History Buzz: November 2008

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University. Her blog is History Musings

November 2008 Roundup

HISTORY BUZZ:

US POLITICS:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES: 45TH ANNIVERSARY KENNEDY ASSASSINATION:

  • Michael Smith “Can Obama eclipse Kennedy legacy? The anniversary of JFK assassination takes on fresh meaning as new era dawns”: “This year is different, and seemingly for good,” says Purdue University history professor Michael Smith. “America may have a truer successor to the Kennedy legacy, meaning that maybe we can once and for all give up some of our national obsession with who else besides Lee Harvey Oswald might have murdered president Kennedy and focus instead on the best, not the worst, of the early 1960s.” “Our generation and our parents’ generation remember that day so well because of the shock of total news coverage for four days in a row,” he said. “We are, largely, the audience and market still reading and watching and listening for the echoes of that day, a strange nostalgia.” – Toronto Star, 11-22-08
  • Douglas Brinkley: “Can Obama eclipse Kennedy legacy? The anniversary of JFK assassination takes on fresh meaning as new era dawns”: “The Kennedys are in the air,” says author and historian Douglas Brinkley. “Their mystique is still with us.” “It remains the great American murder mystery,” says Brinkley, whose forthcoming book “The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and The Crusade For America,” focuses on another American hero. “Nobody really knows what really happened beyond Lee Harvey Oswald. “A lot of history we can now shut down. We even know who Deep Throat is. “But this remains the great whodunit.”
  • Michael G. Smith: “On 45th Anniversary of JFK Assassination, Lingering Conspiracies Tarnish History, Professor Says”: “Historians have pretty much ignored the assassination as a historical event, and they need to weigh in against the excesses of conspiracy theory as false history,” says Michael G. Smith, an associate professor of history who will teach a spring semester course on the Kennedy assassination. “We need to begin to respect the dead rather than distort their memory.”
    “It might take a new generation of scholars, those born after the ‘Baby Boom,’ who did not live through the event and who do not have a personal or political stake in President Kennedy’s loss, to come to grips with his assassination. We need to mark it as a simple crime, a murder solved and closed, as well as understand it as a complex event that has been manipulated and misread.” “There are more than a thousand major books and articles devoted to the Kennedy assassination, but hardly any of them are by history professors,” Smith says. “High school and college history textbooks, for many years, entertained some of the leading conspiracy theories, and still flirt with them today, oddly enough. My profession has forfeited its responsibility, but this is an opportunity to change that.” – Newswire Ascribe, 11-19-08
BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES:

  • U.S. Census Bureau issues Facts for Features in observance of Black (African-American) History Month: February 2009 To commemorate and celebrate the contributions to our nation made by people of African descent, American historian Carter G. Woodson established Black History Week. The first celebration occurred on Feb. 12, 1926. For many years, the second week of February was set aside for this celebration to coincide with the birthdays of abolitionist/editor Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, as part of the nation’s bicentennial, the week was expanded into Black History Month. Each year, U. S. presidents proclaim February as National African-American History Month. – IBI Times, 12-2-08
  • Frank de la Teja: A different take on the first Thanksgiving: Many Texans, however, prefer to claim that El Paso held the first Thanksgiving 23 years earlier. That’s when Spanish conquistador Juan de Oñate arrived with about 600 people at El Paso del Norte after a harrowing trek across the northern Mexican desert and a successful crossing of the Rio Grande. – Dallas News, 11-22-08
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 04/12/1619 – America’s 1st Thanksgiving Day (Va)
  • 04/12/1816 – James Monroe (VA), elected 5th pres, defeating Federalist Rufus King
  • 04/12/1833 – American Anti-Slavery Society formed by Arthur Tappan in Phila
  • 04/12/1836 – Whig party holds its 1st national convention, Harrisburg, Pa
  • 04/12/1844 – James K Polk elected 11th president of US
  • 04/12/1851 – Pres Louis Napolean Boaparte forces crush a coup d’etat in France
  • 04/12/1918 – Pres Wilson sails for Versailles Peace Conference in France, 1st chief executive to travel outside US while in office
  • 04/12/1943 – -Dec 6] 2nd conference of Cairo: FDR, Churchill and Turkish pres Inonu
  • 04/12/1981 – Pres Reagan allows CIA to engage in domestic counter-intelligence, Executive Order on Intelligence (No 12333)
  • 04/12/1985 – Pres Reagan appoints Vice Adm John Poindexter as security adviser
  • 05/12/1349 – 500 Jews of Nuremberg massacre during Black Death riots
  • 05/12/1792 – George Washington re-elected US pres
  • 05/12/1804 – Thomas Jefferson re-elected US pres/George Clinton vice-pres
  • 05/12/1831 – Former Pres John Q Adams takes his seat as member of House of Reps
  • 05/12/1832 – Andrew Jackson re-elected president of US
  • 05/12/1837 – Uprising under William Lyon Mackenzie in Canada
  • 05/12/1955 – Historic bus boycott begins in Montgomery Alabama by Rosa Parks
  • 06/12/1820 – US president James Monroe re-elected
  • 06/12/1849 – Harriet Tubman escapes from slavery in Maryland
  • 06/12/1862 – Pres Lincoln orders hanging of 39 Santee Sioux indians
  • 06/12/1865 – 13th Amendment is ratified, abolishing slavery
  • 06/12/1876 – US Electorial College picks Rep Hayes as pres (although Tilden won)
  • 06/12/1877 – Washington Post publishes 1st edition
  • 06/12/1904 – Theodore Roosevelt confirms Monroe-doctrine (Roosevelt Corollary)
  • 06/12/1923 – 1st presidential address broadcast on radio (Pres Calvin Coolidge)
  • 06/12/1973 – Gerald Ford sworn-in as 1st unelected VP, succeeds Spiro T Agnew
  • 07/12/1808 – James Madison elected US pres/George Clinton vice-pres
  • 07/12/1836 – Martin Van Buren elected 8th president
  • 07/12/1917 – US becomes 13th country to declare war on Austria during World War I
  • 07/12/1941 – Japanese attack Pearl Harbor (a date that will live in infamy)
  • 07/12/1987 – Gorbachev arrives in US for a summit meeting
  • 07/12/1988 – Mikhail Gorbachev cheered by Wall St crowds upon arrival in NYC, Gorbachev announces 10% unilateral Soviet troop reductions at UN
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Conrad Bladey: Historian proposes toast for Linthicum: J. Charles Linthicum’s family provided the name of the Anne Arundel County community, and he did his hometown proud, serving in Congress from 1911 until his death in 1932. The Democrat is best remembered for his role in the adoption of “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the national anthem. But he made a possibly more significant contribution to American history, according to a local historian: paving the way for the repeal of Prohibition. – – AP, 11-29-08
  • In American Heritage Magazine North and South Clash Again: James M. McPherson, a history professor at Princeton and author of “Tried by War: Abraham Lincoln as Commander in Chief,” said that many saw the Confederate flag as an incendiary symbol of slavery and that he would have protested the ad had he been aware of it before publication.
    Eric Foner, a Columbia University professor and fellow essayist in the Lincoln issue, said he thought that the ad was more incongruous than illicit. “The Confederate flag is insulting to a great number of Americans, not just African-Americans, but it is legal,” he said. – NYT, 11-30-08
  • Bernard Lugan: French historian, threatens to walk away from Rwandan court where he’s an expert witness – http://allafrica.com, 11-27-08
  • Middle-East Scholars Hear of Academic Repression in Iraq and Iran – Chronicle of Higher Ed, 11-24-08
  • History Employment — Public and Private – Inside Higher Ed, 11-21-08
  • Conrad Black: Seeking clemency from President Bush – CBC News, 11-20-08
  • Richard L. McCormick: Rutgers’ McCormick on the hot seat – Ralph Luker at HNN blog, Cliopatria, 11-20-08
  • Joel Beinin creates a skirmish over academic freedom – Willamette Week, 11-19-08
  • Muhammad Sven Kalisch: Professor Hired for Outreach to Muslims Delivers a Jolt – WSJ, 11-15-08
  • Jane Kamensky and Jill Lepore: Historians turn to writing a novel Boston Globe, 11-16-08
QUOTES:

QUOTES:

  • Phillip Kay “Historian says Romans faced credit crunch”: “The essential similarity between what happened 21 centuries ago and what is happening in today’s U.K. economy is that a massive increase in monetary liquidity culminated with problems in another country causing a credit crisis at home.” – UPI, 11-28-08
  • Jan Shipps: Renowned historian speaks about LDS Church PR problems ABC4 (SLC, Utah), 11-18-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

REVIEWS:

REVIEWS:

  • Gordon M. Goldstein: ‘The Doves Were Right': LESSONS IN DISASTER McGeorge Bundy and the Path to War in Vietnam NYT, 11-30-08
  • Susan Pinkard: The Sophisticated Table: A REVOLUTION IN TASTE The Rise of French Cuisine, 1650-1800 N”YT, 11-30-08
  • Robert J. Samuelson: Cycles of Doom THE GREAT INFLATION AND ITS AFTERMATH The Past and Future of American Affluence NYT, 11-30-08
  • Sarah Vowell: Mayflower Power THE WORDY SHIPMATES NYT, 11-30-08
  • Philip Jenkins: Historian explores Christianity’s lost age, land The Lost History of Christianity: The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia – and How It Died Reuters, 12-1-08
  • Alan Wolfe on Thomas J. Sugrue: Uncommon Ground: SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North NYT, 11-9-08
  • Thomas J. Sugrue: SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North, First Chapter – NYT, 11-9-08
  • Thomas J. Sugrue: The other battlefield The struggle for civil rights in the North, often overshadowed, gets a comprehensive review SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North Boston Globe, 11-30-08
  • Gordon M. Goldstein: ‘The Doves Were Right’ – LESSONS IN DISASTER McGeorge Bundy and the Path to War in Vietnam NYT, 11-28-08
  • WaPo, 11-26-08
  • James McPherson: Looking at Lincoln Through a Prism of War – NYT, 11-21-08
BEST SELLERS:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

  • Jon Meacham: AMERICAN LION #4 — (2 weeks on list) – 12-7-08
  • THE AMERICAN JOURNEY OF BARACK OBAMA, by the editors of Life magazine. #13 — (3 weeks on list) – 12-7-08
  • Niall Ferguson: THE ASCENT OF MONEY #19 12-7-08
  • Pete Souza: THE RISE OF BARACK OBAMA #27 12-7-08
  • James M. McPherson: TRIED BY WAR #29 12-7-08
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: TEAM OF RIVALS #32 – 12-7-08
BLOGS:

BLOGS:

PROFILES:

PROFILES:

INTER VIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

  • Yury Borisyonok “A Historian’s Thankless Work”: For the past twenty years, the staff of the Rodina Magazine, an illustrated history journal, has been dissecting archived historical materials for fragments of the truth to bring into the public domain. – Russia Profile, 11-30-08
  • Niall Ferguson’s study of the financial history of the world made him prescient about today: “Many professional historians would say that I have no business talking about the present or even the recent past, much less the future. I don’t really understand what the point of that self-denial ordinance is because if historians can’t illuminate the future, I don’t know who can. There’s all sorts of bogus futurology out there, but in my experience most of what people say about the future is implicitly based on some understanding of the past. My caveat is simple: There is no such thing as the future, singular. There are futures, plural. And the historian is quite well-placed to offer plausible scenarios based on past analogies.” – http://www.thestar.com, 11-23-08
FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. “Obama as Hoover: The Importance of Storytelling”: As the Obama era takes shape, the roles of both Schlesinger and Michelson deserve attention. Particularly as Americans are seeing newsmagazines with cover stories comparing the President-elect who campaigned on a dour vision of scarcity with Franklin Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, a considerable leap to understate. – American Spectator, 12-2-08
  • The focus is on Samuel de Champlain – Burlington Free Press, 12-1-08
  • Gordon S. Wood “The Housing-Bubble and the American Revolution “: Gordon S. Wood, a professor at Brown University and perhaps the pre-eminent living historian on the subject, counters: “There was a great deal of instability, but that is hardly an explanation for the Revolution. I don’t think you can make a strong argument for an economic interpretation of the Revolution.” – NYT, 11-30-08
  • What if Hitler had a love child? Historian A.N. Wilson’s “Winnie and Wolf” is a chilling fictional tale of a clandestine affair. – Salon, 11-26-08
HONORS:

HONORS &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

NEW ON THE WEB:

New Web Sites:

EVENTS:

EVENTS:

  • April 3-4, 2009:The Obama Phenomenon: Race and Political Discourse in the United States Today, University of Memphis
ON TV:

ON TV:

  • Lincoln Symposium to air on C-SPAN: On Saturday, December 6th at 8 p.m., selections from “Lincoln in His Time and Ours,” a symposium held on November 22nd at Columbia University, will air on C-SPAN. – Gilder Lehrman Institute, 12-4-08
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300,” Friday, December 5, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Barbarians: Goths,” Friday, December 5, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Surviving History: 07 – Surviving History,” Friday, December 5, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Weapons of Mass Destruction,” Friday, December 5, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Shadow Force: Ghost Ship,” Friday, December 5, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus,” Saturday, December 6, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid,” Saturday, December 6, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “01 – The Wehrmacht: 01 – Attack on Europe,” Sunday, December 7, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “02 – The Wehrmacht: 02 – The Turning Point,” Sunday, December 7, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “03 – The Wehrmacht: 03 – The Crimes,” Sunday, December 7, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “04 – The Wehrmacht: 04 – Resistance,” Sunday, December 7, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “05 – The Wehrmacht: 05 – To the Bitter End,” Sunday, December 7, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “70’s Fever,” Sunday, December 7, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History Rocks: The ’70s, Part 1,” Sunday, December 7, @ 10pm ET/PT
COMING SOON BOOKS:

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Scout Tufankjian: Yes We Can: Barack Obama’s History Making Presidential Campaign, December 1, 2008
  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • Jonathan Brent: Inside the Stalin Archives, December 9, 2008
  • Time Magazine: Time President Obama: The Path to the White House, December 16, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2008
  • Anthony S. Pitch: “They Have Killed Papa Dead!”: The Road to Ford’s Theater, Abraham Lincoln’s Murder, and the Rage for Vengeance, December 30, 2008
  • William E. Leuchtenburg: Herbert Hoover: The 31st President, 1929-1933 (REV), January 6, 2009
  • James J. Sheehan: Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe, January 13, 2009
  • Gwen Ifill: The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama, January 20, 2009
  • Daniel Mark Epstein: Lincoln’s Men: The President and His Private Secretaries, January 27, 2009
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, November 30, 2008 at 8:03 AM

November 10 & 17, 2008

HISTORY BUZZ:

US POLITICS:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 11-10-1954 – Iwo Jima Memorial (servicemen raising US flag) dedicated in Arlington
  • 11-10-1982 – Vietnam Veterans Memorial opened
  • 11-11-1620 – 41 pilgrims land in Mass, sign Mayflower Compact (just & equal laws)
  • 11-11-1918 – Armistice Day-WW I ends (at 11 AM on Western Front)
  • 11-11-1938 – Kristallnacht; Jews forced to wear Star of David
  • 11-12-1998 – Then Vice President of the United States Al Gore symbolically signs the Kyoto Protocol.
  • 11-13-1789 – Ben Franklin writes “Nothing . . . certain but death and taxes”
  • 11-13-1956 – Supreme Court strikes down segregation of races on public buses
  • 11-13-1986 – US president Reagan confesses weapon sales to Iran
  • 11-14-1906 – Theodore Roosevelt becomes 1st US president to visit a foreign country (Panama)
  • 11-14-1968 – “National Turn in Your Draft Card Day” features draft card burning
  • 11-15-1763 – Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon begin surveying Mason-Dixon Line between Pennsylvania and Maryland
  • 11-15-1777 – Articles of Confederation adopted by Continental Congress
  • 11-15-1864 – Union Major General William T. Sherman burns Atlanta
  • 11-15-1969 – 250,000 peacefully demonstrate in Washington DC against the Vietnam War
  • 11-16-1973 – President Richard Nixon authorizes construction of Alaskan pipeline
  • 11-17-1800 – John Adams is the 1st president to move into the White House
  • 11-17-1800 – Congress held 1st session in Wash DC in incompleted Capitol building
  • 11-17-1973 – President Richard Nixon tells AP “…people have got to know whether or not their president is a crook. Well, I’m not a crook”
  • 11-18-1805 – Lewis and Clark reach Pacific Ocean, 1st Americans to cross continent
  • 11-18-1961 – JFK sends 18,000 military advisors to South Vietnam
  • 11-19-1861 – Julia Ward Howe committed “Battle Hymn of the Republic” to paper
  • 11-19-1863 – Lincoln delivers his address in Gettysburg; “4 score and 7 years…”
  • 11-19-1919 – US Senate rejects (55-39) Treaty of Versailles and League of Nations
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

QUOTES:

QUOTES:

  • Andrew Roberts: “Prince Charles turns 60 waiting for throne”: “It can’t be easy. Most of us can look forward to our new jobs, but the circumstances under which her reign comes to an end means that he can’t, emotionally and psychologically…. AP, 11-13-08
  • Robert Lacey “Milestone for a prince whose life has been a waiting game”: “I think he is finally coasting home, perhaps coming to the realisation that he will never be king or, if he does, he’ll be like one of those elderly leaders at the end of the Soviet era – a sort of royal Andropov, with only a few years. His significance will lie in what he has accomplished as Prince and what he does to get the next king ready.” – Guardian, UK, 11-13-08
  • Eric Hobsbawm: Global financial crisis is the “end of the era” for capitalism: “The present crisis is certainly the end of the era in the development of the global capitalist economy.” – http://money.uk.msn.com, 11-3-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

REVIEWS:

REVIEWS:

  • Jack Fischel on Samuel S. Kassow: Forget us not: memorializing the Warsaw Ghetto: Who Will Write Our History? Who Will Write Our History? Emanuel Ringelblum, The Warsaw Ghetto and The Oyneg Shabes Archive NJ Jewish News, 11-13-08
  • Jon Meacham: Elites and Rivals, Beware: He’s Tough as Old Hickory – AMERICAN LION Andrew Jackson in the White House NYT, 11-9-08
  • Thomas J. Sugrue: Uncommon Ground SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North NYT, 11-9-08
  • Thomas J. Sugrue: SWEET LAND OF LIBERTY The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North, First Chapter – NYT, 11-9-08
  • Peter Ackroyd: Troubled Water THAMES The Biography NYT, 11-9-08
  • Carlo D’Este: An Officer and a Bulldog WARLORD A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874-1945 NYT, 11-9-08
  • Tricia Starks: University of Arkansas Historian Publishes Book on Soviet Health and Hygiene – University of Arkansas Daily Headlines, AR, 11-13-08
  • The new book, Wartime Courage, confirms that the British PM’s dogged desire to keep his old craft skills as a historian alive – Independent (UK), 11-7-08
  • Douglas Brinkley on Jon Meacham, David S. Reynolds, Robert V. Remini: HISTORY The Warrior President Andrew Jackson fought the British, the Indians and the bankers. AMERICAN LION Andrew Jackson in the White House, WAKING GIANT America in the Age of Jackson, ANDREW JACKSON WaPo, 11-2-08
  • H.W. Brands: HISTORY Overcoming Privilege Polio crippled FDR physically but strengthened him morally TRAITOR TO HIS CLASS The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt WaPo, 11-2-08
  • Fred Kaplan: Jonathan Yardley on ‘Lincoln’ The Literary Preparation of a Great President LINCOLN The Biography of a Writer WaPo, 11-2-08
  • James M. McPherson, Craig L. Symonds: HISTORY | BIOGRAPHY Commander-in-Chief How Lincoln learned the art of war. TRIED BY WAR Abraham Lincoln as Commander In Chief, LINCOLN AND HIS ADMIRALS Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Navy, and the Civil War WaPo, 11-2-08
  • Harold Holzer: The Travails of Lincoln’s Transition LINCOLN PRESIDENT-ELECT Abraham Lincoln and the Great Secession Winter 1860-1861 WaPo, 11-2-08
BEST SELLERS:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

  • James M. McPherson: TRIED BY WAR #15 — (4 weeks on list) – 11-16-08
  • Andrew Bacevich: THE LIMITS OF POWER #23 – 11-16-08
BLOGS:

BLOGS:

INTER VIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

  • Interview: Elizabeth Perry of Harvard University is the outgoing president of the Association for Asian Studies China Beat, 11-11-08
  • Harold Holzer & James McPherson ask: WWLD? (What would Lincoln Do?) – Chicago Tribune, 11-9-08
  • Andrew Doyle: 2-minute Tuesday: Andrew Doyle, Associate professor of history at Winthrop University – Herald Online, 11-4-08
FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • U.S. history a hot topic for publishers – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 11-11-08
  • James Gregory “UW project sheds light on Klan history”: “People in Washington state really have not known about the strength or impact of the KKK here during the 1920s. Historians focus on the Klan as a powerful force in places like Oregon, in Midwest states and of course in the South. But the Klan had tens of thousands of members right here in Washington.” – Bellingham Herald, WA, 11-13-08
HONORS:

HONORS &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

  • W. Fitzhugh Brundage: UNC professor speaks on South’s differing racial perceptions: “It seems especially relevant in the aftermath of the election…and the way in which many Southerners voted…. These struggles…draw our attention to the profound transformation at work in the contemporary South… Southerners can no longer assume that their version of the past will be promoted in public places…. We could turn to an era where the culture wars become extremely political.” – Tennessee Journalist, TN, 11-12-08
EVENTS:

EVENTS:

  • November 15, 2008: FDR-Obama Comparison Is Theme of Columbia Conference “Restoring America Through a New New Deal: Policy Priorities for the First 100 Days” – Press Release, 11-11-08
  • November 18, 2008: HOWARD ZINN, At Back Pages Books – Back Pages Books, 289 Moody St., presents a post-election State of the Union discussion with acclaimed historian, professor, and activist Howard Zinn, on Tuesday, Nov. 18, 7 p.m. Zinn is the author of “The People’s History of the United States of America” and the recently published graphic work “The People’s History of the American Empire.” Cost is $12. – Daily News Tribune, 11-13-08
  • April 3-4, 2009:The Obama Phenomenon: Race and Political Discourse in the United States Today, University of Memphis
ON TV:

ON TV:

  • PBS, AMERICAN EXPERIENCE: Oswald’s Ghost – Monday, November 17 at 9pm on PBS — American Experience Mondays at 9pm on PBS (check local listings.)
  • History Channel: “The Hunt for John Wilkes Booth,” Friday, November 14, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives: The Civil War: Antietam,” Friday, November 14, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Horrors at Andersonville Prison: The Trial of Henry Wirz,” Friday, November 14, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battlefield Detectives: The Civil War: Gettysburg,” Friday, November 14, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Civil War Tech,” Friday, November 14, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Antichrist,” Saturday, November 15, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The World Trade Center: Rise and Fall of an American Icon,” Saturday, November 15, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Quest for the Lost Ark,” Sunday, November 16, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hell: The Devil’s Domain,” Monday, November 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries: Hell’s Angels,” Monday, November 17, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Einstein,” Monday, November 17, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth: Nature’s Fury: New England’s Killer Hurricane,” Tuesday, November 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Wrath Of God: Buffalo Blizzard: Seige and Survival,” Tuesday, November 18, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crime Wave: 18 Months of Mayhem,” Wednesday, November 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Organized Crime: A World History: Colombia,” Wednesday, November 19, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The True Story of Charlie Wilson,” Thursday, November 20, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Stalking Jihad,” Thursday, November 20, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History’s Mysteries: Ship of Gold,” Thursday, November 20, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Secret Sin City,” Thursday, November 20, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Street Gangs: A Secret History,” Saturday, November 22, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy,” Saturday, November 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power,” Saturday, November 22, @ 8pm ET/PT
COMING SOON BOOKS:

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Carlo D’Este: Warlord: A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874-1945, November 11, 2008
  • Jon Meacham, American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House, November 11, 2008
  • Michael Burlingame: Abraham Lincoln: A Life, November 14, 2008
  • Peter W. Kunhardt: Looking for Lincoln: The Making of an American Icon, November 18, 2008
  • Scout Tufankjian: Yes We Can: Barack Obama’s History Making Presidential Campaign, December 1, 2008
  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • Jonathan Brent: Inside the Stalin Archives, December 9, 2008
  • Time Magazine: Time President Obama: The Path to the White House, December 16, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2008
  • Anthony S. Pitch: “They Have Killed Papa Dead!”: The Road to Ford’s Theater, Abraham Lincoln’s Murder, and the Rage for Vengeance, December 30, 2008
  • William E. Leuchtenburg: Herbert Hoover: The 31st President, 1929-1933 (REV), January 6, 2009
  • James J. Sheehan: Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe, January 13, 2009
  • Gwen Ifill: The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama, January 20, 2009
  • Daniel Mark Epstein: Lincoln’s Men: The President and His Private Secretaries, January 27, 2009
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

  • Studs Terkel’s Legacy: A Vivid Window on the Great Depression – NYT, 11-8-08

Posted on Friday, November 14, 2008 at 3:30 AM

Top Young Historians: 95 – Matthew Avery Sutton

Top Young Historians

Matthew Avery Sutton, 33

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Assistant Professor of History at College of Liberal Arts, Washington State University, 2008-
Area of Research: 20th century United States history, cultural history, and religious history.
Education: PhD, Department of History University of California, Santa Barbara, 2005
Major Publications: Sutton is the author Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America (Harvard University Press, 2007), won the Thomas J. Wilson Memorial Prize from Harvard University Press, Matthew Avery Sutton JPG awarded annually to the best book in any discipline by a first-time author. The book also served as the basis for the Public Broadcasting Service documentary Sister Aimee, part of PBS’s American Experience series.
Sutton’s current book project, tentatively entitled American Evangelicals and the Politics of Apocalypse, Harvard University Press (forthcoming, 2011) examines the relationships among American evangelicalism, apocalyptic thought, and political activism during times of national crisis and war.
Sutton is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, articles and editorials, and reviews including among others: “Crashing into Public History with Aimee Semple McPherson,” The Public Historian 29:4 (Fall 2007): 35-44; “Clutching to ‘Christian’ America: Aimee Semple McPherson, the Great Depression, and the Origins of Pentecostal Political Activism.” Journal of Policy History 17:3 (Summer 2005): 308-338; “‘Between the Refrigerator and the Wildfire': Aimee Semple McPherson, Pentecostalism, and the Fundamentalist-Modernist Controversy.” Church History 72:1 (March 2003): 159-188.
Awards: Sutton is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
Young Scholars in American Religion Program Participant, 2007-09;
New Investigator Research Excellence Award (Oakland University), 2008;
Oakland University Faculty Research Fellowship, 2008;
Historical Society of Southern California/Haynes Research Grant, 2006;
Oakland University Faculty Research Fellowship, 2006;
Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, 2004-05;
Louisville Institute Dissertation Fellowship (declined), 2004-05;
University of California’s President’s Dissertation Fellowship (declined), 2004-05;
Richard Mayberry Award, Department of History, UC Santa Barbara, 2005;
Western Historical Association’s Conference Scholarship 2004;
UC Santa Barbara Humanities Research Assistantship Fellowship, 2003-04;
Walter H. Capps Center Fellowship, Department of Religious Studies, UC Santa Barbara, 2003-04;
Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship, Lilly Library, University of Indiana, 2003;
History Associates Fellowship, 2003;
UC Santa Barbara Academic Senate and UCSB Foundation Distinguished Teaching Assistant Award, 2002-03;
UC Santa Barbara Humanities/Social Sciences Research Grant, 2002;
UC Santa Barbara Graduate Division Summer Dissertation Proposal Fellowship, 2002;
William H. Ellison Prize for “Re-envisioning Evangelicalism Through Pentecostal Eyes.” Best graduate student paper in any field, Department of History, UC Santa Barbara, 2001.
Additional Info:
Formerly Assistant Professor of History, Oakland University, 2005-2008; Instructor, US Cultural History, UC Santa Barbara, 2005; Instructor, Religious Studies, Westmont College, 2004.
Sutton has been featured on National Public Radio’s Morning Edition among many other news shows. He has published articles in Church History, the Journal of Policy History, and the Public Historian, and he writes for the History News Network and the Christian Century.

Personal Anecdote

I remember as an undergraduate watching teachers ruffle through their notes in the middle of a lecture, looking totally perplexed as they hunted for the one page that was eluding them. And I remember others who would check every pocket-pants, shirt, coat, and bag-looking for that lost piece of chalk, or the one white-board marker that still had some ink left. I vowed then and there that I would never become one of them-I would never be an absent minded professor. Well, I have become one. At no time was this clearer than one day last semester. Although I did not teach that day, I had a series of meetings with students. I thought everything had gone fine-until I got home that night and discovered that my polo shirt had been on inside-out the entire day. Yep, the tag was sticking out from the back of my neck, my buttons were on the inside, and the seams ran along the outside of the shirt. I hoped that students might think that I was a trend-setter, but I know what they really thought. There is Sutton-the absent-minded professor. Unfortunately, I suspect my absent-mindedness is only going to get worse. Fight it as I may, I guess I am going to have to embrace the label. I suppose I am in good company.

My research explores the intersections among religion, politics, and American culture. Despite the fact that “religion and politics” are the two things that you are not supposed to discuss at the dinner table, I can’t help myself. I grew up in Southern California’s evangelical subculture and I had a lot of family connections to the International Church of the Foursquare Gospel (the denomination founded by Aimee Semple McPherson). I was vaguely aware of who McPherson was, and as I began studying American religion during my undergraduate years I became increasingly curious about her role in shaping modern American evangelicalism. When I started applying to graduate schools, I needed a good dissertation topic and I realized that McPherson was a perfect vehicle through which to explore gender, mass media, popular culture, and politics in the interwar years. The result was my first book Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America (Harvard University Press, 2007).

My current research explores the connections among evangelicals’ social/political activism and their belief in the nearness of the Apocalypse-especially in the context of national crises and war. I find few things more fun than thinking about people who predict the end of the world; my only fear is that one of these days, one of them might be right!

Quotes

By Matthew Avery Sutton

  • From the Pilgrims who settled at Plymouth Rock to Christian Coalition canvassers working for George W. Bush, Americans have long sought to integrate faith with politics. Few have been as successful as Hollywood evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson.During the years between the two world wars, McPherson was the most flamboyant and controversial minister in the United States. She built an enormously successful and innovative megachurch, established a mass media empire, and produced spellbinding theatrical sermons that rivaled Tinseltown’s spectacular shows. As McPherson’s power grew, she moved beyond religion into the realm of politics, launching a national crusade to fight the teaching of evolution in the schools, defend Prohibition, and resurrect what she believed was the United States’ Christian heritage. Convinced that the antichrist was working to destroy the nation’s Protestant foundations, she and her allies saw themselves as a besieged minority called by God to join the “old time religion” to American patriotism…..On one level this is the story of the rise, fall and redemption of one of the most fascinating characters in American history, Aimee Semple McPherson. But it is much more than that. It is also the story of how Americans came to embrace a thoroughly modern form of evangelicalism that had its roots in McPherson’s innovations and concerns, one that flourished to this day. Indeed, the tensions and controversies that characterized McPherson’s world have come to define faith and politics in the twentieth-first-century United States. — Matthew Sutton in “Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America”

    About Matthew Avery Sutton

  • This biography of McPherson explores how the evangelist combined old-time religion with newfangled technology to build a multimedia soul-saving juggernaut in 1920s Los Angeles…A thorough and absorbing portrait of a wholly original figure. — The Atlantic reviewing “Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America”
  • [Sutton] gives an account of McPherson’s life within the cultural currents of her time. He argues that she had an almost preternatural ability to tap her audience’s social fears–about immigration, for instance, or the changing role of women–and offer reassurance in the form of simple spiritual storytelling…As Mr. Sutton’s fine book shows, she proved to be an emblem of things to come. — Christine Rosen, Wall Street Journal
  • Lively and diligently researched. — Caleb Crain, New York Review of Books
  • In the page-turning book, Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America, Matthew Avery Sutton makes a persuasive case that the Canadian evangelist was responsible for rescuing conservative Protestantism from obscurity while creating the political model for today’s powerful Religious Right. She promoted the now- widely held conviction that Jesus Christ and the ‘American way of life’ are synonymous. Other books have been written about McPherson, but Sutton’s goes furthest in making the important argument that the Canadian evangelist was the most influential model for the merging of conservative Christian identity and American patriotism…At the time of the 1925 Scopes ‘monkey trial’ over the teaching of evolution, McPherson organized a giant parade and theatrical stage play at her baroque Angelus Temple that portrayed what she called the ‘hanging and burial of monkey teachers.’ Eighty years later, McPherson’s brand of evangelical sensationalism is again spiking up the issue of whether to teach evolution in U.S. public schools, while in most other industrialized countries the dispute barely registers…Sutton’s book deserves special praise for its socio-political analysis–for outlining Sister Aimee’s pivotal role in giving birth to today’s politicized evangelical Christianity. — Douglas Todd, Vancouver Sun
  • Decades before televangelists like Billy Graham, Pat Robertson or Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker started mixing show business and conservative Christianity, there was Aimee Semple McPherson…An impressive new biography. — Don Lattin, San Francisco Chronicle
  • Sutton helps readers see in McPherson more than one paradoxical woman: her Foursquare Gospel helped catalyze a fundamental cultural realignment that brought Pentecostals and Evangelicals into the American mainstream, transforming American politics in ways that continue to write today’s headlines. A nuanced portrait of an entire movement. — Bryce Christensen, Booklist
  • Matthew Avery Sutton has done such a thorough and engaging job with Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America. — John M. and Priscilla S. Taylor, Washington Times
  • [A] delightful biography of the first American woman to become a celebrity-preacher. — David Crumm, Detroit Free Press
  • Matthew Avery Sutton knows how to spin a yarn. His new biography of the Pentecostal preacher Aimee Semple McPherson beautifully evokes the allure of this early-twentieth-century charismatic revivalist, and manages as well to capture the boosterism and bravado of Los Angeles in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. One can easily understand why the Public Broadcasting Service chose this book as the basis for an episode of the American Experience. Sutton’s tale has all the pathos of a soap opera, while speaking at the same time to central issues of American cultural life, including gender, celebrity, sexuality, and the volatile mix of religion and politics. When Sutton harnesses his gift for storytelling to the task of critical analysis, the book is a model of what narrative history can be at its best. — Matthew S. Hedstrom, Politics and Religion
  • An impressive work…Sutton’s account of Aimee’s search for companionship and the debilitating toll her “kidnapping” took on her mentally as well as physically (in 1926, she disappeared for 36 days, then concocted a bizarre tale of kidnapping that led to a lengthy trial, the equivalent in its day of the O.J. Simpson trial) is the most persuasive portrayal of this episode to date; it also sheds light on the continuing struggles of Pentecostal women called to ministry in a man’s world…I highly recommend it, not just because it tells a good story-though it certainly does that-but also because its insights into the Pentecostal cult of personality are all too relevant today. — Arlene M. Sanchez Walsh, Books & Culture
  • [Sutton] reminds us that Aimee Semple McPherson ‘exemplified evangelicalism’s appeal to millions of Americans’ and suggests that it is time to re-examine her life and legacy. — Bryan F. LeBeau, Kansas City Star
  • In a clear and frightening way [Aimee Semple McPherson and the Resurrection of Christian America] both locates her origins in what could be called America’s mainstream fringe and her influence on today’s Christian right, with its political manipulating and media empires. — George Fetherling, Seven Oaks
  • [A] gripping new biography of Aimee Semple McPherson…Sutton has focused on McPherson’s substantive legacy– a politically powerful religious commitment shared by millions of Americans–rather than the legend of the self- proclaimed salvation-bearing empire-builder. Many readers will find themselves giving new thought to the potent and disturbing policy-shaping force that today’s Christian Right embodies. — Peter Skinner, ForeWord
  • Although it is hard to imagine in this era, the dominant view among religious Christians in the early part of the 20th century was that mixing the realms of Christ and Caesar was unholy business. McPherson smashed that taboo, and turned evangelical Protestantism into a fighting faith. — Jonathan Kay, National Post
  • [Sutton's] delightful biography of the first American woman to become a celebrity preacher makes us want to enroll in one of his classes — Ventura County Star
  • Sutton’s study, part biography and part cultural history, attempts to explain the long 20th-century run of traditionalist Protestantism on the political stage. It is, therefore, an important book. — Anne Blue Wills, Christian Century
  • Sutton’s engaging work also makes important contributions by linking McPherson’s adept use of publicity and celebrity status, social conservatism, and American patriotism to the modern evangelical vision of a more Christian nation. — W. B. Bedford, Choice
  • [Sutton] offers progressive Christians a must-read study of this important but enigmatic figure in American religious history. If we wish to understand the use of celebrity and technology by religious conservatives, not only to spread the gospel but to influence politics as well, we must look to its beginnings in the ministry of Aimee Semple McPherson. — Rev. Robert Cornwall, Progressive Christian
  • Matthew Sutton’s Aimee Semple McPherson may be the best single book yet published on this icon of early twentieth-century American religion and culture. Beautifully paced and superbly researched, the book weaves McPherson’s inherently fascinating and ultimately tragic career into larger stories about California, pentecostalism, and emerging popular culture. Empathetic, critical, and insightful simultaneously, Sutton has produced a compellingly narrated book about one of modern America’s most magnetic women. — Jon Butler, author of “Becoming America: The Revolution before 1776″
  • At long last, a biographical exploration of Aimee Semple McPherson that steers clear of stereotype, caricature, and condescension. Matthew Sutton deftly addresses Sister Aimee’s fame and her legacy in his fine biography, but he does so with care and attention to her humanity as well. — William Deverell, University of Southern California
  • Aimee Semple McPherson passionately embraced her role as a religious celebrity in an increasingly mass media- oriented age and steadfastly refused to be constrained by traditional notions of gender or sexuality. Americans of the 1920s and 1930s were fascinated by her, and readers today will feel the same way, thanks to Matthew Avery Sutton’s timely and absorbing biography. — Susan Ware, editor of Notable American Women: Completing the Twentieth Century
  • Not content to see Aimee Semple McPherson–“Sister”–simply as a woman evangelist, or even as a religious icon, Matthew Sutton places her career in a wide range of contexts, including gender, media, Southern California popular culture, and the muscular expansion of American evangelicalism. This is terrific history, reflecting meticulous research, persuasive argumentation, and a writing style as vibrant as the story it tells. — Grant Wacker, author of Heaven Below: Early Pentecostals and American Culture
  • “This was BY FAR my favorite class this semester!….
    He’s a very good teacher. He knows a lot about what he’s teaching….
    LOVED this professor…he is really passionate about what he teaches especially his topic of choice, Mcpherson…
    He’s amazing. I absolutely loved his class. He made a subject that I care very little about, into something so intersting. I was always excited to got to his class….
    One of the best profs in any department at OU. Funny, interesting, fair, smart, caring–not too many profs have ALL of those qualities!….
    Professor Sutton is by far the most devoted teacher I have had thus far….
    I loved prof. Sutton. He’s a good guy who knows his stuff….
    Professor Sutton is incredibly passionate about the subject he teaches!….
    excellent professor. Clearly, his forte is history as he has abounding knowledge and passion for this subject area; as a history major, I enjoyed the lectures and multimedia aspects and found his method of visual and auditory stimulators to be the perfect method of teaching to all different types of people, which cannot be said for many profs!….
    Professor Sutton is young and energetic. His class is very interesting. He made me enjoy history…. I enjoyed this class and this professor. History is definitely his thing and he is very passionate and enthusiastic about the subject!….
    I never liked history before this class. He made learning American history fun and interesting he breaks up the class with documentaries, films, class discussion, reading, and lectures….
    Yeah, he is a great teacher, He is young, fun, and very multimedia, makes the new deal exciting, I would definitely reccomend him to anyone, really aprreciates students, very down to earth. — Anonymous Students
  • Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2008 at 12:54 AM

    Campaign 2008: Barack Obama’s Acceptance Speech: November 4 2008 Video & Mp3

    Barack Obama’s Acceptance Speech: November 4 2008 Video & Mp3

    Barack Obama’s First Speech as U.S. President-Elect

    Barack Obama Acceptance Speech: Transcript, Download Mp3

    John mcCain Concession Speech: Transcript, Download Mp3

    Text & Video Source: Ace Showbiz

    Live from Chicago’s Grant Park, Barack Obama gives his first speech as the 44th president of United States. Few hours after he officially won the election over Republican John McCain, Obama ascends the stage to thank all Americans who have put the trust in him to make a change in the country.

    Together with his wife, Michelle and their two daughters, Malia and Sasha, Obama took center stage, applauded and cheered by the audience. He becomes the first African-American to be elected as the U.S. president. On making such history, Obama opened his speech, saying “If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible; who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time; who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer.”

    Obama goes on thanking all the people that have supported him, including his family and his campaign manager David Plouffe. Among the people spotted in the huge crowd are actor Brad Pitt, and a tearful Oprah Winfrey who had endorsed the president on her famous talk show.

    He also calls out to those who do not vote for him “I may not have won your votes tonight, but I hear your voices. I need your help and I will be your president too,” he said.

    Barack Obama Presidential Victory Speech 2008

    Campaign 2008: Barack Obama Wins the Presidency: Election Night Highlights

    Barack Obama Wins the Presidency: Election Night Highlights

    PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN 2008 WATCH:

    Barack Obama arrives on stage at his election night victory rally  at Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois.

    Barack Obama arrives on stage at his election night victory rally at Grant Park in Chicago, Illinois.
    Jewel Samad / AFP / Getty

    Result Snapshot:

      FROM CBS NEWS

    • Barack Obama: 349, 52%
    • John McCain: 160, 47%
    • Senate:
      Democrats: 56, +5
      Republicans: 40
    • House:
      Democrats: 252, +17
      Republicans: 173

    Election Day on the Campaign Trail….

    • November 4, 2008: Obama plans voting, basketball and quick trip to Indiana on Election Day … Hoping for upset, McCain to campaign in Colorado, New Mexico … Tiny New Hampshire towns go for Obama over McCain in Election Day’s first votes – AP, 11-4-08

    Thousands watched the election results on giant TV screens in Times Square. (Photo: James Estrin/ The New York Times)

    The Results: Presidential Race

    • BARACK OBAMA, DEMOCRAT: 349
      • California, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Ohio, Oregon, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, New York, Rhode Island, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin,
    • JOHN MCCAIN, REPUBLICAN: 160
      • Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, Wyoming.
    • Live Blogging Election Night – The NYT CaucusNYT

    The Results: Senate

    • Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Joe Biden, D-Del., Susan Collins, R-Maine, Richard Durbin, D-Ill., John Kerry, D-Mass., Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., Kay Hagan, D-N.C., James Inhofe, R-Okla., Jay Rockefeller, D-W.Va., Mark Warner, D-Va., Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Michael Enzi, R-Wyo., Tim Johnson, D-S.D., Carl Levin, D-Mich., Jack Reed, D-R.I., Tom Udall, D-N.M., Pat Roberts, R-Kan., Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., Max Baucus, D-Mont., Tom Harkin, D-Iowa, Thad Cochran, R-Miss., Mike Johanns, R-Neb., Mark Udall, D-Colo., Jim Risch, R-Idaho – AP
    • Live Blogging the House and Senate Races – The NYT CaucusNYT
    • Dems Snatch 4 GOP Seats In Senate Pickups In North Carolina, Virginia, New Hampshire And New Mexico Add To Dems’ Senate Advantage – CBS News, 11-4-08
    • Democrats expand their control of U.S. Senate – CTV/AP, 11-4-08
    • Democrats snag Va. Senate seat, seek more gains – AP, 11-4-08
    • Hagan Ousts Dole From North Carolina Senate Seat, Networks Say – Bloomberg

    The Results: HOUSE

    Senator Barack Obama took the stage in Grant Park in Chicago with his wife and daughters. (Photo: Damon Winter/The New York Times)

    The Results: GOVERNORS

    • John Lynch, D-N.H., Jack Markell, D-Del., Jay Nixon, D-Mo., John Hoeven, R-N.D., Jon Huntsman, R-Utah, Brian Schweitzer, D-Mont. – AP
    • Dems Pick Up Governor Seat Missouri Flips To Democrat; 11 Governorships Were Up For Grabs – CBS News, 11-4-08
    Doug Mills/The New York Times

    Supporters of Senator Barack Obama cheered during a rally in Chicago on Tuesday as they heard that he won in Pennsylvania. More Photos >

    In the News…

    Final Remarks

    President-elect Barack Obama speaking to 125,000 suppiorters in  Chicago's Grant Park Nov 4, 2008

    • President-Elect Barack Obama’s Acceptance Speech:, Download Mp3
      If there is anyone out there who still doubts America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of democracy, tonight is your answer. It’s the answer told by lines that stretched around schools and churches, in numbers this nation has never seen, by people who waited for three hours, four hours – many for the first time in their lives – because they believed that this time must be different, and their voices could be that difference. At this defining moment, change has come to America.
      If there is anyone out there who still doubts that America is a place where all things are possible, who still wonders if the dream of our founders is alive in our time, who still questions the power of our democracy, tonight is your answer. A new dawn of American leadership is at hand….
      …The greatest of a lifetime, two wars, a planet in peril, the worst financial crisis in a century….
      There are many who won’t agree with every decision or policy I make as president, and we know that government can’t solve every problem. But I will always be honest with you about the challenges we face.
      You did it because you understand the enormity of the task ahead….
      The road ahead will be long. Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even one term, but America – I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there. I promise you – we as a people will get there….
      This is our chance to answer that call. This is our moment. This is our time – to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids; to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace; to reclaim the American Dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth – that out of many, we are one; that while we breathe, we hope, and where we are met with cynicism, and doubt, and those who tell us that we can’t, we will respond with that timeless creed that sums up the spirit of a people: Yes We Can. Thank you, God bless you, and may God Bless the United States of America.

    Defeated Republican presidential candidate Sen. John McCain

    • John McCain’s Concession Speech Download Mp3
      My friends, we have — we have come to the end of a long journey. The American people have spoken, and they have spoken clearly. A little while ago, I had the honor of calling Sen. Barack Obama to congratulate him.
      These are difficult times for our country and I pledged to him tonight to do all in my power to help him lead us in the many challenges we face. I urge all Americans who supported me to join me in not just congratulating him, but offering our next president our good will.
      In a contest, as long and difficult as this campaign has been, his success alone commands my repect for his ability and his perseverence.
      But that he managed to do so by inspiring the hope of so many millions of Americans, who had once wrongly believed that they had little at stake or little influence in the election of an American president, is something I deeply admire and commend him for achieving.
      Whatever our differences, we are fellow Americans, and believe me when I say no association has ever meant more to me than that. It is natural to feel some disappointment, but tomorrow we must move beyond it and … get our country moving again. We fought as hard as we could. Though we fell short, the failure is mine, not yours.
      [Sarah Palin] is one of the best campaigners I have ever seen and an impressive new voice in our party for reform and the principles that have always been our greatest strength.
      This campaign was and will remain the great honor of my life.

    McNew/Getty

    John McCain concedes victory on stage with his wife Cindy McCain.

    Historians’ Comments

    • Peniel Joseph “Sen. Obama Projected to Win the Presidency”: “The Republicans are bearing the fruit of the Southern strategy that was hatched in 1968,” historian Peniel Joseph said on the NewsHour Tuesday night. “That strategy worked brilliantly in the presidential election of 1972. Now, Barack Obama is running a national campaign probably since the first time in 1964.” – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Peniel Joseph “Obama Earns a Slim Win in GOP Stronghold of Virginia”: Some of Obama’s success in the state has been attributed to an influx of professionals to Northern Virginia’s D.C. suburbs, “which has turned it into more of a swing state,” historian Peniel Joseph told the NewsHour. “Virginia, really the cradle of the confederacy,” Joseph said. “When we think about Virginia going to the first African American candidate, it really speaks to the way in which this realignment is happening.” – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Richard Norton Smith “Obama Earns a Slim Win in GOP Stronghold of Virginia”: Historian Richard Norton Smith agreed the results reflect a fundamental change in how politicians should view the state. “If Republicans want to take Virginia back, they better stop talking about the ‘real Virginia.’” Norton Smith said. – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Michael Beschloss, Richard Norton Smith & Peniel Joseph: PBS Newhour with Jim Lehrer History’s View: Historians evaluate how the 2008 election may go down in the history books and its place in the shaping of American politic – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • John Hinshaw “The morning after: Half of us will be disappointed”: John Hinshaw, a historian at Lebanon Valley College in central Pennsylvania, sees a couple things that could dictate the aftermath of Election Day — one aggravating and one mitigating. He says that many people profess after the fact to have voted for the winner even if they didn’t, thus leavening the strong reaction.
      But if voters perceive unfairness, which can happen in both thin margins and landslides, that can be a serious problem. “People can say, ‘It’s not my president. It’s your president,’” he says. “And that’s the kind of stuff that can really weaken nation-states.” – AP, 11-2-08
    • Peniel Joseph “Number of Battleground States Too Close to Call”: “I think Indiana is a big surprise. George Bush won Indiana by 31 points over John Kerry. Indiana probably has to be as rock solid of a red state in the last 44 years as we’ve seen,” said historian Peniel Joseph on the NewsHour. – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Richard Norton Smith “Number of Battleground States Too Close to Call”: Historian Richard Norton Smith added that the lack of results is still telling. “The fact that Virginia, Indiana and North Carolina are too close to call – that tells you that the Democrats, both presidential and Congressional, are poaching on traditionally Republican terrain,” North Smith said. – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Richard Norton Smith “Historians Weigh in on Public’s Energy, Key States”: The potential for record numbers of voters in this year’s election reflects a level of public interest that may be unprecedented, said historian Richard Norton Smith. With a number of traditionally Republican states in play for either ticket and an almost-certain shift in the balance of power in the U.S. Congress, this year’s election is “a history in the making,” he said.
      “This could be the end of a 40-year cycle of conservative domination of American politics,” said Norton Smith….
      Norton Smith feels that while Democrats are expected to seize control of many formerly Republican seats in the Senate and House of Representatives, the electorate in conservative states will still control local politics.
      “The fact is, if the Democrats pick up 20 or 25 or even 30 seats tonight, most of those, the overwhelming number of those, are going to be in red states, they’ll be on Republican turf,” Norton Smith said. “So one of the great ironies that has thus far escaped media attention is that a significantly more Democratic House of Representatives in particular might not be more automatically liberal, it might in fact be more diverse or more conservative at least in terms of the Democratic majority.” – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Peniel Joseph “Historians Weigh in on Public’s Energy, Key States”: Black studies professor Peniel Joseph says this year’s public interest mirrors the excitement of past elections. With Sen. Barack Obama vying to be the country’s first black president and Gov. Sarah Palin aimed at the vice presidency, Joseph is reminded of other important firsts in American history, such as the election of John F. Kennedy over Richard Nixon in 1960. “Kennedy’s the first Irish-Catholic and the only Irish Catholic president in the history of the United States. People don’t remember, but there was really a prejudice against Catholics, and people thought if Kennedy became president, he’d be taking his marching orders from the Pope and the Vatican in Rome, so it’s very interesting and that was really an issue during the primary,” Joseph said….
      “Indiana is really sort of the heartland of America — so for Obama to be in contention in Indiana and Indiana to be a kind of toss-up state – that’s very surprising,” Joseph said. – PBS Newshour, 11-4-08
    • Richard Norton Smith “The undeniably exciting aura of ’08″: “In the spring of 1933 the most popular song in the country was ‘Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf,’” said presidential historian Richard Norton Smith. “Its appeal was attributed in some quarters to mass relief over the departure of Herbert Hoover from the White House.” “I am not equating the incumbent with Hoover,” Smith said. “What I am suggesting is a sense of new possibilities, as well as institutional renewal, that comes with any inauguration — a sense, ironically, heightened this time around by the very contrast with the outgoing and incoming president.” – Politico, 11-3-08
    • Alan Brinkley “The undeniably exciting aura of ’08″: “I think for many people, certainly for African-Americans and certainly for other people who yearn for a kind of final conciliation of our racial history, this is a sort of extraordinary moment, and an unimagined moment,” said Alan Brinkley, a historian of American politics and the provost of Columbia University…
      There was a “kind of zany quality of the campaign, especially for the McCain campaign, [which] at a moment like this really is unprecedented,” said Brinkley. “There’s never been anything quite like this.” – Politico, 11-3-08
    • Al Felzenberg “The undeniably exciting aura of ’08″: “I think you have to acknowledge, in the case of Obama, an event of tremendous historic significance,” said presidential historian Al Felzenberg, the author of a book on rating the presidents. “In the span of my lifetime, not even that, the span of a generation, we have gone from a period when African-American Nobel Laureates and congressional Medal of Honor winners could not walk into restaurants in parts of this country and order a hamburger to a time when an African-American is being seriously considered for the presidency of the United States.” On the other hand, he said, “The McCain campaign has lent itself to the dramatic gesture: the flying back to Washington, threatening to cancel the debate, sometimes changing themes.”
      “Clearly the economic worries have caused people to think in a very dramatic way that we may be ending an era, that we may be on the end of a certain run and on the beginning of something else,” Felzenberg said. – Politico, 11-3-08

    Senator John MCCain waves to supporters in Phoenix. (Photo: Todd Heisler/The New York Times)
    Damon Winter/The New York Times

    On The Campaign Trail…

    • THE DEMOCRATS:
      Barack Obama talks to voters in the Indianapolis area before joining supporters at Grant Park in Chicago.
      Joe Biden votes in Wilmington, Del., and stops in Richmond, Va., before joining Obama in Chicago.
    • THE REPUBLICANS:
      John McCain holds a rally in Grand Junction, Colo., and hosts an election-night party at a hotel in Phoenix.
      Sarah Palin votes in Wasilla, Alaska, before joining McCain in Phoenix.
    • John McCain makes last-minute appeal for votes I feel the momentum. I feel it, you feel it, and we’re going to win the election…..
      Things are looking good, but it’s very early. Then you’ve got to move west, my friends, and we’ve got to win New Mexico.

    Senator Barack Obama with his wife, Michelle, and Senator Joseph R. Biden Jr. with his wife, Jill, in Chicago on Tuesday night. More Photos >

    A women in Chicago yelled “Thank you God,” as CNN announced that Senator Barack Obama had won the election. (Photo: Doug Mills/The New York Times)
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