History Shorts: Natalie Zemon Davis Wins Norway’s Holberg Prize

American Historian Wins Norway’s Holberg Prize

Source: NYT, 6-10-10

The historian Natalie Zemon Davis, probably best known for her work “The Return of Martin Guerre,” which was made into a 1982 film with Gérard Depardieu, won Norway’s 4.5 million kroner ($680,000) Holberg Prize on Wednesday for her narrative approach to history, The Associated Press reported.

The awards committee said that Professor Davis, now 81, won for showing “how particular events can be narrated and analyzed so as to reveal deeper historical tendencies and underlying patterns of thought and action.” Professor Davis helped to create what is known  as  “microhistory,” which attempts to investigate historical themes through individual episodes.

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History Shorts: Ronald Rudin Honored at Concordia’s Second Annual Provost’s Circle of Distinction

Source: Concordia Journal, 6-10-10

On May 26, Provost David Graham was pleased to honour six new inductees into the Provost’s Circle of Distinction at a ceremony and cocktail social event at the Montefiore Club on Guy St.

“You represent the most distinguished members of Concordia’s faculty,” said Graham. “Your outstanding achievements have brought and continue to bring recognition to the entire university.”…

Rudin was inducted as a Fellow in the Royal Society of Canada in fall 2009, and also received a 2010 Book Award from the National Council of Public History in the United States for his book Remembering and Forgetting in Acadie: A Historian’s Journey Through Public Memory. Rudin served as Academic Convenor for Congress 2010.

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