Stephanie McCurry: University of Pennsylvania Professor Wins $25,000 Frederick Douglass Book Prize

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

HISTORY Awards

Source: The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, 10-18-11

Stephanie McCurry, Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, has been selected as the winner of the 2011 Frederick Douglass Book Prize for her book, Confederate Reckoning: Power and Politics in the Civil War South (Harvard University Press). The Douglass Prize is awarded annually by Yale University’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition for the best book written in English on slavery or abolition. The $25,000 prize will be presented to McCurry at a dinner sponsored by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in New York City in February 2012.

In addition to McCurry, the other finalists for the prize were Nicholas Draper for The Price of Emancipation: Slave-Ownership, Compensation, and British Society at the End of Slavery (Cambridge University Press) and Christina Snyder for Slavery in Indian Country: The Changing Face of Captivity in Early America (Harvard University Press).

This year’s finalists were selected from a field of over ninety entries by a jury of scholars that included Edward Alpers (UCLA), Thavolia Glymph (Duke University), and Seth Rockman (Brown University). The winners were selected by a review committee of representatives from the Gilder Lehrman Center, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and Yale University.

“McCurry’s Confederate Reckoning traces the rise and fall of ‘a modern proslavery and antidemocratic state, dedicated to the proposition that all men were not created equal,'” noted Rockman, the 2011 Douglass Prize Jury Chair and Associate Professor of History at Brown University. “McCurry unravels the deadly consequences of the Confederate project to build a slaveholding nation. What previous scholars would have called the social history of the homefront, McCurry reconceptualizes as the political history of the Confederacy wherein ‘unfranchised’ white women and slaves drove events in ways never anticipated by the slaveholding regime’s architects. McCurry deepens our understanding of the slaves’ self-emancipation, while also clarifying the radical nature of the Confederate project. Deeply researched and rich in analytical and comparative insights, McCurry offers a dramatic account befitting this year’s observance of the Civil War sesquicentennial.”

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Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History: Frederick Douglass Book Prize Reception

Source: Bloomberg, 2-26-11

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Lois Chiles and Richard Gilder, a co-founder of the Gilder Lehrman Institute and partner, Gilder Gagnon Howe & Co. Photographer: Amanda Gordon

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Lamaria McDonald, a junior at Frederick Douglass Academy; Lewis Lehrman, a co-founder of the Gilder Lehrman Institute and chairman of Ten Squared Management LLC; and Thakane Masondo, a senior at Frederick Douglass Academy. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Joseph McNay, chairman of Essex Investment Management Co., and a financial supporter of Yale School of Management’s new campus, with Lesley Hermann, executive director of the Gilder Lehrman Institute. McNay is famous in Yale circles for investing money for the class of 1954 ($300,000 turned into $100 million, he said). Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Ned Blackhawk, a professor of history at Yale, and Judith A. Carney, a professor of geography at University of California Los Angeles. Carney is a winner of the Frederick Douglass Book Prize for “In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World,” which she wrote with her husband, Richard Nicholas Rosomoff. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Martha Hodes, a history professor at New York University and chairman of the Frederick Douglass Book Prize jury; David Blight, a history professor at Yale and director of the Gilder Lehrman Center; and Eric Foner, a history professor at Columbia. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Kenneth Morris, president of the Frederick Douglass Family Foundation and great-great-great-grandson of Douglass, with Patrick Ojimba, a junior at Frederick Douglass Academy. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Linda Evans and Walter Evans of Savannah, Georgia. Walter Evans, a retired surgeon, has acquired an extensive collection of African-American art and manuscripts including works by James Baldwin and love letters by Frederick Douglass’s son. The museum at Savannah College of Art and Design is building the Walter O. Evans Center for African-American Studies to house parts of his collection. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Ilana Pergam, director of studies at the Chapin School; Chris Forster, a 1994 recipient of the Yale Medal; Betsy Forster, who taught Pergam in elementary school; and Ellen Baylor, head of the history department at Chapin. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

Gilder Lehrman Institute

Marsha Andrews, an opera singer; Edward Ball, author of “Slaves in the Family,” a recipient of a National Book Award; and Candace Skorupa, who teaches French at Yale.

Yale alumni Lewis Lehrman, chairman of Ten Squared Management LLC, and Richard Gilder, partner at Gilder Gagnon Howe & Co., gathered with other history fans Thursday night at the Yale Club of New York City.

The occasion marked the awarding of the $25,000 Frederick Douglass Book Prize for nonfiction on slavery. It was named for the self-educated abolitionist, whose great-great-great- grandson, Kenneth Morris, was present.

Enjoying the filet mignon and white chocolate mousse were Joseph McNay, chairman of Essex Investment Management Co., Walter Evans, a manuscript collector who owns several Douglass family scrapbooks, historian Eric Foner and a lot of students from the Frederick Douglass Academy.

Lehrman told two students about Alexander Hamilton. “I started out as a teacher,” he said to Bloomberg News.

“I read all the finalists,” Gilder said.

The two men are the founders and funders of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition at Yale University, which sponsor the prize.

“Not only is it a mouthful to spit out all those greats, but it makes me feel far removed,” said Morris, president of the Frederick Douglass Family foundation, in after-dinner remarks. “It’s like trying to picture a billion dollars with all those zeroes.”

Prizes went to “In the Shadow of Slavery: Africa’s Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World” by  and “Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery” by Siddharth Kara, a former Merrill Lynch investment banker.

Foner, a professor at Columbia University, was recently named the 2011 winner of the Gilder Lehrman Institute’s Lincoln Prize for his book “The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery.”

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