White House Recap July 11-17, 2011: President Obama Addresses the Deficit

WHITE HOUSE RECAP

Source: WH, 7-15-11

Compromise isn’t a dirty word: To a group of young Americans of different political persuasions, President Obama spoke candidly the importance of compromise in our democracy.

President Obama on deficit negotiations: On Monday and Friday, President Obama held news conferences on the status of efforts to find a balanced approach to deficit reduction.

First Lady Michelle Obama Attends Funeral for Former First Lady Betty Ford

First Lady Michelle Obama attends the funeral for former First Lady Betty Ford at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Palm Desert, Calif., July 12, 2011. Standing with Mrs. Obama, from left, are: former First Lady Rosalynn Carter, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, former President George W. Bush, and former First Lady Nancy Reagan. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Remembering Betty Ford: First Lady Michelle Obama celebrated the life of former First Lady Betty Ford at a historic gathering at St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church in Palm Desert, California.

At One Year: An update on the first comprehensive National HIV/AIDS Strategy.

West Wing Week: In “Our Heroes Are All Around Us” Check out behind-the-scenes footage from the Medal of Honor ceremony, and more.

Open for Questions: This week, the White House hosted two live chats: one on efforts to improve federal websites, and the other on disability policy.

SAVE Award: The 3rd annual SAVE Award launched on Thursday — a contest for federal employees to submit ideas on how to cut waste, save tax payer dollars, and make government more effective and efficient.

Medal of Honor: Sergeant First Class Leroy Petry was only the second living person to receive the highest military decoration awarded by the United States Government, watch the ceremony.

Sparking Growth: The Housing and Urban Development Agency (HUD) launched a pilot program in six cities where federal staffers partner with local decision makers in six cities.

Harvard training college teachers on black history

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

Source: AP, WSJ, 7-17-11

Every semester, Cheryl Carpenter tries to think of new ways to introduce Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” to her college students.

An English instructor at Alabama A&M, a historically black college in Normal, Ala., Carpenter said students sometimes are confused about the setting and context of the 1937 novel about an independent black woman’s quest for identity.

But after listening to Temple University history professor Bettye Collier-Thomas talk at a Harvard University program how she dove into dusty attics and forgotten archival material to research her book on black women leaders, Carpenter said she immediately came up with ideas to recreate visual scenes through her lectures.

Carpenter and around two dozen college teachers from around the country are participating this month in a Harvard program aimed at training professors to integrate more black history into their classrooms and research projects.

The “National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute for College Teachers” at the university’s W.E.B. Du Bois Institute brought the group to Cambridge for an intensive three-week program, including archival research, debates on history and lectures by some of the nation’s leading scholars in black studies.

“This is amazing,” Carpenter said. “I’m not a historian. I teach English so I don’t go to the archives much. But the topics we’ve talked about cover so much and now I have so many ideas.”

Among those giving lectures were Pulitzer Prize winners Eric Foner and Steven Hahn.

“Very rare will these participants have access to so many scholars like this at one time,” said University of South Carolina history professor Patricia Sullivan, a co-director of the program. “And they see very quickly that the Civil Rights movement didn’t start in the 1950s. There’s a whole history that is overlooked and it’s not just about black history. It’s American history.”

The program was founded in the mid-1990s by Sullivan, Du Bois institute director Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and University of California-Berkeley history professor Waldo Martin. They wanted a way to introduce college teachers from different disciplines to new scholarship on black civil rights, from Emancipation to the 1960s. Teachers are urged to use the scholarship to develop new curriculum and programs for their classrooms….READ MORE

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