History Buzz January 3-6, 2013: American Historical Association 127th Annual Meeting in New Orleans Recap: Historians Look Back, and Inward, at Annual Meeting

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

History Buzz

HISTORY BUZZ: HISTORY NEWS RECAP

127th Annual Meeting

Source: AHA 2013

New Orleans, January 3–6, 2013

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General Information

The 127th annual meeting of the Association will be held January 3–6, 2012, in New Orleans at the New Orleans Marriott and Sheraton New Orleans. With 272 sessions, the program is one of the largest ever assembled by the Program Committee. The AHA has previously met in New Orleans two times, in 1903 and in 1972. More than 1,500 scholars will participate in AHA sessions, and four dozen specialized societies will meet in conjunction with the AHA. William Cronon (Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison) will deliver the presidential address the evening of January 4 during the General Meeting. At the same event, the AHA’s book prizes, the Awards for Scholarly Distinction, and other awards will be announced. Many of the profession’s most distinguished members will be present to deliver papers and more than 1,500 scholars will participate.

Historians Look Back, and Inward, at Annual Meeting

Source: NYT, 1-4-13
 
Sessions at American Historical Association conference look at storytelling, used goods, and the relationship between horses and humans across three continents.

Some 4,000 historians descended on New Orleans on Thursday for the American Historical Association’s four-day annual meeting, replacing the chants of departing Sugar Bowl revelers with more sober talk of job interviews, departmental politics, and — at least in the official panels — the past itself.

As usual, the meeting’s 300-plus sessions touched on contemporary issues like climate change, the 2012 presidential election, and the Arab Spring, along with more purely scholarly topics big (“Horstory: Equines and Humans in Africa, Asia and North America”) and small (“Trash and Treasure: The Significance of Used Goods in America, 1880-1950″). But for many in attendance, the most urgent question was the state of the historical profession itself in an era of budget cuts and declining humanities enrollments….READ MORE

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