Campaign Headlines November 4, 2012: Romney Kicks Off Whirlwind Tour of Battleground States in Iowa

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Romney Kicks Off Whirlwind Tour of Battleground States in Iowa

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-5-12

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Mitt Romney made his final stop in the battleground state of Iowa on Sunday, on a day that took him to Ohio, Virginia and Pennsylvania before midnight.

He had visited Iowa even before announcing his candidacy last June, and this was his 21st campaign event in Iowa this year alone.  Romney made his final argument for voters to come to the polls for him, stressing the importance of the state on Election Day.

“This is much more than our moment.  It’s America’s moment of renewal and purpose and optimism,” he said.  “We’ve journeyed far and wide in this great campaign for America’s future, and now we’re almost home.  One final push will get us there.  We’ve known many long days and short nights, and now we’re close.”…READ MORE

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Full Text Campaign Buzz November 4, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

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Mitt Romney: We Will Bring Real Change To America On Day One

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-4-12

“If you believe we can do better, if you believe America should be on a better course, if you are tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change. Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America on Day One.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks

Morrisville, Pennsylvania

November 4, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “The question of this election comes down to this: Do you want four more years like the last four years or do you want real change? President Obama promised change, but he couldn’t deliver. He could not deliver the change he promised. But I not only promised change, I have a record of achieving change. I built a business. I helped turn around another one. I helped put an Olympics that was off track back on track. With the Democrat legislature, I helped my state turned from deficit to surplus, from job losses to job growth, and from higher taxes to higher take-home pay. And that is why I am running for president. I know how to change the course the nation is on, how to get to a balanced budget, how to build jobs and see, once again, rising take-home pay. Accomplishing real change is not something I just talk about. It is something I have done and it is something I will do as President of the United States. If you believe we can do better, if you believe America should be on a better course, if you are tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change. Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America on Day One.”

Campaign Headlines November 4, 2012: Washington Post-ABC News tracking poll: all tied up as Mitt Romney draws even with President Barack Obama on favorability

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WaPo-ABC tracking poll: all tied up as Romney draws even on favorability

Source: WaPo, 11-4-12

President Obama and Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney are once again tied nationally with just days to go in the 2012 campaign, according to the latest Washington Post-ABC News tracking poll.

Among likely voters, Obama and Romney are deadlocked at 48 percent. For the first time this year, the two contenders are also tied among political independents, with 46 percent apiece. Before this poll, Romney had been consistently ahead with these potentially critical voters.


While Obama has evened the score with independents, the challenger has made gains of his own. Heading into Nov. 6, 53 percent of likely voters express favorable impressions of the former Massachusetts governor, right in line with the 54 percent who view the president favorably….READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 4, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Campaign Trumpets Massive Ground Game on Election Eve

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Obama Camp Trumpets Massive Ground Game on Election Eve

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-4-12

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

With less than two days until voters begin heading to the polls, the Obama campaign is heralding the mobilization of a massive battleground organizing operation – unprecedented in size and scope — that it says will be a decisive factor in the outcome on Nov. 6.

It is a “ground game unlike any that American politics has ever seen and much bigger than we did in 2008,” Obama campaign manager Jim Messina told reporters on an evening conference call Saturday.

“Our get-out-the-vote effort – built over years and running at full speed today – is the reason President Obama will be re-elected to a second term,” said Obama national field director Jeremy Bird….READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 3, 2012: President Barack Obama Closes Out Campaign with Star-Studded Blitz

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Obama Closes Out Campaign with Star-Studded Blitz

Source:
ABC News Radio, 11-3-12

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

After thousands of ads, hundreds of stump speeches and a record war chest of campaign cash, President Obama is banking on a final burst of star power to boost his get-out-the-vote effort in the final 72 hours of the 2012 presidential campaign.

As Obama and his top surrogates – Vice President Joe Biden, first lady Michelle Obama and former President Clinton – barnstorm the battlegrounds this weekend, they will have a cast of Hollywood stars and music icons at their sides.

The pairings are aimed at driving turnout, particularly among young and minority voters, while bolstering enthusiasm in a handful of key states where polls show the presidential race very close….READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 3, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Newington, New Hampshire — Urges Votes for Love Not Revenge

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Romney Starts Whirlwind Day in New Hampshire, Urges Votes for Love Not Revenge

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-3-12

J.D. Pooley/Getty Images

Kicking off the day filled with four campaign events spread across three crucial swing states, Mitt Romney said on Saturday morning that unlike the president, he is urging Americans to vote for love, not revenge.

Romney drew on remarks made by President Obama on Friday at an event in Ohio, during which the President urged supporters to head to the polls saying, “Voting is the best revenge.”

Romney said on Saturday that the remark likely “surprised a lot of people.”….READ MORE

Mitt Romney: Vote For Love Of Country

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-3-12
“Yesterday, the President said something you may have heard by now, that I think surprised a lot of people. Speaking to an audience, he said voting is the best revenge. He told his supporters, voting for ‘revenge.’ Vote for ‘revenge’? Let me tell you what I’d like to tell you: vote for love of country. It is time we lead America to a better place.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks
Newington, New Hampshire
November 3, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “Yesterday, the President said something you may have heard by now, that I think surprised a lot of people. Speaking to an audience, he said voting is the best revenge. He told his supporters, voting for ‘revenge.’ Vote for ‘revenge’? Let me tell you what I’d like to tell you: vote for love of country. It is time we lead America to a better place. Now, if there’s anybody there who’s worried about the last four years and wondered if they’re the best we can do, who fears that the American dream is fading away, if anyone wonders whether good jobs and better take-home pay are out there, I’ve got a clear and unequivocal message for you and that is that America is about to come roaring back. And you saw the differences, you saw the differences between Barack Obama and me in those debates. I like those debates, I’ve got to be honest. I mean, he says it has to be this way. I say it can’t stay this way. He’s offering excuses. I’m offering a plan. I can’t wait to get started. He wants to convince you to settle, but Americans don’t settle, we dream, we aspire, we reach for greater things and we will achieve greater things with new leadership.”

Campaign Headlines November 2, 2012: ABC News/Washington Post Poll: 55 Percent ‘Wrong Track’ Matches 2004; A Difficulty for Obama, But Survivable

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POLL: 55 Percent ‘Wrong Track’ Matches 2004; A Difficulty for Obama, But Survivable

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-2-12

Edward Linsmier/Getty Images

Days before the verdict on his bid for a second term, the bad news for Barack Obama is that most likely voters think the country is headed seriously off on the wrong track. The better news for Obama: Previous incumbents have survived the same challenge.

Just 43 percent in the latest ABC News/Washington Post tracking poll say the country is headed in the right direction; 55 percent say things are pretty seriously off course. The result, hardly an ebullient reflection on Obama’s term in office, clearly defines his difficulties….READ MORE

See PDF with full results and charts here.

Full Text Political Headlines November 3, 2012: GOP Weekly Address: Mitt Romney Delivers His Last Remarks Before the Election

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GOP Address: Mitt Romney Delivers His Last Remarks Before the Election

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-3-12

Alex Wong/Getty Images

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney delivers his last remarks before the election and describes how he would be a different president, if elected.

According to Romney, “Four years ago, candidate Obama promised to do so very much, but he has fallen so very short.  After all of the petty partisanship, all of the standoffs and stalemates, 23 million Americans are still struggling for work.  On Friday, the unemployment rate rose to 7.9 percent.  Forty-seven million people are on food stamps.  Our economy is still on life support—and our country is $16 trillion in debt.”…READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 2, 2012: David Axelrod: President Barack Obama’s Closing Argument ‘Coming from His Loins’

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Axelrod: Obama’s Closing Argument ‘Coming from His Loins’

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-2-12

ABC/ DONNA SVENNEVIK

With four days to go until the election, President Obama has never been more fired up, according to senior campaign strategist David Axelrod.

“I’ve known him for 20 years… I’ve never seen him more exhilarated than he is right now,” he told reporters traveling with the president in Ohio Friday. “He believes in what he’s doing. He believes in what he’s fighting for.”

“You can see in the speech he’s delivering… that this is coming from his loins,” he said, adding, “I just wanted to say ‘loins.’ I wanted to see if I could get ‘loins’ in the story.”…READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speeches at Campaign Event in Springfield & Hilliard, Ohio

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Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: Mitt Romney in Wall Street Journal Op-ed: A New Direction For America

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Mitt Romney: A New Direction For America

A Romney-Ryan administration will confront the problems that politicians have avoided for a decade.

By MITT ROMNEY

Source: WSJ, 11-2-12

After more than a year of campaigning, endless political advertisements, two conventions and four debates, the presidential election is almost over. The big decision of 2012 will soon be in the hands of the voters. The choice Americans make will shape great things, historic things, and those will determine the most important and intimate aspects of every American life and every American family. All presidential elections matter. This one matters a great deal.

It matters to the senior who needs medical care but, thanks to ObamaCare, can’t find a doctor who is taking new Medicare patients. It matters to the men and women who once had good-paying jobs with benefits but now work part-time with no benefits just to put food on the table. It matters to the college student graduating this spring with a heavy load of debt and few opportunities to pay it back. It matters to the single mother who lives in fear of foreclosure as her employment prospects dwindle.

This election is about them. It is about all of us.image

Ken Fallin

It is about the education of our children, the value of our homes, the take-home pay from our jobs, the price of the gasoline we buy, the choices we have in our health care. It is also about broader forces—the growth of the economy, the strength of our military, our dependence on foreign oil, our leadership role in the world.

After four years of disappointments, fixing America’s problems requires a new direction. The path we’re on hasn’t led us where we need to go. In so many ways, it seems that things have gotten even worse. We can make excuses for what has gone wrong, and many have tried. But excuses won’t turn this country around. Only leadership can do that.

I know something about leadership because I have led before. I have reformed businesses that were on the verge of collapse. I have helped to save an Olympics that was plagued by scandal. I have worked with men and women on both sides of the aisle in Massachusetts to achieve real change and real reform.

I can do it again in Washington. Republicans and Democrats in Congress may seem to share very little these days, but they share responsibility for the problems we now face. Just as it took both parties to bring us to where we stand, it will take both parties to get us moving again in the right direction.

That is something we can only accomplish if we work tirelessly to bridge the divide between the political parties. I will meet with Democratic and Republican leadership regularly. I will look for common ground and shared principles. And I will put the interests of the American people above the interests of the politicians and the bureaucrats.

Together, we will overcome our difficulties and usher in a new age of prosperity.

America is ready for that kind of leadership. Paul Ryan and I will provide it. Our plan for a stronger middle class will create jobs, stop the decline in take-home pay, and put America back on the path of possibility and opportunity.

This, in turn, will enable us to fulfill our responsibilities to promote the principles of peace as leader of the Free World. We will help the Muslim world combat the spread of extremism. We will dissuade Iran from building a nuclear bomb. We will build enduring relationships throughout Latin America. And we will partner with China and other great nations to build a more stable and peaceful world.

We face big challenges, but we also have big opportunities. New doors are open for us to sell our ideas and our products to the entire world. New technologies offer the promise of unbounded information and limitless innovation. New ideas are changing lives and hearts in diverse nations and among diverse peoples. If we seize the moment and rise to the occasion, the century ahead will be an American Century.

Our children will graduate into exciting careers that are worthy of their qualifications. Our seniors will be confident that their retirement is secure. Our men and women will have good jobs and good pay and good benefits. Our veterans will come home to a bright future. We will have every confidence that our lives are safe, and that our livelihoods are secure.

This requires a different direction, a change from the course of the past four years. It requires that we put aside the small and the petty, and demand the scale of change that we deserve: real change, big change. I pledge that my presidency will bring about that kind of change—confronting the problems that politicians have avoided for over a decade, revitalizing our competitive economy, modernizing our education system, restoring our founding principles.

If you are ready for that kind of change, if you want this to be a turning point in America’s course, join us and vote Tuesday for the kind of leadership that these times demand.

I am running for president because I believe in America. I believe in the America that never gives up, never stops striving, never ceases believing in itself. That is what I have been campaigning for, and that is what I will fight for as president of the United States.

Mr. Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, is the Republican candidate for president of the United States.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: Barack Obama in Wall Street Journal Op-ed: Real Progress, But We’re Not Done

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Real Progress, But We’re Not Done

Americans shouldn’t surrender to the same philosophy that hurt middle-class families for so long.

By BARACK OBAMA

Source: WSJ, 11-2-12

For the past few days, we’ve all been properly focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetimes. We mourn those who were lost. And we pledge to stand with those whose lives have been turned upside down for as long as it takes to recover and rebuild—better than before.

Because when hardship hits, America is at its best. The petty differences that consume us in normal times fade away. There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm—only fellow Americans. That is how we get through the most trying times: together.

In 2008, we were mired in two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Together, we’ve battled our way back. Our businesses have created over five million new jobs in the past two and a half years. Home values are on the rise. Manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years. The American auto industry is back. Thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over. And Osama bin Laden is dead.

image

Ken Fallin

We’ve made real progress. But we’re not done yet. On Tuesday, you get to choose between two fundamentally different visions of America—one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy four years ago, and one built on a strong, growing middle class.

Our free market is the engine of America’s progress, driven by risk-takers, innovators and dreamers. Our people succeed when they have the chance to get a good education and learn new skills—and so do the businesses that hire them, or the companies they start. We believe that when we support research into scientific and medical breakthroughs, new industries will start here and stay here. We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs in America, and when quality health care and a dignified retirement aren’t just achievable goals but a measure of our values as a nation.

For eight years, we had a president who shared these beliefs. Bill Clinton asked the wealthiest to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make these investments. By the end of his second term, America had created 23 million new jobs. Incomes were up. Poverty was down. Deficits became surpluses. And Wall Street did very well.

In the eight years after, we followed a different path. Bigger tax cuts for the wealthy we couldn’t afford. Encouraging companies to ship jobs and profits overseas. Fewer rules for big banks and insurers. The result of this top-down economics? Falling incomes, record deficits, the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis we’ve been cleaning up for the past four years.

Gov. Mitt Romney has offered—under the guise of “real change”—these very same policies that failed our country so badly. But we know better.

We shouldn’t end college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts; we should make college more affordable for everyone who’s willing to work for it. We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China but in America. And we should equip another two million Americans at community colleges with skills that businesses are looking for right now.

Change is an America that is home to the next generation of manufacturing and innovation. I’m proud I bet on the American auto industry. I refuse to cede the future of manufacturing to other countries. We need a tax code that stops rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas and starts rewarding companies that create jobs here; one that stops subsidizing oil-company profits and keeps supporting new energy jobs and new technology that will cut our oil imports in half.

Change is an America that turns the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building here at home. So long as I’m commander in chief, we’ll pursue our enemies with the strongest military in the world. But it is time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to pay down our debt and rebuild American roads, bridges, schools and broadband.

Change is an America where we reduce our deficit by cutting where we can and asking the wealthiest to go back to the income-tax rates they paid under President Clinton. I’ve worked with Republicans to cut a trillion dollars of spending, and I’ll do more. I’ll work with anyone of any party to move this country forward. But I won’t eliminate health insurance for millions of poor, elderly or disabled on Medicaid, and I won’t turn Medicare into a voucher to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut. That is surrender to the same philosophy that hurt middle-class families for too long.

I’m fighting for the Americans whose letters I read at night, whom I meet on the trail every day. The laid-off furniture worker who’s retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology. The owner of a small restaurant who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down. The autoworker who’s back on the job filled with the pride of building a great car.

When these Americans do well, America does well. That is the change we need right now. Now’s the time to keep pushing forward to make sure that no matter who you are, where you come from or how you started out, you can work to achieve your American dream.

That is the America within our reach. That is why I’m asking for your vote this Tuesday.

Mr. Obama, a Democrat, is seeking re-election as president of the United States.

Campaign Headlines November 1, 2012: ABC News/Washington Post Tracking Poll: Mitt Romney Leads in Confidence on Recovery – But President Barack Obama Escapes Most Economic Blame

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Romney Leads in Confidence on Recovery – But Obama Escapes Most Economic Blame

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/GettyImages

See PDF with full results and charts here.

More likely voters think the economy would improve under Mitt Romney than under Barack Obama – but they disproportionately blame Obama’s predecessor for its troubles in the first place, an example of the mixed sentiments that undergird the deadlocked 2012 election.

Fifty-four percent in the latest ABC News/Washington Post tracking poll express at least some confidence the economy would improve under Romney; fewer, 47 percent, think the same if Obama’s re-elected. Then again, far fewer in either case are “very” confident of economic gains – 19 percent if Romney wins, 21 percent if it’s Obama – hardly a rousing endorsement of either….READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Boulder, Colorado

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Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event, Boulder, CO

Source: WH, 11-1-12

Coors Events Center
Boulder, Colorado

7:42 P.M. MDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  (Applause.)  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you ready to go?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  You seem pretty fired up!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Colorado!  (Applause.)

Everybody, please give Savannah a big round of applause for the great introduction.  (Applause.)  Let’s give a shout out to the folks who are fighting for you every day in Washington — Senator Michael Bennet — (applause) — Senator Mark Udall — (applause) — Congressman Jered Polis.  (Applause.)

It is good to be here.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  I do.  (Applause.)

Those of you who have seats, feel free to sit down.  I don’t want you guys getting tired out.  (Laughter.)

For the past few days, all of us have been focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetime.  And we’re awed and humbled by nature’s destructive power.  We mourn those who were lost.  Obviously our hearts and our thoughts and prayers go out to the families who have been affected.  We pledge to help those whose lives have been turned upside down.

I was just on a phone call with some of the local officials in New York, as well as Governor Cuomo, and they’ve got still a long way to go to deal with this incredible storm.  But we’ve also been inspired these past few days — because when disaster strikes, we see America at its best.  The petty differences that consume us in normal times, they all seem to melt away.  We saw it here in Colorado with the fires this summer, and then the terrible tragedy in Aurora.

In moments like these, we’re reminded there are no Democrats or Republicans during a crisis, just fellow Americans.  (Applause.)  We see leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken; and neighbors helping neighbors to cope with tragedy; communities rallying to rebuild; a spirit that says in the end, we’re all in this together — we rise or fall as one nation, as one people.  (Applause.)

And, Boulder, that spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries.  And it’s carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years.

In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Today, because of the resilience of the American people, our businesses have created over 5 million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back on top.  (Applause.)  American manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years.  (Applause.)  We’re less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in 20 years.  (Applause.)  Home values, home construction is on the rise.  (Applause.)  And thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  (Applause.)  The war in Afghanistan is coming to an end.  (Applause.)  Al Qaeda has been decimated.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

So we’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Colorado, we all know our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a single American who wants a job and can’t find one, our work is not done.  As long as there are families who are working harder and harder but falling further behind, our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a child somewhere in America languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity, anywhere in this country, our work is not yet done.  (Applause.)

Our fight, our mission goes on because we know this nation cannot succeed without a growing, thriving middle class — (applause) — and strong, sturdy ladders into the middle class for everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility. (Applause.)

Our fight, our mission goes on because America has always done best when everybody has a fair shot, when everybody is doing their fair share, when everybody is playing by the same rules.  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, we knew from the beginning that our work would take more than one year, or even one term.  We knew that.  Because, let’s face it, the middle class was getting hammered long before the financial crisis hit.  The economy has changed over the last 20, 30 years.  Technology has made us more productive, but it’s also made a lot of good jobs obsolete.  Global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also meant that companies could locate overseas in low-wage countries.  American workers saw their paychecks getting squeezed, even when corporate profits rose; even as CEO salaries exploded, and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care started to erode — in some cases disappear altogether.

Now, these fundamental changes in the economy — the rise of technology and global competition — those are real.  We can’t wish them away.  But here’s what I know, Colorado:  We can meet those challenges.  We’re Americans.  (Applause.)  We still have the world’s best workers.  We’ve got the world’s best entrepreneurs.  We’ve got the best scientists and researchers. We’ve definitely got the best colleges and universities.  We’ve got the most innovative spirit.  (Applause.)  We have everything we need to thrive in this new economy.  There’s not a country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly trade places with the United States.
But to realize our full potential, to secure a future that we want for our kids and our grandkids, we’ve got to make a choice right now.  In five days, we will choose our next president.  (Applause.)  And, Boulder, it is more than just a choice between two candidates or two parties.  You’re going to be making a choice between two fundamentally different visions of America — one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo — vote.  (Applause.)  Vote.

Or a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.  And we know what the choice needs to be.  We’re here today because we believe that if this country invests in the skills and ideas of its people, then good jobs and businesses will follow.

We believe that America’s free market has been the engine of America’s progress, and we honor the risk-takers and innovators and dreamers that drive our economy forward.  But we also understand that in this country, people succeed when they have a chance at a great education, when they’ve got a chance to learn new skills.  (Applause.)  That’s good for business because they need skilled workers.  That’s good for our country because some of those folks who get those great skills and education start new businesses.  We believe that when we support research into medical breakthroughs or nanotechnology or entire new fields of study, new industries start here and they stay here and they hire here.  (Applause.)

We don’t believe that government should poke its nose into everything we do, but do we believe this country is stronger — and actually our markets work better — when there are rules in place to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution — (applause) — when there are rules to protect consumers from unscrupulous credit card companies and mortgage lenders — (applause) — when we grow — we’re convinced that we grow faster.

And the evidence is on our side.  We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs here in America.  And we believe that quality health care for everybody and a dignified retirement for everybody aren’t just achievable goals — they are a measure of our values as a nation.  That’s what we believe.  (Applause.)

For eight years, we had a President who actually shared those beliefs, and his name was Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  And the interesting thing is when he was first elected, he asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, and science and research.  And guess what — there were a bunch of folks who were running for Congress at the time who said this is going to hurt the economy; this is going to kill job creation.

And if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates happens to be running for President right now.  (Laughter.)  And it turns out his math and their math was just as bad back then as it is now.  (Applause.)  Because by the end of Bill Clinton’s second term, America had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up, and poverty was down, and our deficits had become the biggest surplus in history.  (Applause.)

So, Colorado, we know the ideas that work.  We know our ideas work.  We also know the ideas that don’t work.  Because in the eight years after Bill Clinton left office, his policies were reversed.  The wealthiest Americans got tax cuts they didn’t need.  Companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas.  Insurance companies and oil companies and Wall Street were given free rein to do whatever they pleased.  Folks at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us.  And the result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, and record deficits, and the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis that we have been cleaning up for the last four years.  (Applause.)

So here’s the thing.  We’ve tested both theories.  We’ve tested both visions.  One worked really well.  One worked really badly.  (Laughter.)

Now, in the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has been using all his formidable talents as a salesman — (laughter) — to dress up the very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we’ve been cleaning up after these last four years, and he’s offering them up as change. He’s saying he’s the candidate of change.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  No, don’t boo — vote.  Vote.  (Applause.)

But let me tell you, Colorado, we know what change looks like.  We know what’s going to help the middle class.  (Applause.)  We know what’s going to grow jobs.  We know what’s going to reduce the deficit.  And let me tell you, what Governor Romney is offering sure ain’t it.  It is not it.  Giving more power back to the biggest banks — that’s not change.  Leaving millions without health insurance — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  No, it ain’t!  (Laughter and applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies — not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!

THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughter.)  Ruling out compromise by pledging to rubber-stamp the tea party’s agenda as President — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!

THE PRESIDENT:  In fact, that’s exactly the attitude in Washington that we’ve got to change.

Look, I know that with all the TV commercials that are coming at people, sometimes it’s hard to follow stuff and it’s hard to know who to trust, but here’s the thing.  Look, after four years as President, you know me by now.  (Applause.)  You know me.  You may not agree with every decision that I’ve made.  You may be frustrated at the pace of change.  I always remind people that when we did the auto bailout, only 10 percent of the country approved of it, including, by the way, folks in Michigan and Ohio.  But you know what I believe.  You know where I stand. You know I’m willing to make tough decisions, even when they’re not politically convenient.  (Applause.)  And most importantly, you know that I’ll fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  (Applause.)

And that’s why I know what real change looks like, because I fought for it.  I’ve got the scars to prove it.  (Laughter.)  I’ve got gray hair to show for it.  (Laughter.)  You fought for it, too.  And after all that we’ve been through together, we sure as heck can’t give up now.  (Applause.)

Let’s picture what real change looks like.  Real change is a country where Americans of every age have the skills and education that good jobs require.  And, you know what, we understand government can’t do this alone — parents have to parent; teachers have to teach.  But don’t tell me that hiring more teachers won’t help this economy, or help young people compete.  (Applause.)  Don’t tell me that students who can’t afford college should just borrow money from their parents.  That wasn’t an option for me, and I’ll bet it was not an option for a whole lot of you.  We shouldn’t be ending college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts –- we should be making college more affordable for everybody who’s willing to work for it.  (Applause.)

We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China, but are created right here in Colorado.  (Applause.)  We should work with our community colleges to train another 2 million Americans with the skills that businesses are looking for right now.  And that’s all part of my plan for the future.  That’s what change is.  That’s the America that we’re fighting for.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.  (Applause.)

Change comes when we live up to America’s legacy of innovation, where we make America home to the next generation of advanced manufacturing, and scientific discovery, and technological breakthroughs.  I’m proud that I bet on America’s workers and American ingenuity and the American auto industry.  And today, we’re not just building cars again; we’re building better cars — cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas.  (Applause.)

Today, there are thousands of workers building long-lasting batteries and solar technology and wind turbines all across the country –- jobs that weren’t there four years ago.  (Applause.)  And not every technology we bet on will pan out.  Not every business will thrive.  But I promise you this — there is a brilliant future for manufacturing in America.  There is a future for clean energy in America.  (Applause.)  And I’m not going to cede that future to other countries.

I don’t want a tax code that rewards companies for creating those jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create those jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  I don’t want a tax code that subsidizes oil company profits when they’re making money hand over fist.  I want to support the energy jobs of tomorrow, and the new technology that will cut our oil imports in half; that will reduce the carbon in our atmosphere; that will make us less dependent on foreign oil.  (Applause.)  That’s my plan for growth and jobs.  That’s the future I see in America.  That’s what we’re fighting for.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Change — real change — is finally turning the page on a decade of war.  Let’s do some nation-building right here at home.  (Applause.)  So long as I’m Commander-in-Chief, we will pursue our enemies with the strongest military the world has ever known.  That will not change.  But it’s time to use some of the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to start paying down our debt, to start rebuilding America.  (Applause.)  That’s part of being strong.  That’s part of our national security.

Right now, we can put people back to work all across Colorado, all across the country, fixing roads and bridges; expanding broadband to rural neighborhoods; making sure our schools are state-of-the-art.  Let’s put Americans back to work doing the work that needs to be done.  And let’s especially focus on our veterans -– because nobody who fights for this country should have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads when they come home.  (Applause.)  That’s my commitment to you.  That’s part of keeping America strong.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.

Change is a future where we reduce our deficit in a way that’s balanced and responsible.  And I’ve signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts; I intend to do more.  We can streamline agencies.  We can get rid of programs that aren’t working.  But if we’re serious about the deficit, we also have to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates they paid when Bill Clinton was in office.  (Applause.)

Because a budget is all about priorities.  It’s about what values do we care about.  And as long as I’m President, I’m not going to turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  I’m not going to allow this nation to be plunged into another battle over health care reform, and kick millions of people off of health care, and weaken all the reforms that we put in place, including making sure that young people can stay on their parent’s plan till they’re 26 years old, just so insurance companies can jump back into the driver’s seat.  (Applause.)

And by the way, I’m not going to allow politicians in Washington to control health care choices that women should make for themselves.  (Applause.)  We’re not going to do that.  We’re not going to go backwards.  We’re going forward.  (Applause.)

So, Colorado, we know what change is.  We know what the future requires.  We don’t need a big government agenda or a small government agenda — we need a middle class agenda that rewards the values of hard work and responsibility.  We don’t need a partisan agenda — we need a common-sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, we’re all better off; that says when we fund the research of a young scientist, her new discovery will benefit every American.   (Applause.)

We need an agenda that recognizes we don’t just look out for ourselves — we look out for one another other; we look out for future generations.  We meet those obligations by working together.  That’s the change we believe in.  That’s what 2008 was about.  That’s what this election is about.  That’s why I need you to vote.  (Applause.)

Now, let me be clear — achieving this agenda will not be easy.  It wasn’t easy over these last four years; it’s not going to be easy over the next four years.  Back in 2008, when we talked about change, I told you I wasn’t just talking about changing presidents, I wasn’t just talking about changing parties.  I was talking about changing our politics.  I ran because the voices of the American people — your voices — had been shut out of our democracy for way too long — by lobbyists and special interests, and politicians who thing that compromise is a dirty word and would say anything to win office and do anything to stay in office.

And as we expected, the protectors of the status quo are a powerful force in Washington.  And over the last four years, every time we’ve fought to make change, they’ve fought back with everything they’ve got.  They spent millions to stop us from reforming health care and Wall Street and student loans.  Their strategy from the start was to engineer pure gridlock in Congress, refusing to compromise on ideas that traditionally both Democrats and Republicans have supported in the past.

And what they’re now counting is that the American people will be so worn down by all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction, that you’ll actually reward obstruction, either by voting for folks claiming to bring about change, or not voting at all, but either way, putting people back in charge who advocate the very same policies that got us into this mess.

In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  They’re counting on you not voting.  That’s their entire strategy.  But, Colorado, my bet is on you.  My bet is on you. (Applause.)  My bet is on the decency and good sense of the American people.  (Applause.)

Because despite all the resistance, despite all the setbacks, we’ve gotten done so much and we’ve never lost sight of the vision that we share — that you would have a voice; that there would be somebody at the table fighting every single day for middle class Americans, for folks who are working hard and struggling.

Sometimes Republicans in Congress worked with me to meet our goals — to cut taxes for small businesses and families like yours, to open up new markets for American goods, to finally repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  We had a couple of really brave Republicans who worked with us on that.  (Applause.)

And sometimes we’ve had big fights -– like when we forced the banks to stop overcharging for student loans — (applause) –which is how we made college more affordable for millions of young people; like when we forced Wall Street to abide by the toughest rules since the 1930s; like when we stopped insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with preexisting conditions like cancer or diabetes, so no one in America goes bankrupt just because they get sick.  (Applause.)

I didn’t fight those fights for any partisan advantage.  I have shown my willingness to work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders — whether they’re Democrats, Republicans, or independents — who feel the same way. You’ll vote for candidates like Michael Bennet and Mark Udall and Jared Polis, all who have shown themselves to be willing to work across party lines to get things done, but who also know that there’s some core principles you don’t compromise.  (Applause.)

Because if the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals that will kick students off financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid just to give a millionaire a tax cut, then that’s not a deal worth having.  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not change.  That’s surrender to the same status quo that has hurt middle class families for way too long.

And, Colorado, I’m not ready to give up on the fight.  (Applause.)  I’m not ready to give up on that fight.  (Applause.) And I hope you aren’t either, Colorado.  I hope you aren’t either.  I hope you’ve still got some fight left in you.  (Applause.)

The folks at the very top in this country they don’t need another champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.  They can hire lobbyists.  They’re going to be able to get their phone calls returned.  The people who need a champion are those Americans whose letters I read late at night; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every single day.

The laid-off furniture worker who’s retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology — she needs a champion.  The small restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down — he needs a champion.  The cooks and waiters and cleaning staff working overtime in a hotel somewhere, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college — they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who’d never thought he’d work in a plant again, and now is back on the job building a great car and full of pride and dignity — he needs a champion.  The young teacher doing her best in an overcrowded classroom with outdated textbooks — she needs a champion.  (Applause.)  All those kids in inner cities and small farm towns, in valleys of Ohio, rolling Virginia hills, right here in Boulder; kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors or engineers or entrepreneurs or diplomats or even a president — they need a champion in Washington.  (Applause.)  They need a champion.

Because the future — the future doesn’t have lobbyists.  We’ll never have as many lobbyists as the vested interests — never have as many lobbyists as the past does, but it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.

And that’s why I need you, Colorado.  That’s why I need you, Boulder — to make sure their voices are heard.  To make sure your voices are heard.  (Applause.)  We’ve come too far to turn back now.  We have come too far to grow faint-hearted.  Now is the time to keep pushing forward — to educate all our kids, to train all our workers, to create new jobs, to discover new energy, to broaden opportunity, to grow our middle class, to restore our democracy — to make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, how you started out, you can can make it here in America if you try.  (Applause.)

In the middle of the Great Depression, FDR reminded the country that “failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must shoulder our common load.”  That’s the strength we need today.  That’s the hope I’m asking you to share.  That’s the future in our sights.

That’s why I’m asking for your vote.  That’s why I need you early voting tomorrow.  (Applause.)  That’s why I need young people to turn out.  That’s why I need you to knock on some more doors.  (Applause.)  That’s why I need you to make some phone calls.  And if you turn out for me, if you vote for me, we’ll win Colorado again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win this election.  We’ll finish what we started.  We’ll keep moving forward.  (Applause.) We’ll renew those bonds, and reaffirm that spirit that makes the United States of America the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  Remember to vote!  (Applause.)

END
8:18 P.M. MDT

Campaign Headlines November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney Resume Campaigning after Superstorm Sandy

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama and Romney Resume Campaigning, No More Mr. Nice Guy

JEWEL SAMAD/FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama and Mitt Romney Thursday ended a brief truce for Superstorm Sandy, and made it clear as they returned to the campaign trail that there would be no more Mr. Nice Guy.

Romney stumped in Virginia, hoping to lock up the battleground state in the waning days of the campaign.

Obama began his day in Wisconsin, another key state where a Marist poll released Thursday indicated he had a 49-46 lead on Romney….READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 1, 2012: Mayor Mike Bloomberg Endorses President Barack Obama

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Mayor Mike Bloomberg Endorses Obama

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

Michael Loccisano/FilmMagic

Citing climate change as the deciding factor, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg on Thursday endorsed President Obama for a second term, saying Hurricane Sandy “brought the stakes of Tuesday’s presidential election into sharp relief.”

In the wake of the devastation, Bloomberg, an independent, said the president is the best leader to tackle climate change, which he believes contributed to the storm…..READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Las Vegas, Nevada — Invokes Superstorm Sandy on the Campaign Trail

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama Invokes Superstorm Sandy on the Campaign Trail

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

After canceling campaign events for three days to oversee the response to the devastating storm, President Obama, back on the trail, told supporters in two key battleground states Thursday that Superstorm Sandy serves as a reminder that “when disaster strikes, we see America at its best.”

“All the petty differences that consume us in normal times somehow melt away,” the president told 4,500 Nevadans at a rally in Las Vegas. “There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm, just fellow Americans, leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken, neighbors helping neighbors cope with tragedy, communities rallying to rebuild, a spirit that says, In the end we’re all in this together, that we rise or fall as one nation.”…READ MORE

Remarks by the President in Las Vegas, NV

Source: WH, 11-1-12

Cheyenne Sports Complex
Las Vegas, Nevada

2:05 P.M. PDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Nevada!  (Applause.)  It is great to be back in Vegas!  (Applause.)  It’s great to be here with your next senator, Shelley Berkley — (applause) — who’s going to join my great friend, Majority Leader Harry Reid, in fighting for the people of Nevada.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Where’s Michelle?

THE PRESIDENT:  Michelle couldn’t come, but she says hey.  (Applause.)  She loves you guys.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love her!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, for the past few days, all of us have been focused on —

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you.  All right.  Thank you so much.

Listen, for the past few days, all of us have been focused on one of the worst storms in our lifetime.  We are awed by the destructive power of nature.  We’re mourning those who’ve been lost.  And we’re going to pledge to those whose lives have been turned upside down that we will not quit until we have given them all the help they need to recover.  (Applause.)

This afternoon, as I was flying out to Vegas, we had conference calls with mayors all across New Jersey; had conference calls with mayors and local elected officials all across Connecticut.  I spoke to the governors of New Jersey, Connecticut, and New York, and they’re struggling.  And the cleanup, the aftermath of this storm is going to be hard and it’s going to take some time.

But the thing that I have repeated to them every time I talk to them is America will not forget them.  We are going to make sure they get everything they need.  We’re going to cut through the red tape and the bureaucracy.  (Applause.)  We’ve got military transport getting equipment in to get the power back on.  We’ve got food and water and medical supplies that we’re shipping in.  And we’re not going to stop — because what we understand is, is that this could happen to any of us.

AUDIENCE:  That’s right!

THE PRESIDENT:  And that’s why, even in the midst of tragedy, the situation on the East Coast has also inspired, because it reminds us that when disaster strikes we see America at its best.  All the petty differences that consume us in normal times somehow melt away.  There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm, just fellow Americans –- (applause) — leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken; neighbors helping neighbors cope with tragedy; communities rallying to rebuild; a spirit that says in the end, we’re all in this together –- that we rise or fall as one nation.  (Applause.)

That’s what we have seen on display over these last few days.  That is the spirit that we need going forward.  That spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries.  It’s carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years.

In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Today, our businesses have created over 5 million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back on top.  (Applause.)  American manufacturing is growing faster than any time in the last 15 years.  (Applause.)  We’re less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last 20 years.  (Applause.)  Home values are on the rise.  (Applause.)  Thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  (Applause.)  The war in Afghanistan is coming to an end.  Al Qaeda has been decimated.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Thanks to you!

THE PRESIDENT:  So we’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Nevada, we know our work is not yet done.  We know our work is not yet done in making sure that New Jersey and New York and Connecticut and West Virginia, that they all recover from the hardship they’ve experienced.  (Applause.)

Our work is not done as long as there’s a single American who wants a job and can’t yet find one.  As long as there are families who are working harder and harder, but falling further behind, our work is not yet done.  As long as there is a child languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity anywhere in this country, anywhere in Nevada, our work is not yet done.  (Applause.)

Our fight goes on, because we know this nation can’t succeed without a growing, thriving middle class, and strong, sturdy ladders into the middle class.  Our fight goes on because America has always been at its best when everybody gets a fair shot and everybody is doing their fair share, and everybody is playing by the same rules.  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008, and that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  We knew from the beginning that our work would take more than one year or even one term.  Because, let’s face it, the middle class was getting hammered long before the financial crisis hit — because the economy has changed. Technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete.  Global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to move and hire people in low-wage countries.

American workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits were rising and CEO salaries exploded.  The guaranteed security of pensions and health care started slowly to disappear.

These fundamental changes in the economy, the rise of technology and global competition, these changes are real.  We can’t wish away these challenges.  But here’s what I know, Nevada.  We can meet these challenges.  (Applause.)  This is America.  We’ve got the world’s best workers and the world’s best entrepreneurs.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the world’s best scientists and the world’s best researchers.  We’ve got the best colleges and the best universities.  And we’ve got the most innovative spirit.  We’ve got everything we need to thrive in this new 21st century economy.  And there’s not a country on Earth that would not gladly trade places with the United States.   (Applause.)

But we’ve got a choice to make if we’re going to realize that promise, if we’re going to make sure that that success is there for the next generation.

In five days, we will choose our next President.  (Applause.)  And, Nevada, it’s more than just a choice between two candidates.  It’s more than just a choice between two parties.  You’re going to be making a choice between two fundamentally different visions of America.

On the one hand, we’ve got folks who are arguing to return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  What we’re talking about is a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.  (Applause.)

Nevada, we know the choice that needs to be made, and we’re here today because we believe that if this country invests in the skills and ideas of its people, then good jobs and businesses will follow.

We believe that America’s free market has been the engine of America’s progress, driven by risk-takers and innovators and dreamers.  Folks in Nevada know about dreaming.  (Applause.)  But we also understand that in this country, people succeed when they’ve got a shot at a good education, when they have a chance to learn new skills — and by the way, businesses benefit because they’re hiring those workers, and some of those workers end up starting businesses of their own.

We believe that when we support research into medical breakthroughs, research into new technology, entire new industries will start here and stay here and hire here.

We don’t believe government should poke its nose in everything we do, but we do believe this country is stronger when there are rules to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution — (applause) — when there are rules to protect consumers from unscrupulous credit card companies and mortgage lenders.  (Applause.)  We believe we grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  And we believe that quality health care for everybody and a dignified retirement for everybody aren’t just achievable goals, they are a measure of our values as a nation.  That’s what we believe.

For eight years, we had a President who shared these beliefs.  His name was Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  And when he was elected, he asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, and science and research.  And here’s an interesting thing — plenty of folks who were running for Congress at the time said it would hurt the economy, that raising taxes on the wealthy would kill jobs.  And if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates who was running back then happens to be the guy who is running for President right now.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo — vote.  (Applause.)  Vote.

Turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today — (laughter) — because by the end of Bill Clinton’s second term, America had created 23 million new jobs.  Incomes were up.  Poverty was down.  Our deficit became the biggest surplus in history.

So, Nevada, we know our ideas work.  We also know the ideas that don’t work.  Because in the eight years after Bill Clinton left office, his policies were reversed.  The wealthiest Americans got tax cuts they didn’t need and we couldn’t afford. Companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas.  Insurance companies and oil companies and Wall Street were given free license to do whatever they pleased.  Folks at the top got to play a different set of rules than the rest of us.  And the result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis that we’re still cleaning up after.

So, in the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has been using all his talents as a salesman to dress up the very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we’ve been cleaning up after over these four years, and with a straight face, he’s offering them up as change.  (Laughter.)  He’s saying he’s the candidate of change.

Now, let me tell you, Nevada, we know what change looks like.  (Applause.)  And what the Governor is offering sure ain’t change.  Giving more power back to the biggest banks isn’t change.  Leaving millions without health insurance isn’t change.  Another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy isn’t change.  Refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies isn’t change.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  Turning Medicare into a voucher, that is change, but we don’t want that change.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  Ruling out compromise by pledging to rubber-stamp the tea party’s agenda as President — that’s definitely not change.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo —

AUDIENCE:  Vote!

THE PRESIDENT:  In fact, that’s exactly the attitude in Washington that needs to go.

So after four years as President, you know me by now.  (Applause.)  You may not agree with every decision I’ve made, you may be frustrated at the pace of change, but you know what I believe.  You know where I stand.  You know I’m willing to make tough decisions, even when they’re not politically convenient.  And you know that I will fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  (Applause.)

So my opponent can talk about change, but I know what real change looks like because I’ve fought for it.  (Applause.)  I’ve got the scars to proof it.  You have, too.  And after all that we’ve been through together, Nevada, we sure as heck can’t give up now.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  Change is a country where Americans of every age have the skills and education that good jobs require.  And government can’t do this alone — parents have to parent; teachers have to teach.  But don’t tell me that hiring more teachers won’t help this economy grow, or help young people compete.  We know it will.  (Applause.)

Don’t tell me that students who can’t afford college should just borrow money from their parents.  That wasn’t an option for me.  I’ll bet it wasn’t an option for a whole lot of you.  We shouldn’t be ending college tax credits just to pay for a millionaire’s tax cut — we should be making college more affordable for everybody who’s willing to work for it.  (Applause.)

We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China; they’re created right here in Nevada.  (Applause.)  We should work with our community colleges to train another 2 million Americans with the skills that businesses are looking for right now.  That’s my plan for the future.  That’s what change is.  That’s the America we’re fighting for in this election.

Change comes when we live up to our legacy of innovation, when we make America home to the next generation of outstanding manufacturing, scientific discovery, technological breakthroughs.  I am proud that I bet on American workers, and American ingenuity, and the American auto industry.  (Applause.)   Today we’re not just building cars again; we’re building better cars — cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas.  (Applause.)

Today, there are thousands of workers building long-lasting batteries and wind turbines, installing solar panels all across the country.  And those jobs, they weren’t there four years ago.

And, sure, not all technologies we bet on will pan out.  Some of the businesses we encourage will fail.  But I promise you this:  There is a future for manufacturing in America.  (Applause.)   There’s a future for clean energy in America.  (Applause.)

I refuse to cede that future to other countries.  I don’t want a tax code that rewards companies for creating jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create jobs right here in the United States of America.  (Applause.)  I don’t want a tax code that subsidizes oil company profits when they’re already making money hand over fist.  I want to support the energy jobs of tomorrow, the new technologies that will cut our oil imports in half.  That’s my plan for jobs and growth.  (Applause.)  That’s the future that I see for America.

Change is finally turning the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building right here at home.  (Applause.)  So long as I’m Commander-in-Chief, we will pursue our enemies with the strongest military the world has ever known.  We will not let up.  But it’s time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to start paying down our debt and rebuild America.

Right now — we could be putting more folks back to work right now, fixing roads and bridges, expanding broadband to rural neighborhoods, making sure our schools are state-of-the-art.  Let’s put Americans back to work doing the work that needs to be done — (applause) — especially our veterans, because no one who fights for this country should have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads when they come home.  (Applause.)

That’s my commitment to you.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.  Change is a future where, yes, we reduce our deficit, but we do it in a balanced, responsible way.  I’ve already signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts.  I’ll work with both parties to streamline agencies and get rid of programs that don’t work.  But if we’re really serious about the deficit, then we’ve also got to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates they paid when Bill Clinton was President.  (Applause.)

Because as long as I’m President, I am not going to turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  I won’t allow this nation to be plunged into another battle over health care reform just so insurance companies can jump back in the driver’s seat.  (Applause.)  And I will never allow politicians in Washington to control the health care choices that women should make for themselves.  (Applause.)

So, Nevada, we know what change is.  We know what the future requires.  We don’t need a big government agenda, or a small government agenda; we need a middle-class agenda that rewards the values of hard work and responsibility.  We don’t need a partisan agenda — we need a common-sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, we’ll all be better off; that says when we fund the research of a young scientist, her new discovery will benefit every American.

We need a vision that says we don’t just look out for ourselves; we look out for one another.  We look out for future generations.  We meet those obligations working together.  That’s the change we believe in.  And that’s what this election is all about.  (Applause.)  That’s what this election is all about.  (Applause.)

Now, Nevada, let’s be clear — achieving this agenda won’t be easy.  It’s never been easy.  We always knew it would be hard.  Back in 2008, when we talked about change, I told you I wasn’t just talking about changing presidents.  I wasn’t just talking about changing political parties.  I was talking about changing our politics.  I ran because the voices of the American people — your voices — had been shut out of our democracy for way too long — by lobbyists and special interests; by politicians who believed that compromise is a dirty word; by folks who would say anything to stay in office or win office, or do anything to make sure that the special interests who support them get what they want.

The protectors of the status quo are a powerful force in Washington.  And over the last four years, every time we’ve pushed to make change, they fought back with everything they’ve got.  They spent millions to stop us from reforming health care; spent millions to fight us when we tried to reform Wall Street.  Their strategy from the start was to engineer pure gridlock, refusing to compromise on ideas that both Democrats and Republicans had supported in the past.

And what they’re counting on now is that the American people will be so worn down by all the squabbling in Washington, so tired of all the dysfunction, that you’ll actually reward their obstruction, and put people back in charge who advocate the very same policies that got us into this mess.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  But, Nevada, my bet is on you.  (Applause.)  My bet is on you.  My bet is on the decency and good sense of the American people.  Because despite all the resistance, despite all the setbacks, we have never lost sight of the vision that we shared –- that you’d have a voice; that there would be somebody at the table fighting every single day for middle-class Americans, for folks who are striving to get into the middle class.  (Applause.)

Sometimes Republicans in Congress have worked with me to meet our goals, and nobody could be happier.  We cut taxes for small businesses and families like yours, and they helped.  We opened new markets for American goods.  We finally repealed “don’t ask, don’t tell,” and we had some courageous Republican senators supporting us.  (Applause.)

But, yes, we’ve also had some big fights — like when we forced the banks to stop overcharging for student loans, and made college affordable for millions of students; like when we forced Wall Street to abide by the toughest rules since the 1930s; like when we stopped insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with preexisting conditions like cancer or diabetes, so that no one in America goes bankrupt just because they get sick.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Thank you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I didn’t fight those fights for any partisan advantage.  I’ve shown my willingness to work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders — whether they’re Democrats, Republicans, independents — who feel the same way.  You’ll vote for candidates like Shelley Berkley, and Dina Titus, and John Oceguera, and Steve Horsford  — (applause) — people who just want to fix problems and help America, and work on behalf of hardworking families like yours.

But if the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals that will kick students off of financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid who are poor, or elderly, or disabled, just to give a millionaire a tax cut — I’m not having it.  (Applause.)  That’s not a deal worth having.  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not real change.  That’s surrender to the same status quo that’s hurt middle-class families for way too long.  And I’m not ready to give up on the fight just yet.  (Applause.)

I’m not giving up on the fight, and I hope you aren’t either, Nevada.  (Applause.)  I hope you aren’t either.  I need you still fired up.  (Applause.)

The folks at the very top in this country, they don’t need a champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.  That’s okay, we understand that.  But the people who need a champion are the Americans whose letters I read late at night; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every single day.

The laid-off furniture worker who is retraining at the age of 55 after they got laid off — she needs a champion.  The small restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down — he needs a champion.  (Applause.)  The cooks and waiters and cleaning staff working overtime at a Vegas hotel, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college — they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who’s back on the job after thinking he might never go back, filled with the pride and dignity of building a great American car — he needs a champion.  (Applause.)  The young teacher doing her best in an overcrowded classroom with outdated textbooks, digging into her own pocket to buy school supplies, never giving up on those kids, understanding that they can learn — she needs a champion.  (Applause.)

And all those young people in inner cities and small farm towns, in the valleys of Ohio, or rolling Virginia hills, or right here in Vegas or way up in Elko — kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors, engineers or entrepreneurs, diplomats, maybe even a president — they need a champion in Washington.  (Applause.)

The future will never have as many lobbyists as the past, but it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.  (Applause.)  And that’s why I need you, Nevada — to make sure their voices are heard; to make sure your voices are heard.

We’ve come too far to turn back now.  (Applause.)  We’ve come too far to let our hearts grow faint, to go weary.  (Applause.)  Now is the time to keep pushing forward — to educate all our kids and train all our workers, to create new jobs and rebuild our infrastructure, to discover new sources of energy, to broaden opportunity, to grow our middle class, to restore our democracy — to make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, or how you started out, you can make it here in America.  (Applause.)  That’s why we are moving forward.  (Applause.)

In the midst of the Great Depression, FDR reminded the country that “failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must all shoulder our common load.”  That’s the strength we need today.

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  That’s the hope I’m asking you to share.  That’s the future in our sight.  That’s why I’m asking you for your vote.  (Applause.)  That’s why I’m asking you, Nevada, for your vote.

And if you’re willing to work with me, and knock on some doors with me, and make some phone calls for me — (applause) — if you’re willing to turn out for me, and grab some friends and neighbors for me, we’ll win Clark County again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win Nevada again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win this election.  And together, we’ll renew the bonds and reaffirm the spirit that make the United States of America the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)  Let’s go vote!  Let’s get this done!

END
2:35 P.M. PDT

Campaign Headlines November 1, 2012: Mitt Romney Says He Supports FEMA

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Says He Supports FEMA

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

Win McNamee/Getty Images

With so much attention this week on Hurricane Sandy and the response to its ravaging, year-old comments by Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney suggesting that disaster relief should fall more to the states and the private sector have received new scrutiny….

Romney, who suspended his campaign rallies in favor of donation drives for Sandy on Tuesday, stated his position on FEMA in a statement to ABC News Thursday.

“I believe that FEMA plays a key role in working with states and localities to prepare for and respond to natural disasters,” he said. “As president, I will ensure FEMA has the funding it needs to fulfill its mission, while directing maximum resources to the first responders who work tirelessly to help those in need, because states and localities are in the best position to get aid to the individuals and communities affected by natural disasters.”…READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 1, 2012: Mitt Romney Hits President Barack Obama for ‘Secretary of Business’ Idea

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Hits Obama for ‘Secretary of Business’ Idea

ABC/Martin H. Simon

Mitt Romney’s campaign was back in full swing Thursday in the battleground state of Virginia. The Republican candidate criticized President Obama again after a brief post-hurricane hiatus from negative attacks.

Romney focused in Virginia on cultivating small businesses, mocking President Obama for suggesting that he would developed a “Secretary of Business.”

“He’s got to find something to suggest it’s going to better over the next four years,” Romney said at his first of three campaign events. “And so he came up with an idea last week which his he’s going to create the Department of Business.”….READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Green Bay, Wisconsin — Obama Kicks Off Closing Argument Tour in Wisconsin

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama Kicks Off Closing Argument Tour in Wisconsin

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama is officially back on the campaign trail in full swing, delivering his closing argument at a chilly tarmac rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin — steps from Air Force One — after an unprecedented and unanticipated two-day pause in the home stretch thanks to Hurricane Sandy.

Obama invoked the super-storm, and the lessons he’s taken from it, to set the tone for his three-state, 16-hour swing with just five days of campaigning to Election Day….READ MORE

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Green Bay, WI

Source: WH, 11-1-12 

Austin Straubel International Airport
Green Bay, Wisconsin

10:43 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Wisconsin!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)  I want to thank all of you for giving such a warm welcome to a Bears fan  — (applause) — and I especially want to thank one of the greatest defensive players in NFL history for being here today  — Charles Woodson.  (Applause.)  And I want to thank Charles because I understand he made an announcement about a gift to the Red Cross to help support everybody over on the East Coast, and that’s the kind of guy he is, so we’re grateful to him.  Thank you, Charles.  (Applause.)

Let’s also give it up for your next United States senator, Tammy Baldwin.  (Applause.)  She’s going to be following leaders like Herb Kohl and Russ Feingold in being fierce fighters for the people of Wisconsin.  (Applause.)

Now, for the past few days, all of us have been focused on one of the worst storms in our lifetimes.  And we’re awed and we’re humbled by nature’s destructive power.  We mourn the loss of so many people.  Our hearts go out to those who have lost their loved ones.  We pledge to help those whose lives have been turned upside down.  And I was out in New Jersey yesterday and saw the devastation, and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot, a lot of people.

But we’ve also been inspired these past few days — because when disaster strikes, we see America at its best.  All the petty differences that consume us in normal times all seem to melt away.  There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm, there are just fellow Americans.  (Applause.)  Leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken; neighbors helping neighbors cope with tragedy; communities rallying to rebuild; a spirit that says, in the end, we’re all in this together -– that we rise or fall as one nation, as one people.  (Applause.)

That spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries.  It has carried us through the trials of the last four years.  In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Today, our businesses have created over 5 million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back on top.  American manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years.  Home values are on the rise.  Thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  (Applause.)  The war in Afghanistan is winding down.  Al Qaeda has been decimated.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

So we’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Wisconsin, we know our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a single American who wants a job but can’t find one, our work isn’t done.  As long as there are families who are working harder but falling behind, our work isn’t done.  As long as there’s a child languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity, anywhere in this country, our work is not yet done.  (Applause.)

Our fight goes on because we know this nation cannot succeed without a growing, thriving middle class; and strong, sturdy ladders into the middle class.  Our fight goes on because America has always done its best when everybody gets a fair shot, and everybody is doing their fair share, and everybody is playing by the same rules.  (Applause.)  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President — because we’ve got more work to do.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, we knew from the beginning that our work would take more than one year, or even one term — because let’s face it, the middle class was getting hammered long before the financial crisis hit.  Technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete.  Global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries.  American workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and CEO salaries exploded, and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing.

And these fundamental changes in the economy –- the rise of technology and global competition –- they’re real.  We can’t wish these challenges away.  But here’s what I know, Wisconsin:  We can meet them — because we’re Americans.  We’ve got the world’s best workers and the best entrepreneurs.  We’ve got the best scientists and the best researchers; the best colleges and universities.  And we’ve got the most innovative spirit.  We have everything we need to thrive in this new economy, in this new century, and there’s not a country on Earth that wouldn’t trade places with the United States of America.

But we have a choice to make.  In five days, we will choose our next President.  (Applause.)  And it’s more than just a choice between two candidates or two parties.  You’ll be making a choice between two fundamentally different visions of America -– one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo, Wisconsin — vote.  (Applause.)

Or a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.  (Applause.)  And, Wisconsin, we know what the choice needs to be.  We’re here today because we believe that if this country invests in the skills and ideas of its people, then good jobs and businesses will follow.

We believe that America’s free market has been the engine of America’s progress, driven by risk-takers and innovators, and dreamers.  But we also understand that in this country, people succeed when they’ve got a chance to get a good education and learn new skills –- and, by the way, so do the businesses that hire those people, or the companies that those folks start.

We believe that when we support research into medical breakthroughs or new technology, then entire new industries will start here and stay here and hire here.

We don’t believe government should poke its nose into everything we do.  But do we believe this country is stronger when there are rules to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution — (applause) — when there are rules to protect consumers and ordinary families from credit card companies that are engaging in deceptive practices, mortgage lenders that are unscrupulous.  (Applause.)

We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  And we believe that quality, affordable health care and a dignified retirement aren’t just achievable goals, they’re a measure of our values as a nation.  (Applause.)  That’s what we believe.

For eight years, we had a President who shared these beliefs; his name was Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  When he was first elected, he asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research.  And guess what?  Plenty of folks who were running for Congress at the time said it would hurt the economy; that it would kill jobs.  And if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for President right now.  (Laughter.)  And it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today.  (Applause.)  Because by the end of Bill Clinton’s second term, America had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up, and poverty was down.  And our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history.

So, Wisconsin, we know the ideas that work.  We also know the ideas that don’t work.  Because in the eight years after Bill Clinton left office, his policies were reversed.  The wealthiest Americans got tax cuts they didn’t need and that we couldn’t afford.  Companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas.  Insurance companies and oil companies and Wall Street were given free license to do what they pleased.  Folks at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us.

And the result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis that we’ve been cleaning up for the last four years.

Now, in the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has been using all his talents as a salesman to dress up these very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we’ve been cleaning up after for the past four years.  And he is offering them up as change.  (Laughter.)  He’s saying he’s the candidate of change.

Well, let me tell you, Wisconsin, we know what change looks like.  (Applause.)  And what the Governor is offering sure ain’t change.  Giving more power back to the biggest banks isn’t change.  Leaving millions without health insurance isn’t change.  Another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy isn’t change.  Turning Medicare into a voucher is change, but we don’t want that change.  (Laughter.)  Refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies isn’t change.  Ruling out compromise by pledging to rubberstamp the tea party’s agenda as President -– that’s definitely not change.  In fact, that’s exactly the attitude in Washington that needs to go.
Now, here’s the thing, Wisconsin.  After four years as President, you know me by now.  You may not agree with every decision I’ve made.  You may be frustrated at the pace of change.  But you know what I believe.  You know where I stand.  You know I’m willing to make tough decisions, even when they’re not politically convenient.  (Applause.)  And you know I’ll fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  You know that.  (Applause.)

I know what change looks like, because I fought for it.  You have, too.  And after all we’ve been through together, we sure as heck can’t give up now.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  Change is a country where Americans of every age have the skills and education that good jobs now require.  And government can’t do this alone, but don’t tell me that hiring more teachers won’t help this economy grow, or help young people compete.  (Applause.)  Don’t tell me that students who can’t afford college should just borrow money from their parents.  That wasn’t an option for me, and I’ll bet it wasn’t an option for a whole lot of you.

We shouldn’t be ending college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts; we should be making college more affordable for everyone who’s willing to work for it.  (Applause.)  We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China, they’re created right here in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)

We should work with community colleges to train another two million Americans with skills that businesses are looking for right now.  That’s my plan for the future.  That’s what change is.  That’s the America we’re fighting for in this election.

Change comes when we live up to our legacy of innovation, and make America home to the next generation of manufacturing, scientific discovery, technological breakthroughs.  I’m proud I bet on American workers and American ingenuity and the American auto industry.  And today, we’re not just building cars again, we’re building better cars –- cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas.  (Applause.)

Today, there are thousands of workers building long-lasting batteries and wind turbines and solar panels all across the country –- jobs that weren’t there four years ago.  And sure, not all technologies we bet on will pan out.  Some of the businesses we encourage will fail.  But I promise you this -– there is a future for manufacturing here in America.  There is a future for clean energy here in America.  (Applause.)  And I refuse to cede that future to other countries.

I don’t want tax codes rewarding companies for creating jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  I don’t want a tax code that subsidizes oil company profits; I want to support the energy jobs of tomorrow and the new technologies that will cut our oil imports in half.  That’s my plan for jobs and growth.  That’s the future of America that I see.

Change is finally turning the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building here at home.  So long as I’m Commander-in-Chief, we will pursue our enemies with the strongest military the world has ever known.  But it’s time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to start paying down our debts here and rebuilding America.  Right now, we can put people back to work fixing up roads and bridges.  Right now, we can expand broadband into rural neighborhoods, and make sure our schools are state-of-the-art.

Let’s put Americans back to work doing the work that needs to be done.  And let’s especially focus on our veterans — because no one who fights for this country should have to fight for a job, or a roof over their heads, or the care that they need when they come home.  (Applause.)  That’s my plan to keep us strong.  That’s my commitment to you.  And that’s what’s at stake in this election.

Change is a future where we reduce our deficit in a way that’s balanced and responsible.  I’ve signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts; I intend to do more.  And I’ll work with both parties to streamline agencies and get rid of programs that don’t work.

But if we’re serious about the deficit, we’ve also got to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates that they paid when Bill Clinton was in office.  (Applause.)  Because as long as I’m President, I will never turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  I will never allow this nation to be plunged into another battle over health care reform just so insurance companies can jump back in the driver’s seat.  And I will never allow politicians in Washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves.  (Applause.)

So, Wisconsin, we know what change is.  We know what the future requires — we don’t need a big government agenda or a small government agenda.  We need a middle-class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility.

We don’t need a partisan agenda –- we need a common-sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, we’ll all be better off; that says when we fund the research of a young scientist, her new discovery will benefit every American.

We need a vision that says we don’t just look out for ourselves –- we look out for one another other; we look out for future generations, and we meet those obligations by working together.  That’s the change we believe in.  That’s what this election is all about.

Now, let’s be clear, achieving this agenda won’t be easy.  It’s never been easy.  We always knew that.  Back in 2008, when we talked about change, I told you I wasn’t just talking about changing Presidents.  I wasn’t just talking about changing parties.  I was talking about changing our politics.  I ran because the voices of the American people –- your voices -– had been shut out of our democracy for way too long –- by lobbyists and special interests, and politicians who believe that compromise is somehow a dirty word; by folks who would say anything to win office, and do anything to stay there.

The protectors of the status quo are a powerful force in Washington.  And over the last four years, every time we’ve tried to make a change, they’ve fought back with everything they’ve got.  They spent millions to stop us from reforming health care and Wall Street and student loans.  And their strategy from the start was to engineer pure gridlock in Congress, refusing to compromise on ideas that both Democrats and Republicans had supported in the past.

And what they’re counting on now, Wisconsin, is that the American people will be so worn down by all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction, that you’ll actually reward obstruction, and put people back in charge who advocate the very policies that got us into this mess.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  But, Wisconsin, my bet is on you.  (Applause.)  My bet is on the decency and good sense of the America people — because despite all the resistance, despite all the setbacks, we’ve won some great fights.  And I’ve never lost sight of the vision we share that you would have a voice; that there would be somebody at the table fighting every single day for middle-class Americans who work hard.  Sometimes, Republicans in Congress have worked with me to meet our goals –- to cut taxes for small businesses and families like yours, to open new markets for American goods, or finally repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  (Applause.)

And sometimes we’ve had big fights — fights that were worth having — like when we forced the banks to stop overcharging for student loans, and made college more affordable for millions.  (Applause.)  Like when we forced Wall Street to abide by the toughest rules since the 1930s.  Like when we stopped insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with preexisting conditions like cancer or diabetes, so that nobody in America goes bankrupt just because they get sick.  (Applause.)

I didn’t fight those fights for any partisan advantage.  I’ve shown my willingness to work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders –- whether they are Democrats, Republicans, or independents –- who feel the same way.

But if the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals that will kick students off of financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid who are poor, or elderly, or disabled, just to give a millionaire a tax cut, I’m not having it.  That’s not a deal worth having.  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not change.  That’s surrender to the same status quo that has hurt middle-class families for way too long.  And I’m not ready to give up on that fight.  (Applause.)

I hope you aren’t either, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)  I hope you aren’t either.  See, the folks at the very top in this country don’t need another champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.

The people who need a champion are the Americans whose letters I read late at night; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every day.  The laid off furniture worker who is retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology -– she needs a champion.

The small restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down -– he needs a champion.  The cooks and the waiters and the cleaning staff working overtime at a Vegas hotel, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college -– they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who’s back on the job, filled with pride and dignity because he’s building a great car –- he needs a champion.  (Applause.)  The young teacher doing her best in an overcrowded classroom with outdated textbooks –- she needs a champion.  (Applause.)

All those kids in inner cities and small farm towns, in the valleys of Ohio or rolling Virginia hills or right here in Green Bay; kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors, engineers or entrepreneurs, diplomats or even a president –- (applause) — they need a champion in Washington.  (Applause.)  They need a champion.  They need a champion because the future will never have as many lobbyists as the past, but it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.

And that’s why I need you, Wisconsin — to make sure their voices are heard; to make sure your voices are heard.  We’ve come too far to turn back now.  We’ve come too far to let our hearts grow faint.  Now is the time to keep pushing forward -– to educate all our kids, and train all our workers; to create new jobs, and rebuild our infrastructure; to discover new sources of energy, to broaden opportunity, to grow our middle class, to restore our democracy, and to make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, or how you started out, you can work to achieve your American Dream.  (Applause.)

In the midst of the Great Depression, FDR reminded the country that “failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must [all] shoulder our common load.”  That’s the strength we need today.  That’s the hope I’m asking you to share.  That’s the future in our sights.  That’s why I’m asking for your vote.  (Applause.)

And if you’re willing to work with me again, and knock on some doors with me, and make some phone calls for me, and turn out for me, we’ll win Brown County again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win Wisconsin again.  We’ll win this election.  And together, we’ll renew those bonds, and reaffirm that spirit that makes the United States of America the greatest nation on Earth.

Thank you, Wisconsin.  Get out there and vote!  Thank you.  God bless you, and God bless America.  (Applause.)

END
11:08 A.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Roanoke, Virginia — We Don’t Need A Secretary Of Business, We Need A President Who Understands Business

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney: We Don’t Need A Secretary Of Business, We Need A President Who Understands Business

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-1-12

“We don’t need a secretary of business to understand business; we need a president who understands business, and I do. That’s why I will be able to get this economy going. This isn’t the time for small measures. This is a time for greatness. This is a time for big change, for real change.” – Mitt Romney
Remarks
Roanoke, Virginia
November 1, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “Now, I know the president’s been trying to figure out some way to suggest he’s got some new ideas, because with all these people out of work, with 3 million more women in poverty today than when he took office, with 15 more million people on food stamps than when he took office, he’s got to find something to suggest it’s going to be better over the next four years. And so he came up with an idea last week, which is he’s going to create the department of business. I don’t think adding a new chair in his Cabinet will help add millions of jobs on Main Street. I mean, unfortunately, what you’ve seen before your very eyes is a campaign that keeps on shrinking and shrinking and shrinking to smaller things. I mean, he’s been out talking about how he’s going to save Big Bird and then playing silly word games with my last name and then — or first, and then attacking me day-in and day-out. Attacking me doesn’t make an agenda, doesn’t get people back to work. We don’t need a secretary of business to understand business; we need a president who understands business, and I do. That’s why I will be able to get this economy going. This isn’t the time for small measures. This is a time for greatness. This is a time for big change, for real change. And that’s why, just as your next senator said, this is a time where from day one he’s going to make changes, I’m going to make real changes, I’m going to get this economy going. From day one, we’re making changes.”

Full Text Campaign Buzz October 31, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Coral Gables, Florida — Romney Trades Barbs for Optimism in First Speech Since Sandy

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Trades Barbs for Optimism in First Speech Since Sandy

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-31-12

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As President Obama headed to storm-ravaged New Jersey for a tour with Gov. Chris Christie, Mitt Romney was back on the stump in Florida Wednesday for his first full day of campaigning since Hurricane Sandy devastated areas of the East Coast.

Romney maintained a more subdued tone in Tampa, Fla., trading harsh attacks on Obama’s tenure for a more positive set of remarks then one might be expect just days before election day.

“We come together in times like this and we want to make sure that they have a speedy and quick recovery from their financial and in many cases, personal loss,” said Romney, opening his remarks in Tampa by encouraging Red Cross donations for storm relief efforts.  Romney was joined by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio, who also made mention of Sandy and encouraged donations…..READ MORE

Mitt Romney: “It’s Time To Take A New Path Of Bold, Aggressive Change”

Location

Boston, MA

United States

Remarks
Coral Gables, Florida

October 31, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “We also have other challenges. We have some 23 million Americans that are struggling to get a good job. We also have 1 out of 6 Americans living in poverty. We have 47 million Americans on food stamps. That’s what’s happening here at home. Then around the world, we face challenges as well, as Iran speeds along its course to become nuclear, as we also face competition for jobs from China and other nations. We face some real challenges. And as a result of that, it is my view that we should not continue along the same path but it’s time to take a new path of bold, aggressive change because the road we’re on is not doing so well. Now, you probably know, as I think about what we need to do, I actually have a plan with five key steps to get this economy going and to make sure that when you graduate there’ll be a job there and to get those 23 million people working and to make sure that we help people get off of food stamps because they got good jobs and good incomes. And for that to happen these five steps will create 12 million jobs. And because of those jobs, you’ll see more take-home pay.”

Campaign Headlines October 31, 2012: Mitt Romney Chooses New Hampshire for Site of Final Rally Before Election Day

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Chooses NH for Site of Final Rally Before Election Day

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-31-12

Darren McCollester/Getty Images

Mitt Romney will hold his final campaign rally in New Hampshire, the very state in which he launched his bid for the White House 16 months ago.

The “Victory Rally” will be held in Manchester, N.H., at 9:30 p.m. on Monday night, Election Day eve.  Campaign-theme song artist Kid Rock will be the special guest….READ MORE

Full Text Obama Presidency October 30, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at the American Red Cross — Update on Hurricane Sandy

POLITICAL BUZZ

OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 112TH CONGRESS:

Update on Hurricane Sandy

 

President Obama delivers remarks during his visit to the Disaster Operation Center at the Red CrossPresident Barack Obama delivers remarks during his visit to the Disaster Operation Center at the Red Cross national headquarters in Washington, D.C., Oct. 30, 2012. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

Remarks by the President at the American Red Cross

Source: WH, 10-30-12 

Washington, D.C.

2:18 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  First of all, I want to thank Gail and Charlie who are on the scene doing work every time we have a disaster here in the United States of America.  But obviously, the Red Cross is doing outstanding work internationally, so we want to thank them for their outstanding work.

A few things that I want to emphasize to the public at the top.  This storm is not yet over.  We’ve gotten briefings from the National Hurricane Center.  It is still moving north.  There are still communities that could be affected.  And so I want to emphasize there are still risks of flooding, there are still risks of down power lines, risks of high winds.  And so it is very important for the public to continue to monitor the situation in your local community, listen to your state and local officials, follow instructions.  The more you follow instructions, the easier it is for our first responders to make sure that they are dealing with true emergency situations.  So the better prepared individual families are for the situation, the easier it is going to be for us to deal with it.

Next, obviously, I want to talk about the extraordinary hardship that we’ve seen over the last 48 hours.  Our thoughts and prayers go out to all the families who have lost loved ones.  Unfortunately, there have been fatalities as a consequence of Hurricane Sandy, and it’s not clear that we’ve counted up all the fatalities at this point.  And obviously, this is something that is heartbreaking for the entire nation.  And we certainly feel profoundly for all the families whose lives have been upended and are going to be going through some very tough times over the next several days and perhaps several weeks and months.

The most important message I have for them is that America is with you.  We are standing behind you, and we are going to do everything we can to help you get back on your feet.

Earlier today I had a conversation with the governors and many of the mayors in the affected areas, including Governor Christie, Governor Cuomo, and Mayor Bloomberg.  I want to praise them for the extraordinary work that they have done.  Sadly, we are getting more experience with these kinds of big impact storms along the East Coast, and the preparation shows.  Were it not for the outstanding work that they and their teams have already done and will continue to do in the affected regions, we could have seen more deaths and more property damage.  So they have done extraordinary work working around the clock.  The coordination between the state, local, and federal governments has been outstanding.

Obviously, we’re now moving into the recovery phase in a lot of the most severely affected areas.  New Jersey, New York in particular have been pounded by this storm.  Connecticut has taken a big hit.  Because of some of the work that had been done ahead of time, we’ve been able to get over a thousand FEMA officials in place, pre-positioned.  We’ve been able to get supplies, food, medicine, water, emergency generators to ensure that hospitals and law enforcement offices are able to stay up and running as they are out there responding.

We are going to continue to push as hard as we can to make sure that power is up throughout the region.  And obviously, this is mostly a local responsibility, and the private utilities are going to have to lean forward, but we are doing everything we can to provide them additional resources so that we can expedite getting power up and running in many of these communities.

There are places like Newark, New Jersey, for example, where you’ve got 80, 90 percent of the people without power.  We can’t have a situation where that lasts for days on end.  And so my instructions to the federal agency has been, do not figure out why we can’t do something; I want you to figure out how we do something.  I want you to cut through red tape.  I want you to cut through bureaucracy.  There’s no excuse for inaction at this point.  I want every agency to lean forward and to make sure that we are getting the resources where they need — where they’re needed as quickly as possible.

So I want to repeat — my message to the federal government:  No bureaucracy, no red tape.  Get resources where they’re needed as fast as possible, as hard as possible, and for the duration, because the recovery process obviously in a place like New Jersey is going to take a significant amount of time.  The recovery process in a lower Manhattan is going to take a lot of time.

And part of what we’re trying to do here is also to see where are some resources that can be brought to bear that maybe traditionally are not used in these kind of disaster situations.  For example, there may be military assets that allow us to help move equipment to ensure that pumping and getting the flooding out of New York subway systems can proceed more quickly.  There may be resources that we can bring to bear to help some of the private utilities get their personnel and their equipment in place more swiftly so that we can get power up and running as soon as possible.

So my message to the governors and the mayors and, through them, to the communities that have been hit so hard is that we are going to do everything we can to get resources to you and make sure that any unmet need that is identified, we are responding to it as quickly as possible.  And I told the mayors and the governors if they’re getting no for an answer somewhere in the federal government, they can call me personally at the White House.

Now, obviously, the state, local, federal response is important, but what we do as a community, what we do as neighbors and as fellow citizens is equally important.  So a couple of things that I want the public to know they can do.

First of all, because our local law enforcement, our first responders are being swamped, to the extent that everybody can be out there looking out for their neighbors, especially older folks, I think that’s really important.  If you’ve got a neighbor nearby, you’re not sure how they’re handling a power outage, flooding, et cetera, go over, visit them, knock on their door, make sure that they’re doing okay.  That can make a big difference.  The public can be the eyes and ears in terms of identifying unmet needs.

Second thing, the reason we’re here is because the Red Cross knows what it’s doing when it comes to emergency response.  And so for people all across the country who have not been affected, now is the time to show the kind of generosity that makes America the greatest nation on Earth.  And a good place to express that generosity is by contributing to the Red Cross.

Obviously, you can go on their website.  The Red Cross knows what they’re doing.  They’re in close contact with federal, state, and local officials.  They will make sure that we get the resources to those families as swiftly as possible.  And again, I want to thank everybody here who is doing such a great job when it comes to the disaster response.

The final message I’d just say is during the darkness of the storm, I think we also saw what’s brightest in America.  I think all of us obviously have been shocked by the force of Mother Nature as we watch it on television.  At the same time, we’ve also seen nurses at NYU Hospital carrying fragile newborns to safety.  We’ve seen incredibly brave firefighters in Queens, waist-deep in water, battling infernos and rescuing people in boats.

One of my favorite stories is down in North Carolina, the Coast Guard going out to save a sinking ship.  They sent a rescue swimmer out, and the rescue swimmer said, “Hi, I’m Dan.  I understand you guys need a ride.”  That kind of spirit of resilience and strength, but most importantly looking out for one another, that’s why we always bounce back from these kinds of disasters.

This is a tough time for a lot of people — millions of folks all across the Eastern Seaboard.  But America is tougher, and we’re tougher because we pull together.  We leave nobody behind.  We make sure that we respond as a nation and remind ourselves that whenever an American is in need, all of us stand together to make sure that we’re providing the help that’s necessary.

So I just want to thank the incredible response that we’ve already seen, but I do want to remind people this is going to take some time.  It is not going to be easy for a lot of these communities to recovery swiftly, and so it’s going to be important that we sustain that spirit of resilience, that we continue to be good neighbors for the duration until everybody is back on their feet.

Thank you very much, everybody.  Thank you, Red Cross.  (Applause.)

END
2:28 P.M. EDT

Campaign Headlines October 30, 2012: President Barack Obama Pauses Campaign in Hurricane Sandy’s Wake

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama Pauses Campaign in Sandy’s Wake

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-30-12

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza

Exactly one week to Election Day, President Obama has benched Candidate Obama, hunkering down at the White House for a second straight day to monitor superstorm Sandy and the federal government response to the storm.

The Obama campaign canceled two campaign rallies that had been planned on Tuesday in Colorado Springs, Colo., and Green Bay, Wisc. The president will remain in Washington on Tuesday with no planned political events, an unprecedented step off the campaign trail days before voters head to the polls in a race that many polls say is tied….READ MORE

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