Full Text Campaign Buzz August 18, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Rochester, New Hampshire

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Rochester, NH

Source: WH, 8-18-12

Rochester Commons
Rochester, New Hampshire

3:55 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, New Hampshire!  (Applause.)  Thank you!

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  (Applause.)  Thank you so much.  What a beautiful day in New Hampshire.  (Applause.)

A couple people I want to acknowledge.  First of all, thanks to your outstanding young mayor, T.J. Jean — (applause) — and his folks, who are standing right next to him.  They’re pretty proud of him.  He’s doing a great job.

Please give Amy a great big round of applause for the wonderful introduction.  (Applause.)  One of the national co-chairs of our campaign and your outstanding senator, Jeanne Shaheen, is here.  (Applause.)  And congressional candidate Carol Shea-Porter is here.  (Applause.)  And all of you are here — (applause) — on a beautiful Saturday.

Now, first of all, I’ve got to just say thanks to all of you for looking after Malia and Sasha while they were up here.  They were here for a month at camp, and they did a great — they just had a great time, and enjoyed all the water sports, playing basketball and tennis, and arts and crafts.  And, most importantly, there was some ice cream involved in the thing.  (Laughter.)  They were quite pleased about that.  So we missed them, though.  Parents, it’s tough when your kids are away, isn’t it?  (Laughter.)  We’ve missed them so much.  And they promised they’d write — and they did — and they’d just say, “We’re doing fine.  Bye.”  (Laughter.)  It’s tough.

But, anyway, I can see why they enjoyed themselves because New Hampshire is one of the most beautiful states in the country and we are just so pleased to be here.  (Applause.)

Now, they didn’t — Malia and Sasha didn’t get any TV when they were at camp, but —

AUDIENCE:  Awww —

THE PRESIDENT:  — no, there’s nothing wrong with that.  That’s good.  (Laughter.)  But unless you’ve been able to hide your television set, you may be aware that there’s a pretty intense campaign going on right now.

Now, the reason it is so hotly contested is because the choice that we face this November couldn’t be bigger.  It’s not just a choice between two candidates or two political parties.  This is a choice between two fundamentally different visions for our country; two fundamentally different ideas about the direction that we should be going in.  And the direction that we choose, the direction you choose when you walk into that voting booth in November is going to have an impact not just on your lives, it’s going to have an impact on your children, your grandchildren, and generations to come.

Now, four years ago, we came together as Democrats, but also independents and some Republicans, because we knew we had to restore the basic bargain that built America — what made us an economic superpower, what created the greatest middle class we’ve ever seen.  And it’s a pretty simple bargain.  It’s the idea that if you work hard, you should be able to get ahead.  It’s a deal that says if you put in enough effort and you act responsibly, that you can find a job that pays the bills; you can afford a home that you call your own; you can count on health care when you get sick; you can retire with dignity and respect; and, most importantly, you can give your kids the kind of education and opportunity that allows them to dream even bigger and do even better than you ever did.  (Applause.)  That’s the American idea.  That’s what we came together to fight for in 2008.

It’s a simple American promise.  And we knew it wouldn’t be easy restoring that promise.  We knew it would take more than one year or one term, or even one President, because we had gone through a decade in which that promise wasn’t being kept.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I love you, Mr. President!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you, too, sweetie.  (Applause.)  We had seen a decade, before I came into office, in which jobs were being shipped overseas.  We had run two wars on a credit card, gone from surplus to deficits.  Wages and incomes actually went down during this period, even as the costs of everything from health care and college were going up.  A few folks at the top were doing really, really well, but for a lot of middle-class families, folks were working harder and harder, and seems like if you were lucky you were just treading water.  And that was before the economic crisis, which hammered so many families all across this state and all across this country — people losing their jobs, their homes, their savings — making the American Dream even further out of reach.

So when I ran four years ago, when we talked about how we were going to restore that basic bargain four years ago, I told you there were no quick fixes, there were no simple solutions.  But what I said was, if we were willing to work hard, and we were willing to come together, I had no doubt we could meet every single challenge, because we’ve got so many things going for us.  We’ve got the best workers in the world.  We’ve got the best entrepreneurs and small businesspeople in the world.  We’ve got the best scientists and researchers, the best colleges and universities in the world.  (Applause.)

Compared to other developed countries, we’re a young nation.  And part of it is because we’ve got the greatest diversity of talent and ingenuity.  People still want to come here from every corner of the globe because they understand what America means.  And so no matter what the naysayers say, no matter how dark the other side tries to paint things around election time, there is not another country on Earth that would not gladly trade places with the United States of America.  (Applause.)

They understand, we understand that here in America, if you’re willing to work hard, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, you can make it if you try.  That’s what the last four years has been about — whether it’s been saving the auto industry, or getting health care passed, or creating 4.5 million new jobs, or making sure that young people have an easier time affording college.  It’s all about that idea of making sure hard work is rewarded.  That’s what my presidency has been about.  That is what this campaign is about.  That is why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

Now, my opponent and his new running mate, they just have a different view of things.  They’ve got wonderful families, they’re good people, but they believe in a different vision.  They think the best way forward is the kind of top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.  They truly believe that if you roll back regulations that we put in place to control Wall Street, or if you get rid of regulations we put in place to avoid our air getting dirtier and our water getting dirtier, and then if you combine that with more tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans, then somehow prosperity will come raining down on all of you.  (Laughter.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  That’s why we’re in a drought!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  I’m not exaggerating here.  You can go on their website, look at Congressman Ryan’s budget.  The centerpiece of Governor Romney’s entire economic plan is a new $5 trillion tax cut, a lot of it going to folks like me, a lot of it going to the wealthiest Americans.  His new running mate, Congressman Ryan, put forward a plan that would let Governor Romney pay less than 1 percent in taxes each year.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  That’s a pretty good deal, just paying 1 percent in taxes.  You’re making millions of dollars.

Now, here’s the kicker — they expect you to pick up the tab.  Governor Romney’s tax plan would actually raise taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000.  Now, this is not my analysis.  This is the analysis of independent economists whose job it is to analyze these plans.  Every media outlet has checked on the numbers here, and their estimate is that it would cost you an extra $2,000 — not to grow the economy, not to reduce the deficit, not to make sure that our schools are working well or we’re building roads or we’re strengthening the middle class.  All this would be just to give another tax cut to folks like Governor Romney.  It would give the average person who is making more than $3 million a year another $250,000 in tax cuts.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan will be here in New Hampshire on Monday, so you can tell them if you think this is fair.  (Laughter.)  And you should ask them, how do you think that’s going to grow the economy again?  How is that going to strengthen the middle class?

Look, we have tried this kind of trickle-down snake oil before.  (Laughter.)  It didn’t work then.  It won’t work now.  It’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to reduce our deficit.  It’s not a plan to strengthen our economy.  It’s not a plan to strengthen the middle class.  (Applause.)

It won’t work.  We’re moving forward.  They want to take us backwards.  That’s the choice in this election.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, the truth is, if you ask them or you ask their consultants, I think they know their economic plan isn’t really popular.  (Laughter.)  And that’s why they’ve got to be dishonest about my plan.  They are just throwing everything they can at the wall to see if it sticks.

Their latest approach is to try to challenge me on Medicare.  Now, let’s just think about this for a second — Governor Romney wants to turn Medicare into a voucher system.  Congressman Ryan wants to turn Medicare into a voucher system.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  I, on the other hand, have strengthened Medicare.  (Applause.)  We made reforms that extended the life of the program, saved millions of seniors with Medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription drugs; we’re closing the doughnut hole.  (Applause.)  The only changes to benefits that we made was to make the benefits better by making sure that Medicare now covers new preventive services like cancer screenings and wellness visits for free.  (Applause.)

Meanwhile, Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan want to give seniors a voucher to buy insurance on their own, which — again, somebody did the analysis; not us, somebody else — and they estimate that this could force seniors to pay as much as an extra $6,400 a year for their health care.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  How many people think that’s a good deal?

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  That doesn’t strengthen Medicare.  It undoes the very guarantee of Medicare.  But that’s the core of the plan that was written by Congressman Ryan and endorsed by Governor Romney.

And if they want to talk about benefits, they should be straight with you.  Those new cancer screenings and prescription drug discounts, all those things we put into place with the Affordable Care Act, those things would be eliminated if Governor Romney had his way.  So it would take something away from seniors and it wouldn’t replace it with something better.

So here’s the bottom line, New Hampshire — my plan saves money in Medicare by cracking down on fraud and waste, and making sure insurance companies aren’t getting unfair subsidies.  (Applause.)  Their plan makes seniors pay more so they can give another tax cut to rich folks who don’t need a tax cut.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  My plan has extended the life of Medicare by nearly a decade.  Their plan would shorten the life of Medicare and end Medicare as we know it, because they’d turn it into a voucher system.

So those are the differences between our plans on Medicare.  But that’s just one example of the choice in this election.  That’s what’s at stake.  That’s why I’m running.  And you can see it on every issue.

When it comes to taxes, four years ago, I came before you and I said middle-class families need relief, especially during this crisis; I’m going to lower taxes on middle-class families.  Guess what?  I kept that promise.  (Applause.)  So if you start getting into an argument with your Republican cousin or friend or what have you — (laughter) — you just tell them, look, the typical family is paying $3,600 less in federal taxes since President Obama came into office.  (Applause.)  And right now, what I want to do is I want to keep taxes right where they are for your first $250,000 of income.  Now, that means — 98 percent of Americans make less than $250,000; 97 percent of small businesses make less than $250,000.  So under my plan, you wouldn’t see your taxes — your income taxes go up a single dime next year.  (Applause.)  That’s a contrast with Governor Romney’s plan.

But in the interest of full disclosure here, if you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent, you’re still going to get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of income.  You get to keep that.  All we’re asking is that you contribute a little bit more so that we can pay down our deficit in a responsible way and invest in things like education that help us grow.  (Applause.)  And you’ll hear some people say, well, just taxing the top 2 percent, that won’t eliminate the deficit.  It’s true.  Government is still going to have to do its part in cutting away spending we don’t need.  And we’ve already cut a trillion dollars’ worth of spending, and we’re slated to do another trillion and a half under my budget plan.

But we’re not going to do it all on the backs of middle-class families, and gutting education, and gutting science and research, and no longer investing in our infrastructure.  All we’re asking is that folks like me go back to the rates we paid under Bill Clinton — which, by the way, worked out pretty good.  (Applause.)  We created 23 million new jobs, we had a surplus instead of a deficit, and we created a whole bunch of new millionaires to boot.  (Applause.)

And part of the reason it worked out pretty well — when a teacher or a construction worker or a nurse or a receptionist, when they’ve got a little extra money in their pockets, what do they do?

AUDIENCE:  They spend it!

THE PRESIDENT:  They spend it on basic necessities.  And that means maybe that old beat up car you’ve been hanging on to for the last 12 years, you decide, all right, it’s time to get a new one.  Or maybe you decide, you know what, our kids are going to college, let’s make sure they’ve got a new computer.  And that means, then, business has more customers, which means business gets more profit, which means they then hire more workers, which means those workers then have a little more money in their pockets.  Everybody does better.

That’s how you grow an economy — not from the top down, but from the middle out and the bottom up.  When everybody is doing well, we all prosper.  (Applause.)  That’s the choice in this election.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

On issue after issue, the choice could not be clearer.  When the auto industry was on the brink of collapse, Governor Romney said, let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said, let’s bet on American workers.  And three and a half years later, the American auto industry is back.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney likes to tout his private sector experience, except a lot of that experience is investing in companies that have been called “pioneers” of outsourcing.  We don’t need more outsourcing, we need some insourcing.  (Applause.)  I want to stop giving tax breaks to companies that ship jobs overseas, like Governor Romney is promoting.  I want to give those tax breaks to companies that are investing right here in Rochester, right here in New Hampshire, right here in the United States of America, with American workers making American products, selling them around the world, stamped with three proud words: Made in America.  That’s what I’m fighting for.  (Applause.)

My opponent thinks new sources of clean, homegrown energy like wind energy are “imaginary.”  That’s what he called them.  (Laughter.)  Congressman Ryan said they were a “fad.”  Listen, since I took office, America has doubled the use of renewable energy.  (Applause.)  Thousands of good American jobs have been created.  It’s helping us to reduce our dependence on foreign oil.  That’s not imaginary, that’s real.

We need to stop giving $4 billion of taxpayer subsidies to oil companies that are making money every time you go to the pump.  (Applause.)  Let’s give those tax breaks to producers of clean, renewable energy right here in the United States of America.  That’s a choice in this election.  (Applause.)

I’m running because I made a promise to you in 2008, we’d end the war in Iraq — and we did.  (Applause.)  I said we’d go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — and we did.  (Applause.)  We’re transitioning in Afghanistan so we can begin to bring our troops home.  (Applause.)  All of this was accomplished only because of the incredible service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform — (applause) — which is why we’ve already passed tax breaks for companies that hire veterans, and we’ve made historic investments in the VA — because my attitude is anybody who has fought for our country shouldn’t have to fight for a job when they come home.  (Applause.)

So now, New Hampshire, after a decade of war, I want to take some of those savings and let’s do some nation-building here at home.  (Applause.)  Let’s take about half the money we’re no longer spending on war and let’s put it to use putting people back to work rebuilding roads and runways and ports, and wireless networks and broadband lines into rural communities, and creating a Veterans Jobs Corps that can help returning heroes get back to work as cops and firefighters in communities that need them.  That’s the America we want to build.  That’s the choice in this election.  (Applause.)

I want to make sure we’ve got the best education system in the world.  (Applause.)  So I want to help local school districts hire and retain the very best teachers — especially in math and science –- (applause) — create 2 million more slots for Americans to go to community colleges to learn the skills that businesses are looking for right now.  And I want to keep working to reduce the cost of tuition for colleges and universities — (applause) — because a higher education is not a luxury, it’s an economic necessity in the 21st century.  That’s a choice we’ve got to make in this election.  (Applause.)

And yes, New Hampshire, I’m running because I believe in this nation.  I still believe you shouldn’t go bankrupt when you get sick.  (Applause.)  I’m actually kind of fond of the term “Obamacare.”  (Applause.)  I fought for that bill because I cared, because I cared about the 6.5 million young people who can now get insurance by staying on their parent’s plan.  (Applause.)

I care about the millions of seniors who are now getting discounts on their prescription drugs and free preventive care because of what we did.  (Applause.)  I care about all those folks here in New Hampshire and around the country with preexisting conditions who can now get health insurance because of what we did.  (Applause.)  The Supreme Court has spoken.  This law is here to stay.  We don’t need to refight this battle for another three and a half years.  We’re not going backwards, we’re moving forward.  (Applause.)

We’re not going to put — we’re not going to go back to the days when serving the country you love depended on who you love.  We ended “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  It was the right thing to do.  (Applause.)  We’re not going backwards, we’re going forward.

I believe women should be in charge of their own health care decisions.  (Applause.)  We’re not going backward, we’re going forward.  (Applause.)

On issue after issue, there is a clear choice.  Now, over the next three months, the other side is going to spend more money than we have ever seen.  I mean, they are writing $10 million checks — individuals — just to run the same ad over and over again.  It’s variations on the same theme, which is, the economy is not where it needs to be and it’s Obama’s fault.  They’ll just say that over and over again.  (Laughter.)  And the reason they’ve got to say that — that’s their only message — is because they know their economic plan won’t sell.

They may have a plan to win the election, but they don’t have a plan to create jobs.  They don’t have a plan to grow the economy.  They don’t have a plan to help the middle class.  I do.  (Applause.)

But here’s the thing — I’ve been outspent before.  I’ve been counted out before.  But what gives me hope, what gives me confidence is you.  (Applause.)  Because I know when the American people start paying attention after all the ads have been done and they cut through all the nonsense, and they start remembering the story of their families — their parents, their grandparents — all the struggles they went through, what it means to work hard and get ahead, and overcome obstacles — the same kind of story I’ve got in my life as a son of a single mom; the same kind of story that Michelle has in her life — her parents, dad a blue-collar worker, mom a secretary — we know what it’s been like to go through hard times.  But we also know what it’s like to have hope and determination and resilience, and to watch the next generation do better.  And when you guys are focused on that idea, which is the essence of who we are, then all that other money, all that other stuff doesn’t matter.  (Applause.)

So, New Hampshire, I’m going to need your help.  We’ve come too far to turn back now.  (Applause.)  We’ve still got more good jobs to create, more good teachers to hire, more students to help to go to college, more troops to bring home, more homegrown energy to generate, more doors of opportunity to open for everybody who is willing to walk through them and work hard and put in the effort.  (Applause.)

And if you’re willing to stand with me one more time — (applause) — if you’re willing to knock on some doors and make some phone calls, talk to your friends and talk to your neighbors — we will finish what we started, we will win New Hampshire, we will win this election.  And we’ll remind the world why the United States of America is the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  Thank you.

END
4:22 P.M. EDT

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Full Text Campaign Buzz August 18, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Windham, New Hampshire

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Windham, NH

Source: WH, 8-18-12 

Windham High School
Windham, New Hampshire

1:06 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  (Applause.)  It’s good to be back!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in New Hampshire.  (Applause.)

Well, first all, thank you guys all for being here.  I know it’s a little bit warm.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  (Laughter.)  So for those of you, everybody who is standing, I want you to kind of bend your knees a little bit.  (Laughter.)  We usually see a few folks kind of dropping out a little bit when it’s this warm.  If you’ve got a seat, feel free to sit down and relax.

I want everybody to give a big round of applause to Beth Talbot — (applause) — not only for the great introduction, but for being an outstanding teacher.  I love teachers.  (Applause.)  Love them.

Two other people I want to acknowledge — first of all, congressional candidate, Annie Kuster is here.  Give Annie a big round of applause.  (Applause.)  And my national co-chair back in 2008, one of my earliest supporters in New Hampshire, great guy — Paul Hodes is here.  Give Paul a big round of applause.  (Applause.)  And all of you are here, and I’m very happy about that.  (Applause.)

Let me also say, by the way, thank you for returning Malia and Sasha safe and sound.  They were up here for camp for a month.  They had a wonderful time, but their parents missed them a lot.  (Laughter.)  So we were glad to get them back.  But you guys took good care of them while they were up here, so I appreciate that.  (Applause.)

Now, while they were at camp — there are no TVs at camp — but unless you’ve been able to hide your TV set or your cable is broke, you may be aware that there is a campaign going on right now.  (Laughter and applause.)  And part of the reason the campaign is so intense is because the choice we face in November could not be bigger.  It’s not just a choice between two candidates or two political parties, it is a choice between two fundamentally different visions about where to take the country; two fundamentally paths for America.

And the decisions that you make, the direction you choose for us to walk in when you walk into that voting booth in November, it’s going to have an impact not just on your lives but it’s going to have an impact on your kids and your grandkids and generations to come.

Some of you were involved in 2008 when we came together.  (Applause.)  And it wasn’t just Democrats — we had independents, we had even some Republicans.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  There you go.  (Laughter.)  And the idea was that we needed to restore the basic bargain that made this country great; the basic bargain that created the most prosperous economy that the world has even known.

And it’s a simple bargain.  It says, if you work hard, that work should be rewarded.  It says that if you put in enough effort and you take seriously your responsibilities, you should be able to find a job that pays the bills, you should be able to afford a home you can call your own, you should count on health care if you get sick — (applause) — you should be able to retire with some dignity and some respect after a lifetime of labor — (applause) — and most important, you should be able to give your kids the kind of education and opportunity that allows them to dream bigger and do better than you ever did.  (Applause.)

That’s the American promise.  That’s the American Dream.  And we knew restoring it wouldn’t be easy; that it would take more than one year or one term or even one President, because we had gone through a decade in which that promise was not being kept.  We had seen a decade in which incomes and wages were going down even as the cost of everything from health care to college were going up.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Say it again, Mr. President, so we can hear it again!

THE PRESIDENT:  We had seen a decade — (laughter and applause) — in which jobs were being shipped overseas, in which we took a surplus and turned it into a deficit, ran two wars on a credit card — all culminating in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.  And middle-class families who were already getting hammered lost their jobs, lost their savings, some lost their homes.  And the American Dream seemed even further out of reach.

So when I ran for office, I told you there are no quick fixes, there are no easy solutions.  But what I also insisted was that if we pull together, we have everything we need to meet our challenges.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Yes, we can!

THE PRESIDENT:  Yes, we can.  We still have the best workers in the world, the best entrepreneurs and small businesspeople in the world, the best scientists, the best researchers, the best universities, the best colleges in the world.  (Applause.)

We’re still a young nation, and we’ve got the greatest diversity of talent and ingenuity.  There’s a reason why people still want to come here — because no matter what the naysayers say and no matter how stark the other side tries to paint the situation during election time, there is not another country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly change places with the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Most of all, the American character has not changed.  In fact, we saw during this crisis how people may have gotten knocked down, but they got right back up.  (Applause.)  Folks — people in their 50s, 60s losing their jobs, go back to school, they get retrained and find a new one.  Small business people keeping their doors open even if it meant them not taking a salary, because they understood their workers had families that were depending on them.

We may have gone through tough times, but it turns out we’re tougher than tough times.  (Applause.)  And that’s how we saved an auto industry on the brink of collapse.  That’s how we created 4.5 million new jobs, half a million in manufacturing.

We are not there yet.  We’ve still got a long way to go, because we’ve got to make sure that here in America, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter what your last name is, here in America, you can make it if you try.  That’s what this campaign is about.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, I’ve got to say — remember, I said this is a choice in this election.  We’ve got a particular vision about how to move the country forward.  My opponent and his running mate have a very different view.  They believe the best way forward is to go right back to the old top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Their ideas are pretty simple; they’re not hard to explain.  They think that if we get rid of more regulations on big corporations and big banks — some of which we put in place to prevent another taxpayer-funded bailout — and if we do more tax cuts for the very wealthiest Americans, then somehow prosperity is going to rain down on all of you.  (Laughter.)

That’s their theory.  In fact, the centerpiece of my opponent’s entire economic plan is a new $5 trillion tax cut, a lot of it going to the wealthiest Americans.  His new running mate, Congressman Ryan —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  — he put forward a plan that would let Governor Romney pay less than 1 percent in taxes each year.  And here’s the kicker — he expects you to pick up the tab.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Governor Romney’s tax plan — this is not my analysis now; this is the analysis of independent folks who analyze tax plans for a living — (laughter) — that’s what they do — (laughter.)  Their analysis showed that Governor Romney’s tax plan would actually raise taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000 —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  — not to reduce the deficit, not to grow jobs, not to invest in education, but to give another tax cut to folks like him.

Now, ask Governor Romney and his running mate when they’re here in New Hampshire on Monday — they’re going to be coming here on Monday — ask them if that’s fair.  Ask them how it will grow the economy.  Ask them how it will strengthen the middle class.

They have been trying to sell this trickle-down snake oil before.  (Laughter.)  It did not work then.  It will not work now.  It’s not a plan to create jobs.  It will not reduce the deficit.  It will not move the economy forward.  It’s the wrong direction for America.  (Applause.)

Now, the truth is I think they know it’s not a very popular idea.  You can tell that because now they’re being dishonest about my plans, since they can’t sell their plans.  (Laughter.)  I mean, they are trying to throw everything at the wall just to see what will stick.

The latest thing they’ve been trying is to talk about Medicare.  Now, you would think they would avoid talking about Medicare, given the fact that both of them have proposed to voucherize the Medicare system.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  But I guess they figure the best defense is to try to go on offense.  So, New Hampshire, here is what you need to know:  Since I have been in office, I have strengthened Medicare.  (Applause.)  I have made reforms that have extended the life of the program, that have saved millions of seniors with Medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription drugs.  (Applause.)  The only changes to your benefits that I’ve made on Medicare is that Medicare now covers new preventive services like cancer screenings and wellness visits for free.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney and Congressman Ryan have a very different plan.  What they want to do is they want seniors to get a voucher to buy their own insurance, which could force seniors to pay an extra $6,400 a year for their health care.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Again, this is not my estimate.  Remember those guys who analyze these things for a living?  That’s their assessment.  That doesn’t strengthen Medicare.  That undoes the very guarantee of Medicare.  That’s the core of the plan written by Congressman Ryan and endorsed by Governor Romney.

So here is the bottom line:  My plan saves money in Medicare by cracking down on fraud and waste and insurance company subsidies.  (Applause.)  And their plan makes seniors pay more so they can give another tax cut to millionaires and billionaires.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  My plan has already extended the life of Medicare by nearly a decade.  (Applause.)  Their plan would put Medicare on track to be ended as we know it.  It would be an entirely different plan — a plan in which you could not count on health care because it would have to be coming out of your pocket.  That’s the real difference between our plans on Medicare.

That’s the choice in this election.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  And I need your help.  (Applause.)

Now, four years ago I promised to cut middle-class taxes.  That’s exactly what I’ve done — by a total of about $3,600 for the typical family.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Thank you, Mr. President!

THE PRESIDENT:  So just like we’ve got a difference on Medicare, we’ve got a difference on taxes.  Right now, what I want to do is keep taxes right where they are for the first $250,000 of everybody’s income.  So if your family makes under $250,000 — which — that includes 98 percent of Americans —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  That’s me!

THE PRESIDENT:  — that’s you — (laughter) — 97 percent of small businesses — you won’t see your income taxes increase by a single dime next year.  (Applause.)

Now, if you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent, you’ll still keep your tax cut on the first $250,000 you make.  That’s a pretty good deal.  But all we’re asking is for folks like me who make more than $250,000, we’re asking that you contribute a little bit more above $250,000 so we can pay down this deficit and invest in things like making college more affordable — (applause) — making sure our teachers aren’t laid off, making sure our firefighters are there to respond to emergencies, making sure our economy grows.

And, keep in mind, asking the wealthy to pay a little bit more, that doesn’t eliminate our deficit.  We’re still going to have to make sure that government does its part by cutting away all the spending we don’t need.  And I’ve already cut a trillion dollars in spending, and we’ve slated another trillion more.

But we can’t just reduce our deficit and our debt by gutting education, and gutting research and development, and gutting infrastructure.  And all we’re asking folks like me to do is go back to the rates we paid under Bill Clinton — which, by the way, was a time when we created nearly 23 million new jobs, the biggest budget surplus in history, and a bunch of millionaires to boot.  (Applause.)

See, I’m getting all fired up.  (Applause.)  And I want to explain that this is not just good for middle-class families and working families, it’s good for everybody.  Because what happens when a police officer or a firefighter or a teacher or a construction worker or a receptionist — what happens when they’ve got a little more money in their pocket?

AUDIENCE:  Spend it!

THE PRESIDENT:  They spend it on basic necessities.  So maybe they go out and finally, after 10 years, buy a new car.  Or maybe they buy a new computer for their kid who’s going off to college.  And that means business suddenly has more customers.  And that means businesses are making more profits.  And that means businesses are hiring more workers, who in turn have more money to spend, which makes businesses do even better.  That’s how you grow an economy — not from the top down, but from the middle out and from the bottom up.  (Applause.)  That’s the choice in this election.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President.  (Applause.)

On issue after issue, the choice could not be clearer.  When the auto industry was on the verge of collapse, Governor Romney said let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said, a million jobs are at stake — let’s bet on American workers and American manufacturing.  (Applause.)  And three and a half years later, the American auto industry has come roaring back.  That’s the choice in this election.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney likes to tout his private sector experience, even though a lot of that experience was investing in companies that were called “pioneers” in the business of outsourcing manufacturing jobs.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  He wants to keep on giving tax breaks to companies that ship jobs overseas.  I want to give tax breaks to companies that are investing here in New Hampshire — (applause) — here in the United States, hiring American workers to make American products to sell around the world.  That’s the difference in this election.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney thinks new sources of clean energy are “imaginary.”  Since I took office, we have in fact doubled the use of renewable energy like wind and solar.  Thousands of Americans have good jobs because of it.  It’s not imaginary, it’s real.

New Hampshire, we’ve got to stop giving $4 billion a year in taxpayer subsidies to big oil companies that are making plenty of profits, and use that money to help American homegrown energy that has never been more promising.  (Applause.)  That’s a choice in this election.  (Applause.)

In 2008 I promised I would end the war in Iraq — we did.  (Applause.)  I said we’d go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — we did.  (Applause.)  We now are transitioning so that Afghans take more responsibility for their security and we can start bringing our troops home from there.  (Applause.)  All of these things we did only because of the incredible courage and dedication and patriotism of our men and women in uniform.  (Applause.)  And that’s why we’ve made historic investments in the VA — because I believe that anybody who has fought for America in uniform should not have to fight for a job when they come home — (applause) — shouldn’t have to fight for the benefits they’ve earned.

AUDIENCE:  USA!  USA!  USA!

THE PRESIDENT:  So we could not be prouder of them.  But we want them to return to a strong economy, which means that after a decade of war, it’s time to do some nation-building here at home.  (Applause.)

Let’s create a Veterans Jobs Corps that can help returning heroes get jobs as firefighters and cops in communities that need them the most.  (Applause.)  Let’s take some of the savings from war to rebuild our roads and our bridges and our schools all across America — (applause) — to lay broadband lines and wireless networks that can make us more competitive.  Let’s put some construction workers back to work.  That helps everybody, and that will help America be strong for decades to come.  That’s the choice in this election.  That’s what’s at stake.  (Applause.)

I want to make sure that we’ve got the best education in the world.  I want to help school districts like this one hire and reward the best teachers, especially in math and science.  (Applause.)  I want to give 2 million more Americans the chance to go to community colleges and learn the skills that businesses are hiring for right now.  And I want college and universities to bring their tuitions down, because in the 21st century, our young people have to be able to get a college education, a higher education.  (Applause.)  It’s not a luxury, it is a necessity.  That’s the choice in this election.  (Applause.)

And, yes, New Hampshire, I’m running again because I still believe, in America, nobody should go broke because they get sick.  (Applause.)  I’m kind of fond of the term “Obamacare,” because I do care.  That’s why we passed the law.  That’s why 6.5 million young people can stay on their parent’s plan now.  That’s why seniors are seeing discounts on their prescription drugs.  (Applause.)  That’s why families who have got somebody with a preexisting condition can now get health care.  (Applause.)  It was the right thing to do.  The Supreme Court has spoken.  We are not going backwards, we are going forward.  (Applause.)

We’re not going back to the day when serving the country you love depended on who you love.  We ended “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  It was the right thing to do.  (Applause.)  We’re not going back.  We’re not going back to the day when women didn’t have control of their own health care choices.  We’re going forward, we’re not going back.  (Applause.)

On issue after issue, there is a choice.  And all these issues — manufacturing and health care and education — all these things tie together because it’s part of what not only makes up a middle-class life, but also creates rungs of opportunity for people to get into the middle class.  That’s what we believe in.  That’s what we’re fighting for.  That’s how the economy grows.  And that’s what we learned from our parents and our grandparents and our great-grandparents — some who came here as immigrants — folks working hard, overcoming obstacles, understanding that in America, not only could you do better but your future generations could do better.  That’s what’s at stake in this election, and that’s why I’m running for a second term as President.  (Applause.)

Now, let me say this — let me close up by saying this.   Over the next three months, you will see more negative ads than you have ever seen in your life.  These folks on the other side, they’re writing $10 million checks.  And basically, their argument is going to be the same one over and over again:  The economy is not where it should be, and it’s Obama’s fault.  They’ll just keep on repeating it because they know their own plans don’t sell.

So all they’ll try to do is just hope that if they can tap into people’s frustration and anxiety, that somehow they’re going to win, even though what they’re selling won’t work.  It’s not — what they’re selling is not a plan to create jobs, it’s not a plan to reduce the deficit, it certainly is not a plan to revive the middle class.  But they are counting on just outspending us to win.

But here is the good news.  Here is the good news, New Hampshire — I’ve been counted out before and I’ve been outspent before.  But what I’ve learned — and you guys helped teach this to me — is that when the American people, when they cut through the nonsense, when you focus on what’s important, when you’re reminded of what values built this country, when you remember that we are all in this together, and you affirm the basic American notion that everybody in this country gets a fair shot and everybody should do their fair share, and everybody should play by the same set of rules — when you are focused on the things that make us a great country, we don’t lose.  (Applause.) You will help get us there.

We’ve got too many more jobs we’ve got to create, too many more teachers we’ve got to hire, too many young people who need to go to college, too many troops we’ve got to come home — (applause) — more energy we’ve got to generate, more opportunity that we’ve got to open up to everybody.  (Applause.)

So if you’re willing to stand with me and fight with me, and make phone calls with me, and knock on doors with me — (applause) — if you’re willing to vote for me, we will win New Hampshire.  We will win this election.  And we will finish what we started and remind the world why the United States of America is the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.

END
1:36 P.M. EDT

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