History Buzz: December 2008

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

December 15, 2008

HISTORY BUZZ:

THIS
WEEK:

THIS WEEK ON THE BUZZ….

US
POL.:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

HNN
STATS:

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:

THIS
WEEK
IN
HIST.:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 15/12/1791 – Bill of Rights ratified when Virginia gave its approval
  • 15/12/1791 – 1st US law school established at University of Pennsylvania
  • 15/12/1874 – 1st reigning king to visit US (of Hawaii) received by Pres Grant
  • 15/12/1877 – Thomas Edison patents phonograph
  • 15/12/1916 – French defeat Germans in WW I Battle of Verdun
  • 15/12/1938 – Groundbreaking begins for Jefferson Memorial in Wash DC
  • 15/12/1939 – “Gone With the Wind” premieres in Atlanta
  • 15/12/1948 – Former state dept official Alger Hiss indicted in NYC for perjury
  • 15/12/1964 – Canada adopts maple leaf flag
  • 16/12/1431 – King Henry VI of England crowned king of France
  • 16/12/1631 – Mount Vesuvious, Italy erupts, destroys 6 villages and kills 4,000
  • 16/12/1653 – Oliver Cromwell sworn in as English Lord Protector
  • 16/12/1689 – English Parliament adopts Bill of Rights after Glorious Revolution
  • 16/12/1773 – Big tea party in Boston harbor-indians welcome (Boston Tea Party)
  • 16/12/1864 – Battle of Nashville ends after 4400 casualities
  • 16/12/1944 – Battle of Bulge begins in Belgium
  • 16/12/1950 – Truman proclaims state of emergency against “Communist imperialism”
  • 17/12/1728 – Congregation Shearith Israel of NY purchases a lot on Mill Street in lower Manhattan, to build NY’s 1st synagogue
  • 17/12/1777 – George Washingtons army returns to Valley Forge Pa, France recognizes independence of English colonies in America
  • 17/12/1792 – Opening of 1st legislative assembly of Lower Canada in Quebec city
  • 17/12/1798 – 1st impeachment trial against a US senator (Wm Blount, TN) begins
  • 17/12/1862 – Gen US Grant issues order #11, expelling Jews from Tennessee
  • 17/12/1900 – New Ellis Island Immigration station completed costing $1.5 million
  • 17/12/1944 – US Army announces end of excluding Jap-Americans from West Coast
  • 17/12/1975 – Lynette Fromme sentenced to life for attempt on Pres Ford’s life
  • 17/12/1975 – John Paul Stevens appointed to Supreme Court
  • 18/12/1777 – 1st national Thanksgiving Day, commemorating Burgoyne’s surrender
  • 18/12/1787 – New Jersey becomes 3rd state to ratify constitution
  • 18/12/1799 – George Washington’s body interred at Mount Vernon
  • 18/12/1813 – British take Ft Niagara in War of 1812
  • 18/12/1859 – South Carolina declared an “independent commonwealth”
  • 18/12/1862 – Battle at Lexington, Tennessee (Forrest’s Second Raid)
  • 18/12/1865 – 13th Amendment ratified, slavery abolished
  • 18/12/1892 – “Nutcracker Suite,” Peter Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s ballet, premieres
  • 18/12/1915 – Pres Wilson, widowed the year before, marries Edith Bolling Galt
  • 18/12/1966 – Dr Seuss’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas” airs for 1st time on CBS
  • 19/12/1732 – Benjamin Franklin under the name Richard Saunders begins publication of “Poor Richard’s Almanack”
  • 19/12/1776 – Thomas Paine published his 1st “American Crisis” essay, in which he wrote, “These are the times that try men’s souls”
  • 19/12/1777 – Washington settles his troops at Valley Forge, Pa for winter
  • 19/12/1828 – South Carolina declares right of states to nullify federal laws
  • 19/12/1843 – Charles Dickens publishes “A Christmas Carol,” in England
  • 19/12/1861 – Battle of Black Water
  • 19/12/1930 – James Weldon Johnson resigns as executive secretary of NAACP
  • 19/12/1946 – War breaks out in Indochina as Ho Chi Minh attacks French in Hanoi
  • 20/12/1606 – Virginia Company settlers leave London to establish Jamestown Va
  • 20/12/1669 – 1st jury trial in Delaware; Marcus Jacobson condemned for insurrection and sentenced to flogging, branding and slavery
  • 20/12/1803 – Louisiana Purchase formally transferred from France to US for $27M
  • 20/12/1860 – SC votes 169-0 for Ordinace of Secession, 1st state to secede
  • 20/12/1862 – -Jan 3rd] Vicksburg campaign
  • 20/12/1864 – -Dec 27th] Battle of Ft Fisher, NC
  • 20/12/1893 – 1st state anti-lynching statue approved, in Georgia
  • 20/12/1919 – US House of Representatives restricts immigration
  • 20/12/1922 – 14 republics form Union of Soviet Socialistic Republics (USSR)
  • 20/12/1956 – Montgomery, Ala, removed race-based seat assignments on its buses
  • 20/12/1989 – US troops invade Panama and oust Manuel Noriega, but don’t catch him
  • 21/12/1620 – 103 Mayflower pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock [OS=Dec 11]
  • 21/12/1784 – John Jay becomes 1st US secretary of state (foreign affairs)
  • 21/12/1864 – Gen Sherman conquers Savannah
  • 21/12/1866 – Cheyennes, Arapho’s, Sioux, Fetterman Massacre
  • 21/12/1919 – J Edgar Hoover deports anarchists/feminist Emma Goldman to Russia
  • 21/12/1946 – Frank Capra’s “It’s a Wonderful Life,” premieres
  • 21/12/1954 – Dr Sam Sheppard’s wife Marilyn is murdered (he is accused of crime)
  • 21/12/1962 – US and Cuba accord, releases bay of pigs captive
IN
THE
NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-
EDs:

OP-EDs:

REV-
IEWS:

REVIEWS:

  • Paul Mariani “A Modern Victorian”: GERARD MANLEY HOPKINS A LifeNYT, 12-14-08
  • David Blight on Robert Goodwin: The Slave Who Found a New World Separating myth from fact about Esteban Dorantes is not easy. The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South - WaPo, 12-11-08
  • Robert Goodwin: The Story of the First African-American Explorer of the American South , First Chapter – WaPo, 12-11-08
  • Jane Fletcher Geniesse: A Sect of Celibates How to escape debt and gain absolute control over your followers. AMERICAN PRIESTESS The Extraordinary Story of Anna Spafford and the American Colony in Jerusalem WaPo, 12-14-08
  • Edward Kritzler: On the High Seas JEWISH PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEANWaPo, 12-14-08
  • Max Page “Urban historian recounts 200 years’ worth of fantasies, fears of NYC’s demise”: The City’s End: Two Centuries of Fantasies, Fears, and Premonitions of New York’s Destruction AP, Newsday, 12-12-08
  • Exhibition Review – ‘One Life: The Mask of Lincoln’ Reconsidering the Man From Illinois at the National Portrait Gallery – NYT, 12-12-08
BEST
SEL-
LERS:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

  • Jon Meacham: AMERICAN LION #3 — (4 weeks on list) – 12-21-08
  • THE AMERICAN JOURNEY OF BARACK OBAMA, by the editors of Life magazine. #12 — (5 weeks on list) – 12-21-08
  • Niall Ferguson: THE ASCENT OF MONEY #14 — (2 weeks on list) – 12-21-08
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES: The Complete Front Pages 1851-2008, Introduction by Bill Keller – #20 – 12-21-08
  • Pete Souza: THE RISE OF BARACK OBAMA #34 – 12-21-08
BLOGS:

BLOGS:

QUO-
TES:

QUOTES:

  • Kenneth T. Jackson: “Citi Doesn’t Live Here Anymore as Name Comes Off NYC Skyscraper”: “Buildings no longer have important historic status for companies, if they ever did,” said Kenneth T. Jackson, a Columbia University history professor and editor of the “Encyclopedia of New York City.” “As they get larger and larger, one building does not mean much.” Bloomber, 12-12-08
PRO-
FILES:

PROFILES:

INTER-
VIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

  • Jeffrey B. Perry: Eighty years ago, a prominent black intellectual disappeared from the historical record. Jeffrey B. Perry rescued him from oblivion. (Interview) Hubert Harrison: The Voice of Harlem Radicalism, 1883-1918Scott McLemee, Inside Higher Ed, 12-10-08
FEAT-
URES:

FEATURES:

  • Amy Dru Stanley: For history professor, finding home for photo collection was a walk in the park: The historic photographs of 20th-century photojournalist Wayne Miller have been given as a gift to the University’s Department of History, following what Amy Dru Stanley calls “a typical Hyde Park story.” University of Chicago Chronicle, 12-11-08
  • James Carroll: Disputes belief that Saint Augustine was bad for the Jews – David Van Biema in Time, 12-8-08
HON-
ORS:

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Peter Brown: Irish historian wins $1 million prize: Historian Peter Brown (73), a professor of history at Princeton University, shared the 2008 Kluge Prize with Romila Thapar, from Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi. – Herald, 12-12-08
NEW
ON
THE
WEB:

New Web Sites:

EVENT
CAL.:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • April 3-4, 2009:The Obama Phenomenon: Race and Political Discourse in the United States Today, University of Memphis
ON TV:

ON TV:

  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Gladiators: Blood Sport,” Monday, December 15, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Einstein,” Tuesday, December 16, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “A Global Warning?,” Wednesday, December 17, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Breaking Vegas,” Thursday, December 18, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Gladiators: Blood Sport,” Thursday, December 18, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Wake Island: The Alamo of the Pacific,” Friday, December 19, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Bible Battles,” Saturday, December 20, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Christmas Tech,” Saturday, December 20, @ 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Banned from The Bible,” Saturday, December 20, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Beyond The Da Vinci Code,” Saturday, December 20, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Walt Disney World,” Sunday, December 21, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries: Lost Science of the Bible,” Sunday, December 21, @ 10pm ET/PT
NEW
BOOKS:

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Time Magazine: Time President Obama: The Path to the White House, December 16, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2008
  • Anthony S. Pitch: “They Have Killed Papa Dead!”: The Road to Ford’s Theater, Abraham Lincoln’s Murder, and the Rage for Vengeance, December 30, 2008
  • William E. Leuchtenburg: Herbert Hoover: The 31st President, 1929-1933 (REV), January 6, 2009
  • Adam Cohen: Nothing to Fear: FDR’s Inner Circle and the Hundred Days That Created Modern America, January 9, 2008
  • James J. Sheehan: Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe, January 13, 2009
  • Gwen Ifill: The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama, January 20, 2009
  • Daniel Mark Epstein: Lincoln’s Men: The President and His Private Secretaries, January 27, 2009
OBITS:

DEPARTED:

  • Angeliki E. Laiou: Byzantine Professor Dies of Cancer at 67 – Harvard Crimson, 12-15-08
  • William H. Pierson Jr., 97, Art Historian, Dies – NYT, 12-11-08
  • Dorothy Sterling, author of African American children’s literature, dies at 95: Sterling, who was white, developed an interest in African American history after reading the works of such radical historians as Herbert Aptheker and W.E.B. Du Bois. She wrote more than 35 books, including ‘Freedom Train: The Story of Harriet Tubman,’ and brought attention to less-known figures. – LA Times, 12-14-08
  • Studs Terkel: Hard Times Without Studs – Tom Engelhardt at tomdispatch.com, 12-12-08
  • Studs Terkel: Tribute, Voice of the Underdog – NYT, 12-8-08

Posted on Tuesday, December 16, 2008 at 2:47 AM

December 8, 2008

HISTORY BUZZ:

US POLITICS:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST STORIES:

BIGGEST STORIES: PEARL HARBOR

  • ‘Like It Happened Yesterday’ Pearl Harbor Attack Remembered During 67th Anniversary Ceremony – WaPo, 12-7-08
  • Pearl Harbor: Day of infamy: The Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor altered America. But some scholars say 9/11 is even more memorable. – Memphis Commericial Appeal, 12-7-08
  • Stephen K. Stein “Pearl Harbor: Day of infamy”: “My sense is that Pearl Harbor still resonates more with people,” said Stephen K. Stein, an award-winning assistant professor of history at the University of Memphis. “It connects us with World War II. Pearl Harbor got us into the war. It was a ‘good’ war and Americans (at home and in the military) fought it with a sense of purpose … and we won. “With 9/11 there is no closure and, for some people, it has not been fully explained. Most people don’t understand what happened, how it happened and why it happened.”
    Stein, who also teaches military strategy as an adjunct professor for the U.S. Naval War College, added that if al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden had been captured, “maybe 9/11 would resonate more.” Stein also cited differences in the speeches FDR and President George W. Bush delivered to a traumatized nation after the two events. “President Roosevelt’s speech after Pearl Harbor in which he asked Congress to declare war on Japan continues to resonate with Americans today, particularly his phrase ‘a date which will live in infamy.’ It was a masterful speech by one of our most eloquent presidents that captured Americans’ horror at the attack and determination to avenge it. “In contrast, President Bush’s speech after the Sept. 11 attack remains unmemorable, despite being one of his best speeches.” Memphis Commericial Appeal, 12-7-08
  • James McPherson “Pearl Harbor: Day of infamy”: Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian James McPherson, in a telephone interview, echoed Stein’s thoughts. “I was only 5 years old when Pearl Harbor occurred, but I do remember it always being on radio shows — ‘Remember Pearl Harbor.’ The war that followed allowed us to remember that we triumphed. “We don’t have that after 9/11. There is no feeling that we have triumphed.” – Memphis Commericial Appeal, 12-7-08
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

  • 08/12/1776 – George Washington’s retreating army crosses Delaware River from NJ
  • 08/12/1863 – Abraham Lincoln announces plan for Reconstruction of South and offers amnesty for confederate deserters
  • 08/12/1886 – American Federation of Labor (AFL) formed by 26 craft unions Samuel Gompers elected AFL president
  • 08/12/1987 – President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev sign a treaty eliminating medium range nuclear missiles
  • 10/12/1520 – Martin Luther publicly burned papal edict demands he recant
  • 10/12/1864 – General Shermans armies reach Savannah and 12 day siege begins
  • 10/12/1869 – Women suffrage (right to vote) granted in Wyoming Territory (US 1st)
  • 10/12/1898 – Spanish-American War ends; US acquires Philippines, PR and Guam
  • 10/12/1906 – Pres Theodore Roosevelt (1st American) awarded Nobel Peace Prize
  • 10/12/1915 – Pres Woodrow Wilson marries Edith Galt
  • 10/12/1919 – Nobel peace prize awarded to US president Wilson
  • 10/12/1931 – Jane Addams (1st US woman) named co-recipient of Nobel Peace Prize
  • 10/12/1978 – In Oslo, Menachem Begin and Anwar Sadat accept 1978 Nobel Peace Prize
  • 11/12/1620 – 103 Mayflower pilgrims land at Plymouth Rock (12/21 NS)
  • 11/12/1792 – France’s King Louis XVI went on trial, accused of treason
  • 11/12/1906 – US president Roosevelt attacks abuses in the Congo
  • 11/12/1916 – David Lloyd George forms British war govt
  • 11/12/1917 – 13 black soldiers hanged for alleged participation in Houston riot
  • 11/12/1931 – Brit Statute of Westminster gives complete legislative independence to Canada, Australia, NZ, South Africa, Ireland, Newfoundland
  • 11/12/1936 – King Edward VIII marries Mrs Wallis Simpson; abdicates throne Duke of York becomes King George VI
  • 11/12/1941 – Japanese attack Wake Island (only failed WW II-landing)
  • 11/12/1961 – JFK provides US miltary helicopters and crews to South Vietnam<!–
  • 13/12/1577 – Sir Francis Drake sets sail from England to go around world
  • 13/12/1774 – 1st incident of Revolution-400 attack Ft William and Mary, NH
  • 13/12/1843 – “A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens published, 6,000 copies sold
  • 13/12/1862 – Battle of Fredericksburg, VA (Marye’s Heights)
  • 13/12/1903 – Wright Bros make 1st flight at Kittyhawk
  • 13/12/1918 – Wilson, becomes 1st to make a foreign visit as president (France)
  • 13/12/1920 – League of nations establishes Intl Court of Justice in The Hague
  • 13/12/1949 – Knesset votes to transfer Israel’s capital to Jerusalem
  • 13/12/1966 – 1st US bombing of Hanoi
IN THE NEWS:

IN THE NEWS:

  • John McDonagh: Plymoth Plantation cuts veteran staff – http://www.wickedlocal.com, 12-6-08
  • Denise Spellberg: Historian taken to task for ridiculing novel Winfield Myers at Daniel Pipes’s Campus Watch, 12-3-08
  • Robert Dallek: Fox’s Chris Wallace objects when Bob Dallek equates Nixon and Bush – Jim Pinkerton at the Fox News blog, 12-2-08
  • American Historical Association: Results of 2008 AHA Election – AHA Blog, 12-1-08
  • Korea’s history: What text should high-schoolers read? – Christian Science Monitor, 12-1-08
  • Conrad Bladey: Historian proposes toast for Linthicum: J. Charles Linthicum’s family provided the name of the Anne Arundel County community, and he did his hometown proud, serving in Congress from 1911 until his death in 1932. The Democrat is best remembered for his role in the adoption of “The Star-Spangled Banner” as the national anthem. But he made a possibly more significant contribution to American history, according to a local historian: paving the way for the repeal of Prohibition. – - AP, 11-29-08
QUOTES:

QUOTES:

  • Phillip Kay “Historian says Romans faced credit crunch”: “The essential similarity between what happened 21 centuries ago and what is happening in today’s U.K. economy is that a massive increase in monetary liquidity culminated with problems in another country causing a credit crisis at home.” – UPI, 11-28-08
OP-EDs:

OP-EDs:

REVIEWS:

REVIEWS:

  • WaPo lists top 10 history books of the year – WaPo, 12-7-08
  • Boston Globe: Getting the goods – nonfiction A guide to the most memorable titles of 2008, from entertaining to inspiring – Boston Globe, 12-7-08
  • Les Standiford Holiday Books Father Christmas: THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS How Charles Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol” Rescued His Career and Revived Our Holiday SpiritsNYT, 12-7-08
  • Robert Roper: BIOGRAPHY America’s Poet as Brother: Whitman cared for injured soldiers during the Civil War. NOW THE DRUM OF WAR Walt Whitman and His Brothers in the Civil War - WaPo, 12-7-08
  • Louisa Gilder: SCIENCE Very Small, Very Weird: The struggle to understand what goes on — or doesn’t — inside the atom. THE AGE OF ENTANGLEMENT When Quantum Physics Was Reborn – WaPo, 12-7-08
  • Man of Fetters Dr. Johnson and Mrs. Thrale: Peter Martin’s “Samuel Johnson” and Jeffrey Meyers’s “Samuel Johnson: The Struggle” – The New Yorker, 12-8-08
  • Niall Ferguson: It’s Still Making the World Go ‘Round: THE ASCENT OF MONEY A Financial History of the WorldNYT, 12-2-08
  • Richard Turley Jr. “Mormon-owned press releasing Joseph Smith journals”: “He’s making this very deliberate effort to keep a record. At the same time, he has this self-consciousness,” said Richard Turley Jr., assistant historian for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “So he writes it out, scratches it out, takes a deep breath, writes it again.” – AP, 12-2-08
  • Philip Jenkins: Historian explores Christianity’s lost age, land The Lost History of Christianity: The Thousand-Year Golden Age of the Church in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia – and How It Died Reuters, 12-1-08
BEST SELLERS:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

  • Jon Meacham: AMERICAN LION #2 — (3 weeks on list) – 12-14-08
  • THE AMERICAN JOURNEY OF BARACK OBAMA, by the editors of Life magazine. #15 — (4 weeks on list) – 12-14-08
  • Niall Ferguson: THE ASCENT OF MONEY #10 — (1 weeks on list) – 12-14-08
  • THE NEW YORK TIMES: The Complete Front Pages 1851-2008, Introduction by Bill Keller – #26 – 12-14-08
  • James M. McPherson: TRIED BY WAR #30 – 12-14-08
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: TEAM OF RIVALS #34 – 12-14-08
  • Pete Souza: THE RISE OF BARACK OBAMA #35 – 12-14-08
BLOGS:

BLOGS:

  • H-SHEAR: Scholars’ roundtable examines Daniel Walker Howe’s What Hath God Wrought – Ralph Luker at HNN blog, Cliopatria, 12-3-08
  • Robert Dallek “At ‘Frost/Nixon’ Debut, It Became About Bush and Nixon”: At the Frost/Nixon screening last night, Ron Howard and show writers compared GWB’s abuses of power to Nixon’s. Wallace disagreed…”It trivializes Nixon’s crimes and completely misrepresents what George W. Bush did… I think to compare what Nixon did, and the abuses of power for pure political self-preservation, to George W. Bush trying to protect this country—even if you disagree with rendition or waterboarding—it seems to me is both a gross misreading of history both then and now.” He also had a healthy debate with renowned historian Robert Dallek. – US News, Washington Whispers, 12-2-08
PROFILES:

PROFILES:

INTER VIEWS:

INTERVIEWS:

  • Annette Gordon-Reed: “Questions for Annette Gordon-Reed History Lesson”: After a lifetime spent writing about Thomas Jefferson and the children he fathered with the slave Sally Hemings, you just won a National Book Award for your sprawling history of her family, “The Hemingses of Monticello.” It was great to win it on my birthday. – 12-7-08
FEATURES:

FEATURES:

  • “Gene Test Shows Spain’s Jewish and Muslim Mix”: The genetic signatures of people in Spain and Portugal provide new and explicit evidence of the mass conversions of Sephardic Jews and Muslims to Catholicism in the 15th and 16th centuries after Christian armies wrested Spain back from Muslim control, a team of geneticists reports. NYT, 12-4-08
  • Jane S. Gerber “Gene Test Shows Spain’s Jewish and Muslim Mix”: “One wing grossly underestimates the number of conversions,” said Jane S. Gerber, an expert on Sephardic history at the City University of New York. – NYT, 12-4-08
  • Jonathan S. Ray “Gene Test Shows Spain’s Jewish and Muslim Mix”: The finding bears on two different views of Spanish history, said Jonathan S. Ray, a professor of Jewish studies at Georgetown University. One, proposed by the 20th-century historian Claudio Sánchez- Albornoz, holds that Spanish civilization is Catholic and other influences are foreign; the other sees Spain as having been enriched by drawing from all three of its historical cultures, Catholic, Jewish and Muslim. – NYT, 12-4-08
  • Douglas Brinkley “Slaves helped build White House, U.S. Capitol”: “The apple cart has been turned over here when you have the Obamas — the first African-American couple — now actually management and you are having in some cases white Americans serving them,” says presidential historian Doug Brinkley…. Though Michelle Obama’s ancestors had to come through the ordeal of slavery, “Her children are sleeping in the room of presidents,” said Brinkley. “It’s a very great and hopeful sign.” – CNN, 12-2-08
  • Douglas Brinkley “Slaves helped build White House, U.S. Capitol”: It was the slaves that did a lot of the building the White House, they also worked there… did the service jobs – were the people that would tend the horses or clean the dishes, prepare the meals. I think Michelle should celebrate the fact that her ancestors came through the ordeal of slavery. Her children are sleeping in the room of presidents. And it’s a very great and hopeful sign. – CNN, 12-2-08
  • Arthur Schlesinger, Jr. “Obama as Hoover: The Importance of Storytelling”: As the Obama era takes shape, the roles of both Schlesinger and Michelson deserve attention. Particularly as Americans are seeing newsmagazines with cover stories comparing the President-elect who campaigned on a dour vision of scarcity with Franklin Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln, a considerable leap to understate. – American Spectator,
  • The focus is on Samuel de Champlain – Burlington Free Press, 12-1-08
HONORS:

HONORS &APPOINTED:

  • Peter Brown: Historian selected to share $1 million Kluge Prize – http://www.princeton.edu, 12-3-08
  • Eugene Moehring “Professor wins award for research on Nevada:” Eugene Moehring is one of the nation’s top urban historians UNLV’s resident expert on all things Nevada was presented with the 2008 Harry Reid Silver State Research Award Nov. 14, spotlighting UNLV’s history department and a professor who routinely shuns its glare. – The Rebell Yell, 11-24-08
SPOTTED:

SPOTTED:

NEW ON THE WEB:

New Web Sites:

EVENTS:

EVENTS:

  • April 3-4, 2009:The Obama Phenomenon: Race and Political Discourse in the United States Today, University of Memphis
ON TV:

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN 2, BOOK TV: History “Samuel Adams: A Life” Author: Ira Stoll – Sunday at 11:00 PM, and Monday at 5:00 AM
  • C-SPAN 2, BOOK TV: History Jonathan Alter “The Defining Moment” – Monday at 4:00 AM
  • C-SPAN 2, BOOK TV: History “American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House” Author: Jon Meacham – Monday at 6:00 AM
  • C-SPAN 2, BOOK TV: History “Hurricane of Independence: The Untold Story of the Deadly Storm at the Deciding Moment of the American Revolution” Author: Tony Williams – Monday at 7:15 AM
  • History Channel: “01 – The Wehrmacht: 01 – Attack on Europe,” Sunday, December 7, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “02 – The Wehrmacht: 02 – The Turning Point,” Sunday, December 7, @ 3pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “03 – The Wehrmacht: 03 – The Crimes,” Sunday, December 7, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “04 – The Wehrmacht: 04 – Resistance,” Sunday, December 7, @ 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “05 – The Wehrmacht: 05 – To the Bitter End,” Sunday, December 7, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “70′s Fever,” Sunday, December 7, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “History Rocks: The ’70s, Part 1,” Sunday, December 7, @ 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Land of Manson,” Monday, December 8, @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crude,” Tuesday, December 9, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Street Gangs: A Secret History,” Wednesday, December 10, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power,” Thursday, December 11, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Lost Pyramid,” Friday, December 12, @ 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire,” Friday, December 12, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Prophecies from Below,” Friday, December 12, @ 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Hunters,” Marathon Saturday, December 13, @ 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “FDR: A Presidency Revealed: Part 1.,” Saturday, December 13, @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “FDR: A Presidency Revealed: Part 2.,” Saturday, December 13, @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crash: The Next Great Depression?,” Saturday, December 13, @ 10pm ET/PT
COMING SOON BOOKS:

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Gary May: John Tyler: The American Presidents Series: The 10th President, 1841-1845, December 9, 2008
  • Jonathan Brent: Inside the Stalin Archives, December 9, 2008
  • Time Magazine: Time President Obama: The Path to the White House, December 16, 2008
  • George S. McGovern: Abraham Lincoln: The American Presidents Series: The 16th President, 1861-1865, December 23, 2008
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2008
  • Anthony S. Pitch: “They Have Killed Papa Dead!”: The Road to Ford’s Theater, Abraham Lincoln’s Murder, and the Rage for Vengeance, December 30, 2008
  • William E. Leuchtenburg: Herbert Hoover: The 31st President, 1929-1933 (REV), January 6, 2009
  • Adam Cohen: Nothing to Fear: FDR’s Inner Circle and the Hundred Days That Created Modern America, January 9, 2008
  • James J. Sheehan: Where Have All the Soldiers Gone?: The Transformation of Modern Europe, January 13, 2009
  • Gwen Ifill: The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama, January 20, 2009
  • Daniel Mark Epstein: Lincoln’s Men: The President and His Private Secretaries, January 27, 2009
DEPARTED:

DEPARTED:

  • William Spoelhof: Longtime Calvin College president William Spoelhof dead at age 98 – The Grand Rapids Press, 12-3-08
  • William McGrath: European Intellectual Historian Dies: William J. McGrath, professor emeritus of history at the University of Rochester who was revered for his pioneering histories of Vienna, Austria, and Sigmund Freud, died Nov. 30. He was 71. – Media Newswire, 12-2-08

Posted on Monday, December 8, 2008 at 12:23 AM

Top Young Historians: 96 – J.P. Daughton

Top Young Historians

J.P. Daughton, 38

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Assistant Professor, Department of History, Stanford University, 2004-Present
Area of Research: Late Modern European History, with particular interest in nineteenth and twentieth-century France and the history of French colonialism and imperialism. Modern French political and cultural history; Colonialism and Imperialism; religious missionaries; French republicanism; French national identity; Indochina, Madagascar, Tahiti and the Marquesas.
Education: Ph.D., History, University of California, Berkeley, 2002
Major Publications: Daughton is the author of An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914 (Oxford University Press, 2006; paperback, 2008); Winner of the George Louis Beer Prize, American Historical Association; Winner of the Alf Andrew Heggoy Book Prize, French Colonial Historical Society; A CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title of 2007. JP Daughton JPG In God’s Empire: French Missionaries and the Modern World, co-edited with Owen White (a collection of thirteen articles, currently under review with Oxford University Press). Daughton is currently working on Imperial Hardships: The Politics of Suffering in the Rise and Fall of the French Empire (book length project in progress), and Humanity So Far Away: International Organizations, European Empires, and Modern Humanitarianism (book project in progress) Daughton is also the author of numerous scholarly journal articles, book chapters and reviews including among others: “When Argentina Was ‘French’: Rethinking Cultural Politics and European Imperialism in Belle-Époque Buenos Aires,” Journal of Modern History 80 (December 2008): 831-864; “Documenting Colonial Violence: The International Campaign Against Forced Labor during the Interwar Years,” Revue de l’Histoire de la Shoah, No. 189 (October, 2008); “Recasting Pigneau de Béhaine: French Missionaries and the Politics of Colonial History,” in Nhung Tuyet Tran and Anthony Reid (eds.), Viet Nam: Borderless Histories (University of Wisconsin Press, 2006); “A Colonial Affair?: Dreyfus and the French Empire,” Historical Reflections / Réflexions historiques 31: 3 (Fall 2005): 469-84; “Kings of the Mountains: Mayréna, Missionaries, and French Colonial Divisions in 1880s Indochina,” Itinerario: International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction 25: 3/4 (2001): 185-217; Reprinted in Eric Jennings (ed.), French Colonial Indochina (University of Nebraska Press, forthcoming), and “Sketches of the Poilu’s World: Trench Cartoons from the Great War,” in Douglas Mackaman and Michael Mays (eds.), World War I and the Cultures of Modernity (University Press of Mississippi, 2000). Awards: Daughton is the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships including among others:
George Louis Beer Prize (for best book on any aspect of European international history), American Historical Association, 2007;
Alf Andrew Heggoy Prize (for best book of the year), French Colonial Historical Society, 2007;
American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Fellowship, 2006-2007 (Declined);
Stanford Humanities Postdoctoral Fellowship, Stanford University, 2002-2004;
Pew Charitable Trust Postdoctoral Fellowship, Center on Religion and Democracy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 2002-2003 (Declined);
Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, 2001-2002;
Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship, Woodrow Wilson Foundation, 2000-2001;
Fellowship and Travel Stipend, Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, University of California, San Diego, 2000-2001;
Mabelle McLeod Lewis Memorial Fellowship, 2000-2001 (Declined);
John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Prize, American Catholic Historical Association, 2000;
J. William Fulbright Foundation Fellowship, France, 1998-1999;
Dean’s Fellow in the Humanities, Stanford University, 2008-2010;
John Philip Coghlan Fellow, Stanford University, 2006-2008;
William and Flora Hewlett Endowment Fund Fellowship, Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, 2005;
Course Development Grant, Program in Ethics in Society, Stanford University, 2005;
Townsend Humanities Center Fellowship, U.C. Berkeley, 2000-2001 (Declined);
Humanities Research Grant, U.C. Berkeley, 2000-2001;
Graduate Division Fellowship, U.C. Berkeley, 1999-2000;
Henry Morse Stephens Memorial Travel Grant, U.C. Berkeley, 1999-2000;
Sidney Hellman Ehrman Travel Grant, U.C. Berkeley, 1999-2000;
Allan Sharlin Memorial Fellowship, Institute for International Studies, U.C. Berkeley, 1998-1999 Social Science Research Grant, U.C. Berkeley, 1997;
Research Grant, Center for German and European Studies, U.C. Berkeley, 1997;
Mellon Summer Research Grant, U.C. Berkeley, 1997;
Sather Fellowship, U.C. Berkeley, 1995-1996;
France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, annual conference funding for “Terror and the Making of Modern Europe: Transatlantic Perspectives on the History of Violence / Rencontres Transatlantiques sur l’Histoire de la Violence,” in collaboration with Sciences-Po (Paris), April 17-19, 2008 ($60,000);
Center for European Studies, funding for “Terror and the Making of Modern Europe: Transatlantic Perspectives on the History of Violence,” in collaboration with Sciences-Po (Paris), April 17-19, 2008 ($5,000);
Research Unit of the Division of Languages, Cultures, and Literature, for the French Culture Workshop, Stanford University, Annual Funding for 2005-06, 2006-07 ($10,000);
Mellon Workshop Fellowship, Stanford Humanities Center, for the French Culture Workshop, Annual Funding for 2003-04, 2004-05; 2006-08 ($8500 p.a.).
Additional Info:
Daughton has conducted archival research in France, Italy, and Tahiti, and he was a visiting fellow in the Faculty of History at the National University of Vietnam, Hanoi.
Co-Director, Stanford French Culture Workshop, Stanford Humanities Center, 2003-Present;
Book Review Advisory Panel, H-France, 2006-present.
Co-organizer, with Jean-François Sirinelli, Sciences-Po (Paris), of the conference, “Terror and the Making of Modern Europe: Transatlantic Perspectives on the History of Violence,” Stanford University, April 2008.

Personal Anecdote

The best thing about being an historian, in my opinion, is working in archives. The research for my book, An Empire Divided: Religion, Republicanism, and the Making of French Colonialism, 1880-1914, took me to almost twenty archives on four continents. They ranged from the high-ceilinged reading room of the Archives Nationales in Paris to a small table next to a photocopy machine in a cramped office of the Papeete, Tahiti archdiocese.

Non-historians often ask me what exactly I do at the archives. For me, it is a little like digging through the old papers left in someone’s long abandoned desk. An average box or bundle of documents – at least the ones I look at most – is often a hodgepodge of letters, handwritten notes, receipts, a calling card from some forgotten visitor, official reports, and faded photographs. Spending hours sifting through dead people’s refuse is not for everyone. But at no point in researching or writing do I feel more connected to my subject than in the archives.

There is something undeniably voyeuristic about archival work: reading letters never meant to be read by outsiders, seeing pictures not taken for posterity’s sake, perusing someone else’s secrets and exposing their plans. These remnants present great puzzles to be unraveled. Who were these people whose lives we now look into? How did they see their world, and how did they organize their vision of it? Trying to answer such questions inevitably requires looking for more and more sources, opening wider the cast of human characters, complicating the plot, drawing you in like a good mystery. The probing historian can discover things about historical figures – their motives, insecurities and contradictions – that they themselves may have denied or hidden from friends and loved ones.

Archives are also much more than repositories of documents. They are often themselves places where memories of the past come alive – sometimes in astonishing ways. One archivist, for example, at a religious archive in Paris assured me that, had the Catholic missionaries of the South Pacific failed to spread Christianity in the nineteenth century, the cannibal Polynesians would have eaten one another into extinction.

On another occasion, a French woman working in the departmental archives in Tahiti told me that she did not know why so many people wrote critically of colonialism when it was obvious that the Tahitians were happy to have gained the great cultural traditions of the French. While this struck me as a misguided assessment, I was equally surprised to have an octogenarian Vietnamese historian at the national archives in Hanoi wax nostalgic about the 1930s when he and his friends spoke French and devoured the latest books and music from Paris.

I have been in archives where I saw a rat scurry across the floor. I have unearthed worms gnawing through documents. I have seen people weep, sleep, and get angry in archives. I have even seen an archivist pass out from too much drinking at lunchtime. But I have never been bored in an archive. It is a place where Faulkner’s often quoted observation – “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” – takes on real meaning.

Quotes

By James Patrick Daughton

  • By examining the array of factors that shaped the civilizing mission, this book argues that what is often called French “colonial ideology” – the ideas behind, motivations for, and implementation of programs designed to An Empire Divided JPG reform and develop colonial societies – was in fact much less an extension of revolutionary republican values than a set of individual projects defined by degrees of dissent, debate, competition, and collaboration between people both at home and abroad. Differences of opinion over strategies of colonizing… forced administrators, missionaries, colonists, local inhabitants, and others to present, critique, and defend plans for expansion and control…. The “civilizing” policies ultimately adopted were neither strictly republican nor Catholic. Instead, they were shaped by the anxieties and aspirations of a variety of French men and women faced with the challenge of living with one another and ruling large indigenous populations. — James Patrick Daughton in “An Empire Divided”
  • About James Patrick Daughton

  • “Daughton’s work has important ramificatoins for both imperial and domestic French history…. Remarkably well-researched and well-written first book. Highly recommended.”– D.A. Harvey, CHOICE
  • “Thoroughly researched and eloquently written, Daughton’s comparative study of the complex, often contradictory, relationships between Republicans in France, the Church, and Catholic orders across the French Empire is one of a kind. His work also pays attention to critical issues of women and gender throughout, which renders this history all the more original.”– Julia Clancy-Smith, The University of Arizona
  • “Daughton’s treatment of the relations between colonial administrators and missionaries in the wake of conquest makes for fascinating and often gripping reading…. [A] richly documented and beautifully written book.” — Journal of Modern History
  • “This illuminating book explains how the political tensions between Catholics and Republicans that beset France were exported to its new colonies, with grave consequences for the subject populations. Covering a wide range of territories and examining new documents, J.P. Daughton paints a picture of a colonial enterprise tainted by hypocrisy and warped by the animosity between church and state.” — Ruth Harris, Oxford University, author of “Lourdes: Body and Spirit in the Secular Age”
  • “Under the secular Republic, the cross and the tricolor could be waved in unison in the colonies, albeit with some tension. Daughton succeeds in writing missionaries back into empire and, mostly, at elucidating their complex and shifting roles as para-colonial actors with interests of their own. Nuanced and balanced, the book is also beautifully crafted.” — Eric Jennings, author of “Vichy in the Tropics”
  • “J.P. Daughton uses three deeply researched case studies to explore the enormously important and complicated role of Christian missionaries in the construction of the French empire. Daughton takes their religious motives seriously, while also showing how their tense collaboration with the imperial project led to significant changes in how they understood their work with indigenous peoples. An Empire Divided is broad in its sympathies, gracefully written, and full of dramatic incidents; it is a major contribution to the emerging literature on the history of European imperialism.” — Thomas Kselman, University of Notre Dame
  • “The Third Republic went at the work of empire-building with a civilizing zeal, but it was not alone in its sense of mission. The Roman Catholic Church had a missionary project of its own, which, as J.P. Daughton’s excellent volume reveals, it threw itself into with a passion and on a scale altogether unsuspected. Daughton’s is a history of competing missions, of how they interacted and changed one another with lasting consequences, not just for the French, but also for the colonial populations they ruled.” — Philip G. Nord, Princeton University
  • “An elegant study of the intersection of religion and empire…. It demonstrates how under the umbrella of the French empire, regional particularities were not just shaped by responses to local conditions and peoples, they were often formed by differences and conflicts among the French themselves.” — Patricia Lorcin, H-France Review
  • Posted on Sunday, December 14, 2008 at 3:39 AM

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