Top Young Historians: 16 – Yanek Mieczkowski

TOP YOUNG HISTORIANS

Edited by Bonnie K. Goodman

16: Yanek Mieczkowski, 3-27-06

Basic Facts

Teaching Position: Associate Professor of History, Dowling College.
Chairman, Dowling College History Department (May 2000-May 2003)
Education: Ph.D. Columbia University, 1995
Area of Research: Twentieth-century America, The American Presidency, US Presidential Elections
Major Publications: Mieczkowski is the author of Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s, (University Press of Kentucky, 2005); The Routledge Historical Atlas of Presidential Elections, (Routledge Press, 2001); and Instructor’s Manual for America in Modern Times, by Alan Brinkley & Ellen Fitzpatrick. (McGraw-Hill, 1997).
Yanek Mieczkowski JPG Contributor to The American National Biography (Oxford University Press, 1998); chapter on Gerald R. Ford for The Reader’s Companion to the American Presidency, edited by Alan Brinkley & Davis Dyer (Houghton Mifflin); The History News Service and The History News Network.
Awards: Mieczkowski is the recipient of Released Time Grants, Dowling College Long-Range Planning and Development Committee Course Releases Awarded for Research/Writing (1997-present); Abilene Travel Grant, The Dwight D. Eisenhower Foundation, 2005; Gerald R. Ford Foundation Research Grant, 1992, 2003; The Rockefeller Archive Center Research Grant, Rockefeller University, 1996; Carl Albert Congressional Research and Studies Center Visiting Scholars Grant, The University of Oklahoma at Norman, 1995; Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship, The Lilly Library, Indiana University, 1995.
Additional Info: Mieczkowski has also been a Reader for the Advanced Placement Exam in U.S. History, Educational Testing Service; Faculty Advisor, Dowling College chapter of the Phi Alpha Theta History Honor Society; Oral histories: the Dwight D. Eisenhower presidency; the Gerald R. Ford presidency; friends and family of Ernie Davis (first African American to win the Heisman Trophy); Television commentator for “Our Town,” Long Island Cablevision “Our Town: Meet the Authors” on Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s (May 10, 2005) and The Routledge Historical Atlas of Presidential Elections (Sept. 17, 2004); Consultant for McGraw-Hill, Prentice Hall, Pennsylvania Historical Society; Writing Fellow, The American National Biography.

Personal Anecdote

My Search for a Missing Ford Administration Member

I had been searching for him a long time. His name was Russell Freeburg, and he served as the first director of President Gerald Ford’s “Whip Inflation Now (WIN)” program. Ford employed numerous economic weapons to combat the high inflation of the 1970s, including an attempt to rally citizens in a consumer crusade against rising prices. Yet almost as soon as Ford unveiled the WIN program, it faltered. Critics ridiculed it as feckless and trite, and within a few months Ford abandoned it, partly because a deep recession gripped the country, making an anti-inflation campaign the wrong economic medicine.

I was researching a book on Ford’s presidency and came across documents at the Gerald Ford Presidential Library naming Russell Freeburg as the first WIN director. My research depended heavily on oral interviews with Ford administration members, and I had enjoyed considerable luck in locating them and recording their recollections. Yet the Ford Library had little information on Freeburg; he seemed to have vanished without a trace. I did a white pages search and located a person with the same name in Florida, and I wrote to him. Weeks passed with no response. Finally, one day a handwritten letter arrived, and inside I found words that seemed like magic: “I am the Russell Freeburg you’re looking for.” He explained that he was spending the summer at his cottage in Michigan, and he left a phone number.

I called immediately and told him that I was planning a trip to the Ford Library in Ann Arbor. Could I see him at that time? His cottage was a good five hours from Ann Arbor, near Lake Michigan, but he welcomed a visit. Not wishing to trouble him for directions, I told him that I could find his home on MapQuest. “You’re not going to find this cottage on MapQuest,” he predicted. On the telephone, I could hear someone laughing in the background, and he said, “You see–even my wife’s laughing. MapQuest’s not going to show this place.” I had no idea why he had such little confidence in MapQuest, but I told him I’d try. As it turned out, MapQuest did indeed provide directions, and on a late August day, I drove out to Frankfurt, Michigan.

It was beautiful country, high on Michigan’s lower peninsula. The cool air told me that I was far north, and even though it was still summer, I could see splotches of color marking the tree leaves. As I approached his home, carefully following MapQuest’s directions, I began to see why Freeburg and his wife got such a kick out of the notion that MapQuest would show his cottage. It was in the middle of a forest! I seemed to leave civilization, traveling on a dirt road deep into the woods. But I spotted some cottages, and the directions told me I was there. I knocked on the door of what I believed was Freeburg’s home, and a tall gentleman approached. Before I even got a chance to ask, “Are you Mr. Freeburg?”, he looked down at me and said, “Well. My apologies to MapQuest.”

Interviewing Freeburg that day, I gained valuable insight into WIN. He reiterated what President Ford had told me, that it was just one symbolic part of a larger, more substantive administration fight against inflation, and he spoke of his frustration that there hadn’t been enough time to plan, staff, and fund WIN during its brief existence. I left that day feeling that I could more accurately tell the story of WIN’s rise and fall.

I’ve stayed in touch with Russell over the years, and I was saddened to learn that his wife Sally died last fall. I’ll always remember her cheerful laughter on the telephone, which marked the beginning of a journey that brought WIN, MapQuest, and history together in a quiet forest near Lake Michigan.

Quotes

By Yanek Mieczkowski

  • The post-Vietnam, post-Watergate suspicion was highly visible in the media. After covering the Vietnam War and Watergate and trapping the president in lies during both events, the press would not let presidential statements go unexamined. Reporters, hunting for fame, fortune, and Pulitzer Prizes, engaged in “investigative journalism” both in print and on television. (CBS’s news magazine, 60 Minutes, became a top-rated program during the 1970s and spawned imitations such as ABC’s 20/20.) Ford became the subject of the more aggressive and cynical journalistic code. An example occurred in early 1975, when NBC White House correspondent Tom Brokaw interviewed him at the White House. The young reporter asked Ford if he was “intellectually up to the job of being president.” The audacious question at once illustrated three phenomena: the new, bold press behavior; the diminished reverence that the media felt toward the presidency and its occupant; and the negative public image plaguing Ford. Ford replied by mentioning his solid academic performance at the University of Michigan and Yale Law School. But this was not enough. The next day, reporters demanded that the White House furnish transcripts of Ford’s grades. Jerald terHorst, Ford’s first press secretary, commented that the “distrust was deep and almost endemic. . . . You couldn’t talk about policy and the need for continuity without someone questioning whether there was a devious plot behind it all. The press had been feeding on Watergate and Vietnam for so long that it was hard to shift gears.” Government officials, journalist Bob Woodward believed, were usually guilty as charged, which gave the press additional incentive to pursue aggressively allegations of wrongdoing. — Yanek Mieczkowski in “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”
  • “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s (University Press of Kentucky, 2005) represents the culmination of nearly 15 years of research on Gerald Ford and 1970s America. This work, which reassesses the Ford presidency as more successful than many observers have previously thought, examines the great crises of the 1970s and Ford’s efforts to solve them: economic stagflation, energy shortages, the cold war, the scandal-tainted presidency after Watergate, and jarring transformations in America’s political system. Drawing on numerous interviews with President Ford, cabinet officers, and members of the 94th Congress, as well as extensive archival research, Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s is both a political biography and survey of 1970s America, and it will surprise and fascinate readers with its intriguing portrait of a president and his times. — Yanek Mieczkowski on “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”

About Yanek Mieczkowski

  • “By a masterful analysis, Mieczkowski shows how Ford restored credibility to government and promoted amicable relations with Congres.”– Richard Lowitt, University of Oklahoma praising “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”
  • “One of the best presidential biographies I have read. It explains the rise of the Republican Party as a ruling majority today. It is fast paced and extremely well written. It is a worthy assessment of Mr. Ford’s presidency.” — (Lanett, AL) Valley Times-News reviewing “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”
  • “This ambitious work calls for a reexamination of the Ford presidency in light of the formidable challenges he faced upon taking office. A welcome and important addition to the literature on the Ford presidency.” — Library Journal reviewing “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”
  • “The reader come away from reading this fine and impeccably researched book with a new appreciation for Gerald Ford as a sophisticated thinker and a person with a consistent vision for the nation’s domestic and international policy. . . . Succeeds admirably as a political biography.”– Business History Review reviewing “Gerald Ford and the Challenges of the 1970s”
  • “He’s a great professor!”…”Tremendously intelligent; very challenging.”… “Very intelligent. Quite informative. This class should be for history lovers only. This mans love of history is wasted on none history majors.”…”really knows his history… overall he is an excellent teacher”…”Expects much but is an awesome history professor.” — Anonymous students

Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 at 1:56 PM

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History Buzz: March 2006

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

March 27, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
BIGGEST STORY:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
  • Paul Berman on Francis Fukuyama: Neo No More America at the CrossroadsNYT, 3-26-06
  • Joshua Zeitz: Zelda, Clara and Other Women Gone Wild Flapper : A Madcap Story of Sex, Style, Celebrity, and the Women Who Made America ModernNYT, 3-24-06
  • Francis Fukuyama: The War Among the Conservatives A leading neocon thinker breaks ranks with his former allies over Iraq – Washington Post, 3-26-06
  • Jerome Armstrong and Markos Moulitsas Zuniga: Why Can’t Democrats Win? Crashing the Gate Netroots, Grassroots, and the Rise of People-Powered Politics NYT, 3-26-06
  • Jane Glover: They Loved Wolfgang Mozart’s WomenNYT, 3-26-06
  • Gershom Gorenberg, Walter Laqueur: The Battle for the Holy Land – Washington Post, 3-26-06
  • Historical Fiction, James Morrow: Wicked In colonial America, a young woman sets out to prove that there’s no such thing as witches – Washington Post, 3-26-06
  • James L. Swanson: ‘Manhunt’ a thrilling history – The Post and Courier, 3-26-06
  • John Lewis Gaddis: Misses the Soviet angle in the Cold War – Tony Judt in the NY Review of Books, 3-23-06
  • Michael Kazin: William Jennings Bryan A Complicated, Consequential Leader A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings BryanChristianity Today, 3-20-06
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Historian David McCullough to a Senate Committee in June on the No Child left Behind Act: “history is being put on the back burner or taken off the stove altogether in many or most schools, in favor of math and reading.” – LA Daily News, 3-26-06
SPOTTED:
ON TV:
  • History Channel: Auschwitz: The Forgotten Evidence, Sunday, March 26 @ 8pm ET/PT –
  • PBS: American Experience, “Eugene O’Neill: A Documentary Film” Monday, Mar. 27 @ 9pm – PBS
  • History Channel: Battlefield Detectives “The War of 1812: the Chesapeake and the Shannon” Wednesday, Mar. 29 @ 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: Hitler and Stalin: Roots of Evil, Wednesday, Mar. 27 @ 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: The Plot to Kill Ronald Reagan, Thursday, Mar. 30 @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: True Story of the Bridge on the River Kwai, Saturday, Apr. 1 @ 6pm ET/PT
  • C-Span2, BookTV: In Depth: Shelby Steele, Sunday, Apr. 2 at 12pm & Monday, Apr. 3, @ 12am- BookTV
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #13, (6 weeks on list) 4-2-06
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #19 – 4-2-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Colin G. Calloway: The Scratch of a Pen : 1763 and the Transformation of America, Mar. 31, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Ronald Kessler: Laura Bush: An Intimate Portrait of the First Lady, Apr. 4, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Jon Meacham: American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation, Apr. 4, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Efraim Karsh: Islamic Imperialism : A History, Apr. 11, 2006- Amazon.com
  • Robert Dallek & Terry Golway: Let Every Nation Know, Apr. 17, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Gordon Wood: Revolutionary Characters : What Made the Founders Different, May 18, 2006 – Amazon.com
HONORED:
DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, March 26, 2006 at 5:25 PM

March 20, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
BIGGEST STORY:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
  • Alan Brinkley on Kevin Phillips: Clear and Present Dangers American TheocracyNYT, 3-19-06
  • Eric Foner on Raymond Arsenault: Bound for Glory Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial JusticeNYT, 3-19-06
  • Ira Berlin & Leslie M. Harris: Our Captive Past Slavery in New YorkNYT, 3-19-06
  • Harvey C. Mansfield: Who’s the Man? ManlinessNYT, 3-19-06
  • Elaine Feinstein: Not Silenced Anna of All the Russias: The Life of Anna AkhmatovaNYT, 3-19-06
  • Richard Carwardine: British Historian Crafts Masterful Political Biography of Abraham Lincoln – Huntington News Network, 3-17-06
  • Kevin Phillips: Tying Religion and Politics to an Impending U.S. Decline American TheocracyNYT, 3-17-06
  • Francis Fukuyama: Supporter’s Voice Now Turns on Bush America at the CrossroadsNYT, 3-14-06
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
  • James L. Swanson: Fascinated by Lincoln’s Assassination, and the Trail of the Killer – NYT, 3-15-06
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Jill Lepore on teaching about slavery in the North: Most Americans do not know the story of slavery in the North. There’s no reason to hide the fact that New York City was built by slaves. It’s an important part of the city’s past.” – AP, 3-17-06
  • Michael Kazin on the Third Anniversary of the Iraq War: “During Vietnam, Lyndon Johnson said we can fight them there or fight them here, but no one believed it. This time, there’s more fear about what happens next.” – Courier Post Online, 3-19-06
SPOTTED:
  • Richard Larsen: Historian to discuss life during Civil War in Minnesota and Wisconsin, Mar. 28, 2006 – Pioneer Press, 3-17-06
  • Billy D. Higgins: Book signing for A Stranger and a Sojourner: Peter Caulder, Free Black Frontiersman in Antebellum ArkansasBaxter Bulletin, 3-16-06
  • Laurel Thatcher Ulrich: Discussing “Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History,” Mar. 29, 2006 @ the University of Notre Dame – South Bend Tribune, 3-16-06
  • Mark E. Neely, Jr.: To Compare Civil Liberties Restraints of Lincoln Era to Post-Sept. 11, Mar. 23, 2006 @ SUNY Cortland – SUNY Cortland News, 3-16-06
  • H.R. McMaster: Featured in 60 Minutes story about Iraqi town taken back by US – 60 Minutes, 3-12-06
  • Historians: Book Conference to honor legacy of Shelby Foote @ University of Mississippi, Mar. 30-Apr. 1, 2006 – Daily Journal, 3-12-06 and U of Miss Conference Registration
  • David Wrobel: K-12 Teachers Invited To Partner With History Professors At CU-Boulder Center Of The American West Event, Mar. 22, 2006- CU Boulder News & Events, 3-9-06
ON TV:
  • PBS: American Experience, “Murder of the Century,” Monday, Mar. 20, 2006 @ 9pm – PBS
  • History Channel: UFO Files Texas’ Roswell, Monday, March 20 @ 8pm ET/PT –
  • History Channel: Digging for the Truth “Troy: Of Gods and Warriors,” Monday, March 20 @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: The True Story of the Philadelphia Experiment, Wednesday, March 22 @ 11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: Decoding The Past Secret Brotherhood of Freemasons, Thursday, March 23 @ 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces, Friday, March 24 @ 8pm ET/PT
  • Caligula: Reign of Madness, Friday, March 24 @ 10pm ET/PT
  • C-Span2: After Words: Kevin Phillips and Grover Norquist, Saturday, March 25 @ 9:00 pm & Sunday, March 26 @ 6:00 pm @ 9:00 pm – BookTV
  • History Channel: Women’s History Month Listings – History Channel
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • James L. Swanson: Manhunt The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln’s Killer, #6, (5 weeks on list) 3-26-06
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #11 (20 weeks on list) – 3-26-06
  • David McCullough: 1776, #26 – 3-26-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Kevin Phillips:American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money in the 21st Century, Mar. 21, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Jerome Armstrong & Markos Moulitsas Zuniga: Crashing the Gate: Netroots, Grassroots, and the Rise of People-Powered Politics, Mar. 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Colin G. Calloway: The Scratch of a Pen : 1763 and the Transformation of America, Mar. 31, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Ronald Kessler: Laura Bush: An Intimate Portrait of the First Lady, Apr. 4, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Jon Meacham: American Gospel: God, the Founding Fathers, and the Making of a Nation, Apr. 4, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Efraim Karsh: Islamic Imperialism : A History, Apr. 11, 2006- Amazon.com
  • Robert Dallek & Terry Golway: Let Every Nation Know, Apr. 17, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Gordon Wood: Revolutionary Characters : What Made the Founders Different, May 18, 2006 – Amazon.com
HONORED:
DEPARTED:
  • Madeleine P. Cosman: 68, Medieval Expert, Dies – NYT, 3-19-06

Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 at 3:24 PM

March 13, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
BIGGEST STORY:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
  • Sarah Dunant: 16th-Century Fox In the Company of the Courtesan Historical Fiction – NYT, 3-12-06
  • Sarah Dunant: In the Company of the Courtesan Historical Fiction, First Chapter – NYT, 3-12-06
  • Sarah Dunant: Historical horizontal advancement In the Company of the Courtesan Historical Fiction – Houston Chronicle, 3-10-06
  • Peter Richardson: The conscience of California American Prophet: The Life & Work of Carey McWilliamsLA Times, 3-12-06
  • Michael Kazin: Beyond monkey business Bryan as reformer A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings BryanBaltimore Sun, 3-12-06
  • Texas Reads: Histories focus on 1800s events, figures – Bryan College-Station Eagle, 3-12-06
OP-ED:
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Peter Kornbluh on Chile: “ultimate study of morality – or the lack of it – in American foreign policy.” – Chicago Tribune, 3-10-06
SPOTTED:
ON TV:
  • Elyse Luray: ‘History Detectives’ will be on the Hunt at ‘Atlantique City’ March 25-26 – News-antique.com, 3-8-06
  • History Channel: THE HISTORY OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY, Friday, Mar. 17, 2006 @ 7PM/ET – History Channel
  • History Channel: “Digging for the Truth: City of the Gods” Sunday, Mar. 19, 2006 @ 7PM/ET – History Channel
  • History Channel: Women’s History Month Listings – History Channel
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #8 (19 weeks on list) – 3-19-06
  • David McCullough: 1776, #23 – 3-19-06
  • James Risen: State of War, #29 – 3-19-06
  • Taylor Branch: At Canaan’s Edge, #32 – 3-19-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Jerome Armstrong & Markos Moulitsas Zuniga: Crashing the Gate: Netroots, Grassroots, and the Rise of People-Powered Politics, Mar. 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Colin G. Calloway: The Scratch of a Pen : 1763 and the Transformation of America, Mar. 31, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Apr. 1, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Efraim Karsh: Islamic Imperialism : A History, Apr. 11, 2006- Amazon.com
  • Robert Dallek & Terry Golway: Let Every Nation Know, Apr. 17, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Gordon Wood: Revolutionary Characters : What Made the Founders Different, May 18, 2006 – Amazon.com
LEAVING:
DEPARTED:
  • Richard P. McCormick: Hundreds fill Rutgers: Kirkpatrick Chapel to celebrate beloved professor’s life – The Star Ledger, 3-10-06

Posted on Sunday, March 12, 2006 at 6:13 PM

March 6, 2006

HNN STATS THIS WEEK:
IN THE NEWS:
REVIEWED:
  • Heather Cox Richardson reviewing Eric Foner: A Dream Deferred FOREVER FREE The Story of Emancipation and ReconstructionWashington Post, 3-5-06
  • Michael Kazin: The Man With the Silver Tongue A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings BryanNYT, 3-5-06
  • Michael Kazin: A Godly Hero: The Life of William Jennings Bryan First Chapter – NYT, 3-5-06
  • Mark Kurlansky: The Mollusk That Made Manhattan The Big Oyster: History on the Half ShellNYT, 3-5-06
  • Mark M. Smith: USC professor has a sense of racial stereotypes – The State, 3-5-06
  • David Reynolds: Fascinating look at Churchill’s on words on WWII IN COMMAND OF HISTORY: CHURCHILL FIGHTING AND WRITING THE SECOND WORLD WARToledo Blade, 3-5-06
  • Eric Burns: Book chronicles colorful history of early journalism Infamous Scribblers: The Founding Fathers and the Rowdy Beginnings of American JournalismGwinnett Daily Post, 3-5-06
  • Michael Kazin: His New bio of William Jennings Bryan – Scott McLemee at Inside Higher Ed, 3-1-06
  • Charles Hill: Subject of a former student’s biography – Michiko Kakutani in the NYT, 2-28-06
OP-ED:
  • David Sirota: Tom Friedman Becomes America’s Chief Revisionist Historian – Huffington Post, 3-4-06
  • Fred Kaplan: Yes, We Should Worry About Iran Do we really want to relive the Cold War nuclear nightmare? – Slate, 3-3-06
PROFILED:
INTERVIEWED:
QUOTED:
  • Gil Troy on Bill Clinton’s Canadian Tour: “He’s the first presidential rock star in American history. He still has this tremendous skill set. He can seduce a room like nobody else in America…. He [Mr. Clinton] couldn’t help himself. It’s pathological. It’s not like he doesn’t know his own skill sets. He stole the show, but in stealing the show, he stole it from her [Hillary Clinton].” – The Globe and Mail, 3-4-06
SPOTTED:
  • W. Jeffrey Bolster: Professor to discuss the ‘Colonial Revival’ (Tuesday, Mar. 7, 2006) @ The Exeter Historical Society – The Hampton Union
  • Garry Wills: Will discuss his latest book “What Jesus Meant” (March 29, 2006) @ the Washington National Cathedral – Washington Post, 3-5-06
  • Joseph Ellis: Discussed “His Excellency: George Washington” – iberkshires.com, 3-2-06
  • David Brion Davis: Historian situates ‘back-to-Africa’ movements in broad context at Tanner Lecture – Stanford Report, 3-1-06
  • Charles Bracelen Flood: Will deliver the 24th annual Edward F. Prichard Jr. Lecture (Monday, Mar. 20, 2006) @ the University of Kentucky- U of K News, 3-1-06
  • Nell Painter: Lectured Her New Book, Creating Black Americans @ Hamilton College- Hamilton College News, 2-28-06
  • John O. Anfinson: Spoke at Winona State University’s lecture series, “Celebration of the Book 2006” – WSU Winonan, 2-28-06
  • Raymond E. Janifer: Professor lectures on early American black history – Chambersburg Public Opinion, 2-27-06
ON TV:
  • History Channel: Women’s History Month Listings – History Channel
  • History Channel: Train Wreck in Lake Michigan, Monday 6, 2006 @ 10PM/ET – History Channel
  • History Channel: “Warrior Queen Boudica”, Friday, Mar. 10, 2006 @ 8PM/ET – History Channel
  • C-Span2’s BookTV: Richard Barnet, author of The Rockets’ Red Glare: When America Goes To War — The Presidents and the People, Saturday, Mar. 11, 2006 @ 6PM/ET – C-Span
  • History Channel: THE HISTORY OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY, Friday, Mar. 17, 2006 @ 7PM/ET – History Channel
SELLING BIG (NYT):
  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln, #7 (18 weeks on list) – 3-12-06
  • David McCullough: 1776, #17 – 3-12-06
  • Douglas Brinkley and Julie M. Fenster: Parish Priest, #28 – 3-12-06
  • Taylor Branch: At Canaan’s Edge, #32 – 3-12-06
  • James Risen: State of War, #33 – 3-12-06
FUTURE RELEASES:
  • Liza Picard: Victorian London : The Tale of a City 1840–1870, Mar. 7, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Jerome Armstrong & Markos Moulitsas Zuniga: Crashing the Gate: Netroots, Grassroots, and the Rise of People-Powered Politics, Mar. 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Colin G. Calloway: The Scratch of a Pen : 1763 and the Transformation of America, Mar. 31, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, Apr. 1, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Efraim Karsh: Islamic Imperialism : A History, Apr. 11, 2006- Amazon.com
  • Robert Dallek & Terry Golway: Let Every Nation Know, Apr. 17, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Douglas Brinkley: The Great Deluge : Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, May 9, 2006 – Amazon.com
  • Gordon Wood: Revolutionary Characters : What Made the Founders Different, May 18, 2006 – Amazon.com
HONORED:
  • Don Rittner: Honored with the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution Historic Preservation Award – Albany Times Union, 3-2-06
DEPARTED:
  • Arnold A. Rogow: 81, a Writer Who Put History on the Couch, Dies – NYT, 3-2-06

Posted on Sunday, March 5, 2006 at 5:57 PM

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