History Buzz March 9, 2012: Controversial “Game Change” based on the 2008 Presidential Election & GOP Candidates John McCain & Sarah Palin Premieres on HBO Saturday, March 10 @ 9PM

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor of History Musings. She has a BA in History & Art History & a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University. Ms. Goodman has also contributed the overviews, and chronologies in History of American Presidential Elections, 1789-2008, 4th edition, edited by Gil Troy, Fred L. Israel, and Arthur Meier Schlesinger published by Facts on File, Inc. in late 2011.

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/a/af/Game_Change_2012_poster.jpg

IN FOCUS: GAME CHANGE ON HBO BASED ON MARK HALPERIN & JOHN HEILEMANN BOOK ON THE 2008 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION & GOP CANDIDATES JOHN MCCAIN & SARAH PALIN

Game Change airs on HBO, Saturday, March 10, 2012 @ 9PM

Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, Game Change

“Hollywood lies are Hollywood lies. The film is based on a false narrative.” Palin told Fox News last week. She said she has no plans to see the film though she did catch the trailer. Her PAC even created its own “trailer” to counteract “Game Change,” dubbing the HBO film “fiction.”

  • Trying to Train and Contain a Candidate: “Game Change,” an engaging HBO docudrama about Gov. Sarah Palin’s 2008 run for the vice presidency, stars Julianne Moore as the Alaska governor with her eyes on the White House…. – NYT, 3-9-12
  • ‘Game Change’ debuts Saturday, draws criticism from Palin, McCain: HBO’s much anticipated movie adaptation of “Game Change,” the best-selling book by journalists Mark Halperin and John Heilemann about the 2008 presidential election, airs Saturday night. The film has drawn criticism from two of the major characters…. – WaPo, 3-9-12
  • Sarah Palin attacks HBO’s film ‘Game Change’ about Sarah Palin: Near the end of the HBO film “Game Change,” John McCain (Ed Harris) gives kudos to his running mate Sarah Palin (Julianne Moore) during his concession speech, calling her “one of the best campaigners I’ve ever seen.”
    “Still think she’s fit for office?” says senior campaign strategist Steve Schmidt (Woody Harrelson) to campaign manager Rick Davis (Peter MacNicol).
    “Who cares?” Davis responds. “In 48 hours, nobody will even remember who she is.”…. – Atlanta Journal Constitution, 3-7-12
  • Sarah Palin comes unhinged as star rises in ‘Game Change’: There is one thing the new HBO movie “Game Change” won’t alter after it airs on television in one week: Sarah Palin still will be loved by many Republican conservatives and loathed by liberal Democrats.
    In the controversial new TV movie that aims at a behind-the-scenes portrait of the former U.S. vice presidential candidate, Julianne Moore portrays Sarah Palin as a devoted Republican who lacks basic knowledge of world affairs and careens out of control.
    Adapted from parts of the bestselling book of the same name by journalists John Heilemann and Mark Halperin, “Game Change” dramatizes Republican John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign and his choice of Palin as a running mate who was shaped into a political star, nearly leading to a nervous breakdown…. – Reuters, 3-2-12
  • Sarah Palin Takes Shots At HBO’s ‘Game Change’: Sarah Palin is firing back at the coming HBO docudrama “Game Change.” The former Alaska governor posted a video called “Game Change We Can Believe In” on YouTube that’s critical of the TV docudrama. The HBO film tells the story of the 2008 presidential campaign, focusing on John McCain’s failed bid for the White House alongside vice-presidential candidate Palin. In Palin’s YouTube parody, she labels the movie “Fact Change” and titles announce “we know the truth.” The clip also features real-life images of Palin that put her in a more positive light. In the movie, Palin is played by actress Julianne Moore…. – WSJ, 3-2-12
  • ‘Game Change’ Screenwriter Responds To Charges That Film Borrowed From Palin Biography: After concluding her debate with now-Vice President Joe Biden in the upcoming HBO movie “Game Change,” Sarah Palin tells John McCain’s campaign manager Steve Schmidt why McCain needs to definitely win the 2008 presidential election. “I so don’t want to go back to Alaska,” Palin says.
    The line, uttered by actress Julianne Moore, who portrays Palin in the film, echoes a similar one from a book about Palin — but it isn’t “Game Change,” the bestseller by Time’s Mark Halperin and New York magazine’s John Heilemann. Instead, a slight variation of the quote can be found in “Sarah From Alaska,” a book written by political reporters Scott Conroy and Shushannah Walshe, both of whom were embedded with Palin during her two months on the Republican ticket. “I just don’t want to go back to Alaska,” Palin says in “Sarah From Alaska” after the debate…. – Huff Post, 3-7-12
  • Moviegoers hail Julianne Moore’s Palin: Did DC’s political and media elite find Hollywood’s portrayal of “Game Change” and Sarah Palin fascinating? You betcha. HBO’s “Game Change” had its star-studded — for Washington, at least — premiere Thursday night in the Newseum with some of the town’s … – Politico, 3-9-12
  • Television review: ‘Game Change’: HBO’s surprisingly kind film about Sarah Palin’s run for vice president stars Julianne Moore and Ed Harris. “Game Change” with Julianne Moore and Ed Harris…. – LAT, 3-9-12
  • A star is born on ‘Game Change’ named Sarah Palin: A certain segment of the U.S. population will presumably shun “Game Change.’’
    As a warts-and-all portrayal of the 2008 campaign of GOP presidential candidate John McCain and his vice presidential running mate, Sarah Palin, this HBO film (premiering Saturday at 9 p.m. EST) has raised suspicions, and hackles, among Palin loyalists. Surely its mission is to trash her, they contend.
    Meanwhile, viewers from the other end of the political spectrum will tune in gleefully expecting the same thing: an evisceration of the world’s most famous hockey mom…. – AP, 3-8-12
  • Palin calls movie fiction Film portrays 2008 campaign: The hotly anticipated HBO movie Game Change airs this weekend just as former vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin has audaciously reinserted herself into the American political scene, suggesting on so-called Super Tuesday she’d step in to save the Republican party if necessary.
    Palin has been complaining bitterly for weeks about the film, which airs Saturday and is based on the best-selling memoir of the same name about the 2008 presidential campaign. She’s demanded HBO add a fiction disclaimer to the movie that portrays her as ill-informed, inept and possibly mentally unstable; the cable giant has refused.
    Her political action committee recently released its own two-minute video, a mock movie trailer entitled Game Change We Can Believe In.
    It’s a collection of laudatory remarks about Palin by many of the same Republican strategists who later spoke of deep regret for pushing John McCain to tap the young, dynamic Alaska governor as his running mate in a high-stakes gamble to beat Barack Obama…. – Winniped Free Press, 3-9-12
  • Around the remote: Television picks for the week of March 4-10: “GAME CHANGE” – Like a master illusionist, actress Julianne Moore makes an incredible metamorphosis to become Sarah Palin in this compelling, behind-the-scenes look into John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign…. – Kansas City Star, 3-4-12
  • HBO’s Game Change shows Sarah Palin out of her depth: There is one thing the new HBO movie Game Change won’t alter after it airs on television in one week: Sarah Palin will still be loved by many US Republican conservatives and loathed by American liberals…. – Ottawa Citizen, 3-3-12
  • ‘Game Change’ and Politics as Reality TV: There’s a great scene toward the end of HBO’s Game Change, the controversial and shamelessly entertaining movie about Sarah Palin and the 2008 presidential campaign, starring Julianne Moore as the Wasilla Windbag. A few of John McCain’s advisers hit … – RollingStone.com, 3-2-12
  • Game Change: Game Change is based on a small portion of the best-selling book of the same name by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin — the portion that eviscerates John McCain’s selection of Sarah Palin as his running mate in the 2008 presidential campaign…. – Entertainment Weekly, 3-2-12
  • ‘Game Change’ is unlikely to change minds about Sarah Palin: If you like the former vice presidential candidate, you will find the film to be offensive. If not, you are primed to enjoy it…. – USA Today, 3-8-12
  • Julianne Moore aims for ‘total immersion’: The 51-year-old Oscar-nominated actress portrays American politician and 2008 vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin in HBO’s political drama Going Rogue. The film based on the eponymous book by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin follows the 2008 US … – Belfast Telegraph, 3-2-12
  • Sarah Palin PAC unveils ‘trailer’ mocking HBO’s ‘Game Change,’: Sarah Palin has ripped the movie “Game Change,” which documents her 2008 bid for the vice presidency. Attention HBO: Sarah Palin won’t see your movie. But she will raise you a trailer…. – New York Daily News, 3-2-12
  • Sarah Palin: The big loser in ‘Game Change’: Predictably, Sarah Palin emerges as the big loser in HBO’s movie adaptation of “Game Change,” the best-selling book about the 2008 presidential race. The people in charge of the film could have done … – MarketWatch, 3-9-12
  • Dressing the Part: Julianne Moore as Sarah Palin in ‘Game Change’: The HBO movie “Game Change” has come under fire by Sarah Palin and her supporters for its characterization of her as a vice presidential candidate who was obstinate, out of her depth and even delusional. One aspect of the portrait that hasn’t been attacked: its costuming.
    “It’s a pretty easy thing to be uncontroversial about,” says director Jay Roach, whose team combed through reams of rally footage and rope line photos to source the clothes worn by Palin (played by Julianne Moore), John McCain (Ed Harris) and other members of the Republican team…. – WSJ, 3-9-12
  • Game Change: No one doubted that Julianne Moore would nail the physical details playing Sarah Palin in Game Change, about the Alaska governor’s astonishing explosion on the political scene in 2008 as John McCain’s running mate. So, yes, she does “the voice,” which … – People Magazine, 3-9-12

History Buzz February 17, 2012: American Experience’s ‘Clinton’ on PBS: That was then …

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

PBS’s ‘Clinton’: That was then …

Source: WaPo, 2-17-12

Clinton on PBS’s American Experience

Premiering February 20th and 21st, a biography of a president who rose from a broken childhood in Arkansas to become one of the most successful politicians in modern American history, and one of the most complex and conflicted characters to ever stride across the public stage.
clinton

As we get more into the nitty-gritty of the 21st century, the 1990s die of neglect.

The goodbye process takes about 15 years, but once you notice that a decade is gone, you really, really notice it: Whitney Houston departs the earthly realm from a Beverly Hills hotel room bathtub. Your new hire lets it casually slip that he was born in 1991. The IT guys finally haul off the last of the humpbacked Dell monitors from the Cubicles of the Doomed. Whoomp, there it is. (Or, whoomp, there it was.)

“Clinton,” a four-hour PBS “American Experience” documentary airing Monday and Tuesday, is an honest but sometimes tediously predictable exercise in the further Wikipedia-ing and storage-packing of those years.

Whether intentional or subliminal, the film conveys the obvious and completely mortal recognition of time’s inevitable passage, but not much else. There is no anniversary to note (besides this November’s being 20 years since his election) nor any round-number birthday ahead (65 came and went in August), so it’s puzzling why so much effort has been put into a film about this particular president, now.

Part of the problem is that the Clintons are still very much with us; legacies are still jelling. As Secretary of State, Hillary is engaged in the most important work of her career, while Bill prefers a superhero’s schedule, in constant transit to a crisis or a speaking engagement. We needn’t wonder where his thoughts are at — on any subject — because he keeps telling us. To the right’s everlasting horror, Clinton could show up anywhere, anytime.

And they are still baffled by his resilience, especially the fast rehab of his reputation after the House impeached him in 1998. They’ve watched in vain as he has ascended to elder statesman. They’ve watched people love him in spite of his sins. “That’s one of the things I’ve never figured out,” remarks former senator Trent Lott, the Mississippi Republican and majority whip whose career was derailed by a single, ill-chosen toast at Strom Thurmond’s 100th birthday party.

* * *

With observations and reflections of that sort, it would be tempting to report that “Clinton” lacks fresh news, except that I consider the death of the ’90s to be fresh — even fascinating — news. For the first time, the ’90s appear to be as old as the hills, stripped of any remaining “I Love the ’90s” fizz.

“Clinton” makes the decade look bleak and practically sepia-toned. It asks us to imagine a world that was only on the verge of having a 24-hour news cycle, a more quaint society. Newsweek got nervous about publishing reporter Michael Isikoff’s explosive discovery of the Lewinsky affair, so Lucianne Goldberg sent the news to a fairly obscure Internet gossip named Matthew Drudge. You can almost hear the crackle and hiss of an AOL dial-up — and if I’d been directing this film, you would. The people who feasted on Clinton scandal, Clinton dirt, Clinton pitfalls, Clinton defeats — they were miners panning for a new gold. The hyperwired frenzy we now live with is surely as much a legacy of the Clinton era as welfare reform and “don’t ask, don’t tell.”….

History Buzz September 9, 2011: New C-Span Series “The Contenders” Profiling Failed Presidential Candidates that Changed and Impacted Political History

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor of History Musings. She has a BA in History & Art History & a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

Associated Press

William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate at the turn of the 20th century.

HISTORY ON TV:

The Contenders Premiere

Fri., 8 – 9:30 pm ET on C-SPAN
Henry Clay
LIVE from his Ashland Estate in Lexington, Kentucky

As the 2012 presidential campaign takes shape, we’ll give historical context to our current politics by taking a look back. This Friday night, C-SPAN debuts the first LIVE program in our new history series The Contenders.

Originating from Henry Clay’s home in Lexington, Kentucky, we’ll explore the life, times, and political legacy of a man known simultaneously by his contemporaries as “The Great Compromiser” and “The Dictator” — and perhaps the most powerful politician of his time. Helping us to understand his relevancy today, his almost 50 years in politics, his support for both slavery and keeping the Union together, his quests for the presidency, and a time period covering the first half of the 19th century, we’ll be joined at Ashland Estate by:

· Kentucky State Historian James Klotter, who is currently writing a book on Clay’s presidential aspirations

· Alicestyne Turly, history professor at Louisville University and an expert on the issue of slavery in Kentucky compared to the rest of the country

· Avery Malone, tour director at Ashland Estate

To help connect the discussion to today, we’ll also see clips from House Speaker John Boehner, former Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Kentucky Senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul talking about Clay and his relevancy almost 160 years after his death.
For more information on the series and our Contenders, go to www.c-span.org/thecontenders where you’ll find videos, biographical information, election results, helpful links, and more on each of these 14 Contenders featured in the series:
Henry Clay, James G. Blaine, William Jennings Bryan, Eugene Debs, Charles Evans Hughes, Al Smith, Wendell Willkie, Thomas E. Dewey, Adlai Stevenson, Barry Goldwater, Hubert Humphrey, George Wallace, George McGovern, and Ross Perot.
Watch this Friday at 8 pm ET on C-SPAN, c-span.org, and C-SPAN Radio. The program re-airs Friday night at 11 pm on C-SPAN.

HISTORIANS’ COMMENTS

‘The Contenders’ a Nod to Failed Candidates Who Still Changed History

Source: PBS Newshour, 9-1-11

Mp3 Download

SUMMARY

A new C-SPAN series starting this month called “The Contenders” profiles failed presidential candidates who still managed to change political history. Gwen Ifill discusses the presidential race losers with George Mason University’s Richard Norton Smith and RealClearPolitics.com’s Carl Cannon.

U.S. presidential campaigns always produce a winner — 43 men have served, one of them twice, as the nation’s commander in chief.History books pay less attention to the losers, even though many had an outsized impact on the election and on the national debate. A good number of them turned out to be ahead of their times.

Beginning Sept. 9, a new C-SPAN series titled “The Contenders: They Ran and Lost but Changed Political History,” will examine 14 of the losers who turned out to be influential, even in defeat.

Richard Norton Smith, scholar in residence at George Mason University, is an adviser to the series, and Carl Cannon is Washington editor for the political website RealClearPolitics.com.

RICHARD NORTON SMITH, George Mason University:

Well, it has famously been said, the winners write the history books. And there’s a lot of truth to that.

Turns out winning and losing are relative terms. Of these 14 people, there are a number — we could debate who — who went on, perhaps, ultimately to have greater impact than the people who — quote — “won.”

More important, there are people who lost in the immediate sense, but who turned out not only to be ahead of their time, but in fact were catalysts for political transformations, the most recent example certainly being Barry Goldwater, who carried six states against Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and yet who planted the seeds of a conservative movement that arguably has yet to crest…..

I think Henry Clay may be the best president we never had.

Well, Abraham Lincoln said, “He was my beau ideal of a statesman.”He was a constructive force first part of the 19th century. He’s the bridge between Alexander Hamilton and Abraham Lincoln, the idea that government had a significant role to play. I mean, it’s curious. Conservatives in the 19th century believed in using government as an agent of capitalist development….

Clay was like the speaker of the House on the day he arrived in the House of Representatives, he, of course, known as the great compromiser. The last one in 1850 arguably delayed the Civil War for 10 years, which gave the North an opportunity to become that much stronger, and, equally important, allowed Abraham Lincoln to emerge from obscurity….
Charles Evans Hughes…. A very successful governor of New York, reformer beginning in the 20th century. Then he was put on the Supreme Court, left the court in 1916 to run a very close race against Woodrow Wilson.

He went back to service in the 1920s as secretary of state under two presidents. But his greatest contribution, arguably, his greatest historical significance, came in 1937 when FDR tried famously to pack the Supreme Court. Hughes was then chief justice. Employing all of his old political wiles, he almost single-handedly managed to thwart the president’s effort to change the court in a way that I think a lot of people today, and certainly even then, regarded as radical….

Tom Dewey, someone who tends to be written off as the guy who…. … who lost to Harry Truman.

If Tom Dewey had been elected in 1948, I would — I think you would never have heard of Joe McCarthy.

One, Dewey is a prosecutor. The first national political debate in America was in 1948. Tom Dewey in Oregon against Harold Stassen, the question being, shall we outlaw the Communist Party of America? And Dewey, ironically, the old prosecutor, took the civil libertarian position.

But, beyond that, Dewey was a boss. He was used to having his way. Joe McCarthy wouldn’t have been allowed to become the phenomenon that he had. Dewey would have taken care of it, and Dewey would have cut McCarthy off at the knees.

 

Richard Norton Smith: Don’t Call Them ‘Losers’

Source: NYT, 9-8-11

On cable news these days Republicans are warring for attention, as the presidential primary season reaches a boiling point, and Democrats are wondering how to win despite a wretched economy. Meanwhile the C-SPAN staff is doing what almost no one else on television does: reaching back into history for campaign lessons.

Associated Press

Thomas E. Dewey was twice nominated for president.

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The first person to be profiled is Henry Clay, the successful speaker of the House and unsuccessful Whig Party candidate for president in 1844.

Underwood and Underwood

Charles Evans Hughes waged a “not very effective campaign” for president in 1916.

Associated Press

George S. McGovern, the senator who was the Democratic presidential nominee in 1972.

But it’s doing so in an unusual way. On Friday night that public-affairs channel will start a 14-week series about the presidents who could have been but never were. Called “The Contenders” — purposefully not “The Losers” — the series is about politicians who lost elections but, to borrow from its self-description, “changed political history” anyway.

“The idea is to offer an alternative school of political history,” said Richard Norton Smith, the presidential historian who is a consultant to C-SPAN and who came up with the idea for the series. He said, “More than a few who were deemed losers in their time turned out to be winners in the longer run.”

The first person to be profiled is Henry Clay, the successful speaker of the House and unsuccessful Whig Party candidate for president in 1844 who was known as the Great Compromiser, revealing one of the reasons that Mr. Smith said the series was “not without relevance in our time.”

So many failed candidates now seem to be staples of our national news diet, whether it’s Sarah Palin with her “will she or won’t she?” run for president; Al Gore, with his continuing campaign about climate change; Mike Huckabee, with his new talk-show career; or even John Edwards, with his fall from the op-ed page to the tabloid cover. But the current crop didn’t inspire the series, said Mark Farkas, its executive producer.

“We knew we wanted to do a history series before the presidential election was really kicked off,” Mr. Farkas said Wednesday, taking a break from reviewing video clips for the Clay episode. Studying the runners-up, he said, is a “great way to track how people have run for the presidency and how they have interacted with the media.”

The most recent crop of candidates wouldn’t have qualified for the series. To be a contender the person had to have run for president before 1996. Mr. Farkas said Mr. Gore, who ran for president in 2000, was considered for the series, but the producing group decided that “history’s still being written about 2000.”

The series starts with Clay and ends on Dec. 9 with Ross Perot, who ran for president in 1992 (and again in 1996). In between are men — they are all men — like William Jennings Bryan, the three-time presidential candidate at the turn of the 20th century; Eugene V. Debs, the union leader who ran on a socialist platform five times, once from prison; Thomas E. Dewey, the New York governor who was the Republican nominee in 1944 and 1948; and George S. McGovern, the senator who was the Democratic nominee in 1972.

Mr. Smith said the producing team was careful to include an equal number of Republicans and Democrats and a “good sampling” of third-party candidates.

“You can play all sorts of parlor games with this topic,” he said. “Would these guys have been better than the people who beat them? How might history have been different?”

C-SPAN’s schedule is determined by Congress much of the time because the channel is committed to showing the House of Representatives whenever it is in session. But Friday night is typically free for original programming because the House tends to dismiss itself for the weekend. In 2007 Mr. Smith was a consultant for a Friday series that was set at presidential libraries. “We were combing the treasures of the collections,” he said.

Similarly, each 90-minute episode of “The Contenders” will be produced live from a location that was important in the life of the featured person. The episode about Clay will be broadcast from his former plantation in Lexington, Ky., which is significant, Mr. Farkas said, because “many of the compromises that Clay made were over slavery.” Guests on each episode will include estate or museum curators, outside historians and authors.

The locations are significant because “these people are really windows into their time period as well,” Mr. Farkas said.

Mr. Smith, who is a professor at George Mason University and the author of books about Dewey, Herbert Hoover, George Washington and others, became one of C-SPAN’s top house historians after befriending Brian Lamb, the founder and chief executive of the network. They have, Mr. Smith said with a laugh, a “curious basis for a friendship:” Mr. Lamb found out in 1993 that Mr. Smith had visited the grave site of every United States president and then decided to do the same. (There are no plans at the moment for a series about the grave sites.)

Mr. Smith said he perceived “The Contenders” to be an alternative to the constant coverage of the current Republican primary campaign, but relevant to the coverage too. Take Mr. Perot, for instance. “Perot put the deficit on the agenda in a way that made it virtually impossible for whoever won to avoid doing something about it,” he said.

Perhaps there are lessons too for the losers — or contenders — themselves. The Oct. 7 episode will profile Charles Evan Hughes, who governed New York before joining the Supreme Court in 1910. A Republican, Hughes waged a “not very effective campaign” for president in 1916, but then became the secretary of state and later the nation’s chief justice. He wrote opinions that supported elements of the New Deal and strengthened free-press protections and fended off a proposal to add more justices to the court.

“He never even served in Congress,” Mr. Smith said. “But it’s hard to find many public servants who did as much, as well, as long.”

A version of this article appeared in print on September 8, 2011, on page C1 of the New York edition with the headline: Don’t Call Them ‘Losers’.

History Buzz August 28, 2011: National Geographic Channel Presents George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview — 10th Anniversary of the Terror Attacks on the US

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAPHistory Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor of History Musings. She has a BA in History & Art History & a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

Former President George W. Bush.

HISTORY ON TV:

National Geographic Channel presents George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview, a world premiere documentary that reveals exclusive, first-person insight into the former president’s experience following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In the most in-depth on-camera interview he has ever given on the subject, President Bush recalls what he was thinking and feeling and what drove the real-time, life-or-death decisions he faced in the first minutes, hours and days after the most lethal terrorist attacks ever on U.S. soil. Hear in unprecedented, intimate detail what he grappled with as both commander in chief, and as a man concerned for his family and fellow citizens. George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview also takes viewers behind the scenes with extensive archival footage and exclusive materials directly from his library that open a new window into his personal experiences during that historic day that changed the face of America, and the world, forever. Nat Geo Channel, 8-28-11

“Sept. 11 is a monumental day in our nation’s history,a significant day, and it obviously changed my presidency. I went from being a president that was primarily focused on domestic issues to a wartime president. It’s something I never anticipated nor something I ever wanted to be.” — President George W. Bush

  • Bush on 9/11: ‘This is what war was like in the 21st century’: On Sunday, Aug. 28, two weeks before the 10th anniversary of that day (in other words, today), National Geographic Channel premieres “George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview,” a one-hour documentary on the former president recalling the events of that day, and the days afterward, with clips and photos…. – LAT, 8-28-11
  • 9/11 + 10 years: Ready or not, TV looks back: George W. Bush, seen here in the Oval Office, recounts his actions and thoughts on Sept. 11 and the following days in National Geographic’s “George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview. … – WaPo, 8-26-11
  • Nat Geo’s Bush 911 special: Sitting in front of a plain black backdrop, President George W. Bush explains in a steady voice how he called Ted Olson, the lawyer who argued the Bush v. Gore case, to offer his prayers and condolences just after the 9/11 attacks. … – Politico, 8-28-11
  • Bush Re-tells the 9/11 Story As He Lived It: While all Americans remember where they were on the day of the deadliest attack on this nation’s soil, few have had the opportunity to hear about it from the American at the center of the tragedy and its aftermath. … – Fox News, 8-24-11
  • ‘George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview’: Former president projects calm with no qualms: At several points in his first sit-down interview devoted entirely to 9/11, former President George W. Bush says the primary responsibility of a leader during a crisis is to project calm. Even now, almost 10 years after the event…. – New York Daily News, 8-25-11
  • Bush reflects on 9/11: A “turning point in American life”: As the 10-year anniversary of 9/11 nears, the man at the center of the historic attacks on US soil is now speaking candidly on his personal experience and reflecting on his decision-making as he unexpectedly became a wartime president. … – CBS News, 8-24-11
  • Bush interview on 9/11 to air Sunday: Former President George W. Bush wrote about 9/11 in his memoir, Decision Points, but many people have not heard him recall the horror of that day. As this article in the Wall Street Journal eloquently notes, many will be drawn to their TVs to mark the anniversary…. – Dallas Morning News, 8-26-11
  • George W. Bush recalls 9/11 in significant National Geographic Channel documentary: With the approach of the 10 th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, there is an abundance of television programming that looks back. “George W. Bush: The 9/11 Interview” stands out, however. The former president granted just one interview…. – Salt Lake Tribune, 8-25-11
  • ‘Never forget’: George W. Bush recounts 9/11 in interview: In the years since he left the White House, former President George W. Bush has all but retired from the spotlight. He’s never been a fan of the media. Yet in perhaps his longest interview ever, the ex-commander-in-chief sits down…. – Boston Herald, 8-28-11
  • George W. Bush speaks about day of terrorist attacks: Former President George W. Bush said he tried to “project a sense of calm” in the first moments following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. Bush spoke about his initial reactions in an interview…. – The Hill, 8-24-11
  • ABC, Fox News Run Clips From National Geographic’s George W. Bush 9/11 Interview: National Geographic Channel’s upcoming interview with former President George W. Bush is beginning to get some attention from TV news. Nat Geo released clips from the interview to some outlets, including ABC News and sister network Fox News Channel.
    ABC ran clips on “Good Morning America” “ABC World News” and “Nightline” yesterday, while FNC featured it during its news programs this morning. ABC had Terry Moran doing a voiceover over clips from the special, which runs on Nat Geo Sunday evening…. – Media Bistro, 8-28-11

Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: Black in Latin America, Important Latino History Lesson

Source: My Latino Voice, 4-18-11

blackinlatam

Beginning on April 19th, PBS will air the four part series “Black in Latin America” hosted by Harvard professor Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. Gates explores the cultural, religious, artistic and musical influences of Africa on the Caribbean and Latin America. Historian Gates said that between 1502 to 1867, 12.5 million Africans were brought to the new world as slaves; of that number only 450,000 came to the United States and the rest were sent “south of Miami,” he said.

Often never taught in primary, high school and some colleges the influence of Africa in Latino America has been suppressed. Latinos, who literally can see the influence of Africa on each other’s faces, in places like Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Peru, Panama and Columbia, live in denial that they have anything to do historically or culturally with Africans or African Americans.

In some instances being in total denial, Latinos tend to identify all too often with Europe while failing to acknowledge the contributions of Africa in Latino life, culture and music, and for far too long history was denied to Latinos searching for cultural identification….READ MORE

Niall Ferguson: why the West is now in decline

Source: Telegraph UK, 3-6-11

For 500 years Western civilisation was full of self-belief, but now, historian Niall Ferguson argues in his new Channel 4 series, its dominance is coming to an end.

Niall Fergurson in his new Channel 4 series, Civilization: is the West History?

Niall Ferguson in his new Channel 4 series, Civilization: is the West History? Photo: Channel 4

…Yet any history of the world’s civilisations that underplays the degree of their gradual subordination to the West after 1500 is missing the essential point – the thing most in need of explanation. The rise of the West is, quite simply, the pre-eminent historical phenomenon of the second half of the second millennium after Christ. It is the story at the very heart of modern history. It is perhaps the most challenging riddle historians have to solve.

In my new book and series, I argue that what distinguished the West from the Rest – the mainsprings of global power – were six identifiably novel complexes of institutions and associated ideas and behaviours. For the sake of simplicity, I summarise them under six headings: 1. Competition 2. Science 3. Property rights 4. Medicine 5. The consumer society 6. The work ethic.

To use the language of today’s computerised, synchronised world, these were the six killer applications – the killer apps – that allowed a minority of mankind originating on the western edge of Eurasia to dominate the world for the better part of 500 years.

This is of more than purely historical interest. For it is only by identifying the causes of Western ascendancy that we can hope to estimate with any degree of accuracy the imminence of our fall.

My conclusion is that we are already living through the twilight of Western predominance. But that is not just because most of the Rest have now downloaded all or nearly all of our killer apps. It is also because we ourselves have lost faith in our own civilisation.

Civilization: the West and the Rest (Allen Lane) costs £25 T £23 plus £1.25 p&p. Call 0844 871 1515 or click here. The series starts on Sunday 6 March on Channel 4 at 8.00pm

Niall Ferguson: My modest mission? To change the world

Source: Independent UK, 3-6-11

As his series ‘Civilisation’ – an echo of Kenneth Clark’s renowned television epic – begins tonight, celebrity historian Niall Ferguson tells Matthew Bell about the sacrifices he has had to make to build his empire

JUSTIN SUTCLIFFE

There’s no doubt Ferguson is capable of hard work: ‘Civilisation’ is his ninth book and fifth TV series in just 16 years

 

Apart from the £1.5m gift from Saif Gaddafi, which cost the London School of Economics its director on Thursday, Niall Ferguson is the flashiest bit of bling on campus right now. He certainly looks expensive, in a Savile Row suit and playboy white shirt – open-necked, of course, to offset the tan – though he pooh-poohs rumours that he earns £3m a year.

If the 46-year-old historian and Orlando Bloom lookalike seems out of place in a drab don’s cell, that’s because the world stage is more his scene these days. He’s the Laurence A Tisch professor of history at Harvard, the William Ziegler professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, and, when he’s not giving lucrative advice to hedge funds, he shares homes in Manhattan and London with his girlfriend, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, the Somali-born Dutch ex-MP, who lives under threat of a fatwa for holding anti-Islamic views.

Tonight, as he helpfully reminded friends by email last week, he is back on telly to present the first of a six-part series, Civilisation. It accompanies a book of the same name, a double-pronged attempt to help 16-year-olds get to grips with Western history from the 1500s to the present. It’s divided into six areas, which he calls his six “killer apps”, a gimmick so irritating they’ll surely put off all but the most bovine viewers. Actually, he agrees they are “slightly annoying”, but argues that it’s a good analogy because “outwardly these things are simple, an icon you click on, but in fact they’re very complicated on the inside – just like an app”.

Whatever. The question is: do we really need another breathy TV series repackaging the past as a sexy novelty? David Starkey, Simon Schama, Andrew Marr – haven’t we been here before? “I don’t accept that I am re-presenting stuff that has been written about extensively,” he sniffs. “Anybody who claims that this is somehow rehashed old stuff is” – sniff – “is actually libelling me. Part of my role is to be a synthesiser of material, but that is not the same thing as reheating other people’s meals.”

There’s no doubt Ferguson is capable of hard work: Civilisation is his ninth book and fifth television series in just 16 years. But for all that, he gets tetchy if you challenge his views, hinting at a monstrous ego. Ask him about imperialism, for instance, and he lets off a deep sigh before launching into a rant about how it’s “a very stupid position” to talk only about European empires (there have been many all over the world) and seek to lay the blame for all the world’s ills on them. The terminology gets even more playground when he says “most sane people” agree that one of the greatest achievements of Western civilisation was the treatment of infectious diseases, and that it’s thanks to the Empire that this knowledge spread. But his book, Empire, did argue that the British Empire was a good thing, right? “The point of that book was to explain that, like all historical phenomena, empires have benefits as well as costs. And the British Empire had quite a lot of benefits. The book never glosses over the costs, as anybody who reads it will confirm, but a good number of people with axes to grind thought it would be more fun to skip the reading and caricature the book.”…READ MORE

Robert E. Lee PBS special airs on Jan. 3, 2011 @ 9pm

Source: Washington Times, 1-20-11

The local PBS stations will present a 90-minute documentary on the life of Robert E. Lee tomorrow evening at 9:00 p.m.,  the first of a series of three programs in the “American Experience” series, kicking off the Sesquicentennial observance which begins this year.

The program was duly dissected by Washington Post writer Hank Stuever, who seemed to bend over backwards in his desire to NOT like it, with grudging admissions here and there that  at least there had been no “biographical bombshells, undiscovered offspring or recently unearthed documents.”

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