Full Text Campaign Buzz 2016 July 13, 2015: Hillary Clinton’s Speech on Economic Policy Transcript

ELECTION 2016

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CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2016

THE HEADLINES….

Transcript of Hillary Clinton’s Speech On Economic Policy

Thank you, thank you, thank you so much. Thank you very much President Van Zandt, and thanks to everyone at the New School for welcoming us today. I’m delighted to be back.

You know, over the past few months, I’ve had the opportunity to listen to Americans’ concerns about an economy that still isn’t delivering for them. It’s not delivering the way it should – it still seems to most Americans that I have spoken with that it is stacked for those at the top.

But I’ve also heard their hopes for the future: going to college without drowning in debt… starting that small business they’ve always dreamed about… getting a job that pays well enough to support a family and provide for a secure retirement.

Previous generations of Americans built the greatest economy and strongest middle class the world has ever known on the promise of a basic bargain:

If you work hard and do your part, you should be able to get ahead. And when you get ahead, America gets ahead.

But over several decades, that bargain has eroded. Our job is to make it strong again.

For 35 years, Republicans have argued that if we give more wealth to those at the top – by cutting their taxes and letting big corporations write their own rules – it will trickle down, it will trickle down to everyone else.

Yet every time they have a chance to try that approach, it explodes the national debt, concentrates wealth even more, and does practically nothing to help hard-working Americans.

Twice now in the past 20 years, a Democratic president has had to come in and clean up the mess. I think the results speak for themselves.

Under President Clinton – I like the sound of that – America saw the longest peacetime expansion in history … nearly 23 million jobs… a balanced budget and a surplus for the future. And most importantly, incomes rose across the board, not just for those already at the top.

Eight years later, President Obama and the American people’s hard work pulled us back from the brink of Depression. President Obama saved the auto industry, imposed new rules on Wall Street, and provided health care to 16 million Americans.

Now today, today as the shadow of crisis recedes and longer-term challenges come into focus, I believe we have to build a “growth and fairness” economy. You can’t have one without the other.

We can’t create enough jobs and new businesses without more growth, and we can’t build strong families and support our consumer economy without more fairness.

We need both, because while America is standing again, we’re not yet running the way we should.

Corporate profits are at near-record highs and Americans are working as hard as ever – but paychecks have barely budged in real terms.

Families today are stretched in so many directions, and so are their budgets. Out-of-pocket costs of health care, childcare, caring for aging parents are rising a lot faster than wages.

I hear this everywhere I go.

The single mom who talked to me about juggling a job and classes at community college, while raising three kids. She doesn’t expect anything to come easy, but if she got a raise, everything wouldn’t be quite so hard.

The grandmother who works around the clock providing childcare to other people’s kids. She’s proud of her work but the pay is barely enough to live on, especially with the soaring price of her prescription drugs.

The young entrepreneur whose dream of buying the bowling alley where he worked as a teenager was nearly derailed by his student debt. If he can grow his business, he’ll be able to pay off his debt and pay his employees, including himself, more too.

Millions of hard-working Americans tell similar stories.

Wages need to rise to keep up with costs.

Paychecks need to grow.

Families who work hard and do their part deserve to get ahead and stay ahead.

The defining economic challenge of our time is clear:

We must raise incomes for hard-working Americans so they can afford a middle-class life. We must drive strong and steady income growth that lifts up families and lifts up our country.

And that will be my mission from the first day I’m President to the last. I will get up everyday thinking about the families of America, like the family that I came from with a hard working dad who started a small business and scrimped and saved and gave us a good middle class life. I’ll be thinking about all the people that I represented here in New York and the stories that they told me and that I worked with them to improve. And I will as your President take on this challenge against the backdrop of major changes in our economy and the global economy that didn’t start with the recession and won’t end with the recovery.

You know advances in technology and expanding global trade have created whole new areas of commercial activity and opened new markets for our exports, but too often they’re also polarizing our economy – benefiting high-skilled workers but displacing or downgrading blue collar jobs and other midlevel jobs that used to provide solid incomes for millions of Americans.

Today’s marketplace focuses too much on the short term – like second-to-second financial trading and quarterly earnings reports – and too little on long-term investments.

Meanwhile, many Americans are making extra money renting out a spare room, designing websites, selling products they design themselves at home, or even driving their own car. This “on demand” or so-called “gig economy” is creating exciting opportunities and unleashing innovation but it’s also raising hard questions about workplace protections and what a good job will look like in the future.

So all of these trends are real, and none, none is going away. But they don’t determine our destiny. The choices we make as a nation matter. And the choices we make in the years ahead will set the stage for what American life in the middle class in our economy will be like in this century.

As President, I will work with every possible partner to turn the tide. To make these currents of change start working for us more than against us. To strengthen –not hollow out – the American middle class.

Because I think at our best, that’s what Americans do. We’re problem solvers, not deniers. We don’t hide from change – we harness it.

The measure of our success must be how much incomes rise for hard-working families, not just for successful CEOs and money managers. And not just some arbitrary growth target untethered to people’s lives and livelihoods.

I want to see our economy work for the struggling, the striving, and the successful.

We’re not going to find all the answers we need today in the playbooks of the past. We can’t go back to the old policies that failed us before. Nor can we just replay previous successes. Today is not 1993 or 2009. We need solutions for the big challenges we face now.

So today I am proposing an agenda to raise incomes for hard-working Americans. An agenda for strong growth, fair growth, and long-term growth.

Let me begin with strong growth.

More growth means more jobs and more new businesses. More jobs give people choices about where to work. And employers have to offer higher wages and better benefits in order to compete with each other to hire new workers and keep the productive ones. That’s why economists tell us that getting closer to full employment is crucial for raising incomes.

Small businesses create more than 60 percent of new American jobs on net. So they have to be a top priority. I’ve said I want to be the small business President, and I mean it. And throughout this campaign I’m going to be talking about how we empower entrepreneurs with less red tape, easier access to capital, tax relief and simplification.

I’ll also push for broader business tax reform to spur investment in America, closing those loopholes that reward companies for sending jobs and profits overseas.

And I know it’s not always how we think about this, but another engine of strong growth should be comprehensive immigration reform.

I want you to hear this: Bringing millions of hard-working people into the formal economy would increase our gross domestic product by an estimated $700 billion over 10 years.

Then there are the new public investments that will help established businesses and entrepreneurs create the next generation of high-paying jobs.

You know when we get Americans moving, we get our country moving.

So let’s establish an infrastructure bank that can channel more public and private funds, channel those funds to finance world-class airports, railways, roads, bridges and ports.

And let’s build those faster broadband networks – and make sure there’s a greater diversity of providers so consumers have more choice.

And really there’s no excuse not to make greater investments in cleaner, renewable energy right now. Our economy obviously runs on energy. And the time has come to make America the world’s clean energy superpower. I advocate that because these investments will create millions of jobs, save us money in the long run, and help us meet the threats of climate change.

And let’s fund the scientific and medical research that spawns innovative companies and creates entire new industries, just as the project to sequence the human genome did in the 1990s, and President Obama’s initiatives on precision medicine and brain research will do in the coming years.

I will set ambitious goals in all of these areas in the months ahead.

But today let me emphasize another key ingredient of strong growth that often goes overlooked and undervalued: breaking down barriers so more Americans participate more fully in the workforce – especially women.

We are in a global competition, as I’m sure you have noticed, and we can’t afford to leave talent on the sidelines, but that’s exactly what we’re doing today. When we leave people out, or write them off, we not only shortchange them and their dreams — we shortchange our country and our future.

The movement of women into the workforce over the past forty years was responsible for more than three and a half trillion dollars in economic growth.

But that progress has stalled. The United States used to rank 7th out of 24 advanced countries in women’s labor force participation. By 2013, we had dropped to 19th. That represents a lot of unused potential for our economy and for American families.

Studies show that nearly a third of this decline relative to other countries is because they’re expanding family-friendly policies like paid leave and we are not.

We should be making it easier for Americans to be both good workers and good parents and caregivers. Women who want to work should be able to do so without worrying every day about how they’re going to take care of their children or what will happen if a family member gets sick.

You know last year while I was at the hospital here in Manhattan waiting for little Charlotte to make her grand entrance, one of the nurses said, “Thank you for fighting for paid leave.” And we began to talk about it. She sees first-hand what it means for herself and her colleagues as well as for the working parents that she helps take care of.

It’s time to recognize that quality, affordable childcare is not a luxury – it’s a growth strategy. And it’s way past time to end the outrage of so many women still earning less than men on the job — and women of color making even less.

All this lost money adds up and for some women, it’s thousands of dollars every year.

Now I am well aware that for far too long, these challenges have been dismissed by some as “women’s issues.”

Well those days are over.

Fair pay and fair scheduling, paid family leave and earned sick days, child care are essential to our competitiveness and growth.

And we can do this in a way that doesn’t impose unfair burdens on businesses – especially small businesses.

As President, I’ll fight to put families first – just like I have my entire career.

Now, beyond strong growth, we also need fair growth. And that will be the second key driver of rising incomes.

The evidence is in: Inequality is a drag on our entire economy, so this is the problem we need to tackle.

You may have heard Governor Bush say last week that Americans just need to work longer hours. Well, he must not have met very many American workers.

“Let him tell that to the nurse who stands on her feet all day or the trucker who drives all night. Let him tell that to the fast food workers marching in the streets for better pay. They don’t need a lecture – they need a raise.

The truth is, the current rules for our economy reward some work – like financial trading – much more than other work, like actually building and selling things the work that’s always been the backbone of our economy.

To get all incomes rising again, we need to strike a better balance. If you work hard, you ought to be paid fairly. So we have to raise the minimum wage and implement President Obama’s new rules on overtime. And then we have to go further.

I’ll crack down on bosses who exploit employees by misclassifying them as contractors or even steal their wages.

To make paychecks stretch, we need to take on the major strains on family budgets. I’ll protect the Affordable Care Act – and build on it to lower out-of-pocket health care costs and to make prescription drugs more affordable.

We’ll help families look forward to retirement by defending and enhancing Social Security and making it easier to save for the future.

Now many of these proposals are time-tested and more than a little battle-scarred. We need new ideas as well. And one that I believe in and will fight for is profit sharing.

Hard working Americans deserve to benefit from the record corporate earnings they help produce. So I will propose ways to encourage companies to share profits with their employees.

That’s good for workers and good for business.

Studies show profit-sharing that gives everyone a stake in a company’s success can boost productivity and put money directly into employees’ pockets. It’s a win-win.

Later this week in New Hampshire, I’ll have more to say about how we do this.

Another priority must be reforming our tax code.

Now we hear Republican candidates talk a lot about tax reform. But take a good look at their plans. Senator Rubio’s would cut taxes for households making around $3 million a year by almost $240,000 – which is way more than three times the earnings of a typical family. Well that’s a sure budget-busting give-away to the super-wealthy. And that’s the kind of bad economics you’re likely to get from any of the candidates on the other side.

I have a different take, guided by some simple principles.

First, hard-working families need and deserve tax relief and simplification.

Second, those at the top have to pay their fair share. That’s why I support the Buffett Rule, which makes sure that millionaires don’t pay lower rates than their secretaries.

I have also called for closing the carried interest loophole, which lets wealthy financiers pay an artificially low rate.

And let’s agree that hugely successful companies that benefit from everything America has to offer should not be able to game the system and avoid paying their fair share… especially while companies who can’t afford high-price lawyers and lobbyists end up paying more.

Alongside tax reform, it’s time to stand up to efforts across our country to undermine worker bargaining power, which has been proven again and again to drive up wages.

Republicans governors like Scott Walker have made their names stomping on workers’ rights. And practically all the Republican candidates hope to do the same as President.

I will fight back against these mean-spirited, misguided attacks.

Evidence shows that the decline of unions may be responsible for a third of the increase of inequality among men. So if we want to get serious about raising incomes, we have to get serious about supporting workers.

And let me just say a word here about trade. The Greek crisis as well as the Chinese stock market have reminded us that growth here at home and growth an ocean away are linked in a common global economy. Trade has been a major driver of the economy over recent decades but it has also contributed to hollowing out our manufacturing base and many hard-working communities. So we do need to set a high bar for trade agreements.

We should support them if they create jobs, raise wages, and advance our national security. And we should be prepared to walk away if they don’t.

To create fair growth, we need to create opportunity for more Americans.

I love the saying by Abraham Lincoln, who in many ways was not only the President who saved our union, but the president who understood profoundly the importance of the middle class, and the importance of the government playing its role in providing opportunities. He talked about giving Americans a fair chance in the race of life. I believe that with all my heart. But I also believe it has to start really early at birth. High quality early learning, especially in the first five years, can set children on the course for future success and raise lifetime incomes by 25 percent.

I’m committed to seeing every 4-year old in America have access to high-quality preschool in the next ten years. But I want to do more. I want to call for a great outpouring of support from our faith community, our business community, our academic institutions, from philanthropy and civic groups and concerned citizens to really help parents, particularly parents who are facing a lot of obstacles. To really help prepare their own children in that zero to four age group.

80% of your brain is physically formed by age of three. That’s why families like mine read, talk, and sing endlessly to our granddaughter. I’ve said that her first words are going to be enough with the reading, and the talking, and the singing. But we do it not only because we love doing it, even though I’ll admit it’s a little embarrassing to be reading a book to a two-week old, or a six-week old, a ten-week old. But we do it because we understand that it’s building her capacity for learning. And the research shows that by the time she enters kindergarten she will have heard 30 million more words than I child from a less privileged background.

Think of what we are losing because we are not doing everything we can to reach out to those families and we know again from so much research here in the United States and around the world that the early help, that mentoring, that intervention to help those often-stressed out young moms understand more about what they can do and avoid the difficulties that stand in the way of their being able to get their child off to the best start.

We also have to invest in our students and teachers at every level.

And in the coming weeks and months, I’ll lay out specific steps to improve our schools, make college truly affordable, and help Americans refinance their student debt.

Let’s embrace the idea of lifelong learning. In an age of technological change, we need to provide pathways to get skills and credentials for new occupations, and create online platforms to connect workers to jobs. There are exciting efforts underway and I want to support and scale the ones that show results.

As we pursue all these policies, we can’t forget our fellow Americans hit so hard and left behind by this changing economy— from the inner cities to coal country to Indian country. Talent is universal – you find it everywhere – but opportunity is not.

There are nearly 6 million young people aged 16 to 24 in America today who are not in school or at work. The numbers for young people of color are particularly staggering. A quarter of young black men and nearly 15 percent of all Latino youth cannot find a job.

We’ve got to do a better way of coming up to match the growing middle class incomes we want to generate with more pathways into the middle class. I firmly believe that the best anti-poverty program is a job, but that’s hard to say if there are not enough jobs for people that we are trying to help lift themselves out of poverty.

That’s why I’ve called for reviving the New Markets Tax Credit and Empowerment Zones to create greater incentives to invest in poor and remote areas.

When all Americans have the chance to study hard, work hard, and share in our country’s prosperity – that’s fair growth. It’s what I’ve always believed in and it’s what I will fight for as President.

Now, the third key driver of income alongside strong growth and fair growth must be long-term growth.

Too many pressures in our economy today push us toward short-termism. Many business leaders see this. They’ve talked to me about. One has called it the problem of “quarterly capitalism.” They say everything’s focused on the next earnings report or the short-term share price. The result is too little attention on the sources of long-term growth: research and development, physical capital, and talent.

Net business investment – which includes things like factories, machines, and research labs – has declined as a share of the economy. In recent years, some of our biggest companies have spent more than half their earnings to buy back their own stock, and another third or more to pay dividends. That doesn’t leave a lot left to raise pay or invest in the workers who made those profits possible or to make the new investments necessary to insure a company’s future success. These trends need to change. And I believe that many business leaders are eager to embrace their responsibilities, not just to today’s share price but also to workers, communities, and ultimately to our country and indeed our planet.

I’m not talking about charity – I’m talking about clear-eyed capitalism. Many companies have prospered by improving wages and training their workers that then yield higher productivity, better service, and larger profits.

Now it’s easy to try to cut costs by holding down or decreasing pay and other investments to inflate quarterly stock prices, but I would argue that’s bad for business in the long run.

And, it’s really bad for our country.

Workers are assets. Investing in them pays off. Higher wages pay off. And training pays off.

To help more companies do that, I’ve proposed a new $1,500 apprenticeship tax credit for every worker they train and hire.

And I will soon be proposing a new plan to reform capital gains taxes to reward longer-term investments that create jobs more than just quick trades.

I will also propose reforms to help CEOs and shareholders alike focus on the next decade rather than just the next day. Making sure stock buybacks aren’t being used only for an immediate boost in share prices. Empowering outside investors who want to build companies but discouraging “cut and run” shareholders who act more like old-school corporate raiders. And nowhere will the shift from short-term to long-term be more important than on Wall Street.

As a former Senator from New York, I know first-hand the role that Wall Street can and should play in our economy – helping Main Street grow and prosper and boosting new companies that make America more competitive globally.

But, as we all know, in the years before the crash, financial firms piled risk upon risk. And regulators in Washington either couldn’t or wouldn’t keep up.

I was alarmed by this gathering storm, and called for addressing the risks of derivatives, cracking down on subprime mortgages, and improving financial oversight.

Under President Obama’s leadership, we’ve imposed tough new rules that deal with some of the challenges on Wall Street. But those rules have been under assault by Republicans in Congress and those running for President.

I will fight back against these attacks and protect the reforms we’ve made. We can do that and still ease burdens on community banks to encourage responsible loans to local people and businesses they know and trust.

We also have to go beyond Dodd-Frank.

Too many of our major financial institutions are still too complex and too risky. And the problems are not limited to the big banks that get all the headlines. Serious risks are emerging from institutions in the so-called “shadow banking” system – including hedge funds, high frequency traders, non-bank finance companies – so many new kinds of entities which receive little oversight at all.

Stories of misconduct by individuals and institutions in the financial industry are shocking. HSBC allowing drug cartels to launder money. Five major banks pleading guilty to felony charges for conspiring to manipulate currency exchange and interest rates. There can be no justification or tolerance for this kind of criminal behavior.

And while institutions have paid large fines and in some cases admitted guilt, too often it has seemed that the human beings responsible get off with limited consequences – or none at all, even when they’ve already pocketed the gains.

This is wrong and, on my watch, it will change.

Over the course of this campaign, I will offer plans to rein in excessive risks on Wall Street and ensure that stock markets work for everyday investors, not just high frequency traders and those with the best – or fastest – connections.

I will appoint and empower regulators who understand that Too Big To Fail is still too big a problem.

We’ll ensure that no firm is too complex to manage or oversee.

And we will prosecute individuals as well as firms when they commit fraud or other criminal wrongdoing.

And when the government recovers money from corporations or individuals for harming the public, it should go into a separate trust fund to benefit the public. It, could for example, help modernize infrastructure or even be returned directly to taxpayers.

Now reform is never easy. But we have done it before in our country. But we have to get this right. And we need leadership from the financial industry and across the private sector to join with us.

Two years ago, the head of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, Terry Duffy, published an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal that really caught my attention. He wrote, and I quote: “I’m concerned that those of us in financial services have forgotten who we serve—and that the public knows it… Some Wall Streeters can too easily slip into regarding their work as a kind of money-making game divorced from the concerns of Main Street.”

I think we should listen to Terry Duffy.

Of course, long-term growth is only possible if the public sector steps up as well.

So it’s time to end the era of budget brinksmanship and stop careening from one self-inflicted crisis to another. It’s time to stop having debates over the small stuff and focus on how we’re going to tackle the big stuff together:

How do we respond to technological change in a way that creates more good jobs than it displaces or destroys?

Can we sustain a boom in advanced manufacturing?

What are the best ways to nurture start-ups outside the successful corridors like Silicon Valley?

Questions like these demand thoughtful and mature debate from our policy makers in government, from our leaders in the private sector, and our economists, our academics, and others who can come to the table on behalf of America and perform their patriotic duty to ensure that our economy keeps working and our middle class keeps growing.

So government has to be smarter, simpler, more focused itself on long-term investments than short-term politics – and be a better partner to cities, states, and the private sector. Washington has to be a better steward of America’ tax-dollars and Americans’ trust. And please let’s get back to making decisions that rely on evidence more than ideology.

That’s what I’ll do as President. I will seek out and welcome any good idea that is actually based on reality. I want to have principled and pragmatic and progressive policies that really move us forward together and I will propose ways to ensure that our fiscal outlook is sustainable — including by continuing to restrain healthcare costs, which remain one of the key drivers of long-term deficits. I will make sure Washington learns from how well local governments, business, and non-profits are working together in successful cities and towns across America.

You know passing legislation is not the only way to drive progress. As President, I’ll use the power to convene, connect, and collaborate to build partnerships that actually get things done.

Because above all, we have to break out of the poisonous partisan gridlock and focus on the long-term needs of our country.

I confess maybe it’s the grandmother in me, but I believe that part of public service is planting trees under whose shade you’ll never sit.

And the vision I’ve laid our here today – for strong growth, fair growth, and long term growth, all working together — will get incomes rising again, will help working families get ahead and stay ahead.

That is the test of our time. And I’m inviting everyone to please join me, to do your part, that’s what great countries do. That’s what our country always has done. We rise to challenges.

It’s not about left, right, or center – it’s about the future versus the past.

I’m running for President to build an America for tomorrow, not yesterday.

An America built on growth and fairness.

An America where if you do your part, you will reap the rewards.

Where we don’t leave anyone out, or anyone behind.

Thank you all. Thank you. I just want to leave you with one more thought.

I want every child, every child in our country, not just the granddaughter of a former President or a former secretary of state, but every child to have the chance to live up to his or her God-given potential.

Please join me in that mission. Let’s do it all together.

Thank you so much.

Full Text Political Transcripts May 19, 2015: Hillary Clinton answers 6 questions from the press in Iowa

POLITICAL TRANSCRIPTS

2016 PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN:

Hillary Clinton answers 6 questions from the press in Iowa

Source: USA Today, 5-19-15

FIRST QUESTION: Do you regret the way the Clinton Foundation handled foreign donations when you were U.S. Secretary of State? Your opponents say the donations and your private email account are examples of the Clintons having one set of rules for themselves and another set of rules for everyone else.

CLINTON: “I am so proud of the foundation. I’m proud of the work that it has done and is doing. It attracted donations, from people, organizations, from around the world, and I think that just goes to show that people are very supportive of the life-saving and life-changing work that it’s done here, at home and elsewhere. I’ll let the American people make their own judgments.”

SECOND QUESTION: Given the situation in Iraq, do you think we’re better off without Saddam Hussein in power?

CLINTON: “Look, I know that there have been a lot of questions about Iraq posed to candidates over the last weeks. I’ve been very clear that I made a mistake plain and simple. And I have written about it in my book. I’ve talked about it in the past and you know what we now see is a very different and very dangerous situation. The United States is doing what it can, but ultimately this has to be a struggle that the Iraqi government and the Iraqi people are determined to win for themselves. We can provide support, but they’re going to have to do it.”

THIRD QUESTION: On your income disclosure, you are in the top echelon of income earners in this country. How do you expect every day Americans to relate to you?

CLINTON: “Well, obviously, Bill and I have been blessed and we’re very grateful for the opportunities that we’ve had, but we’ve never forgotten where we came from, and we’ve never forgotten the country that we want to see for our granddaughter, and that means that we’re going to fight to make sure that everybody has the same chances to live up to his or her own God-given potential. So I think that most Americans understand that the deck is stacked for those at the top, and I am running a campaign that is very clearly stating we want to reshuffle that deck. We want to get back to having more opportunities for more people so that they can make more out of their own lives. And I think that’s exactly what America’s looking for.”

FOURTH QUESTION: Can you explain your relationship as secretary of state with Sidney Blumenthal? There’s a report out this morning that you exchanged several emails. Should Americans expect that if elected president that you would have that same type of relationship with these old friends that you’ve had for so long?

CLINTON: “I have many, many old friends, and I always think that it’s important when you get into politics to have friends that you had before you were in politics and to understand what’s on their minds. He’s been a friend of mine for a long time. He sent me unsolicited emails, which I passed on in some instances, and I see that that’s just part of the give-and-take. When you’re in the public eye, when you’re in an official position, I think you do have to work to make sure you’re not caught in the bubble and you only hear from a certain small group of people, and I’m going to keep talking to my old friends, who ever they are.”

FIFTH QUESTION: We learned today that the State Department might not release your emails until January 2016. A federal judge says they should be released sooner. Will you demand that they are released sooner, and to follow up on the question about the speeches, was there a conflict of interest in your giving paid speeches into the run-up of your announcing that you’re running for president?

CLINTON: “The answer to the first is: No. And the answer to the second is: I have said repeatedly, I want those emails out. Nobody has a bigger interest in getting them released than I do. I respect the State Department. They have their process, as they do for everybody, not just for me, but anything that they might do to expedite that process, I heartily support. You know, I want the American people to learn as much as we can about the work that I did with our diplomats and our development experts. Because I think that it will show how hard we worked, and the work we did for our country during the time that I was secretary of state, where I worked extremely hard on behalf of our values, and our interests and our security. And the emails are part of that. So I have said publicly — I’m repeating it here in front of all of you today — I want them out as soon as they can get out.”

SIXTH QUESTION: But will you demand their release?

CLINTON: “Well, they’re not mine. They belong to the State Department. So the State Department has to go through its process and as much as they can expedite that process, that’s what I’m asking them to do. Please move as quickly as they possibly can.”

“Thank you all very much”

 

Full Text Political Transcripts January 30, 2015: Mitt Romney’s Statement Announcing He is Not Running for President in the 2016 Presidential Campaign

POLITICAL TRANSCRIPTS

OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 114TH CONGRESS:

The Romney Statement: Not Running. “I’ve decided it is best to give other leaders in the Party the opportunity to become our next nominee.”

Source: Hugh Hewitt, Jan. 30, 2015

Let me begin by letting you know who else is on this call, besides Ann and me. There are a large number of people who signed on to be leaders of our 2016 finance effort. In addition, state political leadership from several of the early primary states are on the line. And here in New York City, and on the phone, are people who have been helping me think through how to build a new team, as well as supporters from the past who have all been kind enough to volunteer their time during this deliberation stage. Welcome, and thank you. Your loyalty and friendship, and your desire to see the country with new, competent and conservative leadership warms my heart.

After putting considerable thought into making another run for president, I’ve decided it is best to give other leaders in the Party the opportunity to become our next nominee.

Let me give you some of my thinking. First, I am convinced that with the help of the people on this call, we could win the nomination. Our finance calls made it clear that we would have enough funding to be more than competitive. With few exceptions, our field political leadership is ready and enthusiastic about a new race. And the reaction of Republican voters across the country was both surprising and heartening. I know that early poll numbers move up and down a great deal during a campaign, but we would have no doubt started in a strong position. One poll out just today shows me gaining support and leading the next closest contender by nearly two to one. I also am leading in all of the four early states. So I am convinced that we could win the nomination, but fully realize it would have been difficult test and a hard fight.

I also believe with the message of making the world safer, providing opportunity to every American regardless of the neighborhood they live in, and working to break the grip of poverty, I would have the best chance of beating the eventual Democrat nominee, but that is before the other contenders have had the opportunity to take their message to the voters.
I believe that one of our next generation of Republican leaders, one who may not be as well known as I am today, one who has not yet taken their message across the country, one who is just getting started, may well emerge as being better able to defeat the Democrat nominee. In fact, I expect and hope that to be the case.

I feel that it is critical that America elect a conservative leader to become our next president. You know that I have wanted to be that president. But I do not want to make it more difficult for someone else to emerge who may have a better chance of becoming that president. You can’t imagine how hard it is for Ann and me to step aside, especially knowing of your support and the support of so many people across the country. But we believe it is for the best of the Party and the nation.

I’ve been asked, and will certainly be asked again if there are any circumstances whatsoever that might develop that could change my mind. That seems unlikely. Accordingly, I’m not organizing a PAC or taking donations; I’m not hiring a campaign team.

I encourage all of you on this call to stay engaged in the critical process of selecting a Republican nominee for President. Please feel free to sign up on a campaign for a person who you believe may become our best nominee.

I believe a Republican winning back the White House is essential for our country, and I will do whatever I can to make that happen.

To all my supporters, friends and family who worked both tirelessly and loyally to support my campaigns in the past, I will always be deeply appreciative. What you have already done is a tribute to your patriotism. We are overwhelmed and humbled by your loyalty to us, by your generosity of spirit, and by your friendship. God bless you all.

Full Text Obama Presidency June 12, 2013: President Barack Obama’s Speech at Ed Markey for Senate Rally, Boston, Massachusetts

POLITICAL TRANSCRIPTS

OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 113TH CONGRESS:

Remarks by the President at Markey for Senate Rally — Boston, MA

Source: WH, 6-12-13

Reggie Lewis Track and Athletic Center
Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts

1:27 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Boston!  (Applause.)  It is great to be back in Boston.  (Applause.)  Good to be back in Massachusetts.  (Applause.)  And, most of all, it is great to be here with the next senator from Massachusetts — Ed Markey.  (Applause.)

First of all, I want to thank Ed for that great introduction.  (Applause.)  Because I am here with my great friends from Boston, because I’m here to campaign on behalf of somebody who will be an outstanding member of the United States Senate, I am not going to talk trash about the hockey game.  (Laughter.)  I’m not going to say anything about the outstanding qualities of the Chicago Blackhawks.  (Laughter.)

AUDIENCE:  Boooo —

THE PRESIDENT:  I’m not going to say anything.  I’m not going to do it.  (Laughter.)  Because I don’t want to make you all feel bad.  (Laughter.)  I want you to feel good.

Part of the reason you should feel good is not only do you have an outstanding congressional delegation, you also have a great Governor — my good friend, Deval Patrick.  (Applause.)   You’ve got one of the finest mayors in the United States of America — we love Tom Menino.  (Applause.)  I was just backstage talking to Tom, and he doesn’t just inspire Boston and make it a better place, he inspires the country.  And we’re grateful for his lifetime of service.

The last time I saw Tom, the last time I saw a lot of you was for the memorial service honoring the victims of the Marathon bombing.  So this morning, before I came here, I wanted to spend some time with some Bostonians, so we stopped by Charlie’s Sandwich Shop — (applause) — and I got a burger and fries.  And we were saying hi to everybody and hugging folks, and Ed was with me.  And one of the people I met in the shop just by happenstance was a young man whose family had been injured by the bombing.  And he was with a nurse who had been at Mass General the day those folks got brought in.  And she was on her day off.  But I gave her a big hug and I reminded her of how much what she did had meant to so many people all throughout the city and she was an example of the spirit of Boston during a very difficult time.
And I asked people, how is the city doing?  And they said, you know, we’re bouncing back.  Boylston Street may be open again.  Life may be back to normal in a lot of ways.  But we know there’s still too many middle-class families that aren’t seeing their hard work rewarded, too many young people who are looking for work and can’t find it, too many Americans who feel like the rungs on the ladder of opportunity have grown farther and farther apart.  And that’s why Ed and I are focused on building the true engine of long-term economic growth — and that is a rising, thriving middle class.  (Applause.)

And every day I wake up, I ask three questions:  How do I make America a magnet for good jobs?  How do we make sure our workers earn the skills and education they need for those jobs?  How do we make sure those jobs are paying a decent living?  And the answer to that is, government can’t do it by itself.  Obviously, the private sector is the driver of our economy.  It’s the engine of our growth.

But when people say the whole problem is government, they don’t understand government can help by establishing smart priorities, by making smart choices, by investing in American manufacturing so we’re bringing more of our jobs back from overseas — (applause) — investing in our roads and our bridges and our ports to make sure that we are staying competitive all around the world; educating our children from the earliest years, keeping them safe from gun violence; rethinking our high schools, making college more affordable — (applause) — making sure we stay at the cutting edge in science and technology; securing our energy future; addressing climate change.  There are some things that government can do that will help middle-class families, and that’s what Ed Markey is committed to doing.  (Applause.)

We can do all this.  We have all the plans.  We have all the policies.  We have solutions to our challenges.  We have all the ingredients for success.  This is not only the greatest nation on Earth in the past, this is going to be the greatest nation on Earth for the foreseeable future.  There’s no country on Earth that would not gladly trade places with the United States.  But what’s holding us back right now is inaction in Washington, gridlock in Washington — too many folks in Washington who are putting the next election ahead of the next generation.  (Applause.)

Now, Boston, I want you to know I’ve run my last campaign.  Michelle is very happy about that.  (Laughter.)  So my only concern is making sure that we advance the interests of the broadest number of Americans and we leave our children a stronger, safer, more prosperous country than the one we inherited.  That’s all I care about.  (Applause.)  And that means I’m willing to work with anybody — I’ll work with Republicans, Democrats, independents — anybody who wants to make progress. I’m ready to get going.  I want to work with them.  (Applause.)

So, for example, right now on immigration, we’ve got a good bipartisan bill moving through the Senate that strengthens our borders and reforms the system so that everybody is playing by the same rules — reform that will allow us to continue to attract talent from all around the world, the best and the brightest.  And whenever Republicans are ready to work with me, I’m ready to work with them.  (Applause.)  I want to govern not just politic.  (Applause.)

And I notice on gun violence, there are a lot of Republicans out there who recognize that we need some common-sense gun safety measures.  Some Republicans may be rethinking the stances that they took in the past.  That’s the good news.  We want to encourage that.  But the fact of the matter is that a whole bunch of Republicans out there are not interested in getting things done.  They think compromise is a dirty word.  They think the problem we’ve got is just working people who join unions — that that’s what holding us back.  They think environmental regulations are what’s holding us back.  They think that we’re spending, I guess, too much money on science and research and technology.

And because of those attitudes, we’ve got to have some Democrats like Ed Markey, who will stand up and do the right thing.  That’s what we need.  (Applause.)

Ed mentioned that the idea of being a Democrat — look, I don’t believe that any single party has a monopoly on wisdom.  My favorite President is a guy from Illinois who founded the Republican Party, effectively — Abraham Lincoln, our first Republican President.  (Applause.)  But what does make me a Democrat is the basic idea that in this country, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter who you love, you should be able to get ahead if you’re willing to work hard and act responsibly.  (Applause.)

You should be able to buy a home and send your kids to college, and save a little bit for retirement, make sure your kids get a good education, not go bankrupt when you get sick.  Most Americans aren’t asking for a lot.  They know they’ve got to take care of themselves.  They just want to make sure that if they’re working hard, they can get ahead.  That’s the essence of what it means to be a Democrat.

And that’s why we’ve got to have folks like Ed Markey, who are going to help keep weapons of war off the streets and out of our schools; make it harder for criminals to get a gun in their hands.

That’s why we’ve got to have a Democrat who is going to make sure that we implement the Affordable Care Act — because in a nation this wealthy, nobody should have to go without affordable, accessible health care.  They don’t have to do it in Massachusetts.  They shouldn’t have to do it anywhere else.  (Applause.)  It’s the right thing to do, and we need Ed Markey to make sure that it gets implemented.  (Applause.)

We’re fighting to make sure that when it comes to women’s health, no employer or insurance company or politician gets to decide your health care.  Women should make decisions about their health care, not some politician in Washington.  (Applause.)

We need somebody who is going to be supportive of the Consumer Financial Protection Board that Elizabeth Warren and I started talking about even before I was elected President and that we’ve now implemented to make sure you’re not getting cheated by unscrupulous financial practices.  We need somebody who is going to support that robustly.  That’s what Ed is going to do.

We don’t need politicians who are going to roll back these rights.  We need somebody like Ed Markey who is going to fight to secure them, no matter how many times the Republicans in Washington want to refight the old battles.

Do you know that the House Republicans have held nearly 40 votes to repeal Obamacare?  They did another one just two weeks ago because they figured that they were a couple new representatives that hadn’t had a chance to vote against Obamacare.  That’s not a productive thing to do, people.

This law is going to mean big things for the economic security of middle-class families.  We should be spending time figuring out how to spread the word that if you don’t have health insurance, you can now get it.

We need a senator from Massachusetts who will help me, work with me, to deal with climate change in an honest, realistic way. (Applause.)  Ed has been fighting this battle for decades.  If we want our children and our grandchildren to live in the same beautiful planet, the same abundance and natural glory that we have enjoyed in our lives, we’ve got to double down on our investment in science and basic research.  We can’t just develop the energy sources of the past.  We’ve got to develop the energy sources of the future.

We’ve got the tools and the capabilities to make huge strides.  We’ve already doubled the production of clean energy.  We’ve already doubled fuel-efficiency standards on cars.  We’ve got to keep on going forward, not backwards.  And that’s what Ed Markey is going to help us do.  (Applause.)

We’ve ended a war in Iraq; we’re winding down the war in Afghanistan responsibly.  Now we’re going to have to take care of our veterans and keep Americans safe.  And I will keep working with the other side of the aisle on these issues.  But I want somebody like Ed Markey who every single day is going to be fighting on behalf of our veterans, going to be fighting on behalf of our first responders.

These budget battles we have in Washington, they have implications for whether or not we’re helping cities and states fund their firefighters, fund their police officers.  And everybody here in Boston knows how much those first responders mean to us when a crisis has hit.  (Applause.)  And we’ve got to make sure we’re there for them.  (Applause.)

So, look, here’s the bottom line.  We’ve gone through some tough times over these last few years and so many of you put your faith in me in 2008 and 2012 — (applause) — the folks here in Massachusetts were very kind to me back in 2004, when nobody could pronounce my name.  (Laughter.)

And every single day, I think about all of you.  I look out on the faces in this crowd — some of you I know, some of you have knocked on doors for me, some of you poured your heart and soul into our efforts.

But here’s the thing that I think all of us understand — the job of rebuilding America, the job of making sure our kids have a great education, the job of making sure everybody has health care, the job of making sure that financial institutions treat everybody fairly, the job of making sure our veterans have the care that they need, the job of making sure we have a bright energy future, the job of preserving our environment, the job of making sure we stay on the cutting-edge when it comes to innovation — that job is not mine alone.  I can’t do it by myself.  I’ve got to have folks with me who care as passionately about these things as I do.  (Applause.)  I’ve got to have folks in the United States Senate who are willing to stand up for working people just like I have.  I need folks in the United States Senate who, every day, are waking up thinking about the people who sent them there, and trying to figure out how do I make sure that they are getting a brighter future.

That’s who Ed Markey is.  I need Ed Markey in the United States Senate.  (Applause.)

So this election is going to come down to turnout.  We’ve got a whole lot of Democrats in this state and a whole lot of Obama voters, but you can’t just turnout during a presidential election.  You’ve got to turn out in this election.  You can’t think, oh, I did my work in 2012.  You’ve got some work to do right now in 2013.  (Applause.)  You can’t just pat your back and say, well, I knocked on some doors back in November.  I need you knocking on some doors right now in June.  (Applause.)

And if you work with the same focus and the same passion — if you are knocking on some doors and making some phone calls, if you’re talking to your friends and you’re talking to your neighbors — if you’re talking to cousin Jimmy who doesn’t always vote unless you give him a phone call — if you are making sure that people know Ed Markey’s remarkable record in Congress, then I guarantee you he will be the next United States senator from Massachusetts.  (Applause.)  He’ll join Elizabeth Warren.  He’ll carry on the legacy of Ted Kennedy and John Kerry.  He will be my partner, and we will continue the march forward on behalf of not just this generation, but future generations.

Thank you.  Let’s get to work.  God bless you.

END
1:51 P.M. EDT

Full Text Election 2012 November 7, 2012: Democrat President Barack Obama’s Victory Speech in McCormick Place, Chicago after Winning the Presidential Election over Republican Mitt Romney — Transcript

ELECTION 2012

http://politicsbuzz.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/election2012.jpg

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Text of Barack Obama’s speech after re-election

Source: AP, 11-7-12

President Barack Obama’s speech in Chicago after his re-election Tuesday night, as transcribed by Roll Call:———

Thank you so much.

Tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward.

It moves forward because of you. It moves forward because you reaffirmed the spirit that has triumphed over war and depression, the spirit that has lifted this country from the depths of despair to the great heights of hope, the belief that while each of us will pursue our own individual dreams, we are an American family and we rise or fall together as one nation and as one people.

Tonight, in this election, you, the American people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back, and we know in our hearts that for the United States of America the best is yet to come.

I want to thank every American who participated in this election, whether you voted for the very first time or waited in line for a very long time. By the way, we have to fix that. Whether you pounded the pavement or picked up the phone, whether you held an Obama sign or a Romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference.

I just spoke with Gov. Romney and I congratulated him and Paul Ryan on a hard-fought campaign. We may have battled fiercely, but it’s only because we

love this country deeply and we care so strongly about its future. From George to Lenore to their son Mitt, the Romney family has chosen to give back to America through public service and that is the legacy that we honor and applaud tonight. In the weeks ahead, I also look forward to sitting down with Gov. Romney to talk about where we can work together to move this country forward.

I want to thank my friend and partner of the last four years, America’s happy warrior, the best vice president anybody could ever hope for, Joe Biden.

And I wouldn’t be the man I am today without the woman who agreed to marry me 20 years ago. Let me say this publicly: Michelle, I have never loved you more. I have never been prouder to watch the rest of America fall in love with you, too, as our nation’s first lady. Sasha and Malia, before our very eyes you’re growing up to become two strong, smart beautiful young women, just like your mom. And I’m so proud of you guys. But I will say that for now one dog’s probably enough.

To the best campaign team and volunteers in the history of politics. The best. The best ever. Some of you were new this time around, and some of you have been at my side since the very beginning. But all of you are family. No matter what you do or where you go from here, you will carry the memory of the history we made together and you will have the lifelong appreciation of a grateful president. Thank you for believing all the way, through every hill, through every valley. You lifted me up the whole way and I will always be grateful for everything that you’ve done and all the incredible work that you put in.

I know that political campaigns can sometimes seem small, even silly. And that provides plenty of fodder for the cynics that tell us that politics is nothing more than a contest of egos or the domain of special interests. But if you ever get the chance to talk to folks who turned out at our rallies and crowded along a rope line in a high school gym, or saw folks working late in a campaign office in some tiny county far away from home, you’ll discover something else.

You’ll hear the determination in the voice of a young field organizer who’s working his way through college and wants to make sure every child has that same opportunity. You’ll hear the pride in the voice of a volunteer who’s going door to door because her brother was finally hired when the local auto plant added another shift. You’ll hear the deep patriotism in the voice of a military spouse who’s working the phones late at night to make sure that no one who fights for this country ever has to fight for a job or a roof over their head when they come home.

That’s why we do this. That’s what politics can be. That’s why elections matter. It’s not small, it’s big. It’s important. Democracy in a nation of 300 million can be noisy and messy and complicated. We have our own opinions. Each of us has deeply held beliefs. And when we go through tough times, when we make big decisions as a country, it necessarily stirs passions, stirs up controversy.

That won’t change after tonight, and it shouldn’t. These arguments we have are a mark of our liberty. We can never forget that as we speak people in distant nations are risking their lives right now just for a chance to argue about the issues that matter, the chance to cast their ballots like we did today.

But despite all our differences, most of us share certain hopes for America’s future. We want our kids to grow up in a country where they have access to the best schools and the best teachers. A country that lives up to its legacy as the global leader in technology and discovery and innovation, with all the good jobs and new businesses that follow.

We want our children to live in an America that isn’t burdened by debt, that isn’t weakened by inequality, that isn’t threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. We want to pass on a country that’s safe and respected and admired around the world, a nation that is defended by the strongest military on earth and the best troops this—this world has ever known. But also a country that moves with confidence beyond this time of war, to shape a peace that is built on the promise of freedom and dignity for every human being.

We believe in a generous America, in a compassionate America, in a tolerant America, open to the dreams of an immigrant’s daughter who studies in our schools and pledges to our flag. To the young boy on the south side of Chicago who sees a life beyond the nearest street corner. To the furniture worker’s child in North Carolina who wants to become a doctor or a scientist, an engineer or an entrepreneur, a diplomat or even a president—that’s the future we hope for. That’s the vision we share. That’s where we need to go—forward. That’s where we need to go.

Now, we will disagree, sometimes fiercely, about how to get there. As it has for more than two centuries, progress will come in fits and starts. It’s not always a straight line. It’s not always a smooth path. By itself, the recognition that we have common hopes and dreams won’t end all the gridlock or solve all our problems or substitute for the painstaking work of building consensus and making the difficult compromises needed to move this country forward. But that common bond is where we must begin.

Our economy is recovering. A decade of war is ending. A long campaign is now over. And whether I earned your vote or not, I have listened to you, I have learned from you, and you’ve made me a better president. And with your stories and your struggles, I return to the White House more determined and more inspired than ever about the work there is to do and the future that lies ahead.

Tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. You elected us to focus on your jobs, not ours. And in the coming weeks and months, I am looking forward to reaching out and working with leaders of both parties to meet the challenges we can only solve together. Reducing our deficit. Reforming our tax code. Fixing our immigration system. Freeing ourselves from foreign oil. We’ve got more work to do.

But that doesn’t mean your work is done. The role of citizen in our democracy does not end with your vote. America’s never been about what can be done for us. It’s about what can be done by us together through the hard and frustrating, but necessary work of self-government. That’s the principle we were founded on.

This country has more wealth than any nation, but that’s not what makes us rich. We have the most powerful military in history, but that’s not what makes us strong. Our university, our culture are all the envy of the world, but that’s not what keeps the world coming to our shores.

What makes America exceptional are the bonds that hold together the most diverse nation on earth. The belief that our destiny is shared; that this country only works when we accept certain obligations to one another and to future generations. The freedom which so many Americans have fought for and died for come with responsibilities as well as rights. And among those are love and charity and duty and patriotism. That’s what makes America great.

I am hopeful tonight because I’ve seen the spirit at work in America. I’ve seen it in the family business whose owners would rather cut their own pay than lay off their neighbors, and in the workers who would rather cut back their hours than see a friend lose a job. I’ve seen it in the soldiers who reenlist after losing a limb and in those SEALs who charged up the stairs into darkness and danger because they knew there was a buddy behind them watching their back.

I’ve seen it on the shores of New Jersey and New York, where leaders from every party and level of government have swept aside their differences to help a community rebuild from the wreckage of a terrible storm. And I saw just the other day, in Mentor, Ohio, where a father told the story of his 8-year-old daughter, whose long battle with leukemia nearly cost their family everything had it not been for health care reform passing just a few months before the insurance company was about to stop paying for her care.

I had an opportunity to not just talk to the father, but meet this incredible daughter of his. And when he spoke to the crowd listening to that father’s story, every parent in that room had tears in their eyes, because we knew that little girl could be our own. And I know that every American wants her future to be just as bright. That’s who we are. That’s the country I’m so proud to lead as your president.

And tonight, despite all the hardship we’ve been through, despite all the frustrations of Washington, I’ve never been more hopeful about our future. I have never been more hopeful about America. And I ask you to sustain that hope. I’m not talking about blind optimism, the kind of hope that just ignores the enormity of the tasks ahead or the roadblocks that stand in our path. I’m not talking about the wishful idealism that allows us to just sit on the sidelines or shirk from a fight.

I have always believed that hope is that stubborn thing inside us that insists, despite all the evidence to the contrary, that something better awaits us so long as we have the courage to keep reaching, to keep working, to keep fighting.

America, I believe we can build on the progress we’ve made and continue to fight for new jobs and new opportunity and new security for the middle class. I believe we can keep the promise of our founders, the idea that if you’re willing to work hard, it doesn’t matter who you are or where you come from or what you look like or where you love. It doesn’t matter whether you’re black or white or Hispanic or Asian or Native American or young or old or rich or poor, able, disabled, gay or straight, you can make it here in America if you’re willing to try.

I believe we can seize this future together because we are not as divided as our politics suggests. We’re not as cynical as the pundits believe. We are greater than the sum of our individual ambitions, and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. We are and forever will be the United States of America.

And together with your help and God’s grace we will continue our journey forward and remind the world just why it is that we live in the greatest nation on Earth.

Thank you, America. God bless you. God bless these United States.

Full Text Election 2012 November 7, 2012: Republican Mitt Romney’s Concession Speech After Losing Presidential Election to Democrat Barack Obama — Transcript

ELECTION 2012

http://politicsbuzz.files.wordpress.com/2012/11/election2012.jpg

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Mitt Romney’s concession speech (Full transcript)

Source: WaPo, 11-7-12

Here’s the full transcript from Mitt Romney’s concession speech on Wednesday morning, Nov. 7, 2012.

ROMNEY: Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you, my friends. Thank you so very much.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you. Thank you. Thank you.

I have just called President Obama to congratulate him on his victory. His supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations.

ROMNEY: His supporters and his campaign also deserve congratulations. I wish all of them well, but particularly the president, the first lady and their daughters.

(APPLAUSE)

This is a time of great challenges for America, and I pray that the president will be successful in guiding our nation.

(APPLAUSE)

ROMNEY: I want to thank Paul Ryan for all that he has done for our campaign.

(APPLAUSE)

And for our country. Besides my wife, Ann, Paul is the best choice I’ve ever made.

(APPLAUSE)

And I trust that his intellect and his hard work and his commitment to principle will continue to contribute to the good of our nation.

(APPLAUSE)

I also want to thank Ann, the love of my life.

(APPLAUSE)

ROMNEY: She would have been a wonderful first lady. She’s — she has been that and more to me and to our family and to the many people that she has touched with her compassion and her care.

I thank my sons for their tireless work on behalf of the campaign, and thank their wives and children for taking up the slack as their husbands and dads have spent so many weeks away from home.

(APPLAUSE)

I want to thank Matt Rhoades and the dedicated campaign team he led.

(APPLAUSE)

They have made an extraordinary effort not just for me, but also for the country that we love.

And to you here tonight, and to the team across the country — the volunteers, the fundraisers, the donors, the surrogates — I don’t believe that there’s ever been an effort in our party that can compare with what you have done over these past years. Thank you so very much.

Thanks for all the hours of work, for the calls, for the speeches and appearances, for the resources and for the prayers. You gave deeply from yourselves and performed magnificently. And you inspired us and you humbled us. You’ve been the very best we could have imagined.

ROMNEY: The nation, as you know, is at a critical point. At a time like this, we can’t risk partisan bickering and political posturing. Our leaders have to reach across the aisle to do the people’s work.

And we citizens also have to rise to the occasion. We look to our teachers and professors, we count on you not just to teach, but to inspire our children with a passion for learning and discovery.

We look to our pastors and priests and rabbis and counselors of all kinds to testify of the enduring principles upon which our society is built: honesty, charity, integrity and family.

We look to our parents, for in the final analysis everything depends on the success of our homes.

ROMNEY: We look to job creators of all kinds. We’re counting on you to invest, to hire, to step forward.

And we look to Democrats and Republicans in government at all levels to put the people before the politics.

I believe in America. I believe in the people of America.

(APPLAUSE)

And I ran for office because I’m concerned about America. This election is over, but our principles endure. I believe that the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness.

Like so many of you, Paul and I have left everything on the field. We have given our all to this campaign.

(APPLAUSE)

I so wish — I so wish that I had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction, but the nation chose another leader. And so Ann and I join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation.

Thank you, and God bless America. You guys are the best. Thank you so much. Thank you. Thanks, guys.

(APPLAUSE)

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 5, 2012: President Barack Obama & First Lady Michelle Obama’s Speech at Final Presidential Campaign Rally in Des Moines, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the First Lady and the President at Final Campaign Rally — Des Moines, IA

Source: WH, 11-6-12

Intersection of East 4th and East Locust Streets
Des Moines, Iowa

9:58 P.M. CST

MRS. OBAMA:  Thank you, guys.  Thanks so much.

AUDIENCE:  We love Michelle!  We love Michelle!

MRS. OBAMA:  (Laughter.)  And I love you.  I love you from the bottom of my heart.  And I am beyond thrilled to be here with all of you.

But we have to give some love up for Bruce Springsteen.  I mean, gosh.  (Applause.)  For months, I have heard his songs played at our rallies.  But I have to say, there’s nothing like seeing The Boss in person.  (Applause.)  Nothing like it.  He has just been tremendous.  He and his family and his team, they’ve just been amazing.  So we want to thank Bruce for everything that he’s done for us.

And more than anything else, I want to thank you all for being here tonight.  I mean, as you know this is a pretty emotional time for us, because this is the final event of my husband’s final campaign.  (Applause.)  So this is the last time that he and I will be onstage together at a campaign rally.  And that’s why we wanted to come here to Iowa tonight — (applause)  — because truly this is where it all began, right here.

And I have so many fond memories of this state — the house parties in Sioux City and Cedar Rapids; celebrating Malia’s birthday in Pella; and seeing my husband’s face carved in butter. (Applause.)  Believe me, we still talk about that at Christmas.  (Laughter.)

But I will never forget the kindness and warmth and love that you all showed me and my family, especially our girls.  That is truly what made the difference back in those early days when I wasn’t so sure about this whole process; back when I was still wondering what it would mean for our girls and our family if Barack got the chance to serve as President.

But the truth is while I had my worries and my fears, I also realized that this decision affected not only me as a wife and a mother, but as a voter, as an American.  And I started envisioning the kind of person that I wanted to lead our country. And I knew that I wanted a President with a steady character, with deep compassion and strong convictions.  I wanted a President who was smart.  (Applause.)  I wanted someone we could trust — (applause) — someone who would always, always tell us the truth even when it’s hard.  (Applause.)  And I wanted a President driven not by politics or which way the wind is blowing, but by the struggles, hopes and dreams of all Americans. (Applause.)

And the more I thought about it, the more I knew in my heart that I was describing Barack.  I knew he could be that President. And for four years, that’s exactly what he’s done.  He has stayed true to himself, and with your help, he’s worked day after day to make this country better, to move it forward.  He’s rescued our economy from the brink of collapse and saved the auto industry.  (Applause.)  He’s passed historic health reform — (applause) — ended the war in Iraq.  (Applause.)  He’s fought so women get equal pay and students can afford college.  (Applause.)  He’s fought for our seniors, so that they can retire with dignit;, and our veterans, so that they can give the benefits they earned and the respect they deserve.  (Applause.)

For four years, Barack has been fighting to give every single one of us a fair shot at that great American Dream, no matter what we look like or where we come from or who we love.  (Applause.)  And for four years, we have all seen what I’ve seen for the past 23 years.  We’ve seen a man of honor and integrity who knows what he believes and stays true to his values.  (Applause.)  I’m so proud of my husband.  We have seen an honest man who knows the facts and always gives it to us straight.  We’ve seen a man whose strength and resolve to build a better tomorrow has never wavered, never.

And that’s why I am so thrilled to be here in Iowa tonight  — (applause) — because long before most people even knew his name, you all saw what I saw.  So you did all this crazy stuff.  You showed up at campaign offices here in Des Moines and offices all over the state.  More importantly, you opened your homes.  You held caucus trainings.  You marched with us at the Jefferson-Jackson dinner.  (Applause.)  And then, on a cold January night, you stood up for Barack, because you knew that he would stand up for you.  (Applause.)

And over these past four years, our family has been truly blessed — truly blessed — by all of the love and support and prayers that we have received from every corner of this country. And Barack has been truly blessed to have all of you by his side as we have worked together to bring that change we can believe in.

It is an honor and a privilege to serve this nation — just know that.  And tomorrow, we get the chance to finish what we started here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  Tomorrow, all across this state, all across this country, we will line up and vote in libraries and community centers, in school gyms.  We’re going to knock on doors until our fingers are numb.  We’re going to make calls until our voices are hoarse.  (Applause.)  And we won’t stop until every voice and every last vote is counted.  (Applause.)

And we will do it.  We will do it, because while we have come so far, we know that there is so much more to do.  And what we really, truly know is that we cannot turn back now.  We need to keep moving this country forward.  (Applause.)

So that means that we need to reelect the man who has been fighting for us every single day — my husband, the love of my life — the President of the United States Barack Obama.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Iowa!  (Applause.)  Tomorrow.  Tomorrow, Iowa.  Tomorrow, from the granite of New Hampshire to the Rockies of Colorado, from the coastlines of Florida to Virginia’s rolling hills, from the valleys of Ohio to these Iowa fields — we will keep America moving forward.  (Applause.)

I’ve come back to Iowa one more time to ask for your vote.  (Applause.)  I came back to ask you to help us finish what we’ve started.  (Applause.) Because this is where our movement for change began.  (Applause.)  Right here.  Right here.

Right behind these bleachers is the building that was home to our Iowa headquarters in 2008.  (Applause.)  I was just inside, and it brought back a whole lot of memories.  This was where some of the first young people who joined our campaign set up shop, willing to work for little pay and less sleep because they believed that people who love their country can change it.

This was where so many of you who shared that belief came to help.  When the heat didn’t work for the first week or so — (laughter) — some of you brought hats and gloves for the staff. These poor kids, they weren’t prepared.  (Laughter.)  When the walls inside were bare, one of you painted a mural to lift everybody’s spirits.  When we had a Steak Fry to march to, when we had a J-J Dinner to fire up — (applause) — you brought your neighbors and you made homemade signs.  When we had calls to make, teachers and nurses showed up after work, already bone-tired, but staying anyway, late into the night.

And you welcomed me and Michelle into your homes.  And you picked us up when we needed a lift.  And your faces gave me new hope for this country’s future, and your stories filled me with resolve to fight for you every single day I set foot in the Oval Office.  (Applause.)

You inspired us.  And I want to take this opportunity to say one thing to all the young people and not-so-young people who’ve given so much to this campaign over the years — those of you who haven’t done this just for me, but for each other — for a laid-off family member, for a sick child, for a fallen friend — to all of you who’ve lived and breathed the hard work of change:  I want to thank you.

You took this campaign and you made it your own.  And you organized yourselves, block by block, neighborhood by neighborhood, county by county, starting a movement that spread across the country — (applause) — a movement made up of young and old, and rich and poor, and black and white, Latino, Asian, Native American, gay, straight, Democrats, Republicans, who believe we’ve all got something to contribute; that we all deserve a shot at our own American Dream.  (Applause.)

And when the cynics said we couldn’t, you said “Yes, we can.”

AUDIENCE:  Yes, we can!  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  You said, “Yes, we can” — and we did.  Against all odds, we did.  We didn’t know what challenges would come when we began this journey.  We didn’t know how deep the crisis would turn out.  But we knew we would get through those challenges the same way this nation always has — with that determined, unconquerable American spirit that says no matter how bad the storm gets, no matter how tough times are, we’re all in this together.  We rise or fall as one nation and as one people. (Applause.)

That’s the spirit that’s carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years.  In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  And today, our businesses have created nearly five and a half million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back.  Home values are on the rise.  We’re less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last 20 years.  We’ve doubled the production of clean energy.  Because of the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  The war in Afghanistan is ending.  Al Qaeda is on the run.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

We’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Iowa, we’re here tonight because we’ve got more work to do.  We’re not done yet on this journey.  We’ve got more road to travel.  As long as there’s a single American who wants a job but can’t find one; as long as there are families working harder but still falling behind; as long as there’s a child anywhere in Des Moines, anywhere in Iowa, anywhere in this country languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity — our work isn’t done.  (Applause.)  Our fight for change goes on.

Because we know this nation cannot succeed without a growing, thriving middle class and sturdy ladders for everybody who is willing to work to get into that middle class.  (Applause.)  Our fight goes on because America has always done best when everybody has got a fair shot, and everybody is doing their fair share, and everybody plays by the same rules.  The people of Iowa understand that.  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008.  And, Iowa, that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, the choice you make tomorrow — and you understand this; Iowans, you guys pay attention — (laughter and applause) — the choice you make is not just between two candidates or parties.  It’s a choice between two different visions of America — who we are; what we believe; what we care about.  It’s a choice between going back to the top-down policies that caused the mess we’ve been fighting our way out of for four years — or moving forward to a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.

And, Iowa, you know me as well as anybody.  You’ve seen a lot of me these last six years.  (Laughter.)  And you know what, you may not agree with every decision I’ve made — Michelle doesn’t.  (Laughter.)  There may be times where you’ve been frustrated at the pace of change.  I promise you, so have I.  But I tell you what, you know what I believe.  You know where I stand.  You know I tell the truth.  (Applause.)  You know I’ll fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  (Applause.)

And that’s why, when we talk about change, we know what real change looks like because we’ve fought for it.  We’ve got the scars to prove it.  I’ve got the gray hair to show it.  (Laughter.)  I wasn’t this gray when I first showed up in Iowa.  (Applause.)  And sometimes it’s been hard.  Sometimes it’s been frustrating.  We understand that.  But what we also know is that when we decide to make a difference, when Americans come together, determined to bring about change, nobody can stop us.  We cannot be stopped.

And after all we’ve been through together, after all that we fought through together, we cannot give up on change now.  (Applause.)

We know what real change looks like.  Change is a country where every American has a shot at a great education — where we recruit new teachers, train new workers, bring down tuition, so that no one in this country is forced to give up the dream of a college education.  (Applause.)

Change comes when we live up to this country’s legacy of innovation by investing in the next generation of technology and manufacturing.  Instead of subsidizing oil company profits, I want to support energy jobs of tomorrow.  And Iowa knows about clean energy and biodiesel and wind turbines that will free this country from the grip of foreign oil.  (Applause.)

I don’t want a tax code that rewards companies for creating jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create jobs right here in America.  That’s what change is, Iowa.  (Applause.)

Change is turning the page on a decade of war so we can do some nation-building here at home — repairing our roads and our bridges, making our schools state of the art; putting our veterans back to work — because nobody who fights for this country’s freedom should have to fight for a job, or a roof over their heads when they come home.  (Applause.)  That’s what we’re fighting for.  That’s why we’re not done.  (Applause.)

Change is a future where we reduce our deficit by asking the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates they paid when Bill Clinton was in office.  (Applause.)  We’ll cut out spending we don’t need.  But as long as I’m President, we’re not going to turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  We’re not going to kick a kid off of Head Start just to pay for a millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)

Because our budget reflects our priorities and our values.  And we know what our future requires.  We know what real change is.  You helped teach me that, here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  And what we also know is that change isn’t easy.  Remember, a lot of you showed up to town hall meetings back in 2007, 2008, and I used to talk about change.  But I also said I’m not just talking about changing presidents.  I’m not just talking about changing parties.  I’m talking about changing our politics.  (Applause.)
I told you I ran because your voices had been shut out of our democracy for way too long by special interests and politicians who will do whatever it takes to keep things just the way they are.  And we’ve seen over the last four years, the status quo in Washington, they are powerful and they have fought us every step of the way.

When we tried — and succeeded in reforming our health care system, they spent millions trying to stop us.  When we tried — and succeeded — in reforming Wall Street, they spent millions to push us back.  And we kept on going.  But those were tough fights.

And what the protectors of the status quo in Washington are counting on now is that you’ll get worn down by all the squabbling.  You’ll get fed up with the dysfunction.  You’ll give up on the change we’ve fought for.  You’ll walk away and leave them to make decisions that affect every American.  In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  But, Iowa, you taught me to bet on you.  (Applause.)  You taught me to bet on hope.  (Applause.)
I’ll work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders who feel the same way — whether they’re Democrats, or Republicans, or independents — the kind of Iowa leaders you’ve always had — Tom and Christie Vilsack, and Tom Harkin, and Leonard Boswell and Bruce Braley, and my great friends, Tom Miller and Mike Fitzgerald.  (Applause.)

But there’s some principles you got to fight for.  There are times where you’ve got to take a stand.  If the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals to kick students off of financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or let insurance companies discriminate against kids with preexisting conditions, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid who are poor, or elderly, or disabled — I won’t pay that price.  That’s not a deal I will make.  (Applause.)  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not change.  That’s surrender to the same forces of the status quo that has squeezed middle-class families for way too long.

And, Iowa, I’m not ready to give up on the fight.  (Applause.)  I’ve got a lot more fight left in me.  (Applause.)  But to wage that fight on behalf of American families, I need you to still have some fight in you, too.  (Applause.)

The folks at the top in this country, it turns out they don’t need another champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.  The people who need a champion are the Americans whose letters I read late at night after a long day in the office; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every day.

The laid-off furniture worker who’s retraining at the age of 55 for a new career at a community college — she needs a champion.  The restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand — he’s got great food but the bank turned him down — he needs help.  He needs a champion.  The cooks and the waiters and cleaning staff, working overtime in a hotel in Des Moines or Vegas, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college — they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who was laid off, thought the plant would never reopen, and is now back on the job, filled with pride and dignity, building a great car, building America — he needs a champion.  (Applause.)   The teacher in an overcrowded classroom with outdated schoolbooks, digging into her own pocket to buy school supplies, not always feeling like she’s got the support she needs, but showing up every day because she knows that this might be the day that she’s got a breakthrough and she makes a difference in one child’s life — she needs a champion.  (Applause.)

All those kids in inner cities, small farm towns — kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors, engineers or entrepreneurs, diplomats or even a President — they need a champion in Washington, because the future will never have as many lobbyists as the status quo — children don’t have lobbyists the way oil companies or banks do.  But it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.

That’s what we fight for.  That’s why I need you, Iowa.  To make sure their voices are heard.  To make sure your voices are heard.  (Applause.)  And that’s why we’ve come too far to turn back now.  We’ve come too far to let our hearts grow faint.  Now is the time to keep pushing forward — (applause) — to educate all our kids, and train all our workers, and to create new jobs, and rebuild our roads, and bring back our troops, and care for our veterans, and broaden opportunity, and grow our middle class, and restore our democracy — and make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, or how you started out, what you look like, who you love, what your last name is, here in America, you can make it if you try.  That’s what we’re fighting for.  (Applause.)

And, Iowa, after all the months of campaigning, after all the rallies, after the millions of dollars of ads, it all comes down to you.  It’s out of my hands now.  It’s in yours.  All of it depends on what you do when you step into that voting booth tomorrow.  It’s just a remarkable thing, the way our democracy works.  And at a certain point, all this effort and all these campaign rallies — and then it just comes down to each of us, as citizens.  All of it depends on you bringing your friend, or your neighbor, your coworker, your mom, your dad, your wife, your husband to the polls.

That’s how our democracy is supposed to be.  The single most powerful force in our democracy is you.  Moving this country forward begins with you.  (Applause.)  Don’t ever let anybody tell you your voice doesn’t matter.  Don’t let anybody tell you your voice can’t make a difference.  It makes a difference.

I got a powerful reminder of this myself on our last campaign.  Folks in Iowa, I know you may have heard this story but it was early in the primaries, and we were still way down in the polls.  I think this office had just finally gotten the heat turned on.  (Laughter.)  And at the time, I was still competing in South Carolina — it was one of the early primary states.  And I really wanted the endorsement of a state representative down there.  I met her at some function where nobody knew me, nobody could pronounce my name.  They’re wondering, what’s he thinking? (Laughter.)

So I asked her for her endorsement.  And she said, “I tell you what, Obama — I will give you my endorsement if you come to my hometown of Greenwood, South Carolina.”  And I think I had a little bit of wine during dinner, because right away I said “okay.”  (Laughter.)

So it’s about a month later, and I’m traveling back to South Carolina.  And we flew in late — I think we were coming from Iowa.  We had been campaigning non-stop, traveling all through towns and having town hall meetings and shaking hands.  And in between, I’m making phone calls, asking people for support.  And so we land in Greenwood, South Carolina, at around midnight.  We get to the hotel about 1 o’clock in the morning.  I am wiped out. I’m exhausted.  And I’m dragging my bags to my room.  Back then we didn’t fly on Air Force One.  (Laughter.)  And the accommodations were a little different.  (Laughter.)

And just as I’m about to walk into the room, one of my staf taps me on the shoulder to say, “Excuse me, Senator” –I was a senator back then.  “We’re going to have to wake up and be on the road at 6:30 a.m. in the morning.”  And I said, “What?” (Laughter.)  “Why?”  “Well, you made this promise to go to Greenwood, and it’s several hours away.”  (Laughter.)

And you know, Iowa, I try to keep my promises.  So a few hours later, I wake up — and I’m feeling terrible.  I think a cold is coming on.  And I open up the curtains to try to get some light to wake me up, but it’s pouring down rain.  Terrible storm. And I take a shower and get some coffee, and I open up the newspaper and there’s a bad story about me in The New York Times. (Laughter.)  I was much more sensitive at that time to bad stories.  (Laughter.)  I’ve become more accustomed to these now.

And finally I get dressed, I go downstairs and I’m walking out to the car, and my umbrella blows open — and I’m soaked.  So by the time I’m in the car I’m wet and I’m mad and I’m still kind of sleepy.  And it turns out that Greenwood is several hours away from everyplace else.  (Laughter.)

And so we drive, and we drive, and we drive, and we drive.  And finally we get to Greenwood — although you don’t know you’re in Greenwood right away because there are not a lot of tall buildings around.  And we pull up to a small field house, and I walked in, and I’m looking around.  I don’t hear a lot going on. And the state representative said she was going to organize a little meeting for us, and we walked in and there are about 20 people there.  And they’re all kind of wet, too, and they don’t look very excited to see me.  (Laughter.)

But I’m running for President, so I do what I’m supposed to do — and I’m shaking hands, I say, “How do you do?  Nice to meet you.”  And I’m making my way around the room, and suddenly I hear this voice cry out behind me:  “Fired up.”

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  And I’m startled, and I don’t know what’s going on.  But everybody in the room — this is a small room — they act like this is normal.  (Laughter.)  And when the voice says, “Fired up,” they all say, “Ready to go.”

And so once again, I hear the voice:  “Fired up.”  They say, “Fired up.”  They say, “Ready to go!”  “Ready to go!”

I look around, I turned behind me — there’s this small woman.  She’s about 60 years old; looks like she just came from church — she got a big church hat.  (Laughter.)  And she’s looking at me, kind of peering at me, and she’s grinning, smiling, looking happy.  Turns out she’s a city councilwoman from Greenwood — who also moonlights as a private detective.  I’m not making this up.  (Laughter.)  This is true.  And it turns out she’s famous throughout the area.  When she goes to football games and when she goes to rallies and she goes to community events, she does this chant of hers.  She does it wherever she goes.  So for the next few minutes, she just keeps on saying “Fired up.”

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  And everybody says “Fired up,” and she says she’s “Ready to go,” and everybody else says “Ready to go.”

And I’m thinking, this woman is showing me up.  (Laughter.) This is my meeting.  I’m running for President.  (Laughter.)  And she’s dominating the room.  And I look at my staff, and they just shrug their shoulders.  They don’t know what to do.

So this goes on for a few minutes.  Now, here’s the thing, Iowa.  After a few minutes, I’m feeling kind of fired up.  (Laughter.)  I’m feeling like I’m ready to go.  (Laughter.)  So I start joining in the chant, and my staff starts joining in the chant.  And somehow I feel pretty good.

And we go on to talk about the lives of the people in the room, and their families and their struggles and their hopes for their kids and their grandkids.  And we drive out and it’s still raining, but it doesn’t seem so bad.  And we go to our next stop, and for the rest of the day, even after we left Greenwood, even though we still weren’t getting any big crowds anyplace, even though people still couldn’t pronounce my name, I felt good.  (Laughter.)

And I’d see my staff, and I’d say, “Are you fired up?”  They’d say, “We’re fired up.”  I’d say, “Are you ready to go?”  And they’d say, “We’re ready to go.”  (Applause.)

And we brought that to Iowa.  And during our rallies, this became a chant, and we’d have signs saying “Fired up, Ready to go.”  And the woman, her name was Edith Childs — she became a celebrity, and she was written up in The Wall Street Journal — (laughter) — and folks did news stories on her.  And this became one of the anthems of our campaign back in 2008.

Now, here’s the end of the story, though.  We knew we were coming back to Des Moines for the last campaign rally I’ll ever do for me.  And so we were getting kind of sentimental.  And we called up Edith Childs.  And we said, why don’t you come on up?  (Applause.)  No, no, listen to this.  We said, why don’t you come on up; we’ll fly you up from South Carolina and you can do this chant one more time, just for old good-time sake.  It’s like getting the band back together again.  (Laughter.)

And you know what Edith said?  She said, I’d love to see you, but I think we can still win North Carolina, so I’m taking a crew into North Carolina to knock on doors on Election Day — I don’t have time just to be talking about it.  (Applause.)  I’ve got to knock on some doors.  (Applause.)  I’ve got to turn out the vote.  (Applause.)  I’m still fired up, but I’ve got work to do.  (Applause.)

And that shows you what one voice can do.  One voice can change a room.  And if it can change a room, it can change a city.  And if it can change a city, it can change a state.  And if it can change a state, it can change a nation.  (Applause.)  And if it can change a nation, it can change the world.  (Applause.)

And, Iowa, in 2008, your voice changed the world.  And Edith Childs asked me to ask you that if you’re willing to still stand with me tomorrow, if you’re willing to get your friends and your neighbors and your coworkers to the polls tomorrow, if you’re willing to make sure we finish what we started, she’s pretty sure we’ll win Iowa.  (Applause.)  She’s pretty sure we’ll win this election.  (Applause.)  And she just had one question for you, and that is:  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Ready to go!

THE PRESIDENT:  Iowa, tomorrow let’s remind the world just why it is the United States of America is the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

I love you.  (Applause.)  Let’s go vote.  Let’s keep moving forward.  God bless you.  And God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

END
10:35 P.M. CST

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 5, 2012: Mitt Romney Op-ed: Romney Shares His “Vision for America”

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Op-Ed: Mitt Romney Shares His “Vision for America”

Source: Mitt Romney, ABC News, 11-5-12

PHOTO: Romney speaks to Latino voters in Florida.

Tomorrow is Election Day. The closing hours of a campaign have a dynamic of their own. Many voters have known for some time who they will vote for. Others are just now putting aside the demands of daily life and considering how their vote will affect their lives, the lives of their children, and the course of the country we love.

We ask you to look beyond the speeches and the attacks and the ads. Look to the record, the accomplishments and failures, and the judgment. Words are cheap. A record is real and earned with effort. Change cannot be measured in speeches; it is measured in achievements.

Four years ago, candidate Obama promised to do so very much, but he has fallen so very short. He promised to be a “post-partisan president” but he became the most partisan– blaming, attacking, dividing. He was going to focus on creating jobs. Instead, he focused on Obamacare, which killed jobs. He said he was going to cut the federal deficit by half; then he doubled it.

He said that the unemployment rate would now be 5.2 percent; on Friday we learned that it is 7.9 percent — it is 9 million jobs short of what he promised. Americans of Hispanic descent have been hit particularly hard by the President’s failure to get our economy growing again. For the most part of Mr. Obama’s presidency, the unemployment rate among Hispanics has remained at or near 10 percent. That is unacceptable.

President Obama promised change, but he could not deliver it. I promise change, and I have a record of achieving it.

I built a business, and turned around another. I helped put an Olympics back on track. And with a Democrat legislature, I helped turn my state from deficit to surplus, from job losses to job growth, and from higher taxes to higher take-home pay.

This is why I am running for president. I know how to change the course the nation is on, how to get us to a balanced budget and how to build jobs and rising take-home pay. Accomplishing real change is not something I just talk about — it is something I have done. And it is what will do when I am President of the United States.

People across the country are responding to our comprehensive plan to create jobs. Among the things I intend to do is to boost trade, especially with Latin America. I will ask Congress for Trade Promotion Authority, a power every president has used or requested since it was first created in 1974, with the exception of President Obama.

Hispanic Americans are a major force in small business, which is itself the biggest driver of employment in our country. I intend to launch a sweeping review of all Obama-era regulations with an eye to eliminating or repairing those that are killing jobs and hurting small businesses. Every Hispanic small-business person and every job creator will know that for the first time in four years, the government of the United States likes business and loves the jobs and higher wages business brings to our fellow Americans.

I will work day and night to ensure that Hispanic children have access to a great education, affordable college, and a good paying job after graduation. I will reform Medicare and Social Security so that it doesn’t fail this or future generations. l will grant you control of your healthcare decisions, not a bunch of bureaucrats in Washington. And I will achieve what President Obama promised you but did not even try to deliver — a bipartisan agreement on immigration reform.

We are one day away from a fresh start. One day away from the first day of a new beginning. If there is anyone worried the last four years are the best we can do, if there is anyone who fears that the American Dream is fading away, if there is anyone who wonders whether better jobs and better paychecks are things of the past, I have a clear and unequivocal message: with the right leadership, America will come roaring back.

Americans don’t settle. We build, we aspire, we listen to that voice inside that says, “We can do better.” A better job; a better life for our children; a bigger, better country.

The door to a brighter future is there, open, waiting for us. I need your vote, I need your help. Walk with me, walk together. Let us start anew.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 5, 2012: Barack Obama Op-ed: “The America We Believe in Is Within Our Reach.”

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama: “The America We Believe in Is Within Our Reach.”

Source: Barack Obama, ABC News, 11-5-12

PHOTO: President Barack Obama waves to supporters as members of the Mexican Rock band Mana walk off stage during a campaign event.

President Barack Obama waves to supporters as members of the Mexican Rock band Mana walk off stage during a campaign event in Desert Pines High School, Sunday, Sept. 30, 2012 in Las Vegas. Mana performed at Obama?s campaign stop in Las Vegas,… (Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP Photo) View Full Caption

For the past few days, all of us have been properly focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetimes. We mourn those who were lost. And we pledge to stand with those whose lives have been turned upside down for as long as it takes them to recover and rebuild.

Because when hardship hits, America is at its best. The petty differences that consume us in normal times quickly melt away. There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm – only fellow Americans. That’s how we get through the most trying times: together.

That spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries, especially as a nation of immigrants. People have come to America from all over the world, willing to take risks, build their dreams and make sure their kids can dream even bigger. It’s that spirit that’s carried us through the last four years.

Four years ago, we were mired in two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Together, we’ve battled our way back. The war in Iraq is over, Osama bin Laden is dead, and our heroes are coming home. Our businesses have created more than 5 million new jobs in the last two and half years. Home values and 401(k)s are rising. We are less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in the last 20 years. And the American auto industry is back.

We’re not there yet. But we’ve made real progress. And on Tuesday, all Americans will get to choose between two fundamentally different visions of what makes America strong.

I believe America’s prosperity was built on the strength of our middle class. We don’t succeed when a few at the top do well while everyone else struggles to get by – we’re better off when everyone gets a fair shot, everyone does their fair share, and everyone plays by the same rules.

When Bill Clinton was president, he believed that if America invested in the skills and ideas of its people, good jobs and businesses would follow. His economic plan asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce our deficit and still invest in job training and education, research and technology, better health care and a dignified retirement. And what happened? By the end of his second term, our economy created 23 million new jobs. Incomes rose. Poverty fell. Deficits became the biggest surplus in history.

The path Governor Romney offers is the one we tried for eight years after President Clinton left office – a philosophy that says those at the very top get to play by a very different set of rules than everyone else. Bigger tax cuts for the wealthy that we can’t afford. Encouraging companies to ship jobs and profits overseas. Fewer rules for big banks and insurance companies. Vetoing the DREAM Act and making life so miserable for undocumented workers that they’d “self deport.” They’re the policies that caused this mess in the first place.

In the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has started calling himself an agent of change. And I’ll give him one thing – offering another $5 trillion tax cut weighted towards the wealthy, $2 trillion in defense spending our military didn’t ask for and more power for big banks and insurance companies is change, all right. But it’s not the change we need.

We know what real change looks like. And we can’t give up on it now.

Change is an America where people of every age have the skills and education that good jobs require. We took on banks that had been overcharging for student loans for decades, and made college more affordable for millions of students, including Latinos. Now we’ll recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs don’t end up in China, and train 2 million workers at community colleges for the skills local businesses need right now.

Change is an America that’s home to the next generation of manufacturing and innovation. I’m not the candidate who said we should “let Detroit go bankrupt,” I’m the president who bet on American workers and American ingenuity. Now I want a tax code that stops rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas, and starts rewarding companies that create jobs here; one that stops subsidizing oil company profits, and keeps supporting clean energy jobs and technology that will cut our oil imports in half. That’s how we create jobs and support the entrepreneurial spirit of Latino workers and small businesses.

Change is an America where we lift the shadow of deportation hanging over millions of people and help them earn their citizenship. We proposed a change in our laws to cut the red tape so U.S. citizens aren’t unfairly separated from loved ones while waiting for a green card. Then, instead of waiting for Congress to act, I took action so that patriotic young people who are Americans in every way except on paper no longer have to fear being deported. But this is not a permanent solution, so I will continue to work with anyone in Congress to pass the DREAM Act and enact comprehensive immigration reform to create a legal immigration system that rewards hard work and demands responsibility.

Change is an America that turns the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building here at home. So long as I’m commander-in-chief, we’ll pursue our enemies with the strongest military in the world. But it’s time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to pay down our debt and rebuild America – our roads and bridges and schools.

Change is an America where we reduce our deficit by cutting spending where we can, and asking the wealthiest Americans to go back to the income tax rates they paid when Bill Clinton was president. I’ve worked with Republicans to cut a trillion dollars of spending, and I’ll do more. I’ll work with anyone of any party to move this country forward. But I won’t agree to eliminate health insurance for millions of poor, elderly, or disabled on Medicaid, or turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.

The folks at the very top don’t need another champion in Washington. The people who need a champion in Washington are the Americans whose letters I read at night; the men and women I meet on the trail every day. The cooks and cleaning staff working overtime at a Las Vegas hotel. The furniture worker retraining for a career in biotechnology at age 55. The teacher who’s forced to spend less time with each student in her crowded classroom. The DREAMer who dreams of becoming something great. Every Latino small business owner trying to expand and do right by his or her employees – all of these Americans need a champion in Washington.

When these Americans do well, America does well. That’s the change we need right now. It’s time to finish what we’ve started – to educate our kids, train our workers, create new jobs, new energy, and new opportunity – to make sure that no matter who you are, where you come from, or how you started out, this is the country where you can make it if you try.

The America we believe in is within our reach. The future we hope for is within our sights. That’s why I’m asking for your vote this Tuesday.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 5, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech in Sanford, Florida on last day of 2012 presidential campaign

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Mitt Romney’s remarks in Florida on last day of 2012 presidential campaign (Full transcript)

Source: WaPo, 11-5-12

Here is a complete transcript of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney’s remarks at a campaign event in Sanford, Fla., on the last day of the presidential campaign, Nov. 5, 2012.

MITT ROMNEY: That is quite an Orlando welcome. Thank you so very much. What a way to start a day. This is fabulous; what a way to start an election. (APPLAUSE)

And I am — I am so looking forward to getting the chance to work with Senator Connie Mack, you’ve got to make that happen.

(APPLAUSE)

And I also appreciate the — the great leadership of Jeb Bush — Governor Jeb Bush, one of the best this country’s ever known.

(APPLAUSE)

Thank you to Governor Scott for welcoming us here and Lieutenant Governor Carroll.

Thank you also to Jeff Atwater. As you know, Jeff is the Chief Financial Officer of the state, but he’s been the Co-Chair of my effort here along with Adam Putnam, who as you know, is the Commissioner of Agriculture. I appreciate their work.

Will Weatherford, the Speaker of the House has addressed you and I appreciate his support.

Senator Mel Martinez and I appreciate Mel being here.

(APPLAUSE)

I think I’ve — oh, I didn’t mention Congressman John Mica. Where’s John hanging out here?

(APPLAUSE)

He’s over here, hi there.

It’s quite a gathering today.

(APPLAUSE)

This is — it’s quite a welcome that you provided me. You’re — you’re…

(APPLAUSE)

… you’re voices — your voices are not just heard in this hanger, they’re being heard all over the nation.

(APPLAUSE)

And even though — even though Ann is at a different city this morning, they are being felt your voices in both of our hearts and I — I want you to know how much we appreciate all that you’ve done, all the doors you’ve knocked on, all the phone calls you’ve made and the fact that you voted early. I saw how many hands went up when you were asked. That was very good.

(APPLAUSE) And some of you put signs in your yard.

(APPLAUSE)

Some you have put signs in your neighbor’s yard.

(APPLAUSE)

And — and I just — I — I know — I know how many as well have talked to coworkers and tried to convince people to vote for Paul Ryan and me.

Look, we — we have one job left and that’s to make sure that on Election Day, we get — make certain that everybody who’s qualified to vote gets out to vote. We need every single vote in Florida.

(APPLAUSE)

Now what makes this rally and your work so inspiring, is that you’re here because you care about America.

(APPLAUSE)

This is — this is a campaign about America and about the future we’re going to leave our children. We thank you, we ask you to stay at it all the way — all the way to victory on Tuesday night.

(APPLAUSE)

Tomorrow, we begin a new tomorrow. Tomorrow we begin a better tomorrow. This nation is going to begin to change for the better tomorrow. Your work is making a difference, the people of the world are watching, the people of America are watching. We can begin a better tomorrow tomorrow and with the help of the people in Florida, that’s exactly what’s going to happen.

(APPLAUSE)

Now there may be some of your friends and family members who haven’t made up their mind yet who they’re going to vote for. So I’d ask them to look beyond the speeches and beyond the attacks and even beyond all the ads, look to the record. You see talk is cheap, but a record, that’s real and it’s earned with real effort.

And so…

(APPLAUSE)

I mean the president promised a lot of change but change can’t be measured in speeches. It has to be measured in achievements and four years ago, candidate Obama promised to do oh so very much but he’s fallen also very short.

I mean you know some of these things. I mean he said he’d said he’d be a post-partisan president, but he’s been most partisan, attacking, dividing, blaming, it’s not only Republicans he’s refused to listen to, he’s also refused to listen to Independent voices.

He was going to focus on creating jobs, instead he focused on Obamacare and that killed jobs.

He was going to cut the federal deficit in half, instead he doubled it.

He said that by now, unemployment would be at 5.2 percent and last Friday, we learned that it’s 7.9 percent.

Now that’s…

(BOOING)

… that’s — that’s — that’s nine million jobs short of what he promised. Unemployment today is higher than when Barack Obama was elected president. Think of that.

He promised that he would propose a plan to save Social Security and Medicare. He didn’t, never even proposed a plan. Instead, he took $716 billion out of Medicare and used it to pay for Obamacare, that we didn’t want.

(BOOING)

He also said he would lower the health insurance premiums of the average family in America this year, we’d be down $2,500 a year. Anybody see that yet?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: Actually, they’re up $3,000 a year. Think of what impact that has on a middle-income family in America.

And of course the average American family now pays about $2,000 a year more for gasoline than they did when the president was elected.

(BOOING)

One more thing, let me mention, he said he would reach across the aisle on the most important issues that the country faced. Do you realize he has not met on the economy or on the budget, sequestration or on jobs with either the Republican leader or the Republican — of the House or the Republican leader of the Senate since July. That is not working across the aisle. That’s not bridging the divide, it’s making the divide wider.

So now we’ve had a lot of debates in this country and not as Republican or as Democrats, but as Americans that look at the — the issues that are before them and you’ve watched what’s happened in the country over the last four years with a — with an independent voice.

You hoped that President Obama would live up to his promise to bring people together and to solve problems. He hasn’t; I will.

(APPLAUSE) And you know why he fell so short — you know why he fell so short of what he promised. He cared more — he cared more about a liberal agenda than about repairing the economy.

Did Obamacare create new jobs?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: Did his war on coal and gas and oil put new jobs in the — in the marketplace?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: Did the Dodd-Frank regulations help banks make more loans to people?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: Does raising taxes create more jobs?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: Does an avalanche of new regulations help small business build new jobs?

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: You passed the test.

(LAUGHTER)

I mean I’ll…

(APPLAUSE)

Look, I’m — I’m happy to sit down and discuss this with anybody who likes you but almost every measure the president took made it harder for the economy to recover and it hurt our fellow Americans.

And — and we’re not just talking about a handful of people. We’re talking 23 million Americans are struggling to find a good job. One in six Americans are poor and the middle class, even those that have jobs, the middle class is being squeezed with lower incomes every year and higher prices from everything to health insurance to gasoline and electricity bills. It’s been tough for middle-income Americans, even those that are employed.

This — this weekend, I spoke with a wife of a 60-year-old man; he — he’s worked as a welder for 40 years but he just got laid off. And she said, what’s he going to do? She asked what I could do to help them and she made it very clear, they’re not looking for a government check, he wants a job.

The president thinks — the president thinks more government is the answer. No, Mr. President, more jobs, that’s that answer for America. (APPLAUSE)

I mean the question of this election — the question of this election really comes down to this, do the people of America want four more years like the last four years or…

AUDIENCE: No!

ROMNEY: … or do you want real change, finally?

(APPLAUSE)

Now I think you know that the president promised change, but he couldn’t deliver change. I not only promise change, I have a record of achieving it, I actually…

(APPLAUSE)

I actually built a business, I helped turn around another business, I helped get the Olympics back on track. And then with a Democrat legislature, 85 percent Democrat, I helped turn my state from deficit to surplus, from job losses to job growth and from lower take- home pay to higher take-home pay. That’s…

(APPLAUSE)

… that’s why I’m running for president. I know how to change the course the nation is on. I know how to get us to a balanced budget and how to build jobs and — and make rising take-home pay happen again.

See, accomplishing real change is not just something I talk about, it is something I have done and it is something I will do as the president of the United States.

(APPLAUSE)

If you believe we can do better, if you believe America should be on a better course, if you’re tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change; Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America from day one.

When I’m elected, of course, the economy and the American job market will continue to be stagnant, but I won’t waste any time complaining about my predecessor.

(APPLAUSE)

And I won’t spend my effort trying to pass partisan legislation unrelated to jobs and growth.

From day one, I’m going to go to work to help Americans get back to work.

(APPLAUSE) And, you know, people all over the country are responding to Paul Ryan and my five part plan to create more jobs and rising take-home pay.

Part one of that is taking full advantages of our energy resources, our oil, our coal, our gas, our nuclear, renewables…

(APPLAUSE)

On day one — on day one, I’ll act to increase the number of leases and permits to drill on federal lands.

(APPLAUSE)

And I’ll act to speed the approval of the Keystone Pipeline from Canada.

(APPLAUSE)

Number two, I will move to boost trade, particularly with Latin America. It’s an enormous opportunity for us. We need to take advantage of it.

(APPLAUSE)

And I will finally designate China as a currency manipulator, we all have to play by the same rules.

(APPLAUSE)

Now third, I’m going to send to Congress a retraining reform act to make sure every worker can get the skills they need for a good job.

And number four, I’m going to tackle out of control spending. I’m going to send Congress the first of several fundamental reforms. This first one will be called the Down Payment on Fiscal Sanity Act.

(APPLAUSE)

And it is going to do something that’s been spoken of but never done and that is we’re not going to — just — just going to slow down the rate of federal spending, we’re actually going to cut federal spending and get ourselves on track to a balanced budget.

(APPLAUSE)

I’m not just going to take office on January 20, I’m going to take responsibility for that office as well.

(APPLAUSE)

And number five, I’m going act to boost small business and all business by the way. I’m going to issue Executive Orders aimed at straightening out the problems that are holding the economy back.

The first is going to grant waivers from Obamacare to help begin its repeal.

(APPLAUSE)

The second, we’ll launch a sweeping review of all Obama era regulations with an eye to eliminating or repairing those that are killing jobs.

(APPLAUSE)

And by the way, for the first time — for the first time in four years, every entrepreneur, every small business person, every job creator is going to know that the president of the United States and our government likes them and likes the jobs they help bring to America’s…

(APPLAUSE)

See, Paul Ryan and I believe in limiting government instead of limiting the dreams of our fellow Americans.

(APPLAUSE)

Now our choice tomorrow is going to lead to one of two very different outcomes and people across the country, I think have the information they need to — to know where those outcomes would be. They can judge what kind of America we’ll have based upon who they vote for.

If for instance, they were able to reelect President Obama, he will still be unable to work with Congress and the people there, because he’s ignored them in the past, he’s attacked them, he’s blamed them. The debt ceiling that comes up from time to time, it’s going to come up again. There’ll be threats of shutdown and default and of course, that scares the heck out of the economy, freezes job growth.

I think the president was right the other day when he said he can’t change Washington from the inside, only from the outside. We’re going to give him that chance.

(APPLAUSE)

That’s his way. My way is quite different. When I’m elected, I’m going to work with Republicans and Democrats in Congress. I’m going to meet regularly with leaders in both parties and I’m going to endeavor to find good men and good women on both sides of the aisle that care more about the country than they do about politics and they’re there and we can make that happen.

(APPLAUSE)

Now, there’s no question, but you know that regardless of what he says, if the president gets reelected, he’s going to continue his war on coal and oil and natural gas.

I have a very different path. When I’m elected, we’re going to change course on energy to build jobs, to help with the price at the pump. We’re going to achieve North American energy independence in eight years.

(APPLAUSE)

If the president were to be reelected, I’m convinced he will continue to crush small business with his plan to raise taxes on them, to force employees to join unions whether they want to or not, to expand regulations and to impose Obamacare, which also kills jobs.

I care about small business. I see it as a means for people to fulfill their dreams.

Last week, I met a — a woman in Richmond, Virginia named Rhoda Elliott (ph). She — she’s been running her family restaurant for a number of years, Bill’s Barbecue, a business that’s been in her family for some 82 years. At the high point, she had 200 employees. She just closed it down and she told me that it was the Obama era taxes and regulation, Obamacare and the Obama era economy that put her out of business.

And she teared up as she was talking about it. This wasn’t about money, this is about the future for her family and the future for the families of the employees that worked there.

I want to help the hundreds of thousands of dreamers like Rhoda and I will.

(APPLAUSE)

You know that if the president were to be reelected, he’s going to say he’s going to improve our schools, but he’ll do what his largest campaign supporters, the public sector unions insist on. And your kids will have the same schools with the same results.

When I’m president, having learned lessons from Jeb Bush in the experience of Florida…

(APPLAUSE)

… I’m going to be the voice of the children and the parents across the nation because there’s no union for the PTA.

(APPLAUSE)

I want to make sure the kids of the nation get what your kids here get. I want to make sure they — they receive the information about the school their kids are going to to know whether it’s succeeding or failing and I want every child to have the choice they need to pick the school where their child can succeed.

(APPLAUSE)

Now I’m proud of the fact that in my state, we took our schools to the top of the nation, number one of all 50 states. But we did that by working together, Republicans and Democrats, by listening to the good advice of our best teachers who’ve dedicated their lives to helping others; listened to parents and always putting the students and their education first and I’ll do the same thing as president.

Now these last — these last few months of the campaign, you’ve noted that we’ve gathered strength. It’s become a movement across the country.

(APPLAUSE)

You see it — you see it, not just in the — in the size of the crowds that gather and the energy and passion, but also in the — the shared conviction we have. It’s made me strive even more to be worthy of your support and to campaign as I was governor to speak for the aspirations of — of all Americans.

I learned that as governor of Massachusetts, that the best achievements are shared achievements. I learned that respect and good will go a long way and are usually returned in kind. That’s how I’ll conduct myself as your president.

I’ll bring people together, I won’t just represent one party, I’ll represent one nation.

(APPLAUSE)

Throughout the campaign, using every argument he can think of, President Obama has tried to convince you that the last four years have been a success.

(BOOING)

And so his plan for the next four years is take all the ideas from his first four years, you know the stimulus, the tax increase, the borrowing, Obamacare, and do them all over again.

(BOOING)

He calls this plan “Forward,” I call it forewarned.

(APPLAUSE)

That same path means $20 trillion in debt. It means continuing crippling unemployment. It means depressed home values, stagnant take-home pay and a deficit in military.

Unless we change course, we may be looking at another recession as well.

And his closing argument, did you hear this? Just the other day, President Obama asked his supporters to vote for revenge.

(BOOING)

For revenge. Instead I ask the American people to vote for love of country.

(APPLAUSE) We have — we have got to lead America back to a better place. Our — our motto, united we stand, this is — this is — this is — out of one many — excuse me — out of many one, this — this unity is a — is a fundamental principle of America. We’ve got to restore it.

And so we’re one day way from a fresh start.

(APPLAUSE)

One day away for the first day of a new beginning. My conviction is that better days are ahead and it’s not based on — it’s not based on promises or rhetoric, but it’s based on solid plans and proven results and an unshakable faith in the American people.

(APPLAUSE)

Now if there’s anybody — if there’s anybody who’s worried that the last four years are the best we can do or if there’s anyone who’s fearing that the American Dream is fading away or if there’s anyone who wonders whether better jobs and better paychecks are things of the past, I have a clear and unequivocal message. With the right leadership, America is about to come roaring back.

(APPLAUSE)

We’re Americans, we can do anything. The only thing that stands between us and some of the best years we’ve — we’ve ever imagined is lack of leadership and that’s why we have elections.

Tomorrow is a moment to look into the future and imagine what we can do to put the past four years behind us and start building a new future.

And you saw the differences when President Obama and I were side by side at the debates.

(APPLAUSE)

He says it has to be this way. I say it can’t stay this way. He’s offering excuses, I’ve got a plan. I can’t wait to get started. He’s hoping we’ll settle. But Americans don’t settle, we build, we aspire, we listen to the voice inside that says we can do better — a better job, a better life, a bigger, better country. That is what’s in store with new leadership.

(APPLAUSE)

That better life is out there. It’s waiting for us. Our destiny, it’s in your hands. Tomorrow we get to work rebuilding our country. Tomorrow we restore our confidence and renew our conviction. Tomorrow that confidence that we’re on a solid path to steady improvement begins. Confidence in college grads will be able to find a good a good job at the end of four years.

(APPLAUSE)

Confidence that moms and dads that are working two jobs will have a shot at a better job.

Tomorrow on November 6, we come together for a better future and on November 7, we’ll get to work.

(APPLAUSE)

Now I’d like you to reach across the street to that neighbor with the other campaign’s yard sign and we’ll reach across the aisle in Washington to people of good faith in the other party.

This — this is such a critical time. It’s so much more than just our moment, it’s America’s moment of renewal and purpose and optimism. We’ve journeyed far and wide in this campaign. And now we’re almost home. One final push is going to get us there.

We’ve known — we’ve known many long days and some short nights and now we’re close. The door to a brighter future is open. It’s waiting for us. I need your vote. I need your help. Walk with me. Tomorrow we begin a new tomorrow.

(APPLAUSE)

God bless you all. God bless Florida. God bless Orlando. We’re going to take back this country and make it strong and proud and prosperous.

Thank you so very much. Thanks you guys. Thank you.

(APPLAUSE)

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 5, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Op-ed in USA Today: “We Need A New Beginning”

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Mitt Romney: “We Need A New Beginning”

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-5-12
We Need A New Beginning
USA Today
Mitt Romney

November 5, 2012
http://www.usatoday.com

This presidential campaign has allowed me to travel to every corner of the country and listen to the hopes and concerns of people of every class, race and background. It has reaffirmed to me what an extraordinarily impressive, resilient and compassionate country America is. But it has also reinforced in me the belief that America is facing serious challenges and in need of serious change.

We are at a turning point. The decision we make on Tuesday will affect not only us but also generations yet to be born. President Obama and I offer fundamentally different visions about the size, cost, reach and role of the federal government. And this election will determine our policies on job growth and debt, on whether our standard of living rises or falls, and whether we have unity at home.

We can do better

Four years ago, we were promised a new beginning — but it turned out to be false start. President Obama is a well-intentioned man whose policies have manifestly failed. Under his stewardship, we’ve seen a historically weak economic recovery, chronically high unemployment, falling household incomes, rising health care and tuition costs, a record number of Americans in poverty and on food stamps, record deficits, and a national debt that threatens to bury our future. President Obama calls this a recovery. Most Americans consider it a disaster.

Fortunately we still have time, though not much time, to change course. We need a new direction — and that requires a new president.

Based on a lifetime in the private sector, as head of the Olympics and as a governor, I know how to fix things that are broken and turn institutions around. I have a five-point plan that will put America back on the path of economic growth and fiscal responsibility.

Part one will bring us to North American energy independence by 2020. Part two will open new markets for American goods and ensure that we trade on a level playing field; the days of China’s cheating will be numbered. Part three will transform our educational system so that Americans can gain the skills required for success in the 21st century. Part four will cut the deficit, get the national debt under control and pare back our overgrown federal government. Part five will empower small business, the central engine of job creation in this country.

Real jobs, real growth

During my presidency, America will create 12 million new jobs, raise take-home pay and get the economy growing at an average rate of 4% a year, more than double this year’s rate.

Animating these policies is an unshakable commitment to help improve individual American lives — the unemployed single mother, the struggling middle-class family, the wounded veteran, the senior citizen who relies on Medicare.

But it’s the nature of our political system that we can’t achieve large and lasting change unless people in Washington put aside pettiness and bickering and work together. That is one of the largest failures of the past four years. As governor of Massachusetts, I worked with a legislature that was 85% Democratic to implement good ideas. And what I did for Massachusetts, I will do for America. I’ll work with Republicans and Democrats to advance reforms that meet the challenges of our time.

On Nov. 6, we can begin to build shared prosperity that touches every corner of our country. We can experience unity as a nation. And we can begin to write great new chapters in the American story.

I’m prepared for this moment, and I am ready to lead this nation. But I need your vote, because there is an economy to revive, and dreams to build, and great work to be done.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 4, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Morrisville, Pennsylvania

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Mitt Romney: We Will Bring Real Change To America On Day One

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-4-12

“If you believe we can do better, if you believe America should be on a better course, if you are tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change. Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America on Day One.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks

Morrisville, Pennsylvania

November 4, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “The question of this election comes down to this: Do you want four more years like the last four years or do you want real change? President Obama promised change, but he couldn’t deliver. He could not deliver the change he promised. But I not only promised change, I have a record of achieving change. I built a business. I helped turn around another one. I helped put an Olympics that was off track back on track. With the Democrat legislature, I helped my state turned from deficit to surplus, from job losses to job growth, and from higher taxes to higher take-home pay. And that is why I am running for president. I know how to change the course the nation is on, how to get to a balanced budget, how to build jobs and see, once again, rising take-home pay. Accomplishing real change is not something I just talk about. It is something I have done and it is something I will do as President of the United States. If you believe we can do better, if you believe America should be on a better course, if you are tired of being tired, then I ask you to vote for real change. Paul Ryan and I will bring real change to America on Day One.”

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 3, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Newington, New Hampshire — Urges Votes for Love Not Revenge

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Romney Starts Whirlwind Day in New Hampshire, Urges Votes for Love Not Revenge

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-3-12

J.D. Pooley/Getty Images

Kicking off the day filled with four campaign events spread across three crucial swing states, Mitt Romney said on Saturday morning that unlike the president, he is urging Americans to vote for love, not revenge.

Romney drew on remarks made by President Obama on Friday at an event in Ohio, during which the President urged supporters to head to the polls saying, “Voting is the best revenge.”

Romney said on Saturday that the remark likely “surprised a lot of people.”….READ MORE

Mitt Romney: Vote For Love Of Country

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-3-12
“Yesterday, the President said something you may have heard by now, that I think surprised a lot of people. Speaking to an audience, he said voting is the best revenge. He told his supporters, voting for ‘revenge.’ Vote for ‘revenge’? Let me tell you what I’d like to tell you: vote for love of country. It is time we lead America to a better place.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks
Newington, New Hampshire
November 3, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “Yesterday, the President said something you may have heard by now, that I think surprised a lot of people. Speaking to an audience, he said voting is the best revenge. He told his supporters, voting for ‘revenge.’ Vote for ‘revenge’? Let me tell you what I’d like to tell you: vote for love of country. It is time we lead America to a better place. Now, if there’s anybody there who’s worried about the last four years and wondered if they’re the best we can do, who fears that the American dream is fading away, if anyone wonders whether good jobs and better take-home pay are out there, I’ve got a clear and unequivocal message for you and that is that America is about to come roaring back. And you saw the differences, you saw the differences between Barack Obama and me in those debates. I like those debates, I’ve got to be honest. I mean, he says it has to be this way. I say it can’t stay this way. He’s offering excuses. I’m offering a plan. I can’t wait to get started. He wants to convince you to settle, but Americans don’t settle, we dream, we aspire, we reach for greater things and we will achieve greater things with new leadership.”

Full Text Political Headlines November 3, 2012: GOP Weekly Address: Mitt Romney Delivers His Last Remarks Before the Election

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GOP Address: Mitt Romney Delivers His Last Remarks Before the Election

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-3-12

Alex Wong/Getty Images

GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney delivers his last remarks before the election and describes how he would be a different president, if elected.

According to Romney, “Four years ago, candidate Obama promised to do so very much, but he has fallen so very short.  After all of the petty partisanship, all of the standoffs and stalemates, 23 million Americans are still struggling for work.  On Friday, the unemployment rate rose to 7.9 percent.  Forty-seven million people are on food stamps.  Our economy is still on life support—and our country is $16 trillion in debt.”…READ MORE

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speeches at Campaign Event in Springfield & Hilliard, Ohio

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Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: Mitt Romney in Wall Street Journal Op-ed: A New Direction For America

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Mitt Romney: A New Direction For America

A Romney-Ryan administration will confront the problems that politicians have avoided for a decade.

By MITT ROMNEY

Source: WSJ, 11-2-12

After more than a year of campaigning, endless political advertisements, two conventions and four debates, the presidential election is almost over. The big decision of 2012 will soon be in the hands of the voters. The choice Americans make will shape great things, historic things, and those will determine the most important and intimate aspects of every American life and every American family. All presidential elections matter. This one matters a great deal.

It matters to the senior who needs medical care but, thanks to ObamaCare, can’t find a doctor who is taking new Medicare patients. It matters to the men and women who once had good-paying jobs with benefits but now work part-time with no benefits just to put food on the table. It matters to the college student graduating this spring with a heavy load of debt and few opportunities to pay it back. It matters to the single mother who lives in fear of foreclosure as her employment prospects dwindle.

This election is about them. It is about all of us.image

Ken Fallin

It is about the education of our children, the value of our homes, the take-home pay from our jobs, the price of the gasoline we buy, the choices we have in our health care. It is also about broader forces—the growth of the economy, the strength of our military, our dependence on foreign oil, our leadership role in the world.

After four years of disappointments, fixing America’s problems requires a new direction. The path we’re on hasn’t led us where we need to go. In so many ways, it seems that things have gotten even worse. We can make excuses for what has gone wrong, and many have tried. But excuses won’t turn this country around. Only leadership can do that.

I know something about leadership because I have led before. I have reformed businesses that were on the verge of collapse. I have helped to save an Olympics that was plagued by scandal. I have worked with men and women on both sides of the aisle in Massachusetts to achieve real change and real reform.

I can do it again in Washington. Republicans and Democrats in Congress may seem to share very little these days, but they share responsibility for the problems we now face. Just as it took both parties to bring us to where we stand, it will take both parties to get us moving again in the right direction.

That is something we can only accomplish if we work tirelessly to bridge the divide between the political parties. I will meet with Democratic and Republican leadership regularly. I will look for common ground and shared principles. And I will put the interests of the American people above the interests of the politicians and the bureaucrats.

Together, we will overcome our difficulties and usher in a new age of prosperity.

America is ready for that kind of leadership. Paul Ryan and I will provide it. Our plan for a stronger middle class will create jobs, stop the decline in take-home pay, and put America back on the path of possibility and opportunity.

This, in turn, will enable us to fulfill our responsibilities to promote the principles of peace as leader of the Free World. We will help the Muslim world combat the spread of extremism. We will dissuade Iran from building a nuclear bomb. We will build enduring relationships throughout Latin America. And we will partner with China and other great nations to build a more stable and peaceful world.

We face big challenges, but we also have big opportunities. New doors are open for us to sell our ideas and our products to the entire world. New technologies offer the promise of unbounded information and limitless innovation. New ideas are changing lives and hearts in diverse nations and among diverse peoples. If we seize the moment and rise to the occasion, the century ahead will be an American Century.

Our children will graduate into exciting careers that are worthy of their qualifications. Our seniors will be confident that their retirement is secure. Our men and women will have good jobs and good pay and good benefits. Our veterans will come home to a bright future. We will have every confidence that our lives are safe, and that our livelihoods are secure.

This requires a different direction, a change from the course of the past four years. It requires that we put aside the small and the petty, and demand the scale of change that we deserve: real change, big change. I pledge that my presidency will bring about that kind of change—confronting the problems that politicians have avoided for over a decade, revitalizing our competitive economy, modernizing our education system, restoring our founding principles.

If you are ready for that kind of change, if you want this to be a turning point in America’s course, join us and vote Tuesday for the kind of leadership that these times demand.

I am running for president because I believe in America. I believe in the America that never gives up, never stops striving, never ceases believing in itself. That is what I have been campaigning for, and that is what I will fight for as president of the United States.

Mr. Romney, a former governor of Massachusetts, is the Republican candidate for president of the United States.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 2, 2012: Barack Obama in Wall Street Journal Op-ed: Real Progress, But We’re Not Done

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Real Progress, But We’re Not Done

Americans shouldn’t surrender to the same philosophy that hurt middle-class families for so long.

By BARACK OBAMA

Source: WSJ, 11-2-12

For the past few days, we’ve all been properly focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetimes. We mourn those who were lost. And we pledge to stand with those whose lives have been turned upside down for as long as it takes to recover and rebuild—better than before.

Because when hardship hits, America is at its best. The petty differences that consume us in normal times fade away. There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm—only fellow Americans. That is how we get through the most trying times: together.

In 2008, we were mired in two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression. Together, we’ve battled our way back. Our businesses have created over five million new jobs in the past two and a half years. Home values are on the rise. Manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years. The American auto industry is back. Thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over. And Osama bin Laden is dead.

image

Ken Fallin

We’ve made real progress. But we’re not done yet. On Tuesday, you get to choose between two fundamentally different visions of America—one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy four years ago, and one built on a strong, growing middle class.

Our free market is the engine of America’s progress, driven by risk-takers, innovators and dreamers. Our people succeed when they have the chance to get a good education and learn new skills—and so do the businesses that hire them, or the companies they start. We believe that when we support research into scientific and medical breakthroughs, new industries will start here and stay here. We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs in America, and when quality health care and a dignified retirement aren’t just achievable goals but a measure of our values as a nation.

For eight years, we had a president who shared these beliefs. Bill Clinton asked the wealthiest to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make these investments. By the end of his second term, America had created 23 million new jobs. Incomes were up. Poverty was down. Deficits became surpluses. And Wall Street did very well.

In the eight years after, we followed a different path. Bigger tax cuts for the wealthy we couldn’t afford. Encouraging companies to ship jobs and profits overseas. Fewer rules for big banks and insurers. The result of this top-down economics? Falling incomes, record deficits, the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis we’ve been cleaning up for the past four years.

Gov. Mitt Romney has offered—under the guise of “real change”—these very same policies that failed our country so badly. But we know better.

We shouldn’t end college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts; we should make college more affordable for everyone who’s willing to work for it. We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China but in America. And we should equip another two million Americans at community colleges with skills that businesses are looking for right now.

Change is an America that is home to the next generation of manufacturing and innovation. I’m proud I bet on the American auto industry. I refuse to cede the future of manufacturing to other countries. We need a tax code that stops rewarding companies that ship jobs overseas and starts rewarding companies that create jobs here; one that stops subsidizing oil-company profits and keeps supporting new energy jobs and new technology that will cut our oil imports in half.

Change is an America that turns the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building here at home. So long as I’m commander in chief, we’ll pursue our enemies with the strongest military in the world. But it is time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to pay down our debt and rebuild American roads, bridges, schools and broadband.

Change is an America where we reduce our deficit by cutting where we can and asking the wealthiest to go back to the income-tax rates they paid under President Clinton. I’ve worked with Republicans to cut a trillion dollars of spending, and I’ll do more. I’ll work with anyone of any party to move this country forward. But I won’t eliminate health insurance for millions of poor, elderly or disabled on Medicaid, and I won’t turn Medicare into a voucher to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut. That is surrender to the same philosophy that hurt middle-class families for too long.

I’m fighting for the Americans whose letters I read at night, whom I meet on the trail every day. The laid-off furniture worker who’s retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology. The owner of a small restaurant who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down. The autoworker who’s back on the job filled with the pride of building a great car.

When these Americans do well, America does well. That is the change we need right now. Now’s the time to keep pushing forward to make sure that no matter who you are, where you come from or how you started out, you can work to achieve your American dream.

That is the America within our reach. That is why I’m asking for your vote this Tuesday.

Mr. Obama, a Democrat, is seeking re-election as president of the United States.

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Boulder, Colorado

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Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event, Boulder, CO

Source: WH, 11-1-12

Coors Events Center
Boulder, Colorado

7:42 P.M. MDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Thank you!  (Applause.)  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you ready to go?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  You seem pretty fired up!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Colorado!  (Applause.)

Everybody, please give Savannah a big round of applause for the great introduction.  (Applause.)  Let’s give a shout out to the folks who are fighting for you every day in Washington — Senator Michael Bennet — (applause) — Senator Mark Udall — (applause) — Congressman Jered Polis.  (Applause.)

It is good to be here.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  I do.  (Applause.)

Those of you who have seats, feel free to sit down.  I don’t want you guys getting tired out.  (Laughter.)

For the past few days, all of us have been focused on one of the worst storms of our lifetime.  And we’re awed and humbled by nature’s destructive power.  We mourn those who were lost.  Obviously our hearts and our thoughts and prayers go out to the families who have been affected.  We pledge to help those whose lives have been turned upside down.

I was just on a phone call with some of the local officials in New York, as well as Governor Cuomo, and they’ve got still a long way to go to deal with this incredible storm.  But we’ve also been inspired these past few days — because when disaster strikes, we see America at its best.  The petty differences that consume us in normal times, they all seem to melt away.  We saw it here in Colorado with the fires this summer, and then the terrible tragedy in Aurora.

In moments like these, we’re reminded there are no Democrats or Republicans during a crisis, just fellow Americans.  (Applause.)  We see leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken; and neighbors helping neighbors to cope with tragedy; communities rallying to rebuild; a spirit that says in the end, we’re all in this together — we rise or fall as one nation, as one people.  (Applause.)

And, Boulder, that spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries.  And it’s carried us through the trials and tribulations of the last four years.

In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Today, because of the resilience of the American people, our businesses have created over 5 million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back on top.  (Applause.)  American manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years.  (Applause.)  We’re less dependent on foreign oil than at any time in 20 years.  (Applause.)  Home values, home construction is on the rise.  (Applause.)  And thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  (Applause.)  The war in Afghanistan is coming to an end.  (Applause.)  Al Qaeda has been decimated.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

So we’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Colorado, we all know our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a single American who wants a job and can’t find one, our work is not done.  As long as there are families who are working harder and harder but falling further behind, our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a child somewhere in America languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity, anywhere in this country, our work is not yet done.  (Applause.)

Our fight, our mission goes on because we know this nation cannot succeed without a growing, thriving middle class — (applause) — and strong, sturdy ladders into the middle class for everybody who’s willing to work hard and take responsibility. (Applause.)

Our fight, our mission goes on because America has always done best when everybody has a fair shot, when everybody is doing their fair share, when everybody is playing by the same rules.  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, we knew from the beginning that our work would take more than one year, or even one term.  We knew that.  Because, let’s face it, the middle class was getting hammered long before the financial crisis hit.  The economy has changed over the last 20, 30 years.  Technology has made us more productive, but it’s also made a lot of good jobs obsolete.  Global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also meant that companies could locate overseas in low-wage countries.  American workers saw their paychecks getting squeezed, even when corporate profits rose; even as CEO salaries exploded, and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care started to erode — in some cases disappear altogether.

Now, these fundamental changes in the economy — the rise of technology and global competition — those are real.  We can’t wish them away.  But here’s what I know, Colorado:  We can meet those challenges.  We’re Americans.  (Applause.)  We still have the world’s best workers.  We’ve got the world’s best entrepreneurs.  We’ve got the best scientists and researchers. We’ve definitely got the best colleges and universities.  We’ve got the most innovative spirit.  (Applause.)  We have everything we need to thrive in this new economy.  There’s not a country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly trade places with the United States.
But to realize our full potential, to secure a future that we want for our kids and our grandkids, we’ve got to make a choice right now.  In five days, we will choose our next president.  (Applause.)  And, Boulder, it is more than just a choice between two candidates or two parties.  You’re going to be making a choice between two fundamentally different visions of America — one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo — vote.  (Applause.)  Vote.

Or a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.  And we know what the choice needs to be.  We’re here today because we believe that if this country invests in the skills and ideas of its people, then good jobs and businesses will follow.

We believe that America’s free market has been the engine of America’s progress, and we honor the risk-takers and innovators and dreamers that drive our economy forward.  But we also understand that in this country, people succeed when they have a chance at a great education, when they’ve got a chance to learn new skills.  (Applause.)  That’s good for business because they need skilled workers.  That’s good for our country because some of those folks who get those great skills and education start new businesses.  We believe that when we support research into medical breakthroughs or nanotechnology or entire new fields of study, new industries start here and they stay here and they hire here.  (Applause.)

We don’t believe that government should poke its nose into everything we do, but do we believe this country is stronger — and actually our markets work better — when there are rules in place to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution — (applause) — when there are rules to protect consumers from unscrupulous credit card companies and mortgage lenders — (applause) — when we grow — we’re convinced that we grow faster.

And the evidence is on our side.  We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs here in America.  And we believe that quality health care for everybody and a dignified retirement for everybody aren’t just achievable goals — they are a measure of our values as a nation.  That’s what we believe.  (Applause.)

For eight years, we had a President who actually shared those beliefs, and his name was Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  And the interesting thing is when he was first elected, he asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, and science and research.  And guess what — there were a bunch of folks who were running for Congress at the time who said this is going to hurt the economy; this is going to kill job creation.

And if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates happens to be running for President right now.  (Laughter.)  And it turns out his math and their math was just as bad back then as it is now.  (Applause.)  Because by the end of Bill Clinton’s second term, America had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up, and poverty was down, and our deficits had become the biggest surplus in history.  (Applause.)

So, Colorado, we know the ideas that work.  We know our ideas work.  We also know the ideas that don’t work.  Because in the eight years after Bill Clinton left office, his policies were reversed.  The wealthiest Americans got tax cuts they didn’t need.  Companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas.  Insurance companies and oil companies and Wall Street were given free rein to do whatever they pleased.  Folks at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us.  And the result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, and record deficits, and the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis that we have been cleaning up for the last four years.  (Applause.)

So here’s the thing.  We’ve tested both theories.  We’ve tested both visions.  One worked really well.  One worked really badly.  (Laughter.)

Now, in the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has been using all his formidable talents as a salesman — (laughter) — to dress up the very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we’ve been cleaning up after these last four years, and he’s offering them up as change. He’s saying he’s the candidate of change.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  No, don’t boo — vote.  Vote.  (Applause.)

But let me tell you, Colorado, we know what change looks like.  We know what’s going to help the middle class.  (Applause.)  We know what’s going to grow jobs.  We know what’s going to reduce the deficit.  And let me tell you, what Governor Romney is offering sure ain’t it.  It is not it.  Giving more power back to the biggest banks — that’s not change.  Leaving millions without health insurance — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  No, it ain’t!  (Laughter and applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies — not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!

THE PRESIDENT:  (Laughter.)  Ruling out compromise by pledging to rubber-stamp the tea party’s agenda as President — that’s not change.

AUDIENCE:  No, it ain’t!

THE PRESIDENT:  In fact, that’s exactly the attitude in Washington that we’ve got to change.

Look, I know that with all the TV commercials that are coming at people, sometimes it’s hard to follow stuff and it’s hard to know who to trust, but here’s the thing.  Look, after four years as President, you know me by now.  (Applause.)  You know me.  You may not agree with every decision that I’ve made.  You may be frustrated at the pace of change.  I always remind people that when we did the auto bailout, only 10 percent of the country approved of it, including, by the way, folks in Michigan and Ohio.  But you know what I believe.  You know where I stand. You know I’m willing to make tough decisions, even when they’re not politically convenient.  (Applause.)  And most importantly, you know that I’ll fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  (Applause.)

And that’s why I know what real change looks like, because I fought for it.  I’ve got the scars to prove it.  (Laughter.)  I’ve got gray hair to show for it.  (Laughter.)  You fought for it, too.  And after all that we’ve been through together, we sure as heck can’t give up now.  (Applause.)

Let’s picture what real change looks like.  Real change is a country where Americans of every age have the skills and education that good jobs require.  And, you know what, we understand government can’t do this alone — parents have to parent; teachers have to teach.  But don’t tell me that hiring more teachers won’t help this economy, or help young people compete.  (Applause.)  Don’t tell me that students who can’t afford college should just borrow money from their parents.  That wasn’t an option for me, and I’ll bet it was not an option for a whole lot of you.  We shouldn’t be ending college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts –- we should be making college more affordable for everybody who’s willing to work for it.  (Applause.)

We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China, but are created right here in Colorado.  (Applause.)  We should work with our community colleges to train another 2 million Americans with the skills that businesses are looking for right now.  And that’s all part of my plan for the future.  That’s what change is.  That’s the America that we’re fighting for.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.  (Applause.)

Change comes when we live up to America’s legacy of innovation, where we make America home to the next generation of advanced manufacturing, and scientific discovery, and technological breakthroughs.  I’m proud that I bet on America’s workers and American ingenuity and the American auto industry.  And today, we’re not just building cars again; we’re building better cars — cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas.  (Applause.)

Today, there are thousands of workers building long-lasting batteries and solar technology and wind turbines all across the country –- jobs that weren’t there four years ago.  (Applause.)  And not every technology we bet on will pan out.  Not every business will thrive.  But I promise you this — there is a brilliant future for manufacturing in America.  There is a future for clean energy in America.  (Applause.)  And I’m not going to cede that future to other countries.

I don’t want a tax code that rewards companies for creating those jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create those jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  I don’t want a tax code that subsidizes oil company profits when they’re making money hand over fist.  I want to support the energy jobs of tomorrow, and the new technology that will cut our oil imports in half; that will reduce the carbon in our atmosphere; that will make us less dependent on foreign oil.  (Applause.)  That’s my plan for growth and jobs.  That’s the future I see in America.  That’s what we’re fighting for.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Change — real change — is finally turning the page on a decade of war.  Let’s do some nation-building right here at home.  (Applause.)  So long as I’m Commander-in-Chief, we will pursue our enemies with the strongest military the world has ever known.  That will not change.  But it’s time to use some of the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to start paying down our debt, to start rebuilding America.  (Applause.)  That’s part of being strong.  That’s part of our national security.

Right now, we can put people back to work all across Colorado, all across the country, fixing roads and bridges; expanding broadband to rural neighborhoods; making sure our schools are state-of-the-art.  Let’s put Americans back to work doing the work that needs to be done.  And let’s especially focus on our veterans -– because nobody who fights for this country should have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads when they come home.  (Applause.)  That’s my commitment to you.  That’s part of keeping America strong.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.

Change is a future where we reduce our deficit in a way that’s balanced and responsible.  And I’ve signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts; I intend to do more.  We can streamline agencies.  We can get rid of programs that aren’t working.  But if we’re serious about the deficit, we also have to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates they paid when Bill Clinton was in office.  (Applause.)

Because a budget is all about priorities.  It’s about what values do we care about.  And as long as I’m President, I’m not going to turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  I’m not going to allow this nation to be plunged into another battle over health care reform, and kick millions of people off of health care, and weaken all the reforms that we put in place, including making sure that young people can stay on their parent’s plan till they’re 26 years old, just so insurance companies can jump back into the driver’s seat.  (Applause.)

And by the way, I’m not going to allow politicians in Washington to control health care choices that women should make for themselves.  (Applause.)  We’re not going to do that.  We’re not going to go backwards.  We’re going forward.  (Applause.)

So, Colorado, we know what change is.  We know what the future requires.  We don’t need a big government agenda or a small government agenda — we need a middle class agenda that rewards the values of hard work and responsibility.  We don’t need a partisan agenda — we need a common-sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, we’re all better off; that says when we fund the research of a young scientist, her new discovery will benefit every American.   (Applause.)

We need an agenda that recognizes we don’t just look out for ourselves — we look out for one another other; we look out for future generations.  We meet those obligations by working together.  That’s the change we believe in.  That’s what 2008 was about.  That’s what this election is about.  That’s why I need you to vote.  (Applause.)

Now, let me be clear — achieving this agenda will not be easy.  It wasn’t easy over these last four years; it’s not going to be easy over the next four years.  Back in 2008, when we talked about change, I told you I wasn’t just talking about changing presidents, I wasn’t just talking about changing parties.  I was talking about changing our politics.  I ran because the voices of the American people — your voices — had been shut out of our democracy for way too long — by lobbyists and special interests, and politicians who thing that compromise is a dirty word and would say anything to win office and do anything to stay in office.

And as we expected, the protectors of the status quo are a powerful force in Washington.  And over the last four years, every time we’ve fought to make change, they’ve fought back with everything they’ve got.  They spent millions to stop us from reforming health care and Wall Street and student loans.  Their strategy from the start was to engineer pure gridlock in Congress, refusing to compromise on ideas that traditionally both Democrats and Republicans have supported in the past.

And what they’re now counting is that the American people will be so worn down by all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction, that you’ll actually reward obstruction, either by voting for folks claiming to bring about change, or not voting at all, but either way, putting people back in charge who advocate the very same policies that got us into this mess.

In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  They’re counting on you not voting.  That’s their entire strategy.  But, Colorado, my bet is on you.  My bet is on you. (Applause.)  My bet is on the decency and good sense of the American people.  (Applause.)

Because despite all the resistance, despite all the setbacks, we’ve gotten done so much and we’ve never lost sight of the vision that we share — that you would have a voice; that there would be somebody at the table fighting every single day for middle class Americans, for folks who are working hard and struggling.

Sometimes Republicans in Congress worked with me to meet our goals — to cut taxes for small businesses and families like yours, to open up new markets for American goods, to finally repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  We had a couple of really brave Republicans who worked with us on that.  (Applause.)

And sometimes we’ve had big fights -– like when we forced the banks to stop overcharging for student loans — (applause) –which is how we made college more affordable for millions of young people; like when we forced Wall Street to abide by the toughest rules since the 1930s; like when we stopped insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with preexisting conditions like cancer or diabetes, so no one in America goes bankrupt just because they get sick.  (Applause.)

I didn’t fight those fights for any partisan advantage.  I have shown my willingness to work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders — whether they’re Democrats, Republicans, or independents — who feel the same way. You’ll vote for candidates like Michael Bennet and Mark Udall and Jared Polis, all who have shown themselves to be willing to work across party lines to get things done, but who also know that there’s some core principles you don’t compromise.  (Applause.)

Because if the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals that will kick students off financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid just to give a millionaire a tax cut, then that’s not a deal worth having.  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not change.  That’s surrender to the same status quo that has hurt middle class families for way too long.

And, Colorado, I’m not ready to give up on the fight.  (Applause.)  I’m not ready to give up on that fight.  (Applause.) And I hope you aren’t either, Colorado.  I hope you aren’t either.  I hope you’ve still got some fight left in you.  (Applause.)

The folks at the very top in this country they don’t need another champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.  They can hire lobbyists.  They’re going to be able to get their phone calls returned.  The people who need a champion are those Americans whose letters I read late at night; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every single day.

The laid-off furniture worker who’s retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology — she needs a champion.  The small restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down — he needs a champion.  The cooks and waiters and cleaning staff working overtime in a hotel somewhere, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college — they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who’d never thought he’d work in a plant again, and now is back on the job building a great car and full of pride and dignity — he needs a champion.  The young teacher doing her best in an overcrowded classroom with outdated textbooks — she needs a champion.  (Applause.)  All those kids in inner cities and small farm towns, in valleys of Ohio, rolling Virginia hills, right here in Boulder; kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors or engineers or entrepreneurs or diplomats or even a president — they need a champion in Washington.  (Applause.)  They need a champion.

Because the future — the future doesn’t have lobbyists.  We’ll never have as many lobbyists as the vested interests — never have as many lobbyists as the past does, but it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.

And that’s why I need you, Colorado.  That’s why I need you, Boulder — to make sure their voices are heard.  To make sure your voices are heard.  (Applause.)  We’ve come too far to turn back now.  We have come too far to grow faint-hearted.  Now is the time to keep pushing forward — to educate all our kids, to train all our workers, to create new jobs, to discover new energy, to broaden opportunity, to grow our middle class, to restore our democracy — to make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, how you started out, you can can make it here in America if you try.  (Applause.)

In the middle of the Great Depression, FDR reminded the country that “failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must shoulder our common load.”  That’s the strength we need today.  That’s the hope I’m asking you to share.  That’s the future in our sights.

That’s why I’m asking for your vote.  That’s why I need you early voting tomorrow.  (Applause.)  That’s why I need young people to turn out.  That’s why I need you to knock on some more doors.  (Applause.)  That’s why I need you to make some phone calls.  And if you turn out for me, if you vote for me, we’ll win Colorado again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win this election.  We’ll finish what we started.  We’ll keep moving forward.  (Applause.) We’ll renew those bonds, and reaffirm that spirit that makes the United States of America the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you.  God bless the United States of America.  Remember to vote!  (Applause.)

END
8:18 P.M. MDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Green Bay, Wisconsin — Obama Kicks Off Closing Argument Tour in Wisconsin

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Obama Kicks Off Closing Argument Tour in Wisconsin

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-1-12

JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama is officially back on the campaign trail in full swing, delivering his closing argument at a chilly tarmac rally in Green Bay, Wisconsin — steps from Air Force One — after an unprecedented and unanticipated two-day pause in the home stretch thanks to Hurricane Sandy.

Obama invoked the super-storm, and the lessons he’s taken from it, to set the tone for his three-state, 16-hour swing with just five days of campaigning to Election Day….READ MORE

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Green Bay, WI

Source: WH, 11-1-12 

Austin Straubel International Airport
Green Bay, Wisconsin

10:43 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Wisconsin!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)  I want to thank all of you for giving such a warm welcome to a Bears fan  — (applause) — and I especially want to thank one of the greatest defensive players in NFL history for being here today  — Charles Woodson.  (Applause.)  And I want to thank Charles because I understand he made an announcement about a gift to the Red Cross to help support everybody over on the East Coast, and that’s the kind of guy he is, so we’re grateful to him.  Thank you, Charles.  (Applause.)

Let’s also give it up for your next United States senator, Tammy Baldwin.  (Applause.)  She’s going to be following leaders like Herb Kohl and Russ Feingold in being fierce fighters for the people of Wisconsin.  (Applause.)

Now, for the past few days, all of us have been focused on one of the worst storms in our lifetimes.  And we’re awed and we’re humbled by nature’s destructive power.  We mourn the loss of so many people.  Our hearts go out to those who have lost their loved ones.  We pledge to help those whose lives have been turned upside down.  And I was out in New Jersey yesterday and saw the devastation, and you really get a sense of how difficult this is going to be for a lot, a lot of people.

But we’ve also been inspired these past few days — because when disaster strikes, we see America at its best.  All the petty differences that consume us in normal times all seem to melt away.  There are no Democrats or Republicans during a storm, there are just fellow Americans.  (Applause.)  Leaders of different parties working to fix what’s broken; neighbors helping neighbors cope with tragedy; communities rallying to rebuild; a spirit that says, in the end, we’re all in this together -– that we rise or fall as one nation, as one people.  (Applause.)

That spirit has guided this country along its improbable journey for more than two centuries.  It has carried us through the trials of the last four years.  In 2008, we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.  Today, our businesses have created over 5 million new jobs.  (Applause.)  The American auto industry is back on top.  American manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace in 15 years.  Home values are on the rise.  Thanks to the service and sacrifice of our brave men and women in uniform, the war in Iraq is over.  (Applause.)  The war in Afghanistan is winding down.  Al Qaeda has been decimated.  Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

So we’ve made real progress these past four years.  But, Wisconsin, we know our work is not yet done.  As long as there’s a single American who wants a job but can’t find one, our work isn’t done.  As long as there are families who are working harder but falling behind, our work isn’t done.  As long as there’s a child languishing in poverty, barred from opportunity, anywhere in this country, our work is not yet done.  (Applause.)

Our fight goes on because we know this nation cannot succeed without a growing, thriving middle class; and strong, sturdy ladders into the middle class.  Our fight goes on because America has always done its best when everybody gets a fair shot, and everybody is doing their fair share, and everybody is playing by the same rules.  (Applause.)  That’s what we believe.  That’s why you elected me in 2008.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President — because we’ve got more work to do.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, we knew from the beginning that our work would take more than one year, or even one term — because let’s face it, the middle class was getting hammered long before the financial crisis hit.  Technology made us more productive, but it also made a lot of good jobs obsolete.  Global trade brought us cheaper products, but it also allowed companies to hire in low-wage countries.  American workers saw their paychecks squeezed, even as corporate profits rose and CEO salaries exploded, and the guaranteed security of pensions and health care slowly started disappearing.

And these fundamental changes in the economy –- the rise of technology and global competition –- they’re real.  We can’t wish these challenges away.  But here’s what I know, Wisconsin:  We can meet them — because we’re Americans.  We’ve got the world’s best workers and the best entrepreneurs.  We’ve got the best scientists and the best researchers; the best colleges and universities.  And we’ve got the most innovative spirit.  We have everything we need to thrive in this new economy, in this new century, and there’s not a country on Earth that wouldn’t trade places with the United States of America.

But we have a choice to make.  In five days, we will choose our next President.  (Applause.)  And it’s more than just a choice between two candidates or two parties.  You’ll be making a choice between two fundamentally different visions of America -– one where we return to the top-down policies that crashed our economy —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo, Wisconsin — vote.  (Applause.)

Or a future that’s built on a strong and growing middle class.  (Applause.)  And, Wisconsin, we know what the choice needs to be.  We’re here today because we believe that if this country invests in the skills and ideas of its people, then good jobs and businesses will follow.

We believe that America’s free market has been the engine of America’s progress, driven by risk-takers and innovators, and dreamers.  But we also understand that in this country, people succeed when they’ve got a chance to get a good education and learn new skills –- and, by the way, so do the businesses that hire those people, or the companies that those folks start.

We believe that when we support research into medical breakthroughs or new technology, then entire new industries will start here and stay here and hire here.

We don’t believe government should poke its nose into everything we do.  But do we believe this country is stronger when there are rules to protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution — (applause) — when there are rules to protect consumers and ordinary families from credit card companies that are engaging in deceptive practices, mortgage lenders that are unscrupulous.  (Applause.)

We grow faster when our tax code rewards hard work and companies that create jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  And we believe that quality, affordable health care and a dignified retirement aren’t just achievable goals, they’re a measure of our values as a nation.  (Applause.)  That’s what we believe.

For eight years, we had a President who shared these beliefs; his name was Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  When he was first elected, he asked the wealthiest Americans to pay a little more so we could reduce the deficit and still make investments in things like education and training, science and research.  And guess what?  Plenty of folks who were running for Congress at the time said it would hurt the economy; that it would kill jobs.  And if that argument sounds familiar, one of those candidates back then happens to be running for President right now.  (Laughter.)  And it turns out their math was just as bad back then as it is today.  (Applause.)  Because by the end of Bill Clinton’s second term, America had created 23 million new jobs, and incomes were up, and poverty was down.  And our deficit became the biggest surplus in our history.

So, Wisconsin, we know the ideas that work.  We also know the ideas that don’t work.  Because in the eight years after Bill Clinton left office, his policies were reversed.  The wealthiest Americans got tax cuts they didn’t need and that we couldn’t afford.  Companies enjoyed tax breaks for shipping jobs overseas.  Insurance companies and oil companies and Wall Street were given free license to do what they pleased.  Folks at the top got to play by a different set of rules than the rest of us.

And the result of this top-down economics was falling incomes, record deficits, the slowest job growth in half a century, and an economic crisis that we’ve been cleaning up for the last four years.

Now, in the closing weeks of this campaign, Governor Romney has been using all his talents as a salesman to dress up these very same policies that failed our country so badly, the very same policies we’ve been cleaning up after for the past four years.  And he is offering them up as change.  (Laughter.)  He’s saying he’s the candidate of change.

Well, let me tell you, Wisconsin, we know what change looks like.  (Applause.)  And what the Governor is offering sure ain’t change.  Giving more power back to the biggest banks isn’t change.  Leaving millions without health insurance isn’t change.  Another $5 trillion tax cut that favors the wealthy isn’t change.  Turning Medicare into a voucher is change, but we don’t want that change.  (Laughter.)  Refusing to answer questions about the details of your policies isn’t change.  Ruling out compromise by pledging to rubberstamp the tea party’s agenda as President -– that’s definitely not change.  In fact, that’s exactly the attitude in Washington that needs to go.
Now, here’s the thing, Wisconsin.  After four years as President, you know me by now.  You may not agree with every decision I’ve made.  You may be frustrated at the pace of change.  But you know what I believe.  You know where I stand.  You know I’m willing to make tough decisions, even when they’re not politically convenient.  (Applause.)  And you know I’ll fight for you and your families every single day, as hard as I know how.  You know that.  (Applause.)

I know what change looks like, because I fought for it.  You have, too.  And after all we’ve been through together, we sure as heck can’t give up now.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  Change is a country where Americans of every age have the skills and education that good jobs now require.  And government can’t do this alone, but don’t tell me that hiring more teachers won’t help this economy grow, or help young people compete.  (Applause.)  Don’t tell me that students who can’t afford college should just borrow money from their parents.  That wasn’t an option for me, and I’ll bet it wasn’t an option for a whole lot of you.

We shouldn’t be ending college tax credits to pay for millionaires’ tax cuts; we should be making college more affordable for everyone who’s willing to work for it.  (Applause.)  We should recruit 100,000 math and science teachers so that high-tech, high-wage jobs aren’t created in China, they’re created right here in Green Bay, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)

We should work with community colleges to train another two million Americans with skills that businesses are looking for right now.  That’s my plan for the future.  That’s what change is.  That’s the America we’re fighting for in this election.

Change comes when we live up to our legacy of innovation, and make America home to the next generation of manufacturing, scientific discovery, technological breakthroughs.  I’m proud I bet on American workers and American ingenuity and the American auto industry.  And today, we’re not just building cars again, we’re building better cars –- cars that by the middle of the next decade will go twice as far on a gallon of gas.  (Applause.)

Today, there are thousands of workers building long-lasting batteries and wind turbines and solar panels all across the country –- jobs that weren’t there four years ago.  And sure, not all technologies we bet on will pan out.  Some of the businesses we encourage will fail.  But I promise you this -– there is a future for manufacturing here in America.  There is a future for clean energy here in America.  (Applause.)  And I refuse to cede that future to other countries.

I don’t want tax codes rewarding companies for creating jobs overseas; I want to reward companies that create jobs here in America.  (Applause.)  I don’t want a tax code that subsidizes oil company profits; I want to support the energy jobs of tomorrow and the new technologies that will cut our oil imports in half.  That’s my plan for jobs and growth.  That’s the future of America that I see.

Change is finally turning the page on a decade of war to do some nation-building here at home.  So long as I’m Commander-in-Chief, we will pursue our enemies with the strongest military the world has ever known.  But it’s time to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to start paying down our debts here and rebuilding America.  Right now, we can put people back to work fixing up roads and bridges.  Right now, we can expand broadband into rural neighborhoods, and make sure our schools are state-of-the-art.

Let’s put Americans back to work doing the work that needs to be done.  And let’s especially focus on our veterans — because no one who fights for this country should have to fight for a job, or a roof over their heads, or the care that they need when they come home.  (Applause.)  That’s my plan to keep us strong.  That’s my commitment to you.  And that’s what’s at stake in this election.

Change is a future where we reduce our deficit in a way that’s balanced and responsible.  I’ve signed a trillion dollars’ worth of spending cuts; I intend to do more.  And I’ll work with both parties to streamline agencies and get rid of programs that don’t work.

But if we’re serious about the deficit, we’ve also got to ask the wealthiest Americans to go back to the tax rates that they paid when Bill Clinton was in office.  (Applause.)  Because as long as I’m President, I will never turn Medicare into a voucher just to pay for another millionaire’s tax cut.  (Applause.)  I will never allow this nation to be plunged into another battle over health care reform just so insurance companies can jump back in the driver’s seat.  And I will never allow politicians in Washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves.  (Applause.)

So, Wisconsin, we know what change is.  We know what the future requires — we don’t need a big government agenda or a small government agenda.  We need a middle-class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility.

We don’t need a partisan agenda –- we need a common-sense agenda that says when we educate a poor child, we’ll all be better off; that says when we fund the research of a young scientist, her new discovery will benefit every American.

We need a vision that says we don’t just look out for ourselves –- we look out for one another other; we look out for future generations, and we meet those obligations by working together.  That’s the change we believe in.  That’s what this election is all about.

Now, let’s be clear, achieving this agenda won’t be easy.  It’s never been easy.  We always knew that.  Back in 2008, when we talked about change, I told you I wasn’t just talking about changing Presidents.  I wasn’t just talking about changing parties.  I was talking about changing our politics.  I ran because the voices of the American people –- your voices -– had been shut out of our democracy for way too long –- by lobbyists and special interests, and politicians who believe that compromise is somehow a dirty word; by folks who would say anything to win office, and do anything to stay there.

The protectors of the status quo are a powerful force in Washington.  And over the last four years, every time we’ve tried to make a change, they’ve fought back with everything they’ve got.  They spent millions to stop us from reforming health care and Wall Street and student loans.  And their strategy from the start was to engineer pure gridlock in Congress, refusing to compromise on ideas that both Democrats and Republicans had supported in the past.

And what they’re counting on now, Wisconsin, is that the American people will be so worn down by all the squabbling, so tired of all the dysfunction, that you’ll actually reward obstruction, and put people back in charge who advocate the very policies that got us into this mess.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  In other words, their bet is on cynicism.  But, Wisconsin, my bet is on you.  (Applause.)  My bet is on the decency and good sense of the America people — because despite all the resistance, despite all the setbacks, we’ve won some great fights.  And I’ve never lost sight of the vision we share that you would have a voice; that there would be somebody at the table fighting every single day for middle-class Americans who work hard.  Sometimes, Republicans in Congress have worked with me to meet our goals –- to cut taxes for small businesses and families like yours, to open new markets for American goods, or finally repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell.”  (Applause.)

And sometimes we’ve had big fights — fights that were worth having — like when we forced the banks to stop overcharging for student loans, and made college more affordable for millions.  (Applause.)  Like when we forced Wall Street to abide by the toughest rules since the 1930s.  Like when we stopped insurance companies from discriminating against Americans with preexisting conditions like cancer or diabetes, so that nobody in America goes bankrupt just because they get sick.  (Applause.)

I didn’t fight those fights for any partisan advantage.  I’ve shown my willingness to work with anybody, of any party, to move this country forward.  And if you want to break the gridlock in Congress, you’ll vote for leaders –- whether they are Democrats, Republicans, or independents –- who feel the same way.

But if the price of peace in Washington is cutting deals that will kick students off of financial aid, or get rid of funding for Planned Parenthood, or eliminate health care for millions on Medicaid who are poor, or elderly, or disabled, just to give a millionaire a tax cut, I’m not having it.  That’s not a deal worth having.  That’s not bipartisanship.  That’s not change.  That’s surrender to the same status quo that has hurt middle-class families for way too long.  And I’m not ready to give up on that fight.  (Applause.)

I hope you aren’t either, Wisconsin.  (Applause.)  I hope you aren’t either.  See, the folks at the very top in this country don’t need another champion in Washington.  They’ll always have a seat at the table.  They’ll always have access and influence.

The people who need a champion are the Americans whose letters I read late at night; the men and women I meet on the campaign trail every day.  The laid off furniture worker who is retraining at age 55 for a career in biotechnology -– she needs a champion.

The small restaurant owner who needs a loan to expand after the bank turned him down -– he needs a champion.  The cooks and the waiters and the cleaning staff working overtime at a Vegas hotel, trying to save enough to buy a first home or send their kid to college -– they need a champion.  (Applause.)

The autoworker who’s back on the job, filled with pride and dignity because he’s building a great car –- he needs a champion.  (Applause.)  The young teacher doing her best in an overcrowded classroom with outdated textbooks –- she needs a champion.  (Applause.)

All those kids in inner cities and small farm towns, in the valleys of Ohio or rolling Virginia hills or right here in Green Bay; kids dreaming of becoming scientists or doctors, engineers or entrepreneurs, diplomats or even a president –- (applause) — they need a champion in Washington.  (Applause.)  They need a champion.  They need a champion because the future will never have as many lobbyists as the past, but it’s the dreams of those children that will be our saving grace.

And that’s why I need you, Wisconsin — to make sure their voices are heard; to make sure your voices are heard.  We’ve come too far to turn back now.  We’ve come too far to let our hearts grow faint.  Now is the time to keep pushing forward -– to educate all our kids, and train all our workers; to create new jobs, and rebuild our infrastructure; to discover new sources of energy, to broaden opportunity, to grow our middle class, to restore our democracy, and to make sure that no matter who you are, or where you come from, or how you started out, you can work to achieve your American Dream.  (Applause.)

In the midst of the Great Depression, FDR reminded the country that “failure is not an American habit; and in the strength of great hope we must [all] shoulder our common load.”  That’s the strength we need today.  That’s the hope I’m asking you to share.  That’s the future in our sights.  That’s why I’m asking for your vote.  (Applause.)

And if you’re willing to work with me again, and knock on some doors with me, and make some phone calls for me, and turn out for me, we’ll win Brown County again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win Wisconsin again.  We’ll win this election.  And together, we’ll renew those bonds, and reaffirm that spirit that makes the United States of America the greatest nation on Earth.

Thank you, Wisconsin.  Get out there and vote!  Thank you.  God bless you, and God bless America.  (Applause.)

END
11:08 A.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz November 1, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Roanoke, Virginia — We Don’t Need A Secretary Of Business, We Need A President Who Understands Business

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney: We Don’t Need A Secretary Of Business, We Need A President Who Understands Business

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 11-1-12

“We don’t need a secretary of business to understand business; we need a president who understands business, and I do. That’s why I will be able to get this economy going. This isn’t the time for small measures. This is a time for greatness. This is a time for big change, for real change.” – Mitt Romney
Remarks
Roanoke, Virginia
November 1, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “Now, I know the president’s been trying to figure out some way to suggest he’s got some new ideas, because with all these people out of work, with 3 million more women in poverty today than when he took office, with 15 more million people on food stamps than when he took office, he’s got to find something to suggest it’s going to be better over the next four years. And so he came up with an idea last week, which is he’s going to create the department of business. I don’t think adding a new chair in his Cabinet will help add millions of jobs on Main Street. I mean, unfortunately, what you’ve seen before your very eyes is a campaign that keeps on shrinking and shrinking and shrinking to smaller things. I mean, he’s been out talking about how he’s going to save Big Bird and then playing silly word games with my last name and then — or first, and then attacking me day-in and day-out. Attacking me doesn’t make an agenda, doesn’t get people back to work. We don’t need a secretary of business to understand business; we need a president who understands business, and I do. That’s why I will be able to get this economy going. This isn’t the time for small measures. This is a time for greatness. This is a time for big change, for real change. And that’s why, just as your next senator said, this is a time where from day one he’s going to make changes, I’m going to make real changes, I’m going to get this economy going. From day one, we’re making changes.”

Full Text Campaign Buzz October 31, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Coral Gables, Florida — Romney Trades Barbs for Optimism in First Speech Since Sandy

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Trades Barbs for Optimism in First Speech Since Sandy

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-31-12

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As President Obama headed to storm-ravaged New Jersey for a tour with Gov. Chris Christie, Mitt Romney was back on the stump in Florida Wednesday for his first full day of campaigning since Hurricane Sandy devastated areas of the East Coast.

Romney maintained a more subdued tone in Tampa, Fla., trading harsh attacks on Obama’s tenure for a more positive set of remarks then one might be expect just days before election day.

“We come together in times like this and we want to make sure that they have a speedy and quick recovery from their financial and in many cases, personal loss,” said Romney, opening his remarks in Tampa by encouraging Red Cross donations for storm relief efforts.  Romney was joined by former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and Sen. Marco Rubio, who also made mention of Sandy and encouraged donations…..READ MORE

Mitt Romney: “It’s Time To Take A New Path Of Bold, Aggressive Change”

Location

Boston, MA

United States

Remarks
Coral Gables, Florida

October 31, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “We also have other challenges. We have some 23 million Americans that are struggling to get a good job. We also have 1 out of 6 Americans living in poverty. We have 47 million Americans on food stamps. That’s what’s happening here at home. Then around the world, we face challenges as well, as Iran speeds along its course to become nuclear, as we also face competition for jobs from China and other nations. We face some real challenges. And as a result of that, it is my view that we should not continue along the same path but it’s time to take a new path of bold, aggressive change because the road we’re on is not doing so well. Now, you probably know, as I think about what we need to do, I actually have a plan with five key steps to get this economy going and to make sure that when you graduate there’ll be a job there and to get those 23 million people working and to make sure that we help people get off of food stamps because they got good jobs and good incomes. And for that to happen these five steps will create 12 million jobs. And because of those jobs, you’ll see more take-home pay.”

Full Text Campaign Buzz October 28, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Nashua, New Hampshire — Hits Mitt Romney for ‘Cradle to Grave Tax Hikes, Fees’

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

President Obama Hits Mitt Romney for ‘Cradle to Grave Tax Hikes, Fees’

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-28-12

SAUL LOEB/AFP/GettyImages

President Obama delivered his final pitch to voters Saturday in the Live Free or Die state, accusing rival Mitt Romney of being untrustworthy, and slamming his record of “cradle to grave tax hikes and fees” as governor of neighboring Massachusetts.

“During Gov. Romney’s campaign for governor down there, he promised the same thing he’s promising now, said he’d fight for jobs and middle class families,” Obama said. “But once he took office, he pushed through a tax cut that overwhelmingly benefited 278 of the wealthiest families in the state and then he raised taxes and fees on middle class families to the tune of $750 million. Does that sound familiar to you?…READ MORE

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event in Nashua, NH

Source: WH, 10-28-12

Elm Street Middle School

Nashua, New Hampshire

1:59 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT:  How’s it going, Nashua?  (Applause.)  Are you fired up?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  Are you ready to go?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  This is an unbelievable crowd!  (Applause.) And this is what the weather is always like in late October in New Hampshire — 70 degrees and sunny.  (Applause.)

Can everybody please give it up for your outstanding United States Senator, Jeanne Shaheen?  (Applause.)  Your next governor, Maggie Hassan.  (Applause.)  Your next congresswoman, Annie Kuster.  (Applause.)

And I’ve just got to say something special about one of the most talented singers and songwriters that America has ever had. He has just been a great friend.  This guy has been working his tail off on behalf of this campaign.  I couldn’t be prouder that he’s working with us — James Taylor.  Give him a big round of applause.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  (Applause.)

Ten days, New Hampshire.  (Applause.)  Ten days.  Ten days and you’ll be stepping into a voting booth and making a defining choice about the future of our country.  Not just a choice between two candidates or two political parties, it is a choice between two fundamentally different visions for America.

We believe in the values that built the largest middle class, the strongest economy the world has ever known; the promise that hard work will pay off; the promise that responsibility will be rewarded; the idea at the core of this nation that no matter who you are, no matter where you come from, no matter what you look like, this is a country where everybody gets a fair shot and everybody does their fair share, everybody plays by the same rules.  (Applause.)  That’s what we believe here in America.  (Applause.)

We believe that we are endowed by our Creator with certain inalienable rights.  We insist on personal responsibility.  We don’t believe anybody is entitled to success — we know we all have to earn it.  We honor the strivers, the dreamers, the risk-takers, everybody who has been the driving force behind our free enterprise system, the greatest engine of growth and prosperity the world has ever known.

But we also believe that the true measure of prosperity is more than just a running tally of corporate balance sheets, quarterly profit reports.  We measure prosperity not just by how many millionaires and billionaires we produce; we measure prosperity by how well a typical family is doing — (applause) — by whether our kids are getting a great education and can go as far as their dreams and hard work will take us.  (Applause.)

We understand that in this country people succeed when they’ve got a chance at a decent education, when they can learn new skills.  And by the way, so do the businesses that hire them or the companies that they start.  We believe our economy grows when we support research into medical breakthroughs — (applause) — or new technologies like clean energy and fuel-efficient cars. (Applause.)

We know that our country is stronger when we can count on affordable health insurance and Medicare and Social Security — (applause) — when we protect our kids from toxic dumping and mercury pollution; when there are rules in place to make sure that we aren’t taken advantage of by credit card companies or mortgage lenders or unscrupulous financial institutions.  (Applause.)

We know we’re better off when politicians in Washington aren’t allowed to make decisions about health care that women are perfectly capable of making for themselves.  (Applause.)

That’s what we believe.  That’s the vision that we embrace.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We believe in you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I appreciate that.  (Laughter.)

Governor Romney, now, he’s got an entirely different view about what this country is about.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Don’t boo —

AUDIENCE:  Vote!

THE PRESIDENT:  — vote.  Vote.  (Applause.)

He’s been running around saying he’s got a five-point plan for the economy — turns out it’s a one-point plan.  (Laughter.) Folks at the very top get to play by a different set of rules than you do.  They get to pay lower tax rates, outsource jobs.  They want to let Wall Street run wild and make reckless bets with other folks’ money.  That was his philosophy when he was a CEO.  That was his philosophy as governor.  And as President Clinton said, he does have a lot of brass because he’s not talking about big change, but all he’s offering is a big rerun of the same policies that created so much hardship for so many Americans.

And Governor Romney has been out here making a lot of last-minute promises lately — said he’s all about fighting for the middle class; says he’d cut taxes for everybody, and ask something from nobody.  But the problem is we’ve heard those promises before.

Now keep in mind, Governor Romney lives just a few miles south of here in the state of Massachusetts.  (Applause.)  Love Massachusetts.  (Applause.)  But during Governor Romney’s campaign for governor down there, he promised the same thing he’s promising now — said he’d fight for jobs and middle-class families.  But once he took office, he pushed through a tax cut that overwhelmingly benefitted 278 of the wealthiest families in the state, and then he raised taxes and fees on middle-class families to the tune of $750 million.  Does that sound familiar to you?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, when he’s asked about this, he says, no these weren’t taxes, these were fees.  (Laughter.)  But keep in mind there were higher fees to be a barber, higher fees to become a nurse.  There were higher fees for gas.  There were higher fees for milk.  There were higher fees for blind people who needed to get a certificate that they were blind.  He raised fees to get a birth certificate — which would have been expensive for me.  (Laughter and applause.)

He raised fees for marriage certificates and fees for funeral homes — so there were literally cradle-to-grave tax hikes and fees.  (Laughter.)  And when he left office, there were only three states in the country that had created fewer jobs than Massachusetts.  And by the way, one of them was Louisiana that had been hit by Hurricane Katrina.  (Laughter.)

He talked a lot about small businesses — still talks about it.  Says, I’m a business guy, I know about small businesses.  Massachusetts, when he was governor, ranked 48th in small business creation.  And one of the two states that ranked lower was Louisiana that had gotten hit by Hurricane Katrina.  So this is a guy who has a track record of saying one thing and doing something else.

On the other hand, when I ran four years ago, I made promises, too.  I promised to cut taxes for middle-class families — and I did, by $3,600.  (Applause.)  I promised to cut taxes for small business owners — and I did, 18 times.  (Applause.)  I promised to end taxpayer-funded Wall Street bailouts — and we have.  And by the way, we got every dime worth of money that we used for the bank rescue, and we got interest with it, too.  (Applause.)  I promised to take on those financial institutions that were charging too much for student loans — and we, as a consequence, were able to make college more affordable for millions of Americans.  (Applause.)

I promised I’d never walk away from the millions of jobs that were in jeopardy when the auto industry was on the brink of collapse.  We decided to ignore Governor Romney’s business advice when he said Detroit should go bankrupt — and now, America, we are building the best cars on Earth.  (Applause.)

Four years ago, I promised to end the war in Iraq — and we did.  (Applause.)  I promised that we would begin the transition in Afghanistan — and we are.  (Applause.)  I said we’d go after the terrorists who attacked us on 9/11 — and thanks to the brave men and women in uniform, the courage of our Navy SEALs, al Qaeda is on the path to defeat, and Osama bin Laden is dead.  (Applause.)

After losing 9 million jobs under the theories that Governor Romney is now promoting, our businesses under the ideas we’ve been working with have added more than 5 million new jobs over the last two-and-a-half years.  (Applause.)  Manufacturing — highest job growth in manufacturing since the 1990s.  The unemployment rate is falling.  Manufacturing is coming back to our shores.  Our assembly lines are humming again.  Housing prices are starting to pick up.  Housing starts are all on the move.

We’ve got a lot of work to do.  But, New Hampshire, the country has come too far for us to turn back now.  (Applause.)  We can’t afford to go back to the policies that got us into this mess.  We’ve got to continue with the policies that are getting out of the mess.  We’ve got to move forward.  And that’s why I am running for second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  You can do it, Mr. President!

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, I’m going to do it with you.  We can do it together.  (Applause.)

Unlike Governor Romney’s plan — he doesn’t like to talk about it too much — I have a plan that will actually create jobs; that will actually lower our deficit; and will actually provide the middle class with a greater sense of security.  And the good news is my plan — the math actually adds up.  (Applause.)

If you want to check it out, you can go to BarackObama.com/plans.  And I want you to share it with your friends and your neighbors and your coworkers.  There are still people out there who are trying to make up their minds.  Some of you who are here may be trying to make up your mind.  Maybe your girlfriend dragged you out here.  (Laughter.)  No, no, maybe Grandma said, you’ve got to go to the Obama rally — (laughter)  — and you’re still trying to figure it out.  So I’m asking you to compare my plan with Governor Romney’s.  I want you to know what we’re proposing, each of us, and see which plan is better for you and what is better for the future of America.

So, number one, I want to end tax breaks for companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  (Applause.)  I want to reward small businesses and manufacturers who are putting down roots here, hiring American workers, creating American products stamped with three proud words:  Made in America.  We can bring those jobs back to our shores.  (Applause.)

Number two, I want to cut our oil imports in half by 2020 so we control more of our own energy.  Because of the work we’ve already done — increasing oil production, increasing natural gas production, but also emphasizing renewables like solar and wind and biofuels — today we are less dependent on foreign oil than in any time in the last two decades.  (Applause.)  That’s good for your pocketbook.  That’s good for our national security.  It’s good for the environment.

And one reason we’ve been able — we have confidence we can keep on making progress is we’ve doubled the fuel-efficiency standards for cars and trucks.  So in the middle of the next decade, you’ll go twice as far on a gallon of gas. (Applause.)   I want us now to build on that progress.  We’ve got to keep making those investments.  I don’t want fuel-efficient cars and long-lasting batteries and wind turbines and solar panels produced in China.  I want them produced right here in New Hampshire.  (Applause.)  I want them made right here in America. And we can do that.

Number three, we have to make it a nation mission to educate our kids and train our workers better than anybody else in the world.  (Applause.)  I want to recruit 100,000 new math and science teachers because we know that’s an area where we can’t afford to fall behind.  I want to train 2 million workers at our community colleges for the skills that businesses are hiring for right now.  And I want to work with colleges and universities to make sure that tuition does not keep on going up — because our young people can’t afford the debt that they are taking on, and that’s something we can do.  (Applause.)

Number four, my plan will reduce the deficit by $4 trillion over the next 10 years in a balanced way.  We’re going to cut out spending we don’t need — we’ve already cut out a trillion dollars’ worth of spending.  We can do more, but I’m also going to ask the wealthiest Americans to pay a little bit more so we can invest in the research and technology and education that will keep new jobs and businesses coming to America.

And under the guise of reducing the deficit, I will never turn Medicare into a voucher system — (applause) — because no American should have to spend their golden years at the mercy of an insurance company.

And by the way — I think we saw just this past week — we don’t need a whole bunch of politicians in Washington, most of whom are male, making health care decisions for women.  (Applause.)  I don’t think your boss or your insurance company should be making those decisions either.  I believe women should be making their own health care decisions for themselves.  (Applause.)

That’s why the health care law we passed put those choices in your hands, where they belong, and that’s where they’ll stay as long as I’m President of the United States.  (Applause.)

Now, finally, number five, we’re going to use the savings from ending the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to put our people back to work.  Let’s do some nation-building here at home.  Let’s rebuild our roads, our bridges, our schools.  Let’s lay broadband lines into rural communities all across the country.  And as we’re doing that, we’re going to be putting our veterans back to work.  We’ve got to serve them as well as they’ve served us — because nobody who fights for this country should have to fight for a job, or a roof over their heads, or the care that they’ve earned when they come home.  (Applause.)

So that’s the plan we need, New Hampshire.  That’s how you build a strong, sustainable economy.  That’s how you make sure that middle-class jobs that pay a good wage are out there.  That’s how you encourage new businesses to start here and stay here in America.  That’s how you increase take-home pay — not just by talking about it.  That’s how you build an economy where everybody who works hard can get ahead.  And that’s what we can do together.

But here’s the thing, New Hampshire, it’s now up to you.  It’s your choice.  It’s up to the young people who are here to choose — (applause) — a future that is worthy of all your dreams.  It’s up to the not-so-young people here, including me — I’m included in that category — (laughter) — to make sure we’re leaving the kind of America we want for future generations.

You can choose the top-down policy that got us into this mess, but I think we need to build on the policies that are helping us to make real progress all across this country.  You can choose a foreign policy that’s reckless and wrong, or you can choose the kinds of leadership that I’ve provided that’s steady and strong.  (Applause.)

You can choose to turn back the clock 50 years for women and immigrants and gays — or in this election, you can stand up for that basic principle enshrined in our founding documents that all of us are created equal — black, white, Hispanic, Asian, Native American, young, old, rich, poor, gay, straight, abled, disabled. No matter who you are, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, you’ve got a place in America.  You can make it here if you try.  That’s what we believe.  (Applause.)

New Hampshire, we’ve been through tough times, but we’ve been through tough times before and we are tougher.  We always come out on top.  We always bounce back because we pull together. Because we look after one another.  Because we don’t leave anybody behind.  Because when we succeed, we prop that door open and bring those who are following behind us — we pull them through.  That’s who we are.  (Applause.)

Our destiny is not written for us; it’s written by us.  We don’t go backward.  We look forward to that distant horizon, to that new frontier.  We imagine a better America and then we work hard to make it happen.  That’s who we are.

That’s why I’m asking for your vote.  And if you give me your vote, I promise you, you will always have a President who hears your voices, who will fight for your families, who will spend every waking moment thinking about how to make your lives a little bit better.  (Applause.)

New Hampshire, I still believe in you.  I need you to keep believing in me.  (Applause.)  And if you’re willing to work with me, and roll up your sleeves with me, knock on some doors with me, make some phone calls for me, we’ll win Hillsborough County again.  (Applause.)  We’ll win New Hampshire again.  (Applause.) We’ll finish what we started.  And we’ll remind the world why the United States of America is the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Full Text Campaign Buzz October 23, 24, 25, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speeches During 9 State Campaign Tour

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

President Obama Wraps Blitz With Air Force One Rally in Ohio

TOBY MELVILLE/AFP/Getty Images

After 37 hours, 6,500 flight miles and six grassroots rallies that drew tens of thousands of supporters, President Obama’s frenetic battleground-state blitz came to a close Thursday night with a rally on a small airport tarmac overlooking Lake Erie.

“This is the final stop on our 48-hour fly-around all across America. We’ve been going for two days straight,” a visibly tired but spirited Obama told a crowd of 12,000 after taking the stage under starry skies….READ MORE

SPEECHES TRANSCRIPTS









Full Text Campaign Buzz October 25, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Worthington, Ohio — It’s Time For A Big Change

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Romney Offers a ‘Big Change’ in November

Source: ABC News Radio, 10-26-12

Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call

Kicking off a full day of campaigning across the crucial Buckeye State, Mitt Romney promised “big change” if voters push him to victory in November.

“This is a critical time for our country, and the choice of paths we choose will have an enormous impact,” Romney began. “We have huge challenges: the debts I mentioned, the fact that our schools are underperforming, the fact that college kids getting out of school this year can’t find jobs in half the cases, or jobs that are at college level. The fact that they have thousands and thousands of dollars in debt that’s on their back they’re going to have to be paying for.”

“These challenges are big challenges,” he said. “This election is therefore a big choice, and America wants to see big changes, and we’re going to bring big changes to get America strong again!”…READ MORE

Mitt Romney: “It’s Time For A Big Change”

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 10-25-12

“The President’s campaign is slipping because he can’t find an agenda. He’s been looking for it. There are only 12 days left. He hasn’t had a chance to defend or to describe it to the American people in our debates. And so the American people now have to recognize that given the big challenges we have and the big election we have, it’s time for a big change. And Paul Ryan and I represent a big change for America.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks
Worthington, Ohio
October 25, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “The President’s campaign is slipping because he can’t find an agenda. He’s been looking for it. There are only 12 days left. He hasn’t had a chance to defend or to describe it to the American people in our debates. And so the American people now have to recognize that given the big challenges we have and the big election we have, it’s time for a big change. And Paul Ryan and I represent a big change for America. We’re going to finally tackle the problems politicians have spoken about for years but haven’t been willing to deal with. We’re going to finally get America strong again with an economy to compete with anyone in the world. We’re going to help America get good jobs and rising take-home pay.”

Full Text Campaign Buzz October 25, 2012: Mitt Romney’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Cincinnati, Ohio — President Obama Can’t Define What He Will Do To Make America Strong

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Mitt Romney: President Obama Can’t Define What He Will Do To Make America Strong

Source: Mitt Romney Press, 10-25-12

“For the last year, and four debates, three presidential debates and one vice presidential debate, the President’s been looking for a plan. He’s been looking for some way to help the gentleman I spoke about, some way to help the 23 million people that are out of work. He hasn’t been able to find a plan. He hasn’t been able to define what he’s going to do to make America strong going forward. I have.” – Mitt Romney

Remarks
Cincinnati, Ohio
October 25, 2012

Click Here To Watch Mitt Romney

MITT ROMNEY: “Now, for those of you in your 40s and 50s, who have always anticipated that these would be the high earning years, the most productive years, the years that you’d be able to put a little away for retirement or perhaps help your kids with college, and yet you’re finding that’s harder and harder to do because incomes have been going down at the same time prices have been going up for things like gasoline and health care and food. I was speaking with a gentleman just the other day, and he said that he used to have a job at $25 an hour plus benefits, and now he’s only able to get a job at $9 an hour, and he wonders what’s going to become of him, what’s going to happen to his future. The President’s campaign slogan is ‘Forward.’ To this gentleman, things don’t feel like they’re going forward; it feels more like backward. To 23 million Americans, it feels like backward, those that can’t find good work. And so for the last — for the last year, and four debates, three presidential debates and one vice presidential debate, the President’s been looking for a plan. He’s been looking for some way to help the gentleman I spoke about, some way to help the 23 million people that are out of work. He hasn’t been able to find a plan. He hasn’t been able to define what he’s going to do to make America strong going forward. I have. I have a plan that will create 12 million jobs and rising take-home pay, and I’m going to help that man who needs that good job.”

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