – Georgia Colony reverses itself and rules slavery is legal
  • 26/10/1774 – 1st Continental Congress adjourns in Philadelphia
  • 26/10/1774 – Minute Men organized in colonies
  • 26/10/1787 – “Federalist Papers” published, calls for ratification of Constitution
  • 26/10/1795 – Pinckney’s Treaty between Spain and US is signed, establishing southern boundary of US and giving Americans right to send goods down Mississippi
  • 26/10/1810 – US annexes western Florida
  • 26/10/1863 – Worldwide Red Cross organized in Geneva
  • 26/10/1881 – Gunfight at OK Corral, in Tombstone, Az
  • 26/10/1900 – After 4 years of work, 1st section of NY subway opens
  • 26/10/1916 – Margaret Sanger arrested for obscenity (advocating birth control)
  • 26/10/1919 – President Wilson’s veto of Prohibition Enforcement Bill is overridden
  • 26/10/1950 – Mother Teresa found her Mission of Charity in Calcutta, India
  • 26/10/1955 – Ngo Dinh Diem proclaims Vietnam a republic with himself as pres
  • 26/10/1962 – Nikita Khrushchev sends note to JFK offering to withdraw his missiles from Cuba if US closed its bases in Turkey offer is rejected
  • 26/10/1962 – JFK warns Russia US will not allow Soviet missiles to remain in Cuba
  • 26/10/1972 – Henry Kissinger declares “Peace is at hand” in Vietnam
  • 26/10/1973 – President Nixon released 1st White House tapes on Watergate scandal
  • 26/10/1994 – Jordan and Israel sign peace accord
  • 27/10/1864 – Siege of Petersburg, VA
  • 27/10/1871 – Boss Tweed (William Macy Tweed), Democratic leader of Tammany Hall, arrested after NY Times exposed his corruption
  • 27/10/1913 – Pres Wilson says US will never attack another country
  • 27/10/1920 – League of Nations moves headquarters in Geneva
  • 27/10/1954 – Pres Eisenhower offers aid to S Vietnam pres Ngo Dinh Diem
  • 27/10/1962 – Black Saturday – Russian nuclear missile crisis in Cuba
  • 28/10/1636 – Harvard University (Cambridge Mass) founded
  • 28/10/1776 – Battle of White Plains; Washington retreats to NJ
  • 28/10/1793 – Eli Whitney applies for a patent on cotton gin
  • 28/10/1858 – Macy’s Dept store opens in NYC
  • 28/10/1863 – Battle at Wauhatchie Georgia: 865 killed or injured
  • 28/10/1864 – Battle at Fair Oaks, Virginia, ends after 1554 casualties
  • 28/10/1867 – Maimonides College in Penns is 1st Jewish college in the US
  • 28/10/1886 – Statue of Liberty dedicated by Pres Grover Cleveland, it is celebrated by 1st confetti (ticker tape) parade in NYC
  • 28/10/1919 – Volstead Act passed by Congress, start prohibition over Wilson’s veto
  • 28/10/1936 – FDR rededicates Statue of Liberty on its 50th anniversary
  • 28/10/1948 – Flag of Israel is adopted
  • 28/10/1949 – Eugenie Anderson is 1st woman US ambassador (to Denmark)
  • 28/10/1962 – Khrushchev orders withdrawal of missiles from Cuba, ending crisis
  • 29/10/1929 – “Black Tuesday,” Stock Market crashes triggers “Great Depression”
  • 29/10/1956 – Israeli paratroopers drop into Sinai to open Straits of Tiran
  • 29/10/1966 – National Organization of Women founded
  • 29/10/1969 – Supreme Court orders end to all school desegregation “at once”
  • 29/10/1929 – “Black Tuesday,” Stock Market crashes triggers “Great Depression”
  • 29/10/1956 – Israeli paratroopers drop into Sinai to open Straits of Tiran
  • 29/10/1966 – National Organization of Women founded
  • 29/10/1969 – Supreme Court orders end to all school desegregation “at once”
  • 30/10/1270 – 8th and last crusade is launched
  • 30/10/1697 – Germany signs French/English/Spanish/Neth/Brandenburgs peace treaty ending 9 year War
  • 30/10/1864 – The city of Helena, Montana, is founded after miners discover gold
  • 30/10/1893 – Senate approves repealing Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890
  • 30/10/1896 – Martha Hughes Cannon of Utah becomes 1st female senator
  • 30/10/1905 – “October Manifesto” Russian Tsar Nicholas II grants civil liberties
  • 30/10/1914 – Allied offensive at Ypres (Belgium) begins
  • 30/10/1941 – FDR approves Lend-Lease aid to the USSR
  • 30/10/1954 – US Armed Forces end segregation of races
  • 31/10/0834 – 1st All Hallows Eve (Halloween) observed to honor the saints
  • 31/10/1517 – Luther posts 95 theses on Wittenberg church-Protestant Reformation
  • 31/10/1541 – Michelangelo Buonarroti’s paints “last judgement” in 16th Chapel
  • 31/10/1846 – Donner party, unable to cross the Donner Pass, construct a winter camp
  • 31/10/1918 – Spanish flu-virus kills 21,000 in US in 1 week
  • 31/10/1922 – Benito Mussolini (Il Duce) becomes premier of Italy
  • 31/10/1940 – Battle of Britain: Germany and Britain control of English Channel, ends
  • 31/10/1941 – Prior to US in WW II, Germany torpedoes US destroyer Reuben James
  • 31/10/1963 – Ed Sullivan witnesses Beatles and their fans at London Airport
  • 31/10/1968 – President Johnson orders a halt to all bombing of North Vietnam
  • 01/11/1512 – Michelangelo’s paintings on ceiling of Sistine Chapel, 1st exhibited
  • 01/11/1765 – Stamp Act goes into effect in British colonies
  • 01/11/1783 – Continental Army dissolved; George Washington’s “Farewell Address”
  • 01/11/1800 – 1st president to live in white house (John Adams)
  • 01/11/1861 – Gen George B McClellan made general in chief of Union armies
  • 01/11/1866 – 1st Civil Rights Bill passes
  • 01/11/1878 – Edward Scripps and John Sweeney found Penny Press (Cleveland Press)
  • 01/11/1917 – In WW I, the 1st US soldiers are killed in combat
  • 01/11/1954 – US Senate admonishes Joseph Mccarthy because of slander campaign
  • 01/11/1962 – Cuban missile crisis ends, JFK says USSR is dismantling missile bases
  • 01/11/1983 – Pres Reagan established Dr Martin Luther King Jr holiday
  • 02/11/1772 – Boston: anti-English Committee of Correspondence forms
  • 02/11/1811 – Battle of Tippecanoe: Gen Jackson vs indians
  • 02/11/1824 – Popular presidential vote 1st recorded; Jackson beats J Q Adams
  • 02/11/1852 – Franklin Pierce elected as president of US
  • 02/11/1917 – Balfour Declaration proclaims support for a Jewish state in Palestine
  • 02/11/1948 – Pres Truman re-elected in an upset over Republican Thomas Dewey
  • 02/11/1954 – JS Thurmond is 1st senator elected by write-in vote (SC)
  • 02/11/1962 – JFK announces Cuban missile bases were being dismantled
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • JAY WINIK on DAVID S. REYNOLDS: Young America’s Wild Side Waking Giant: America in the Age of JacksonNYT, 10-26-08
  • DAVID S. REYNOLDS: Waking Giant: America in the Age of Jackson, First Chapter – NYT, 10-26-08
  • John D. Gartner: Jonathan Yardley on ‘In Search of Bill Clinton’ Putting Bill Clinton on the couch IN SEARCH OF BILL CLINTON A Psychological Biography – WaPo, 10-23-08
  • Timothy W. Ryback: Michael Dirda on ‘Hitler’s Private Library’ The Führer loved his library, but what good did it do? HITLER’S PRIVATE LIBRARY The Books That Shaped His LifeWaPo, 10-26-08
  • Treasure Trove of Newsreels Rediscovered by Film Historian – Press Release, 10-21-08
  • Annette Gordon-Reed’s new book on the Hemingses called valuable but flawed – Eric Foner in the NYT Book Review, 10-3-08
  • Pierre Berton: Canadian historian Berton had his own secrets – Vancouver Sun, 10-13-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs & LETTERS:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Robert Caro “Former JFK, LBJ aide Nicholas Katzenbach remembers years in Washington”: “He is a central figure in so many of the pivotal episodes of American history of the 1960s,” says Robert Caro, who has interviewed Katzenbach for the fourth and final volume of his series of books on Lyndon Johnson. “And he has the ability, which not every participant has, to see the larger implications of their actions.” – Canadian Press, 10-24-08
  • Sean Wilentz “Former JFK, LBJ aide Nicholas Katzenbach remembers years in Washington”: “Nick has been a truly noble public servant,” says historian Sean Wilentz, who praises Katzenbach as a model for a time when government officials were “honest pursuers of justice, without ideological axes to grind.” – Canadian Press, 10-24-08
  • Alan Kraut says it’s time to get the immigrant story right – Francis X. Clines in the NYT, 10-11-08
  • David Fowler: Historian says Beatles were just capitalists, and not youth heroes – Guardian (UK), 10-9-08
HONORED / AWARDED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

  • John Demos “Historian examines witch hunts past and present “: “Connecticut would have been the leader in witch hunting if it hadn’t been for Salem,” historian John Demos told a full house the Windsor Historical Society. – Windsor Journal, 10-23-08
CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • October 30, 2008: Columbia University Historian to Lecture on Illegal Immigration – Mae Ngai, the Lung Family Professor of Asian American Studies and professor of history at Columbia University will give the talk, “Illegal Immigration to the United States: Origins and Consequences,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30 in the Wailes Lounge at the Elston Inn & Conference Center. – Sweet Briar College, 10-23-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • The Weather Channel’s original program: “When Weather Changed History”: Season 2 debuts October 5 with an episode dedicated to the Chicago Fire of 1871. Repeats of Season 1 are on Every Sunday at 9pmET with re-airings through out the week. – When Weather Changed History
  • Ken Burns: PBS to air his national parks series next year – AP, 7-13-08
  • PBS, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: LBJ, Part Two Monday, October 27 at 9pm on PBS — As this year’s political campaigns heat up, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE continues to showcase THE PRESIDENTS Mondays at 9pm on PBS (check local listings.)
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: City of Blood,” Sunday, October 26, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Extreme Marksmen,” Monday, October 27, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Halloween Tech,” Monday, October 27, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Primal Fear,” Monday, October 27, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Bloodlines: The Dracula Family Tree,” Monday, October 27, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 500 Years Later,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds: The Pagans,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Mayan Doomsday Prophecy,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Chocolate,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Snackfood Tech,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: More Snackfood Tech,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries: Amityville: Horror or Hoax? ,” Tuesday, October 28, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Special: An Alien History of Planet Earth,” Wednesday, October 29, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files: The Day after Roswell,” Wednesday, October 29, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest: Monster Spiders ,” Wednesday, October 29, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Star Wars: The Legacy Revealed,” Thursday, October 30, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Star Wars Tech,” Thursday, October 30, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds: The Real Dracula,” Thursday, October 30, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Movers: Strange Structures,” Thursday, October 30, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Castles & Dungeons,” Thursday, October 30, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Candy,” Thursday, October 30, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: City of Blood,” Thursday, October 30, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: 11 – Dracula’s Underground,” Thursday, October 30, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Exorcism: Driving Out the Devil,” Friday, October 31, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest: Vampire Beast,” Friday, October 31, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest: Vampires in America,” Friday, October 31, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Haunted History of Halloween,” Friday, October 31, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Halloween Tech,” Friday, October 31, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1789-1825,” Saturday, November 1, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1825-1849,” Saturday, November 1, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1865-1885,” Saturday, November 1, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1913-1945,” Saturday, November 1, @ 11pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Sarah Vowell: THE WORDY SHIPMATES, #8 — (2 weeks on list) – 11-2-08
  • Bob Woodward: THE WAR WITHIN #11 — (6 weeks on list) – 11-2-08
  • Andrew Bacevich: THE LIMITS OF POWER #13 — (10 weeks on list) – 11-2-08
  • James M. McPherson: TRIED BY WAR #15 — (2 weeks on list) – 11-2-08
  • Jerome R. Corsi: THE OBAMA NATION #26 – 11-2-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • H. W. Brands: Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, November 4, 2008
  • Carlo D’Este: Warlord: A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874-1945, November 11, 2008
  • Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, November 11, 2008
  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, October 27, 2008 at 2:54 AM

October 13, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

  • Campaign 2008 Highlights
  • Gil Troy “Stuck In the Muck Mudslinging Isn’t New. Here’s the Messy Truth”: “Everybody always assumes there was a golden age of presidential campaigning that occurred 20 years ago,” says Gil Troy, an American history scholar at McGill University. “Almost from the start, American politics had its two sides — it had its Sunday morning high church sermon side, and it had its Saturday night rough-and- tumble ugly side.”… Oh, “John Quincy Adams was accused of pimping for the czar,” Troy says. Really. The czar of Russia. The press backing Jackson labeled Adams “The Pimp.” – Washington Post, 10-13-08
  • David A. Hollinger: Palin Distorts Small-Town America – New West Politics, 10-12-08
  • David S. Tanenhaus: Barack, Bill, and MeThe Bill Ayers that Barack Obama and I worked with was no “domestic terrorist.” – Slate, 10-10-08
  • Julian Zelizer “Palin Abused Power in Trooper Case, Alaska Probe Says”: “It’s one more blow to a deeply troubled campaign,” said Julian Zelizer, a history and public affairs professor at Princeton University in New Jersey. “The report on Palin raises more questions about why McCain made this choice and how much he really cares about fighting corruption.” – Bloomberg, 10-11-08
  • Dewar MacLeod “A lesson for WPU students in making every vote count”: “Democracy is not something that happens only once every four years; democracy needs to happen every single day. While this year’s ongoing presidential election promises to bring millions of new voters, especially the young, I hope students will also explore and participate in the ongoing process of civic engagement. Our democracy is only as strong as citizens are willing to make it.” – NorthJersey.com, NJ, 10-11-08
  • Peter Kastor “If history is guide, path to White House is through Missouri”: “Missouri is in the middle of the country geographically but also the center of the country politically,” Washington University history professor Peter Kastor said. “It is a state where various regional political cultures all exist.” – AFP, 10-10-08
BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

  • Larry Schweikart “Is History Repeating Itself?”: A Professor of History at the University of Dayton says it may very well be. Prof. Larry Schweikart said as far as the economy goes, history does tend to repeat itself in 20-year cycles. However, Schweikart said, just as 20 years ago, well will probably see lower fuel and energy costs, which will mean lower food costs. – WHIOTV.com, 10-11-08
  • David Moss “Bernanke vows to learn from Great Depression”: “We’re incredibly lucky we have a Fed chairman at this moment who has looked so closely at the Great Depression,” said David Moss, a professor of economic history at Harvard Business School. “He has an appreciation for the complexities and reality of what was going on then, as much or more than any other scholar. He is not afraid to be aggressive and believes it is his role to try to stem the crisis; that is a huge advantage.” – San Fransico Chronicle, 10-11-08
  • Scott Nelson: Is This 1929 Or 1873? William And Mary Professor Compares Today’s Situation To A Previous Economic Panic – WRVA 1140, 10-9-08
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Curriculum to scale back Aussie history THE emphasis on teaching Australian history in recent years will be scaled down in the national curriculum, as its initial draft, to be released today, outlines a course that places the national story in the context of broader global events – The Australian, 10-13-08
  • Alan Kraut: Getting the Nation’s Story Straight The true tale of America involves far more than teeming masses yearning to be free — a story well told at the Ellis Island Immigration Museum in New York Harbor – NYT, 10-12-08
  • Shlomo Sand’s latest academic work has spent 19 weeks on Israel’s bestseller list – and that success has come to the history professor despite his book challenging Israel’s biggest taboo – Middle-East Online, 10-11-08
  • David McDonald: Growing emphasis on academics is helping athletes at UW-Madison – Wisconsin State Journal, 10-11-08
  • Simon Schama argues that Barack Obama’s emergence as presidential candidate represents a profound change in the American psyche – BBC, 10-9-08
  • Chinese historian slapped in the face for pro-Manchu views – http://www.danwei.org, 10-7-08
  • Andrew Roberts: The Anglosphere’s greatest modern mythologist, may be perfectly suited to sanitize the Bush presidency – R.J. Stove in the American Conservative, 9-22-08
  • Kyle Volk: History professor’s deal with burrito joint went against school policy – http://missoulian.com (10-2-08)
  • Howard Zinn taken to task for giving Rosenbergs a pass – New Criterion editorial, 10-3-08
  • Chandra Manning will not come to Princeton – Daily Princetonian, 10-1-08
  • Five held guilty of professor Papiya Ghosh’s murder – Hindustan Times, 9-18-08
REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • John Demos: Crucibles THE ENEMY WITHIN 2,000 Years of Witch-Hunting in the Western WorldNYT, 10-12-08
  • Barton Gellman: The Shadow President ANGLER The Cheney Vice PresidencyNYT, 10-12-08
  • Charles D. Ellis: Rich Bank, Poor Bank THE PARTNERSHIP The Making of Goldman SachsNYT, 10-12-08
  • Mark Mazower: HISTORY | WORLD WAR II Axis of Incompetence Lessons from the Nazis on how not to run an empire HITLER’S EMPIRE How the Nazis Ruled Europe - WaPo, 10-12-08
  • Hilda Gadea: Rebel Wife MY LIFE WITH CHE The Making of a Revolutionary WaPo, 10-12-08
  • New in Paperback History and Chutzpah – WaPo, 10-12-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

FEATURES:

FEATURES:

QUOTED:

QUOTED:

AWARDED – APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

  • Washington State University provost Steven Hoch will return — but as a professor – Seattle Times, 10-10-08
  • William Cook: Recently earned a grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities that will fund a seminar he will teach in Siena, Italy in the summer of 2009. – Lamron, NY, 10-9-08
  • FIU History professor Darden Asbury Pyron was this year’s recipient of the Outstanding Faculty Award – Miami Herald, 10-5-08
  • Stephanie E. Smallwood: UW professor wins Frederick Douglass Book Prize University of Washington professor Stephanie E. Smallwood has won a prestigious prize for her groundbreaking history of the trans-Atlantic slave trade – Seattle Times, 10-1-08
  • Julian Bond: University of Virginia History Professor, NAACP Leader Julian Bond Is Named Living Legend. Bond was one of seven honored at the Library of Congress.- Media Newswire, 9-26-08
  • Bobby H. Johnson: Oral history professor receives Lifetime Achievement Award – Pine Log, Stephen F. Austin University
  • Mark Carey: W&L History Professor Receives NSF Grant to Study Natural Disasters and Climate Change – Rock Bridge Weekly
SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • Jackson Center Hosts Civil Rights Symposium – Jamestown Post Journal, NY, 10-12-08
  • October 18, 2008: History buffs and students alike are encouraged to attend “The Legacy of Stones River: Pathways to Freedom” in Murfreesboro, an Oct. 18 symposium focusing on the demise of slavery during the Civil War and feature distinguished speakers. – Murfreesboro Post, TN, 9-15-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • The Weather Channel’s original program: “When Weather Changed History”: Season 2 debuts October 5 with an episode dedicated to the Chicago Fire of 1871. Repeats of Season 1 are on Every Sunday at 9pmET with re-airings through out the week. – When Weather Changed History
  • Ken Burns: PBS to air his national parks series next year – AP, 7-13-08
  • PBS, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: NIXON, Monday, October 13 at 9 pm on PBS — As this year’s political campaigns heat up, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE continues to showcase THE PRESIDENTS Mondays at 9pm on PBS (check local listings.)
  • PBS, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: LBJ Part One, Monday, October 20 on PBS — As this year’s political campaigns heat up, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE continues to showcase THE PRESIDENTS Mondays at 9pm on PBS (check local listings.)
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest,” Marathon Monday, October 13, @ 2-6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest: Ghosts,” Monday, October 13, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries: 12 – Machines of the Gods ,” Monday, October 13, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hippies,” Tuesday, October 14, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “In the World Of…Jack the Ripper,” Tuesday, October 14, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Book of Nostradamus,” Wednesday, October 15, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Doomsday 2012: The End of Days,” Wednesday, October 15, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Garden of Eden,” Wednesday, October 15, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Jurassic Fight Club: Raptor vs. T-Rex,” Wednesday, October 15, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files: The Day after Roswell,” Wednesday, October 15, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lincoln,” Thursday, October 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Garden of Eden,” Thursday, October 16, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Mob Underground,” Thursday, October 16, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: A-Bomb Underground,” Thursday, October 16, @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe: Beyond the Big Bang,” Friday, October 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Big Bang,” Friday, October 17, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Band Of Brothers,” Marathon, Saturday, October 18, @ 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Black Blizzard,” Saturday, October 18, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “A Global Warning?,” Saturday, October 18, @ 10pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Bob Woodward: THE WAR WITHIN #4 — (3 weeks on list) – 10-12-08
  • Andrew Bacevich: THE LIMITS OF POWER #7 — (7 weeks on list) – 10-12-08
  • Barton Gellman: ANGLER #14 — (2 weeks on list) – 10-12-08
  • David Freddoso: THE CASE AGAINST BARACK OBAMA #18 10-12-08
  • Jerome R. Corsi: THE OBAMA NATION #26 — (8 weeks on list) – 10-12-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • David Hackett Fischer: Champlain’s Dream, October 14, 2008
  • Joe Hilley: Sarah Palin: A New Kind of Leader, October 16, 2008
  • Harold Holzer: Lincoln: President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Winter of Secession, 1860-1861, October 21, 2008
  • Laurence Bergreen: Marco Polo: From Venice to Xanadu, October 21, 2008
  • H. W. Brands: Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, November 4, 2008
  • Carlo D’Este: Warlord: A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874-1945, November 11, 2008
  • Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, November 11, 2008
  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, October 13, 2008 at 1:48 AM

September 22 & 29, 2008

CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 30/09/1199 – Rambam (Maimonides) authorizes Samuel Ibn Tibbon to translate Guide of Perplexed from Arabic into Hebrew
  • 30/09/1452 – 1st book published, Johann Guttenberg’s Bible
  • 30/09/1777 – Congress, flees to York Pa, as British forces advance
  • 30/09/1787 – 1st US voyage around the world – Columbia leaves Boston
  • 30/09/1805 – Napoleons army draws into the Rhine
  • 30/09/1864 – Black Soldiers given Medal of Honor
  • 30/09/1946 – 22 Nazi leaders found guilty of war crimes at Nuremberg
  • 30/09/1953 – Earl Warren appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
  • 30/09/1962 – James Meredith registers for classes at University of Mississippi; JFK routes 3,000 federal troops to Mississippi
  • 01/10/1791 – 1st session of new French legislative assembly
  • 01/10/1768 – English troops under general Gauge lands in Boston
  • 01/10/1867 – Karl Marx’ “Das Kapital,” published
  • 01/10/1948 – Calif Supreme Court voids state statue banning interracial marriages
  • 01/10/1958 – Inauguration of NASA
  • 02/10/1187 – Sultan Saladin captures Jerusalem from Crusaders
  • 02/10/1535 – Jacques Cartier discovers Mount Royal (Montreal)
  • 02/10/1833 – NY Anti-Slavery Society organized
  • 02/10/1861 – Former VP John C Breckinridge flees Kentucky
  • 02/10/1870 – Italy annexes Rome and Papal States; Rome made Italian capital
  • 02/10/1967 – Thurgood Marshall sworn in as 1st black Supreme Court Justice
  • 03/10/1789 – Washington proclaims 1st national Thanksgiving Day on Nov 26
  • 03/10/1863 – Lincoln designates last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving Day
  • 03/10/1922 – Rebecca Felton of Georgia becomes 1st woman in Senate
  • 03/10/1941 – Nazi’s blow up 6 synagoges in Paris
  • 03/10/1942 – FDR forms Office of Economic Stabilization
  • 03/10/1974 – Watergate trial begins
  • 03/10/1990 – East Germany and West Germany merge to become Germany
  • 04/10/1636 – In Massachusetts the Plymouth Colony’s 1st law drafted
  • 04/10/1648 – Peter Stuyvesant establishes Americas 1st volunteer firemen
  • 04/10/1777 – Gen George Washington’s troops attacked British at Germantown Pa
  • 04/10/1854 – Abraham Lincoln made his 1st political speech at Illinois State Fair
  • 04/10/1864 – National black convention meets (Syracuse NY)
  • 04/10/1864 – New Orleans Tribune, 1st black daily newspaper, forms
  • 04/10/1880 – University of California founded in Los Angeles
  • 05/10/1582 – Gregorian calendar introduced in Italy, other Catholic countries
  • 05/10/1796 – Spain declares war on England
  • 05/10/1813 – Battle of Thames in Canada; Americans defeat British
  • 05/10/1862 – Federal fleet occupies Galveston, Texas
  • 05/10/1947 – 1st Presidential address televised from White House-HS Truman
  • 05/10/1953 – Earl Warren sworn in as 14th chief justice of US
  • 05/10/1970 – Quebec separatists kidnap British trade commissioner James Cross
  • 06/10/1683 – 13 Mennonite families from Germany found Germantown Pa (Phila)
  • 06/10/1781 – Americans and French begin siege of Cornwallis at Yorktown; last battle of Revolutionary War
  • 06/10/1944 – Canadians free Austria
  • 06/10/1945 – Gen Eisenhower welcomed in Hague (on Hitler’s train)
  • 06/10/1949 – Pres Truman signs Mutual Defense Assistance Act (for NATO)
  • 06/10/1961 – JFK advises Americans to build fallout shelters
  • 06/10/1973 – Yom Kippur War begins as Syria and Egypt attack Israel
  • 06/10/1976 – Pres Ford says there is “no Soviet domination in Eastern Europe”
  • 06/10/1996 – Bob Dole and Pres Bill Clinton meet in their 1st debate
  • 07/10/1579 – English royal marriage of queen Elizabeth I to duke of Anjou
  • 07/10/1690 – English attack Quebec under Louis de Buade
  • 07/10/1763 – George III of Great Britain issues Proclamation of 1763, closing lands in North America north and west of Alleghenies to white settlement
  • 07/10/1765 – Stamp Act Congress convenes in NY
  • 07/10/1777 – Americans beat Brits in 2nd Battle of Saratoga and Battle of Bemis Hts
  • 07/10/1780 – British defeated by American militia near Kings Mountain, SC
  • 07/10/1868 – Cornell University (Ithaca NY) open
  • 07/10/1886 – Spain abolishes slavery in Cuba
  • 07/10/1944 – Uprising at Birkenau concentration camp, Uprising at Auschwitz, Jews burn down crematoriums
  • 07/10/1960 – 2nd JFK and Richard Nixon debate
  • 07/10/1963 – JFK signs ratification for nuclear test ban treaty
  • 07/10/1991 – Law Professor Anita Hill accuses Supreme nominee Clarence Thomas of making sexually inappropriate comments to her
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

REVIEWED AND FIRST CHAPTERS:

OP-EDs:

OP-EDs & LETTERS:

  • Andrew Roberts: Discovered extraordinary secret documents recording every Cabinet conversation of Churchill – Telegraph, UK, 9-19-08
BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILED:

PROFILED:

INTERVIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

  • Annette Gordon-Reed: ‘Monticello’ Tells Untold Story Of Sally Hemings – NPR, 9-22-08
FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • Conservatives recruiting historians on campus to establish academic beachheads for their ideas – NYT, 9-21-08
QUOTED:

QUOTED:

  • Richard Norton Smith, a historian at George Mason University, said that for much of American history before Roosevelt’s election in 1932, presidents were not expected to respond to economic troubles. But after banks collapsed during the devastating stock market crash in September 1929, the United States entered the Great Depression and a worldwide economic downturn ensued. When Roosevelt was elected, he enacted the New Deal, a series of government reforms and programs aimed at improving the economy. “It redefined the relationship of most citizens to their government, he created a safety net. Before that banks and Wall Street were unregulated,” Smith said. On the other end of the government involvement scale, Republican President Ronald Reagan in 1980 was part of a movement to decrease the influence of the federal government in people’s lives. Reagan, who was in office until 1988, focused on cutting taxes and reducing Washington D.C.’s regulation of business. “The Reagan revolution was an effort to empower state (governments) to attack the same social ills that Washington tried to take care of,” Smith said. – PBS Newshour, 9-23-08
  • David Sicilia: Too Bad Greenspan Wasn’t So Blunt in Office – University of Maryland website, 9-15-08
ANNOUNCEMENTS:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

HONORED / AWARDED / APPOINTED:

HONORED, AWARDED, APPOINTED:

EXHIBITS / WEBSITES:

EXHIBITS / WEBSITES:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

CALENDAR:

CALENDAR:

  • October 18, 2008: History buffs and students alike are encouraged to attend “The Legacy of Stones River: Pathways to Freedom” in Murfreesboro, an Oct. 18 symposium focusing on the demise of slavery during the Civil War and feature distinguished speakers. – Murfreesboro Post, TN, 9-15-08
ON TV:

    ON TV: History Listings This Week

  • The Weather Channel’s original program: “When Weather Changed History”: Season 2 debuts October 5 with an episode dedicated to the Chicago Fire of 1871. Repeats of Season 1 are on Every Sunday at 9pmET with re-airings through out the week. – When Weather Changed History
  • Ken Burns: PBS to air his national parks series next year – AP, 7-13-08
  • History Channel: “How the Earth Was Made,” Monday, September 29, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe: Life and Death of a Star,” Monday, September 29, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers,” Monday, September 29, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Dangerous Territory,” Tuesday, September 30, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tougher In Alaska,” Marathon Tuesday, September 30, @ 4-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries: Ships,” Tuesday, September 30, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power,” Wednesday, October 1, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Weird U.S.: Weird Underworld,” Wednesday, October 1, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest: Lake Monsters of the North,” Wednesday, October 1, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Jurassic Fight Club: Ice Age Monsters,” Wednesday, October 1, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Real Tomb Hunters: Snakes, Curses, and Booby Traps,” Thursday, October 2, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: 10 – Beneath Vesuvius,” Thursday, October 2, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: New York: Secret Societies,” Thursday, October 2, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Underground Apocalypse,” Thursday, October 2, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secret Access: Air Force One,” Thursday, October 2, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Street Gangs: A Secret History: Street Gangs: A Secret History,” Friday, October 3, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Gangland: 06 – Kings of New York,” Friday, October 3, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Jurassic Fight Club,” Marathon, Saturday, October 4, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Super City: New York,” Saturday, October 4, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History: Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History,” Saturday, October 4, @ 8pm ET/PT
SELLING BIG (NYT):

SELLING BIG (NYT):

  • Bob Woodward: THE WAR WITHIN #2 — (2 weeks on list) – 10-5-08
  • Andrew Bacevich: THE LIMITS OF POWER #3 — (6 weeks on list) – 10-5-08
  • David Freddoso: THE CASE AGAINST BARACK OBAMA #12 — (7 weeks on list) – 10-5-08
  • Jerome R. Corsi: THE OBAMA NATION #14 — (8 weeks on list) – 10-5-08
  • Thomas Frank: THE WRECKING CREW #32 – 10-5-08
FUTURE RELEASES:

FUTURE RELEASES:

  • Tom Chaffin: The H. L. Hunley: The Secret Hope of the Confederacy, September 30, 2008
  • James M. McPherson: Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander-in-Chief, October 7, 2008
  • Jeff Belanger: Who’s Haunting the White House?: The President’s Mansion and the Ghosts Who Live There, October 7, 2008
  • David Hackett Fischer: Champlain’s Dream, October 14, 2008
  • Joe Hilley: Sarah Palin: A New Kind of Leader, October 16, 2008
  • Harold Holzer: Lincoln: President-Elect: Abraham Lincoln and the Winter of Secession, 1860-1861, October 21, 2008
  • Laurence Bergreen: Marco Polo: From Venice to Xanadu, October 21, 2008
  • H. W. Brands: Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, November 4, 2008
  • Carlo D’Este: Warlord: A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874-1945, November 11, 2008
  • Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, November 11, 2008
  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

  • William Woodruff: Economic historian who received a wider audience for his memoirs of an impoverished childhood in Blackburn – Telegraph (UK), 9-24-08
  • John Taylor, 87, Specialist on Military at Archives, Is Dead – NYT, 9-23-08
  • Georgi Kitov: Excavated Thrace, Dies at 65 – NYT, 9-17-08

Posted on Thursday, October 2, 2008 at 1:06 AM

Top Young Historians: 94 – Eugenia Y. Lean

Top Young Historians

Eugenia Y. Lean, 40

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, July 2002-present.
Area of Research: Late imperial and modern Chinese history with a particular focus on the history of emotions and gender, law and media, as well as consumer culture, science, and urban society, issues of historiography and critical theory in the study of East Asia
Education: Ph.D., Chinese History, University of California, Los Angeles, December 2001.
Major Publications: Lean is the author of Public Passions: the Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China, (University of California Press, April 2007), which is a study of how a high-profile crime of female passion helped give rise to the moral and political authority of “public sympathy” in Republican-era China. The book was awarded the American Historical Association’s 2007 John K. Fairbank prize for an outstanding book in modern East Asian history. Eugenia  Lean JPG She is currently working on Global Soap, Local Desires: Transnational Circuits of Science and Commerce in Modern China, which is a study of the global circuits of science and commerce that introduced modern soap to China.
Lean is the author of scholarly journal articles and book chapters in both English and Chinese including:
“Daode xunjie yu meiti xiaoying: Shi Jianqiao’an yu sanshi niandai Zhongguo dushi dazhong wenhua” [Moral Exhortation and Media Sensation: the Case of Shi Jianqiao and Urban Mass Culture in 1930s China]. In Wenhua qimeng yu zhishi shengchan [Cultural Enlightenment and Knowledge Production]. Ed. Chia-ling Mei, 213-232. Taipei: Maitian Publishing, 2006; “Shenpan zhong de ganqing yinsu: ji 1935-36 nian xiju xing de shenpan – Shi Jianqiao qi’an” [Emotions on Trial: Courtroom Drama and Urban Spectacle in the 1935-36 Case of Shi Jianqiao].” Zhongguo Xueshu (China Scholarship) 6.2 (2005): 206-231; “Liu Jinggui Qingsha’an: sanshi niandai Beiping de dazhong wenhua yu meiti chaozuo” [Love with a Vengeance: Media Sensation in Republican Era Beiping]. Beijing: Urban Culture and Historical Memory. Eds. Chen Pingyuan and David Wang, 269-84. Beijing: Beijing University Press, 2005; “The Making of a Public: Emotions and Media Sensation in 1930s China.” Twentieth Century China 29.2 (April 2004): 39-61; Gongde huo sichou? Yijiu sanshi niandai Zhongguo “qing” de guozu zhengzhi [Public Virtue or Private Revenge? Female Qing and the Chinese Nation]. Public and Private: Individual and Collective Bodies in Modern Chinese History. Eds. Huang Kewu and Chang Che-chia, 223-53. Taibei: Institute of Modern History, 2000; “Reflections on Theory, Gender and the Psyche in the Study of Chinese History.” Funü lishi yanjiu fukan [Research on Women in Modern Chinese History] 6 (August 1998): 141-173; “The Modern Elixir: Medicine as a Consumer Item in the Early Twentieth-Century Press.” UCLA Historical Journal 15 (1995): 65-92.
Awards: Lean is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
2007 John K. Fairbank Book Prize (awarded by the American Historical Association) for Public Passions: the Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, April 2007).
ACLS/Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship for Junior Faculty, 2004-2005;
An Wang Postdoctoral Fellowship, Fairbank Center for East Asian Research, Harvard University, 2004-2005;
School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study, Mellow Fellowship in East Asian Studies, Fall 2004 (Declined);
University of California, Berkeley’s Center for Chinese Studies Post-doctoral Fellowship, 2004-2005 (Alternate);
UCLA History Department Dissertation Writing Fellowship, 2000-2001;
Paula Stone Dissertation Fellowship (Center for Study ofWomen, UCLA), 2000-2001;
Herma and Celia Wise Fellowship (UCLA), 2000-2001;
ICFOG Pre-Dissertation Fellowship (UCLA), 1999-2000;
American Council for Learned Societies-Committee on Scholarly Communication with China (ACLS-CSCC), Dissertation Research Grant, 2/1999-12/1999;
Fulbright IIE, Dissertation Research Grant, 9/1998-2/1999;
Eugene Cota-Robles Four-year Fellowship, University of California, Office of the President, 1992-1994, 1995-1997.
Additional Info:
Formerly Assistant Professor, History Department, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, July 2001-June 2002.

Personal Anecdote

My first book, Public Passions, historicizes the political uses of emotions. It explores a 1935-36 cause célèbre, the trial of Shi Jianqiao (a woman who assassinated a warlord to avenge her father’s death), to show how “public sympathy” (tongqing) for the female assassin gained unprecedented moral and political authority in early twentieth century China. The affair generated sensation and stirred passions precisely because it effectively mediated much larger social anxieties, including debate over proper gender norms, questions of legal reform versus vigilante justice, and concerns with attempts by the Nationalist (Guomindang) government to expand its authoritarian rule. In its ability to skewer politicians, cast doubt on official narratives, and enable serious exploration of social and gender issues, the sentiment-based public that arose in the case came, I argue, to exhibit qualities that much of the critical theory on political participation conventionally associates with “rational” publics.

In the course of writing this history of emotions, I found myself reflecting upon my own passions. There is no doubt that in writing Public Passions, I was informed by a range of sentiments. I had an unmistakable admiration for the “heroine” at the center of story; I was driven by a desire to recoup her “agency,” as well as the agency of China itself, too often depicted in historiography as a passive agent in the face of modernization wrought by the West. My penchant for cultural history was pivotal, and to be sure, I am easily smitten by romantic, even exotic, stories and narratives that shape the lives of humans in the past. Yet, a large part of being a historian lies precisely in reining in such passions so as to engage in rigorous analysis. As historians, we are taught to establish a critical distance with our object of study by faithfully interpreting our texts and materials, by carefully considering context, and by inquiring into the conditions that shaped historical agency and events in the past. Dispassionate analysis is the goal.

Thus, by definition, my passionate commitment to unraveling and probing this event in the Chinese past had now become a methodological challenge of the present. Indeed, if you think about the relationship between passions and history writing, things become quite complicated. The tension between subjective passions and critical objectivity was implicitly at the heart of some of the thorny theoretical and methodological debates that consumed academia in the 1990s during my graduate student days. Post-structuralism levied a serious critique of objectivity and empiricism. For many historians, this critique led to a reconsideration of some of the fundamentals of our discipline, which rest on the assumption that we are able to retrieve through empirical fact the objective truth regarding the past. Many were forced to think seriously about how our subjectivity and passions come into play when writing history. Questions swirled about how best to handle the need for dispassionate analysis in historical inquiry while recognizing our subjective perspectives as historically-situated subjects.

I do not profess that the writing of a history of passions has resolved this vexing issue for me. Yet, what has been made clear to me is that passions inevitably inform the endeavor of history writing and thus, matter in writing history. Passionate curiosities, for example, can help animate stories of yesteryear. Emotional investment in one’s historical topic can sustain what is a long, often grueling, process in writing and researching about that past. Thus, while unbridled passions certainly risk obfuscating the “objectivity” we historians should constantly strive to achieve, I want to take seriously something that I suggest in my book, namely, that passions are not necessarily mutually exclusive from critical inquiry, and under certain conditions, might even enable it. In other words, historians should add to their disciplinary tool kit the ability to acknowledge their passions and interests, and reflect seriously on how they shape our ways of knowing events of an earlier age. Only by doing so are we better equipped to take a step back, when necessary, and create the needed critical distance crucial for good history writing, all without sacrificing the affective element of the endeavor that often makes it all possible and indeed, worthwhile.

Quotes

By Eugenia Lean

  • What the study of the Shi Jianqiao affair suggests is that the very qualities of commercialism, sensation, and sentimentalism that Lin Yutang and others bemoan as evidence of political apathy were, in fact, prime conditions Public Passions JPG for the making of a critical public. It was precisely the sensationalism in Shi Jianqiao’s case that enabled accounts of her affair to fly undetected under the radar of state censorship, and thus provide a forum for the public airing of pressing social and political issues. Not subjected to the kind of control exercised over conventional venues of “serious” journalism, serialized fiction based on the case allowed the reading public to explore radically new gender norms during a period when calls for constraints on female morality were increasingly strident among Nationalist ideologues. Dramas inspired by the killing were also not strictly policed. By celebrating Shi Jianqiao as the female knight-errant antihero and a superior bearer of national justice, theatrical productions could articulate alternative forms of public justice that lay outside the official court system. [p. 75]. — Eugenia Lean in “Public Passions: the Trial of Shi Jianqiao and the Rise of Popular Sympathy in Republican China”
  • About Eugenia Lean

  • “What [Lean] finds is political debate but conducted in very different terms from that suggested by Jürgen Habermas and with very different implications. This is the world of the mass media; of politics as scandal, sensation, and entertainment; of popular political participation that is active indeed but focused around emotional involvement in stories told by the popular press rather than rational debate among bourgeois men. Lean makes us look again at the new, and conflicting, ways in which Chinese in the twentieth century were invited to participate in politics.” – Henrietta Harrison, author of “The Man Awakened from Dreams: One Man’s Life in a North China Village 1857-1942″
  • “This book is at the forefront of the next generation of scholarship on early-twentieth-century China. Lean makes a number of important claims about sentiment and modernity, puts forward broader claims that go beyond China studies, and poses stark questions about the place of ‘rationality’ in modernity that will compel others to defer to her study for many years to come.” – John Fitzgerald, author of “Awakening China: Politics, Culture, and Class in the Nationalist Revolution”
  • “This ingeniously crafted book provides intriguing ways of linking the past to the present, weaving debates that stretch as far back as the Qin with questions of contemporary Chinese culture and politics. Through exhaustive examinations of media, political, and judicial records, the author vividly shows how the debate on emotions that Shi’s case engendered was a manifestation of a ‘modern public’ in China.” – Ruth Rogaski, author of “Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China”
  • “It is increasingly clear both that culture influences the perception and representation of emotions and that emotions play a great role in human behavior and in historical events. This book shows how dealing intelligently with passions can be extremely useful in writing history.” – Paolo Santangelo, author of “Sentimental Education in Chinese History”
  • “This fine study offers a new and promising direction for our thoughts on the forces that have shaped not only Republican and Communist China, but also Western Europe and the United States.” – Susan Glosser, author of “Chinese Visions of Family and State, 1915-1953″
  • “[A]s a corrective to an overproduction of scholarly efforts to apply Jürgen Habermas’s public sphere ideals to republican China – this book provides a welcome shift of focus in understanding the murky realm of the public.” – Bryna Goodman, author of “Native Place, City and Nation: Regional Networks and Identities in Shanghai, 1853-1937″
  • Posted on Monday, October 20, 2008 at 2:33 AM

    %d bloggers like this: