Full Text Campaign Buzz August 15, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Dubuque, Iowa — Michelle Obama Joins the President’s Iowa Bus Tour

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Michelle Obama Joins the President’s Iowa Bus Tour

Source: ABC News Radio, 8-15-12

First lady Michelle Obama joins President Obama on the campaign trail in Iowa today, making her first joint appearance with her husband in the Hawkeye State this election cycle.

“This is where the journey began for him, and where it began for the first lady, and Iowa will always have a special place in their hearts,” campaign spokeswoman Jen Psaki told reporters Tuesday.

Mrs. Obama’s appearance at the president’s campaign events today in Dubuque and Davenport, comes after a bruising day of escalated mudslinging between the Obama and Romney camps….READ MORE

Remarks by the President and First Lady at a Campaign Event — Dubuque, IA

Source: WH, 8-15-12

Alliant Energy Amphitheater
Dubuque, Iowa

12:34 P.M. CDT

MRS. OBAMA:  Oh, my goodness!  (Applause.)  This is so sweet.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

MRS. OBAMA:  We love you guys, too.  (Applause.)  Let me start by —

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

MRS. OBAMA:  Four more!  (Applause.)  But I want to start by thanking Jennifer for — (applause.)  We are so proud of her.  And we are so grateful for her sacrifice and her service, and for Andrew’s service and sacrifice as well.  So I just want to thank her for that wonderful introduction and for all she’s doing for our country.  (Applause.)

And, yes, it sounds like you all are pretty fired up.  (Applause.)  And very ready to go.  (Applause.)  And I’m really glad to hear that.  First of all, it’s good to see my husband.  (Laughter.)  Because I haven’t seen him in a good week.

THE PRESIDENT:  Five days.

MRS. OBAMA:  Five days?

THE PRESIDENT:  Five days.

MRS. OBAMA:  It seemed like a week, it was so long.  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  I missed you.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

MRS. OBAMA:  Just take care of him.  (Laughter.)

But I am just as happy to be back in the great state of Iowa, where it all began.  (Applause.)  So you guys are getting me all fired up just being here.  It is so beautiful here.  (Applause.)  It is so beautiful.  Good to be back.  Our family has so many wonderful memories of our time here in Iowa.  In Pella, I remember that an entire neighborhood sang “Happy Birthday” to Malia on the Fourth of July.  (Laughter.)  That was so sweet.  She was a little, bitty something, too.

And on the day of the big Jefferson-Jackson Dinner, I remember how we danced down the street with the Isiserettes. (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  That’s what they were called.

MRS. OBAMA:  It was the Isiserettes — and a few thousand folks across the state, as well, were there, too.  So that was fun.

THE PRESIDENT:  That was fun.

MRS. OBAMA:  And our girls, Malia and Sasha, they still talk about our visit to the State Fair.  (Applause.)  We had a ball.  We rode the bumper cars; we slid down that big slide — where Barack almost lost Sasha.  (Laughter.)  She flew up —

THE PRESIDENT:  I held on.

MRS. OBAMA:  It wasn’t pretty.  Wasn’t happy about that.  (Laughter.)  And, yes, we experienced the magic of our first fried Twinkie.  (Applause.)  Yes, we did.  Even though you say I don’t let you eat them, you eat what you want.  (Laughter.)

But we were surrounded by the press, so Barack left and the girls looked at me and they said, “Oh, I’m so glad Dad is gone.”  (Laughter.)  Now we can have fun.  (Laughter.)  So after he left, we stayed.  We cut loose.  We stayed until the fair shut down.  It was a ball.  And I have to say that we’re all very jealous that Barack got to go back to the fair without us last week.  Did you have a fried Twinkie?

THE PRESIDENT:  Pork chop and beer.  (Laughter and applause.)

MRS. OBAMA:  He’s so pleased with himself.  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  It was good.  It was tasty.

MRS. OBAMA:  But in all seriousness, though, because of those wonderful memories and so many more, I want to start by saying thank you.  Truly.  Thank you for the kindness, generosity and love that you have shown our family — I mean, throughout the state, consistently.  (Applause.)  Iowa was our very first experience with a national campaign, truly.  And it is because of all of you that Malia and Sasha still think campaigning is fun.  (Laughter.)  They do.  Now, they never really want to go, but they’re like, that was fun.  (Laughter.)

But more importantly, because of you, Barack and I will always remember what this process can be at its very best.  Every election, you all remind us what democracy is all about.  It’s about people getting to know the issues and discussing them with their neighbors.  It’s about meeting your candidates and getting to know them and their families up close and personal.

I will never forget the very first visit that I made here back in 2007, and I think it was the very first campaign event I did, so of course I was nervous.  And it was in the backyard of someone’s home, and I have to admit I really didn’t know what it would be like.  I hadn’t done much campaigning, and back then people barely even knew who Barack was, let alone who I was.

But the folks in that backyard welcomed me like an old friend, and within minutes, I was so comfortable that I remember kicking off my heels and I was standing barefoot in the grass, just talking and laughing and listening to people’s stories.  And I heard about what was going on in folks’ lives — the jobs they were juggling, the businesses they were trying to keep afloat, the kids they hoped to send to college if they could just find a way to afford it.

And the more we talked, the more at home I felt — because what I learned was that in all of those stories I saw my story; I saw Barack’s story.  I mean, you all know that story by now.  My father worked at the city water plant his entire life.  And neither of my parents had a college degree, but they saved and sacrificed so that my brother and I could have the kind of education they only dreamed of.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Whitney Young!

MRS. OBAMA:  And while — Whitney Young?  Oh, my goodness, that’s my high school.  (Laughter.)  Go, Dolphins!  (Laughter.)

And while pretty much all of our college tuition came from student loans and grants, my dad still had to pay a small portion of that tuition himself.  And every semester, my dad was determined to pay his little portion of our tuition bill and to pay it on time — because he was so proud to be able to play even just a little part in sending his kids to college.  So he couldn’t bear the thought that me or my brother would miss a registration deadline because his check was late.

And really, more than anything else, what I remind people is that’s what’s at stake in this election.  That’s why we’re all here.  That’s what we’re working for.  It’s that fundamental promise that no matter who you are or where you started out, in America, if you work hard you can build a decent life for yourself and an even better life for your kids.  (Applause.)  That’s why we’re here.

And whether it’s equal pay for women or health care for our families, whether it’s supporting our veterans or saving our auto industry, that’s what this man, my husband, has been fighting for every single day as President.  (Applause.)

And the one thing I share with people is that over the last three and a half years, as First Lady, I have had the chance to see up close and personal what being President really looks like.  And I’ve seen some things.  (Laughter.)  But seriously, I have seen how the issues that come across the President’s desk are always the hard ones — the problems with no clear solutions, the judgment calls where the stakes are so high and there’s absolutely no margin for error.

And as President, I’ve seen how you’re going to get all kinds of advice and opinions from all kinds of people.  But the truth is that at the end of the day, as President, all you have to guide you are your values and your vision and your life experiences.  In the end, it all boils down to who you are and what you stand for.  (Applause.)

And we all know who my husband is, don’t we?  (Applause.)  And we all know what he stands for.  (Applause.)  He is the son of a single mother who struggled to put herself through school and pay the bills.  He’s the grandson of a woman who woke up before dawn every day to catch a bus to her job at the bank.

And even though Barack’s grandmother worked hard to help support his family and she was good at her job, like so many women, she hit that glass ceiling and watched men no more qualified than she was — men she’d actually trained — climb up that ladder ahead of her.

So what I remind people is that your President knows what it means when a family struggles.  This is not a hypothetical situation for him.  He knows what it means to want something better for your kids and your grandkids.  (Applause.)  And that’s why I love him, that’s why I married.  And that’s what I think about every night when I put Malia and Sasha to bed.  Sometimes they put me to bed.  (Laughter.)  I can’t stay up later than them anymore.

But I think about the world that I want to leave for them, for all of our sons and daughters.  I think about how I want to give our kids that foundation for their dreams, opportunities worthy of their promise — because all of our children in this country are worthy.  (Applause.)  We all want to work to give them that sense of limitless possibility, that belief that here in America, the greatest country on Earth, there’s always something better out there if you’re willing to work for it.  (Applause.)

So we know that we can’t turn back now.  We have come so far, but we have so much more work to do.  And if we keep moving forward, then we need to work our hearts out for the man that I have the pleasure of introducing — (applause) — my husband and our President, President Barack Obama.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Dubuque!  (Applause.)  Thank you, Dubuque.  How is everybody doing today?  (Applause.)

Now, first of all, I, too, just want to thank Jennifer for not just her introduction, but for serving as a military spouse and championing the causes that are so important for so many military families like hers.  And so please give her a big — another round of applause.  Thank you for everything that you do.  Very proud of you.  (Applause.)

I also want to acknowledge, sitting next to Jennifer is Congressman Bruce Braley — (applause) — who helped to get the bill that Jennifer had worked on, based on her experience with Andrew, passed, and I had the honor of signing into law — Congressman Bruce Braley, who is doing a great job on behalf of our veterans and on behalf of working people here in Iowa.  (Applause.)

A couple of other friends who are here — your own Attorney General — this guy supported me when nobody could pronounce my name.  (Laughter.)  Folks would say, Tom, why are you doing that?  But he is a man of great integrity, a champion on behalf of consumers nationwide as well as here in Iowa — Tom Miller is here.  Give him a big round of applause.  (Applause.)  Also, your own Mayor — Mayor Roy Buol is here.  Give Roy a big round of applause.  (Applause.)

And finally, my wife.  (Applause.)  Now, it is true, I have not seen her in five days and — except I caught the end of Leno.  (Laughter.)  And the only reason that she, I think, is happy to see me is because she knows that after today, she gets to go tomorrow and get our girls from sleep-away camp, and she has been missing them terribly.  So we stand in the way of her getting to her babies.  (Laughter.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We still love you.  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  But I have to tell you, when I stand here and listen to her, I am just reminded how lucky I am, because she is a woman of strength and integrity and honor.  (Applause.)   She keeps me straight every single day.  She is the best mom in the world.  (Applause.)  And she’s cute.  (Laughter.)

And the problem is, sometimes when I listen to her talk I start choking up a little bit, and I forget what I’m going to say.  (Laughter.)  But I could not be prouder of her.  And I say often — back in 2008, I said, look, I’m not a perfect man; I won’t be a perfect President.  I do think she is a perfect First Lady.  I just want you to know that.  (Applause.)

Now, this is our third day in Iowa.  (Applause.)  And she’s right, we have been traveling all across the state.  We did stop at the State Fair.  We stopped to get something to eat before she showed up, just so there wasn’t any issues —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Smart man.

THE PRESIDENT:  Smart man.  (Laughter.)

We began the journey in Council Bluffs, and just like four years ago, we’ve traveled all across this state, west to east, meeting with you and talking about your lives.  We’ve driven through Boone and Des Moines and Oskaloosa and Marshalltown and Waterloo and Cedar Rapids.

We met farmers who’ve been badly hurt by drought and who now need us to pass a farm bill.  (Applause.)  We met folks who’ve helped Iowa become a leader in wind energy.  (Applause.) And now they need us to keep investing in clean, renewable energy.  (Applause.)  This morning I had breakfast with some of our outstanding veterans who fought under our proud flag. (Applause.)  And so now we need to serve them just as well as they’ve served us, and make sure that they’ve got new jobs and new opportunities and a roof over their heads when they come home. (Applause.)

And every stop, I’ve got fond memories of the last campaign — the campaign we had four years ago.  Every stop, I’ve gotten reminders of what makes Iowa so special and how this is where our movement for change happened. (Applause.)

It was because of you.  It was because of your stories and your strength and your spirit that I had the strength and the spirit to go through that campaign.  And it’s because of you that I’ve had the strength to do the job over the last three and a half years.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Thank you!  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  And I’ve got to tell you, Iowa, we’re not done yet.  This journey is not done yet.  We’ve got some unfinished business to do.  (Applause.)  And I’ve come here to ask you to stand with me, just like you stood with me in 2008, to finish what we started. (Applause.)

Because less than three months from now, you will face a choice, and that choice could not be bigger.  This is a choice not just between two candidates.  It’s not just between two political parties.  More than any election in recent memory, this is a choice about two fundamentally different visions for our country, how we move this country forward.  And the direction that you choose when you walk into that voting booth will have an impact not just on your lives, but on the lives of your children and the lives of your grandchildren.  It will impact us for decades to come.

When we came together in 2008 — and it wasn’t just Democrats, we had independents and some Republicans, too — it was to restore the basic bargain that built this country, the basic bargain that made us the most prosperous economy in the world.  It’s a bargain that says if we work hard, we should be rewarded.  It’s a deal that says if you put in enough effort, you can find a job that pays the bills.  You can afford a home that you call your own.  You won’t go broke when you get sick. You can retire with dignity and respect.  (Applause.)  And, most of all, it’s a bargain that says your kids will get a great education and they’ll grow up safe and healthy.  And they will have opportunities that you couldn’t even dream of; that they will be able to achieve things that you could have only hoped for.

That’s the basic promise of America.  That’s the American Dream.  And we knew that restoring it wouldn’t be easy, that it would take more than one year, or one term, or even one President — because we had just gone through a decade in which the middle class had been taking a lot of hits.  (Applause.)  Jobs had been getting shipped overseas.  Incomes and wages were flat or even going down, while the cost of everything from health care to college were going up.  A few folks at the top were doing really well, but the average family was struggling.

And this was before we saw the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.  And so many more of our friends and neighbors and family members lost their jobs and lost their homes, lost their savings and pushed that American Dream even further out of reach.

So when I ran for this office four years ago, I told you there were no quick fixes, there were no easy solutions.  That’s still true today.  But what I also told you and what is also still true today is that we have the capacity to meet every challenge.  We’ve got everything we need to meet our challenges.  (Applause.)  We’ve still got the best workers in the world.  (Applause.) We’ve still got the best entrepreneurs, and small businessmen and women in the world.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the best scientists and researchers in the world.  We’ve got the best farmers in the world.  We’ve got the best colleges and universities in the world.  (Applause.)

We are still a young nation and we’ve got the greatest diversity of talent and ingenuity — people want to come here from every corner of the globe.  So no matter what the naysayers say, no matter how dark the other side tries to paint things, there is not another country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly change places with the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Because people understand that even though we go through some tough times, there is a resilience and grit about this country.  And this country is the place where if you’re willing to work hard — no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter what your last name is — you can make it.  (Applause.)

That’s the idea that we were trying to rebuild in 2008.  That’s the idea that we continue to pursue in 2012.  That is what this campaign is all about.  And that is why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, Dubuque, here’s the thing — I told you all the things we’ve got going for us.  We do have one problem — politics in Washington.

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  You’ve got the other side, which has decided that “compromise” is a dirty word, and thinks the only way to move forward is to go backwards to the same top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  You know, Governor Romney chose his running mate this week — Congressman Ryan.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  No, no, no, Congressman Ryan — I know him. He’s a good man, beautiful family.  He is the ideological leader of the Republicans in Congress.  He is a articulate spokesman for Governor Romney’s vision.  I just happen to fundamentally disagree with his vision.  (Applause.)  Their vision is wrong for working families and it is wrong for the country.

Look, my opponent and his friends in Congress, they believe that if you just get rid of more regulations on big corporations and big banks, and then you give more tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans, that that will automatically lead to jobs and prosperity for ordinary families.  And I’m not exaggerating here, that’s their basic economic plan.

The centerpiece of Governor Romney’s economic plan is a new $5 trillion tax cut — a lot of it going to the wealthiest Americans.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, keep in mind, $5 trillion is a lot of money, even in Washington.  Our entire defense budget is a little over half a trillion dollars a year, so this tax cut would be like giving the equivalent of the entire defense budget in tax cuts — a lot of it going to very rich people — every year for 10 years.

Now, these folks say they want to reduce the deficit and the debt.  So the question is, well, how do you give away $5 trillion and then reduce the deficit?  Well, recently we found out.  Governor Romney expects you to pay for it —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  — expects middle-class families to pick up the tab.  Governor Romney’s tax plan would actually raise taxes on middle-class families by an average of $2,000 for families with children.

AUDIENCE MEMBER: I don’t have $2,000 —

THE PRESIDENT:  You don’t have $2,000 to spare.  I didn’t think so.

And, by the way, don’t take my word for it.  This is based on independent studies that have been done by folks who analyze this stuff for a living.  They say, look, this will cost middle-class families with children an average of $2,000.  And they’re asking you to pay an extra 2,000 bucks not to reduce the deficit, not to help our kids get educated, not to help kids go to college, not to rebuild our roads or our bridges or our ports — they’re doing this to give another $250,000 tax cut to folks who are making $3 million a year or more.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, have you heard this before?

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  They have been trying to sell this trickle-down snake oil before.  (Laughter.)  And guess what, it didn’t work then.  It won’t work now.  It’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to reduce the deficit.  It’s not a plan to move the economy forward.

And, secretly, I think they know this.  I think they know their plan is not very popular.  You can tell that because they’re being pretty dishonest about my plan — especially, by the way, when it comes to Medicare.  Now, this is something I’ve got to point out here, because they are just throwing everything at the wall to see if it sticks.  (Laughter.)

Here’s what you need to know:  I have strengthened Medicare.  I have made reforms that have saved millions of seniors with Medicare hundreds of dollars on their prescription drugs.  (Applause.)  I have proposed reforms that will save Medicare money by getting rid of wasteful spending in the health care system — reforms that will not touch your Medicare benefits — not by a dime.

Now, Mr. Romney and his running mate have a very different plan.  They want to turn Medicare into a voucher program.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  That means seniors would no longer have the guarantee of Medicare — they’d get a voucher to buy private insurance.  And because the voucher wouldn’t keep up with costs, the plan authored by Governor Romney’s running mate, Congressman Ryan, would force seniors to pay an extra $6,400 a year.  And I assume they don’t have it.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  My plan has already extended Medicare by nearly a decade.  (Applause.)  Their plan ends Medicare as we know it.  My plan reduces the cost of Medicare by cracking down on fraud and waste and subsidies to insurance companies.  Their plan makes seniors pay more so they can give another tax cut to millionaires and billionaires.

That’s the difference between our plans on Medicare.  That’s an example of the choice in this election.  And that is why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Just like we’ve got a different plan on Medicare, we’ve got a different economic plan.  You just heard, they want to give $5 trillion tax cuts — tax breaks to wealthy Americans who don’t need them.  Four years ago, I promised to cut middle-class taxes — and, Dubuque, that’s exactly what I’ve done.  (Applause.)  So if you talk to a friend of yours who says, oh, those Democrats, they’re all tax-and-spend liberals, you tell them the average middle-class family, their taxes are about $3,600 lower since I’ve become President.  (Applause.)

And right now, what I want to do is to keep taxes right where they are for the first $250,000 of everybody’s income.  If your family makes under $250,000 — like 98 percent of American families do and 97 percent of small businesses do — you won’t see your income taxes increase by a single dime next year.  (Applause.)  Now, if you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I wish!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  If you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent, you still get a tax cut on your first $250,000.  But all we’re asking is for the next little bit that you make you can afford to contribute a little bit more, above $250,000, so that we can pay down our deficit in a responsible, balanced way, and invest in things like education that help America grow.  (Applause.)

Now, that alone won’t cut our deficit.  We’re going to have to still make sure government does its part.  We’ve already cut a trillion dollars’ worth of spending that we don’t need, and we can do more to make government more efficient.  We have to do more.  But we’re not going to reduce the deficit just on the backs of the middle class.

So I think it makes sense to ask folks like me who’ve been incredibly blessed to go back to the rates that we paid under Bill Clinton — a time, by the way, when nearly 23 million new jobs were created, we went from deficit to surplus — (applause) — and here’s the kicker — we created a lot of millionaires, too.  (Laughter.)  And the reason is, is because the economy, when you look back on American history, always works best when the middle class is doing well.  (Applause.)

Let me ask you something.  When a teacher or a construction worker or a receptionist or a firefighter — when you get a little extra money in your pocket, what do you do?

AUDIENCE:  Spend it!

THE PRESIDENT:  You spend it.  Because times are tight and maybe you’ve been driving around in that old beater, you had that car for 10 years and you decide it’s about time to trade it in.  Or maybe you think now is the time I can finally buy a new computer for my kid who is about to go to college.  Or maybe I’ll go to a restaurant, or, heaven forbid, I take a vacation once in a while.  (Laughter.)  And what happens is that suddenly businesses have more customers and they make more profits.  And so folks at the top are doing very well, but the businesses — because they’re more profitable — now they’re hiring more workers, who then have more money, who then buy more products, who then give businesses more customers.  (Applause.)

That’s how you grow an economy — not from the top down, from the middle out, from the bottom up, giving everybody a fair shot.  (Applause.)  That’s the choice in this election, and that’s why I’m running for a second term as President, because that’s what I believe.  That’s my vision for the future.  (Applause.)

On just about every issue, Governor Romney and I just have a different opinion.  When the auto industry was on the brink of collapse, more than a million jobs at stake, Governor Romney said let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said let’s bet on American workers.  And we got workers and management together, and they changed how they were doing business.  And three years later, the American auto industry is back on top.  (Applause.)  That’s what I believe.  That’s the kind of America we need.  (Applause.)

So now I want American manufacturing back in America.  (Applause.)  I want to stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  Let’s give those tax breaks to companies that are investing right here in Dubuque, right here in the Quads, right here in Iowa — in Cleveland and Raleigh.  (Applause.)  Let’s put people back to work.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney likes to say, well, you know what, I know how to fix the economy, because I’ve been in the private sector.  Well, it turns out that a lot of that experience was investing in companies that were called “pioneers” in outsourcing.  We don’t need folks who know how to outsource.  We need folks who are working to insource, to create jobs here, and hire American workers so we sell American products around the world stamped with three proud words:  Made In America.  That’s what I believe.  (Applause.)

On energy, Governor Romney has said that he wants to get rid of the tax credit for wind energy — doesn’t believe in — he says these sources of energy are “imaginary.”  Congressman Ryan calls them a “fad”.  He needs to come to Iowa.  He’ll find out that there are 7,000 jobs in this state that depend on the wind industry.  These jobs aren’t a “fad.”  They’re the future.  (Applause.)

We should stop giving $4 billion of taxpayer subsidies to oil companies that are making money every time you go to the pump.  Let’s start investing in clean energy that will create jobs and secure our future.  That’s a difference in this election.  (Applause.)

I want to make sure that our kids are getting the best education in the world.  (Applause.)  I was just visiting some teachers before — Cascade Middle School, right before I came here.  Aren’t you supposed to be at the in-service over there?  (Laughter.)  I won’t tell.  Just don’t get photographed.  (Laughter.)

And we had this great meeting — and folks don’t go into teaching for the money.  They go into it because they believe in our kids, they believe in our future.  (Applause.)  But school districts all across Iowa and all across the country are having a tough time — budget cuts, teacher layoffs.  So I’ve said let’s help local school districts to make sure they can hire great teachers, especially in math and science, where we’ve got to really do better in terms of our performance.  (Applause.)  Let’s make sure that 2 million more people can go to community colleges to train for the jobs that businesses are hiring for right now.  And let’s bring down college tuitions once and for all for young people — because higher education is not a luxury.  It’s an economic necessity for young people.  (Applause.)

Back in 2008, I said I would end the war in Iraq — we ended it.  (Applause.)  I said we would go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — we did.  (Applause.)  We are transitioning and bringing our troops out of Afghanistan.  And so after a decade of war — I say to folks none of this could have been accomplished if it hadn’t been for our amazing men and women in uniform.  (Applause.)  So we’ve got to make investments to make sure that they’re getting the services that they have earned, because they should never have to fight for a job when they have fought for this country.  (Applause.)

And let’s take half the money that we can save after a decade of war, and let’s do some nation-building here at home.  Let’s hire some hardhats to get on the job rebuilding roads and bridges, schools.  That’s good for the economy.  That’s where we need to take America.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney says his big economic plan — in addition to these tax cuts for the wealthy — he wants to kill Obamacare.  Get rid of it.

AUDIENCE:  Nooo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, first of all, I want you to know I kind of like the term “Obamacare.”  (Laughter.)  Because I do care.  That’s why I passed the bill.  I care about folks with preexisting conditions — which is why, because of this law, they’ll be able to get health insurance.  (Applause.)  I care about the 6.5 million young people who can now stay on their parent’s plan because of Obamacare.  (Applause.)  I care about the seniors who have seen discounts on their prescription drugs.  We’re closing the doughnut hole because of the law that we passed.  (Applause.)

So if Mr. Romney and Congressman Ryan want to spend the next two and a half years having the same argument we had about health care all over again, they can feel free to try to do it.  But the Supreme Court has spoken.  It is the law of the land.  We are moving forward to give every American the health security that they deserve.  That is the difference in this election.  (Applause.)

On all these issues — health care, manufacturing, education — all these things that go into creating a solid, secure middle-class life, all these issues tie together.  It goes back to what Michelle was talking about and what I started off with, and that is who we are, our values.  You know, we’ve gone through tough times, but what hasn’t changed is our character.  Americans are tough and we are resilient and we may get knocked down, but we bounce back up.

And the other thing that we understand is what our parents and our grandparents and our great-grandparents taught us, which is, if you work hard, this is the country to be.  (Applause.)  That you may meet some barriers some times, there may be some hurdles, but you can’t be stopped when you decide on something.
And that’s what’s at stake in this election.  Do we affirm those values and pass them on to our kids and our grandkids just like we got them from our parents and our grandparents?

Now, over the next three months you are going to see more negative ads than you’ve ever seen in your life.  You’ve already seen them.  And these folks on the other side, I mean, they’re just writing $10 million checks.  Governor Romney obviously has got more friends than I do that can write $10 million checks.  (Laughter.)  And they are just — they are running these ads, and they’re not selling a plan to create jobs or to grow the economy or revive the middle class.  Basically, they’ve got one message, and that is, the economy is not where it should be and it’s Obama’s fault.

And they’re just going to say it over and over again.  Over and over again.  You’re going to get sick of it — you already are.  And you know, I’ve got to admit, I would be worried, given the amount of money that is being spent, if it weren’t for Iowa; if it weren’t for what I remember about 2008.  See, we’ve been outspent before.  We’ve been counted out before.  But what I know is, when the American people cut through the nonsense and they focus on what’s important, and when they remember what it means for us to have a country where everybody gets a fair shot and everybody does their fair share and everybody plays by the same set of rules — when you guys decide what’s important, you can’t be stopped.  When you pull together, you’ve got more power than any guy who is writing a $10 million check.  (Applause.)

And so, Iowa, I’m going to need your help one more time, here, to finish the job.  (Applause.)  We’ve got more schools to build.  We’ve got more folks to put back to work.  (Applause.)  We’ve got more roads to build.  We’ve got more young people to send to college.  We’ve got more troops to come home.  (Applause.)  And if you are willing to stand with me, and work with me, and make some phone calls with me and knock on some doors with me, if you’re still fired up, if you are still ready to go like I am, I promise you we will win Iowa.  We will win this election.  We will finish what we started.  And you and I together will remind the world why America is the greatest nation on Earth.

God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

END
1:17 P.M. CDT

Advertisements

Full Text Campaign Buzz August 14, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Waterloo, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Waterloo, Iowa

Source: WH, 8-14-12

RiverLoop Amphitheatre
Waterloo Center for the Arts
Waterloo, Iowa

8:05 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Waterloo!  (Applause.)  What a beautiful evening here in Iowa!  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We love you!

THE PRESIDENT:  I love you back.  (Applause.)  This is spectacular!  It feels good to be back.  (Applause.)

A couple of acknowledgments I want to make — first of all, Mike is a pretty humble guy, but this is the Iowa Firefighter of the Year.  Give him a big round of applause for that great introduction.  (Applause.)   We are proud of him, and every single firefighter that puts their life at risk for us.  We are grateful to them.

A couple other outstanding folks here — you’ve got your own Attorney General, Tom Miller, in the house.  (Applause.)  Congressman Bruce Braley is here.  (Applause.) And Mayor Buck Clark is here.  (Applause.)  And all of you are here.  (Applause.)

Now, listen, if you’ve got a seat, feel free to sit down, because I’ve got some things to say.  I’ve got some things to say.  First of all, it is good to be back.  Some of you may remember that one of my first stops after I announced for the presidency was right here in Waterloo.  (Applause.)  Back — way back when in 2007.  I had no gray hair.  (Laughter.)  Maybe I had a little bit, but you couldn’t see it.  (Laughter.)  Now you can see it.

But the reason that’s important, it’s worth reminding people, is because it was on your front, it was in your backyards, where our movement for change began.  We spent a lot of time on bus tours like the one I’m taking right now — although the bus wasn’t as nice as it is now.  (Laughter.)  And we went to school gyms and family farms and small businesses across the state.  And so it was pretty good being back here — yesterday I went to the State Fair and I had a pork chop and a beer.  (Applause.)  And it was good.  (Laughter.)  Today I just had a beer.  (Laughter.)  I didn’t get the pork chop.  But the beer was good, too.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  I’ll fry you a pork chop!

THE PRESIDENT:  You say you’ll fry me a pork chop, huh?  (Laughter.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Four more beers?

THE PRESIDENT:  Somebody just said — it’s true, at the State Fair, instead of saying “four more years,” they were saying, “four more beers.”  (Laughter.)  So I bought him four more beers.  (Laughter.)  Told him he had to register to vote, though, to get one of the beers.  (Laughter.)

Now, here’s the thing.  The reason I’m back — other than I just love being in Iowa — (applause) — the reason I’m back is because that journey we started in 2008, we’re not finished yet. (Applause.)  So just like we did in 2007, we started over in Council Bluffs, and we are driving all the way to the Quads.  And we want to make sure that everybody understands the choice that you face in November.

And this choice could not be bigger, because it’s not just a choice between two candidates; it’s not just a choice between two parties.  More than any recent election, more than 2008, this is a choice between two fundamentally different visions of where we need to go as a country.

AUDIENCE:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  And the direction that you choose when you walk into that voting booth in November, that’s going to have an impact not just on your lives, it will have an impact on your children and your grandchildren for decades to come.

Now, remember why we came together in 2008.  And it was Democrats and independents, but it was also some Republicans.  It was because we saw that the basic bargain that built this country, that created the most prosperous economy the world has ever known, that basic bargain wasn’t being met.  And let me tell you what that bargain is.  It says that if you work hard, your work should be rewarded.  (Applause.)  It says that if you act responsibly and you put in enough effort, you can find a job that pays the bills.  (Applause.)  You can have a home that you call your own.  You won’t go broke just because somebody in your family gets sick.  You can retire with dignity and respect.  (Applause.)  And most importantly, you can give your kids a great education so they can dream even bigger and do even better than you did.  (Applause.)

That is the American promise.  That is what made this country great.  But the problem was, for a decade we had seen that bargain wasn’t being met.  The promise wasn’t being kept.  So we had seen a decade in which jobs were being shipped overseas, and wages and incomes for working people were going down — even though folks at the very top were doing very well — and the costs of everything from health care to college were going up.  We ran two wars on a credit card.  We went from surplus to deficit.  So when I walked into office we already had a $1 trillion deficit.  And it all culminated in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

That’s the track record of the other party the last time they were in charge.  And we knew that restoring the bargain that made this country great would not be easy.  It was going to take more than one year, or one term, or even more than one President, but we knew we had to get started.  And obviously it became that much harder when the middle class was hammered by this crisis, because a lot of folks lost jobs, lost homes, lost savings, and that American Dream seemed even further out of reach.

But I told you there wouldn’t be any quick fixes, there wouldn’t be any easy solutions, but what I also promised you — and I absolutely believe this — is we’ve got everything we need to meet our challenges.  (Applause.)  Waterloo, we’ve still got the best workers in the world.  (Applause.)  And the best entrepreneurs in the world.  We’ve got the best scientists, and the best researchers in the world.  We’ve got the best farmers in the world.  We’ve got the best colleges and universities in the world.  (Applause.)  We are still a young nation, full of promise, and we’ve got the greatest diversity of talent and ingenuity from every corner of the globe.

So no matter what the naysayers say, no matter how dark they try to paint things when they’re running against me in an election, there is not another country on Earth that wouldn’t trade places with the United States of America.  (Applause.)  Because people around the world still believe that America is the place where, if you work hard, no matter who you are, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, you can still make it.  (Applause.)

That’s the idea that we are running to rebuild.  That is the campaign.  That is what my presidency is about.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, Waterloo, there is one thing standing in our way, though.  It is strange politics in Washington.  You’ve got a party that says “compromise” is a dirty word.  Folks who want to go back to the same top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.

You may have heard my opponent chose as his running mate Congressman Ryan this weekend and —

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  No, no, no, listen, I know Congressman Ryan. He is a decent man.  He is a family man.  He is the ideological leader of the Republicans in Congress.  And he’s an articulate spokesperson for Governor Romney’s vision.  The problem his vision is wrong.  (Applause.)  See, my opponent, Governor Romney, and his friends in Congress, they believe — this is their whole platform, this is their basic plan, as much detail as you get, this is what you get.  Their plan to grow the economy is to eliminate regulations, including on big banks and insurance companies — some of the regulations we put in place to make sure, for example, that we don’t have another taxpayer-funded bailout, so he wants to get rid of regulations, and then what he wants to do is give more tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans. And the idea, then, is that jobs and prosperity will trickle down on everybody.  That’s the centerpiece of his plan.  You can go on his website.

His economic plan is a new $5 trillion tax cut, a lot of it going to the wealthiest Americans.  Now, keep in mind, these are the same folks who say the deficit is our biggest problem, but they want to pass a new $5 trillion tax cut — $5 trillion, that’s with a “t” — (laughter.)  So just to give you some perspective, our annual defense budget, everything we spend on national security, is just a little over $500 billion.  So this would be, every year for 10 years, a tax cut as big as our defense spending.

And here’s the kicker, though — he says he’s going to pay for it.  So people asked, well, how are you going to pay for it? It turns out that he expects you to pay for it.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  He expects middle-class families to pick up the tab.  Governor Romney’s plan, according to independent analysts, would actually raise taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, keep in mind this is not $2,000 to reduce the deficit, or create jobs, or build new schools, or help kids go to college, or send a man to the moon.  This is $2,000 each that you’d have to pay to give another $250,000 tax cut to folks who are making $3 million a year or more.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  That’s crazy!  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, I’m not making this stuff up.  You can look on their website.

Now, here’s the thing — we’ve tried this before.  We tried this trickle-down fairy dust before.  And guess what — it didn’t work then, it won’t work now.  It’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to lower the deficit.  It’s not a plan to move our economy forward.  It’s not a plan to revive the middle class.
We do not need more tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.  We need to give tax relief to working families who are trying to raise their kids, keep them healthy, send them to college, keep a roof over their heads.  That’s the choice in this election.  That’s one of the reasons I’m running for a second term as President.  (Applause.)

So, Waterloo, I’ve got a different idea.  Four years ago, I came into office — I promised to cut taxes for middle-class families.  That’s exactly what I’ve done — by a total of about $3,600 for the typical family.  So if you talk to somebody who is feeling not convinced and undecided in the election, you tell them your taxes are lower — your federal taxes are lower now than when I came into office.  (Applause.)

Now, what I want to do is I want to keep everybody’s taxes right there where they are for the first $250,000 of everybody’s income.  (Applause.)  So if your family makes under $250,000 — like 98 percent of families do, and 97 percent of small businesses do — then you won’t see your income taxes go up by a single dime next year.  Not one dime.  (Applause.)

But if you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent — like I am — you’ll still get a tax break on your first $250,000.  But for the amount that you make over that, we’re asking you to contribute a little bit more so we can pay down our deficit without gutting education, without getting rid of transportation projects, without gutting all the things that help make America grow.

Now, government — I’ll make sure government still does its part to reduce our debt and our deficits.  We’ve cut out already a trillion dollars’ worth of spending we don’t need.  And we can do more.  I want to make government efficient.  We’ve got to make sure that your tax dollars are being well spent.  But we can’t bring down our deficit and our debt just by asking us to get rid of the things that help open up opportunity to Americans.  (Applause.)

So instead, we’re asking folks like me to go back to the rates we paid under Bill Clinton — which, by the way, was a time when we created 23 million new jobs, went from deficit to surplus, and we created a whole lot of millionaires to boot.  (Applause.)

See, Waterloo, this comes down to your basic philosophy, but also, when you look at the evidence of our economic history — when teachers and nurses and firefighters and receptionists and construction workers, when you’ve got a little more money in your pocket, what do you do?  You spend it.  Because times are tight, right?  So if you’ve got a little extra money, now maybe you finally trade in that 10-year-old car you’ve been driving.  Maybe you buy a computer for your kid who is about to go to college.  So suddenly businesses have more customers, which means they’re making more profits, which means they’re hiring more workers, who then spend more money, and suddenly the economy gets better for everybody — including folks at the top.

I don’t believe in top-down economics.  I believe in middle-class-out economics.  I believe in bottom-up economics.  I believe in making sure everybody has got a fair shot.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America. (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  But you know what?  That’s not the only difference between me and Mr. Romney.  When the auto industry was on the brink of collapse — you remember that — more than a million jobs at stake, Governor Romney said, let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said, let’s bet on American workers.  (Applause.)  And management and workers got together in a great, iconic American industry, and you know what?  Three years later, the American auto industry is roaring back.  (Applause.)

I want to see high-tech, advanced manufacturing come back all across America in other industries.  I don’t want those jobs in China or Germany.  I want them here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  Governor Romney says, well, no, look, I understand the economy because I’ve been in the private sector.  Well, a lot of that experience was investing in companies, including those that were called “pioneers” in the business of outsourcing.  He wants to keep giving tax breaks to companies that ship jobs overseas.  I want to end those tax breaks once and for all and start rewarding companies that are investing right here in the United States of America, hiring American workers, making American products.  That’s the choice in this election.  (Applause.)

That’s not the only difference.  Right now, we’re seeing homegrown energy, new sources of energy creating jobs right here in Iowa.  So what does Governor Romney want to do?  He wants to end the tax credit for wind energy producers.  He said these new sources of energy are “imaginary.”  Congressman Ryan, his running mate, calls them a “fad.”  During a speech a few months ago, Governor Romney even explained his energy policy.  This is what he said — he said, “You can’t drive a car with a windmill on it.”  (Laughter.)  That’s what he said about wind power — you can’t drive a car with a windmill on it.  (Laughter.)  I mean, maybe he’s tried it; he’s put other things on the roof.  (Laughter and applause.)

But if he really wants to learn something about wind energy, he should come to Iowa.  (Applause.)  Then he’d know that 7,000 Iowa jobs depend on the wind industry — more than any other state in America.  (Applause.)  These jobs aren’t a “fad.”  They’re our future.  He’d know that the parts for making these high-tech wind turbines, they’re now made in Iowa.  They’re made in America.  That’s not “imaginary.”  (Applause.)  I’ve been to the places in Newton, Iowa where some of this stuff is being made.  (Applause.)

I understand he may not have figured out how to drive a car with a windmill on it, but if he came to Iowa, he’d know that 20 percent of Iowa’s electricity now comes from wind energy.  America has doubled the amount of electricity we get from wind over the last four years, enough power for nearly 13 million homes — clean, renewable energy.  That’s something you leave behind for the next generation.  That is worth fighting for.  There are 37,000 American jobs at stake in this wind energy tax credit.  We should support it.  I support it.  (Applause.)

And instead of giving $4 billion in taxpayer subsidies to oil companies that are making plenty of money every time you go to the pump, we should be investing in homegrown energy that’s never been more promising.  That’s the choice in this election.  That’s why I’m running for a second term.  (Applause.)

I’m not done yet.  In 2008, I promised to end the war in Iraq — I ended it.  (Applause.)  Governor Romney said the way I ended it was “tragic”.  I said I’d go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — I went after them.  (Applause.)  We’re now beginning a transition out of Afghanistan.  And so all of this is possible only because of the extraordinary service of our men and women in uniform.  And that’s why I’ve made sure to make historic investments in the VA — because somebody who has fought for us shouldn’t have to fight for a job when they come home.  (Applause.)

But if we’re serious about them coming home to a strong economy, then we’ve got to do some building here at home, some nation-building — take half of the money that we’ve been spending over a decade of war and let’s start doing some rebuilding here in America.  (Applause.)  Let’s put Americans back to work rebuilding roads and bridges and ports and airports, laying broadband lines in rural communities.  (Applause.)  Let’s create a Veterans Jobs Corp so returning heroes can get jobs as firefighters and cops in communities that need them.

There’s a lot of work to be done right here in America, and I’m running to rebuild America.  That’s a choice in this election.  (Applause.)

And I’m running make sure America once again has the best education system in the world and the best training system for workers in the world.  (Applause.)  I want to help our schools hire and reward the best teachers, especially in math and science.  I want to give 2 million more Americans the chance to go to community colleges to train for the jobs that businesses are hiring for right now.  (Applause.)  I want to get colleges and universities to bring down the cost of tuition, so that every young person can get the kind of education that they need to succeed in the 21st century.  (Applause.)

I want to help homeowners refinance their homes, save $3,000 at these historically low rates.  Governor Romney thinks we should just let the housing market bottom out.  That’s a difference in this election.

I believe that you should have some health care security.  That’s why I passed Obamacare.  And I like Obamacare.  (Applause.)  I like the phrase “Obamacare”, because you know what, I do care.  (Applause.)  I care about all those folks with preexisting conditions who now are going to be able to get coverage.  (Applause.)  I care about folks who already have insurance, making sure insurance companies don’t jerk them around right when they need that insurance the most.  (Applause.)

I care about the 6.5 million young people who are now able to stay on their parent’s plan and don’t have to go without insurance.  (Applause.)  I care about the seniors who now have more discounts on their prescriptions drugs — and we’re closing the doughnut hole.  (Applause.)

So, Waterloo, we don’t need another two years of arguing about health care.  The Supreme Court has spoken.  We are implementing this law.  We are moving forward.  We’re not moving backwards.  (Applause.)

All these things — health care security, American manufacturing, rebuilding America and putting construction workers back to work, making sure our kids are getting a great education and can afford college — all these things that make up a middle-class life, they all tie together.  It goes back to that central idea of America, that here in this country everybody gets a fair shot, everybody does their fair share, everybody plays by the same set of rules.  It’s the same promise our parents and grandparents passed on to us.  And now, our job is to pass it on to our kids.  (Applause.)

Now, over the next three months, the other side will spend more money than we have ever seen.  Now, you noticed their ads generally don’t tell you what it is that they’re going to do, because they know their plans won’t sell.  You haven’t forgotten. You didn’t get amnesia.  (Laughter.)  You didn’t forget the last time they tried what they’re selling.

So basically, the argument that they’re going to make over and over again is just the same one, which is the economy is still not where it needs to be and it’s Obama’s fault.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  And you know what?  Listen, the economy is not where it needs to be.  We’ve still got too many folks out of work and too many homes underwater.  And we haven’t brought back all the jobs that need to be brought back.  But you know what, what they’re offering — it’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to reduce the deficit.  They don’t have a plan to grow the economy.  They don’t have a plan to revive the middle class.

The plan I’ve put forward can do that.  But I need your help.  I need your help.  (Applause.)  Your friends have to be registered.  Your family has to be registered.  You can get a voter registration form online.  Just go to GottaRegister.com.  This is not GotToRegister.com — this is g-o-t-t-a register, GottaRegister.com — (applause) — because we’ve come too far to turn back now.

We’ve been outspent before.  I’ve been counted out before.  But here’s what I know.  When all of you decide to mobilize and organize, and when you focus on those values that are best in America, when you remember the stories of your family and your parents, your grandparents — the hard work, the sacrifice — recognizing sometimes times are tough and sometimes we get knocked down but we get back up, we are determined, we are tougher than any tough times — and most importantly, that reminder that when we do things together, when we’re focused on how we build this country together, we can’t be stopped — that’s more powerful than any money.  (Applause.)  That’s more powerful than any TV commercials.

So we’ve got to keep on going, because we’ve got too many schools we still need to build; too many teachers we still need to hire; too many kids we still need to send to college.  We’ve got too many roads we still need to build; too much energy we’ve still got to generate right here at home; too many troops we’ve got to bring home; too many doors of opportunity that we’ve got to open up for every young person who’s willing to make the effort.  That’s what’s at stake right now.  (Applause.)

And if you’re willing to stand with me, and work with me, and vote for me, we will win Iowa.  (Applause.)  We will win in November.  (Applause.)  And we will finish what we started and remind the world why America is the greatest nation on Earth.

God bless you.  And God bless the United States of America.  (Applause.)

END
8:35 P.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz August 14, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event in Marshalltown, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at Campaign Event — Marshalltown, IA

Source: WH, 8-14-12 

B.R. Miller Middle School
Marshalltown, Iowa

4:00 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Marshalltown!  (Applause.)  Hello, Bobcats!  (Applause.)  Now, I was just told that school, at least for the teachers, starts tomorrow.  (Laughter.)  Teachers in the house?  (Applause.)

So I want to start off by saying thank you to our teachers for the outstanding job that they do each and every day.  (Applause.)  Your principal, your superintendent, your assistant principal, they’re all doing a great job — which means, students, you’re going to have to hit the books, all right?  (Laughter.)  Going to have to hit the books.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, they’ll have to hit the books maybe for longer than four more years.  (Laughter.)  We’ll be talking about that.

A couple of other people I want to acknowledge.  First of all, thank Kirk for the wonderful introduction.  Please give him a big round of applause.  (Applause.)  I want to acknowledge Mayor Pro-Tem Bethany Wirin is here.  Where’s Bethany?  There she is, right here.  (Applause.)

And I want to offer my condolences to the family of the Mayor who just passed — Mayor Gene Beach.  (Applause.)

I’ve got to tell you, it’s good to be back in Iowa, and it’s good to be back in Marshalltown.  (Applause.)  I started in Council Bluffs, and we are driving to the Quads, and we are stopping off a whole bunch of different places.  Yesterday I got to the State Fair and had a pork chop and a beer.  (Applause.)  It was good.  I might have another beer today.  (Laughter.)  Just one.  Just one.

But the reason it’s so good to be back is because this is really where our movement began — here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  In people’s backyards, on family farms and school gyms, on people’s porches all across this state, we had a conversation about how we move our country in a direction where everybody has opportunity, where everybody has got a shot.  And we know that journey is not done yet.  We’ve still got a lot of work to do.  So we are now spending another three days driving through the state.

And the reason it’s so important is because in some ways this election may be more consequential than the last election.  You’ve got a choice not just between two candidates or two political parties, but between two fundamentally different visions for where we should take our country.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  You’re preaching to the choir.

THE PRESIDENT:  It’s true, I am.  (Laughter.)  But you’re going to have to go then preach to the folks who aren’t converted yet.  More than any other election, when you go into the voting booth in November, you’re going to be making a decision about the kind of America that we have not just for yourselves but for your children and your grandchildren for decades to come.

Four years ago, we came together — and it wasn’t just Democrats, we had independents, we had some Republicans — because we understood that the basic bargain that built this country was at stake.  We had gone through a decade where jobs were being shipped overseas, where incomes were going down even while the costs of health care and a college education and groceries were going up, and it all culminated in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.  And what we understood then was we had to work hard to get back to that basic bargain, that basic deal that built this country.

And it’s a very simple promise.  It’s a promise that says if you work hard in this country, you’ll get ahead.  If you are responsible, then you can meet your obligations — to yourself, to your family, to your community.  You can find a job that pays the bills.  You can have a home that you can call your own.  You can be assured that you won’t go bankrupt if you get sick.  You can retire with some dignity and some respect.  And most importantly, you can make sure that your kids get the kind of education and opportunities so they can dream even bigger and do even better than you did.  That is what the American promise is all about.  (Applause.)  That’s what we’ve been fighting for.  That’s what we’ve been fighting for.

And we knew it wasn’t going to happen overnight.  We knew it was going to take more than one term, maybe even one President, to get this country back to the place where everybody has got a fair shot.  But we started.  And three and a half years ago, we saved ourselves from going into a Great Depression.  And 4.5 million jobs have been created, and half a million manufacturing jobs.  And the auto industry got saved.  (Applause.)  We’re now at a point where a lot of folks are still struggling.  And so we’ve got to move forward and not backwards.  We’ve got to move forward.

Now, the good news is we’ve got everything we need to succeed.  We’ve still got the best workers in the world.  (Applause.)  We’ve still got the best universities and colleges in the world.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the best researchers and scientists in the world.  We’ve got the best entrepreneurs, small businessmen and women, and large businesses that are the best in the world, making some of the best products.  We’ve got everything that we need.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Best President.  (Applause.)

THE PRESIDENT:  And we’re a young nation.  We’re a young nation, in part because we’ve got this incredible diversity — people are willing to come here from all corners of the globe because they understand there’s something special about this place.

And so, for all the naysayers out there and the folks who try to paint things as dark as they can, especially during election time, the fact of the matter is there’s no nation on Earth that wouldn’t trade places with us.  (Applause.)  So we’ve got the tools to make sure that we are living up to this country’s promise — a country where you can make it if you try, no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter what faith you are, no matter what race you are, no matter what your last name is, here in America you can make it.  That’s what we have the opportunity to make sure continues for the next generation.  (Applause.)

That’s what we’re fighting for.  That’s the choice in this election.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Now, there is one thing holding back, though, and that is the politics in Washington.  We’ve got — the other side has decided that “compromise” is a dirty word.  And they spend a lot of time trying to beat me instead of moving the country forward. (Applause.)  But part of it is just an honest disagreement about how we move the country forward.

Governor Romney chose a running mate this weekend, and I know Congressman Ryan.  He’s a good man — he’s a good family man.  But he’s got a fundamentally different view about how we move this country forward.  He’s an articulate spokesperson for Governor Romney’s views.  He’s the ideological leader of the Republicans in Congress.  But that vision is wrong.

Look, let me tell you, you can sum up Governor Romney’s plans pretty simply.  He wants to eliminate —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Everything.  (Laughter.)

THE PRESIDENT:  He wants to eliminate regulations on big banks and corporations, some of which we put in place in the wake of the disaster on Wall Street.  And he wants to institute even more tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  The centerpiece of his plan is a new $5 trillion tax cut, a lot of it which would go to folks like me who don’t need it.  And here’s the kicker.  He expects all of you to pick up the tab.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  No, no, don’t take my word for it.  Independent analysis shows that if his plan was instituted, the only way you could pay for it would be to have the average middle-class family with children pay an extra $2,000 in taxes.  How many people think that’s a good idea?

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  How many people think that would actually grow the economy?

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  But that’s his theory.  The theory is, is that if folks up here are doing really well, then all the benefits are going to trickle down.  The extra $2,000 you’d be paying wouldn’t be used to pay down the deficit or the debt that we’ve already got.  It wouldn’t be to invest in more teachers or a better school system, or making college more affordable, or rebuilding our roads and bridges, and finding new ways to create cheap energy.  No, this $2,000 would be to help finance an average $250,000 tax break for folks making $3 million a year or more.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  I got to tell you, we have heard this sales pitch from these folks before.  We’ve heard this trickle-down fairy dust before.  It didn’t work then; it will not work now.  (Applause.)  We don’t think it’s a plan to reduce the deficit.  It’s certainly not a plan to create jobs and to help families right now.

See, I believe in a different theory.  When it comes to taxes, I said in 2008 I was going to lower middle-class taxes.  And guess what — I did.  (Applause.)  So the average family — the typical family is paying $3,600 less in taxes than they were when I came into office.  (Applause.)  So what I believe now is I want to keep your income taxes right where they are for everybody making $250,000 or less — which is 98 percent of Americans, 97 percent of small businesses.  And folks who are in the other 2 percent, who are fortunate enough to be in the top 2 percent, they still get a tax cut for the first $250,000.  But after that, we’re asking them to pay a little bit more so we can finance things like education and reduce our deficit in a balanced, responsible way.  (Applause.)

Now, I still want to make sure that government does its part by being good stewards of taxpayer dollars.  So we’ve cut a trillion dollars out of federal spending — a trillion dollars that I’ve already signed into law.  We’ve got an additional trillion that’s slated.  So we’re prepared to make some tough choices on things we can’t afford.  But we’re not going to reduce the deficit by gutting education investments, gutting investments that we make in our infrastructure, gutting our investments in basic science and research that can lead to discoveries in clean energy or lead to discoveries in curing cancer.  That’s not how we’re going to grow this economy and make sure that the middle class is strong.

And, by the way, when I say asking folks like me to do a little bit more — we’ve tried that before, too, under Bill Clinton.  And we created 23 million new jobs, went from a deficit to a surplus.  (Applause.)  And guess what, Marshalltown, here’s the thing — it actually was good for rich people, too.  Because what happens is, look, when a teacher or a construction worker or a receptionist or a nurse, when they’ve got a little more money in their pocket, what do they do?

AUDIENCE:  Spend it.

THE PRESIDENT:  They spend it on necessities.  And so, maybe you’ve got a 10-year-old car and you go out and buy a new one.  Or maybe you need a new appliance and you go out and you get a new appliance.  Or maybe you buy a computer for your kid as they’re going off to college.  And suddenly, business has more customers, and those businesses get more profits and they hire more workers.

We don’t believe in top-down economics.  The history of this country has been a middle class-out economics, a bottom-up economics.  When everybody is doing well, when everybody has opportunity, then we all succeed and the country moves forward.  That’s what’s at stake in this election.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)
You see the difference in philosophies on almost every issue.  When the automakers were on the brink of collapse, a million jobs at stake, Governor Romney said let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said let’s bet on American workers.  And three and a half years later, the American auto industry has come roaring back.  (Applause.)

So we know American manufacturing can succeed in this country — high-tech manufacturing, advanced manufacturing — but we’ve got to make sure we’ve got a tax code that encourages it.  I want to stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  Let’s give tax breaks to companies that are investing here in the United States of America, hiring American workers, making American products.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney has got a different view.  He talks about how he has been in the private sector, so he knows how to put folks back to work.  But it turns out most of his business was investing on behalf of folks like him and investing in some cases in what has been called “pioneers” of outsourcing.  We don’t need pioneers of outsourcing.  We need folks who are interested in insourcing and bringing some jobs back to Marshalltown, back to Iowa, and back to the United States of America.  (Applause.)

Let me give you another example.  Kirk was just talking about wind power.  I was just visiting a wind farm close by.  It’s a working farm.  It has about five windmills on one property, 52 in this area — 52 wind farms generating incredible amounts of energy and, by the way, helping family farmers with a little bit of extra income.

Now, Governor Romney has decided that we should end the tax credit that we provide for wind power once and for all.  That’s his idea.  He wants to get rid of it.  At a moment when homegrown energy is creating new jobs here in states like Iowa, he wants to bring an end to it.  He said — and I’m quoting here — he said new sources of energy like these are “imaginary.”

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  His running mate, Congressman Ryan, calls them a “fad.”  Then during a speech a few months ago, Governor Romney explained his energy policy this way — “You can’t drive a car with a windmill on it.”  That’s what he said about wind power.  Now, I know he’s tried some other things on top of a car. (Laughter and applause.)  I didn’t know he had tried windmills on top of a car.  (Applause.)  But maybe he tried it.  I would have liked to have seen that.  (Laughter.)

But maybe he needs to come to Iowa to learn something about wind power.  He’d know if he came here that 7,000 jobs have been created here in Iowa by the wind industry — more than any other state in America.  These jobs aren’t a “fad,” they’re the future, and we’ve got to be investing in them.  (Applause.)

If he came to Iowa, he might know that not only are we putting out these windmills, but, increasingly, they’re made right here in Iowa, made here in America.  That’s not “imaginary” — that’s real.  (Applause.)

If he came here to Iowa, he might know that 20 percent of Iowa’s electricity now comes from wind energy.  (Applause.)  Over the past 4 years, America has doubled its — the amount of electricity that is produced from wind, and this is enough to power 13 million homes with clean and renewable energy.  Think about that.  It’s the equivalent of 12 Hoover Dams’ worth of electricity is being generated by wind power in this country.  (Applause.)  That’s something that’s worth investing in.  That’s something we’re doing for the next generation.  And so are the 37,000 American jobs that are on the line if we let this wind tax credit expire.

So this is a difference between me and Governor Romney.  I want to stop giving $4 billion in taxpayer subsidies every single year to the oil companies that are doing just great, and let’s take some of that money and continue to invest in homegrown, renewable energy right here in Iowa and all across America that can put people back to work.  (Applause.)

I’ll give you another example of a difference.  I said in 2008 I’d end the war in Iraq — and I did.  (Applause.)  I said we’d refocus and go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — we did.  (Applause.)  We’re bringing our troops home from Afghanistan.  All this is possible because of the extraordinary service and sacrifice of our men and women in uniform.  (Applause.)  So we’ve made some historic investments in the VA.  My attitude is anybody who has fought for America, they shouldn’t have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads when they come home.  (Applause.) We’ve got to serve them as well as they serve us.

But we also need to make sure that folks coming home, they’re coming back to a vibrant economy.  So what I’ve said is let’s take half of the money that we’re saving after a decade of war and let’s put people back to work.  Let’s create a Veterans Jobs Corps that can hire police officers and firefighters in communities that need them.  (Applause.)  Let’s get a whole bunch of construction workers to rebuild our roads and our bridges, our ports and our airports.  (Applause.)  Let’s rebuild our schools. Let’s lay broadband lines into rural communities.  Those investments are good now because they put people back to work, and that means folks have got more money in their pockets.  And what do they do when they’ve got more money in their pockets?

AUDIENCE:  Spend it!

THE PRESIDENT:  They spend it.  And suddenly, businesses have more customers.  But it’s also good for the long run, because if we’ve got the best roads, the best bridges, the best airports, the fastest broadband lines, the best wireless networks, the best transmission lines — all that makes us more productive, and it means our economy is going to grow in the future.  So why wouldn’t we start now?  That’s what we need to be investing in.

So, look — one more difference.  When it comes to education, I believe that nothing is more important than making our kids competitive in the 21st century economy.  Our young people, they’re not just competing against folks in North Carolina or New Hampshire; they’re now competing against folks in India and China.

So I want to make sure that we’re helping school districts hire and retain the best teachers — especially in math and science.  I want to make sure that we’re creating 2 million more slots in community colleges so folks can get trained in the jobs that businesses are hiring for right now.  And I want to make college more affordable for young people.  We have already made progress on this front.  (Applause.)  And I’m not just talking about four-year colleges, I’m talking about two-year community colleges, getting advanced training.

But the point is that some form of higher education, it is no longer a luxury, it is an economic necessity in the 21st century.  And I want to make sure every young person in America and every young person in Marshalltown can take advantage of those opportunities.  That’s part of what this election is all about.  (Applause.)

Governor Romney wants to repeal Obamacare.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  First of all, I don’t mind the term Obamacare.  I like it, because I do care.  That’s why we passed the bill.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Yes!

THE PRESIDENT:  And because of it, 6.5 million young people can stay on their parent’s plan.  (Applause.)  Because of it, we’ve got millions of seniors out there who are seeing more discounts on their prescription drugs, and we’re closing the doughnut hole.  Because of what we’re doing, more people are getting preventive care.  Because of what we’re doing, insurance companies can’t drop you right when you need insurance most just because of some fine print.  (Applause.)

So maybe Governor Romney wants to spend the next three years rearguing what we’ve been arguing about for the last three years, but the Supreme Court has spoken — we are implementing this law. We are moving forward.  We are not going backwards.  That is a choice in this election.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President.  (Applause.)

We’re not going to undo the reforms we’ve put into place to make sure Wall Street doesn’t ask for another taxpayer-funded bailout.  We’re not going to go back to the days when folks, to serve this country, it depended on who they loved.  If they love this country, they should be able to serve this country — period.  (Applause.)

We’re going to make sure that young people who are brought to this country when they were very young and have grown up as Americans, that they have an opportunity to contribute here in America, the country that they love.  (Applause.)  We’re not going backwards.  We’re going forward.  (Applause.)

Now, I have to tell you that over the course of the next three months, though, you will see more money spent by the other side than we’ve ever seen in history.  And I don’t want to lie.  I mean, we’re raising money — but these folks are writing $10 million checks.  I mean, they’ve got some friends in — with a lot of money.  And we are seeing all these ads — and you notice they don’t really have a plan?  I mean, you don’t see these ads saying what they’re going to do, because they know that their plan would not sell.

So instead, what they’re going to do is just repeat over and over again the same things that they’ve been saying for the last three and a half years, and that is, the economy is not doing as well as it should and it’s Obama’s fault.  I mean, that’s their  — basically, they’ll do different ads, but it’s the same theme.

And you know, I might be a little worried about it except — what you taught me, Iowa, in 2008.  We have been outspent before; we have been counted out before.  But what I’ve learned is that when the American people cut through the nonsense, when they’re paying attention and they’re focused, and they think back to their own families and their parents and their grandparents and everything that’s made this country great, when they decide we’re going to make sure that we’ve got a government that is not just representing the powerful and the wealthy but just looking after ordinary folks, and recognizing government can’t solve every problem, and nobody expects a handout or a bailout, but we do expect to make sure that together we are doing things that help the next generation — when the American people start focusing on those core values that have made this country great, I tell you what, you can’t be stopped.  You can’t be stopped.  (Applause.)  You’re the most powerful force in this democracy.

So, Marshalltown, I’m going to need your help.  I’m going to need you fired up again.  I’m going to need you ready to go.  We’re going to have to make sure everybody is registered.  If you’re not registered, by the way, you can get forms online, going to gottaregister.com.  (Laughter.)  That’s g-o-t-t-a.  I’m sorry, teachers, but it’s “gotta.”  (Laughter.)  It’s not “got to,” it’s “gotta.”  Gottaregister.com.

But if you guys are ready to work, we’ll get this done.  Because we’ve got more work to do.  We’ve got more schools to build.  We’ve got more teachers to hire.  We’ve got more troops to bring home.  We’ve got more roads to build.  We’ve got more opportunity to create for our young people to make college more affordable.  We’ve got a lot of unfinished business.

And I tell you what, back in 2008, I used to say to folks, look, I’m not a perfect man — you can ask Michelle.  (Laughter.) And I tell folks, I’m not — I won’t be a perfect President.  Nobody is.  But what I did say is I’ll wake up every single day fighting as hard as I know how for you; that I will think about you, and I will represent you, and I will fight for you.  (Applause.)  And I have kept that promise, Iowa.  I have kept that promise.  (Applause.)

So if you’re willing to stand with me and work with me and organize with me, and knock on some doors and make some phone calls with me, we will finish what we started.  We will get folks back to work.  We will revive the middle-class dream of America. And we will remind the world why this is the greatest nation on Earth.

Thank you, everybody.  God bless you.  God bless America.  Thank you.

END
4:27 P.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz August 14, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event at Nelson Pioneer Farm & Museum in Oskaloosa, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at a Campaign Event — Oskaloosa, Iowa

Source: WH, 8-14-12 

Nelson Pioneer Farm & Museum
Oskaloosa, Iowa

11:33 A.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Iowa!  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Oskaloosa.  (Applause.)  It is good to see all of you.  If you’ve got a chair, please feel free to take a seat.  I want everybody to feel relaxed out here.  It’s a beautiful summer day.

I’ve been talking to some kids; I guess school starts up in a couple of days, so they were looking a little depressed.  (Laughter.)  But it’s okay.  School is going to be great.  I know you guys have had a great summer.

Before I start, I just want to acknowledge an outstanding member of Congress who is fighting every day on behalf of the people of his district — Dave Loebsack is here.  Give Dave a big round of applause.  (Applause.)  There he is.  Thank you, Dave.

It has been great to be back in Iowa.  Back in 2007-2008, I was on your farms and in your backyards and on your porches.  And that’s where our movement for change really began, right here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  And we spent a lot of time on bus tours like this one all across the state.

And it was good also to be back at the Iowa State Fair, although when I was just a candidate, they let me go on the bumper cars.  (Laughter.)  And I went up on the Big Bend — you guys ever been on that, where they just shoot you up about 500 feet in the air?  I was with Malia and I started screaming, and she looked at me, saying, come on, Dad, get it under control.  (Laughter.)  But it was terrifying.  Anyway, Secret Service does not let me do that anymore.  But I was still able to get a beer and a pork chop — (applause) — so I was pretty happy about that.  I was pretty happy about that.

Here’s the thing — I’m back because our journey is not done.  We’re spending three days driving all the way across the state, just like we did in 2007 and 2008; we’re going from Council Bluffs all the way to the Quads, Quad Cities, because once again you face a critical choice in November.  In some ways, this is even more important an election than 2008, because this choice could not be bigger.

It’s not just a choice between two candidates.  It’s not just a choice between two political parties.  It is a choice between two fundamentally different visions of how America became great and how it’s going to stay great, two fundamentally different visions of the path we need to take for the future of our kids and our grandkids.  (Applause.)

And the direction that you choose when you walk into the voting booth in November, it’s going to determine not our lives next year or five years from now.  It’s going to determine the future for decades to come for our kids and our grandchildren.

Four years ago when we came together — and it wasn’t just Democrats, by the way; we had independents and we had some Republicans.  We came together because a lot of us realized that the core idea, the basic bargain that made this country, was under threat.  And it’s a basic bargain that says if you work hard in this country, you can get ahead; that if you take responsibility, than you can make it, and you can get into the middle class.  You can feel a sense of security.  That you can find a job that pays the bills and have a home you call your own.  That you won’t go bankrupt when you get sick.  That you can retire with dignity and respect.  And most importantly, that you can give your kids a great education and they can do even better and dream even bigger than you ever imagined.  That’s the American Promise.  That’s the American Dream.  That’s what we’ve been fighting for.  (Applause.)

Now, we knew restoring that basic idea wouldn’t be easy because we had just gone through a decade in which that bargain, that promise wasn’t being kept.  Jobs had gotten shipped overseas.  People were working harder, but making less, while the cost of everything from health care to college was going up.  We fought two wars on a credit card, adding enormously to our debt.  And all this culminated then in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

And so, we knew this wasn’t going to be easy.  And when the crisis hit in 2008 and 2009, millions of people all across this country — some of our friends and neighbors and family members — lost their jobs, lost their homes, lost their savings.  And that made the American Dream even a little bit further out of reach.

Now, I told you when I ran the first time that this was not going to be easy, restoring that bargain; that there weren’t any quick fixes to our solutions.  But what I also insisted, and what I still believe, is we’ve got everything we need to solve these challenges.  (Applause.)  We have everything we need right here in America to make the middle class strong again.

We’ve got the best workers in the world.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the best entrepreneurs in the world.  (Applause.)  Everybody knows we’ve got the best farms in the world.  (Applause.)  We’ve got the best scientists, the best researchers.  We’ve got the best universities.  We’ve got the best colleges.  We are a young nation still, partly because we’re still a magnet for talent from all around the world.  We’ve got the greatest diversity of talent and ingenuity of any other country.

And so even though there are some people who like to talk about America in decline, or they try to paint things as dark as possible — especially during election season — there is no doubt in my mind that there’s not another country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly trade places with us.  We’ve got everything we need to succeed.  (Applause.)

And most of all, what we’ve got is the American character.  I’ve seen it over the last three and a half years.  I see it in folks who lose their jobs at the age of 50 or 55 and they go back to a community college, studying hard, sitting next to 20-year-olds, and retrain, and suddenly they go back and they get a job in a new industry.  Or the small business owner who could barely keep their doors open but decided, you know what, I’m not going to take a salary, I’m not going to take any pay, because I want to make sure my workers are taken care of because they’ve got families to support.

All across America, it turns out Americans are tougher than any tough times.  We are resilient, and we work hard, and we may get knocked down but we always get back up.  That has been the character of America, and that character has not changed.  (Applause.)

And it’s because of that character that over the last three and a half years we’ve made some progress.  We’re not all the way back to where we need to be, but we’ve created four and a half million new jobs — half a million new jobs in manufacturing.  (Applause.)  We have seen small businesses start to open back up.  We’ve seen workers getting retrained and getting rehired.  And so we’ve made progress.

But our goal in 2007-2008 wasn’t just getting back to where we were before the crisis.  Our goal was to make sure that we built an economy that lasts; where we built an economy where middle-class folks and folks aspiring to the middle class can succeed.  That has been our goal.  That’s what we’re still fighting for.  We are not yet done, and that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America — because we’ve got more work to do.  (Applause.)

Now, I said we’ve got everything we need to solve our problems.  The main impediment we’ve got, the main roadblock we’ve got is politics in Washington.  (Applause.)  You’ve got another party that thinks compromise is a dirty word, and that believes the only way we can move forward is to go back to the same top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Yes.  You’re right!

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, you may have heard that Governor Romney just chose his running mate, Congressman Ryan.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  He’s a good man, he’s a family man.  He’s the ideological leader of the Republicans in Congress, and he’s an articulate spokesperson for Governor Romney’s views.  The problem is those views are wrong.  I fundamentally disagree with their vision for America.  (Applause.)  Their basic prescription for America is to get rid of more regulations on big banks and big corporations, give more tax breaks to the very wealthiest Americans, and their belief is somehow that prosperity then will trickle down on everybody else.  That’s their view.

Look, the centerpiece of Governor Romney’s entire economic plan — the centerpiece of it, his main idea — his one big idea is to give another $5 trillion tax cut on top of the Bush tax cuts that he’s keeping — he wants to keep in place — $5 trillion.  To give you some sense of perspective, our entire defense budget is about half a trillion dollars a year.  So this tax cut would be the equivalent of what we spend on the national defense every single year for the next 10 years — $5 trillion.  Last week we found out that he expects you to pay the tab.  Governor Romney’s tax plan would actually raise taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000 to pay for this big tax break that’s going mostly to the wealthiest folks.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Understand, this is not asking you to pay more taxes to reduce our deficit or to help kids get an education or to rebuild some roads and bridges and ports around the country.  This is asking you to pay more to give an average $250,000 tax break to folks making $3 million a year or more.  That is his big idea.

Now, they have tried to sell this kind of trickle-down fairy dust before.  (Laughter.)  And frankly, they tried it as recently as 2001, 2002, 2003.  And what did we get?  The most sluggish job growth in generations, incomes and wages going down, jobs going overseas, and a huge economic crisis — and, by the way, the deficits kept on going up so by the time I walked into office we had a trillion-dollar deficit.

Why would we want to try that again?  I don’t know about you, but my general rule is if I do something and it doesn’t work, and then I do it again and it doesn’t work again, I stop doing it.  (Laughter.)  I stop doing it.  I try something else.  (Applause.)

So they don’t have a plan to cut the deficit.  They don’t have a plan to create jobs.  They sure don’t have a plan to revive the middle class.  We don’t need more tax cuts for folks like me — folks who are doing fine.  We need tax relief for working Americans.  (Applause.)

So when I came into office, I had promised you that I would cut taxes for middle-class Americans.  And guess what?  I kept that promise.  (Applause.)  The Republicans like to call Democrats the big tax-and-spend folks, but it turns out that your tax rates are lower by about $3,600 for the typical family than they were when I came into office because I kept my promise.  (Applause.)

So now what I want to do is to keep your income tax rates exactly where they are.  I don’t want your taxes going up for the first $250,000 of income that you make — which, by the way, covers about 98 percent of all Americans and 97 percent of all small businesses.  Your taxes — your income taxes would not go up one single dime next year if Congress does what I’ve asked them to do.  (Applause.)

What I have said is, for those who are fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent, you’d still get a tax cut for the first $250,000 you make, but after that we’re asking you to pay a little bit more to help pay down the deficit, and help to invest in making college affordable for young people, and making sure that we’ve got teachers on the job, and making sure that we’re investing in science to help cure cancer and Alzheimer’s.  (Applause.)  That’s how our economy can grow.  That’s how our economy will grow.

We’re going to make sure government does its part.  A lot of people don’t realize we’ve already cut a trillion dollars of government spending to lower our deficit — a trillion dollars.  And we can do more.  I think government has to make sure that it’s good stewards for your taxpayer dollars, that it’s not being wasted — and there’s still more waste that we can get out of there.  But we can’t close the deficit and invest in our future just by cutting taxes for the wealthiest Americans, cutting education, cutting the things that help us grow.  And by the way, the proposal that I’m putting forward that says folks like me and Governor Romney have to pay a little bit more — we actually have tried that, too.  We tried it under Bill Clinton, when we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest budget surplus in history.  (Applause.)

And guess what — folks at the top, they did good, too.  And the reason is, when you give a family farmer, or you give a construction worker, or you give a receptionist, or you give a nurse or a teacher a little bit more money in their pockets, what do they do?

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Spend it.

THE PRESIDENT:  They spend it.  Maybe they can finally trade in that 10-year-old car and get a new car.  Maybe they get a new appliance because the dishwasher or the washing machine is broken.  Maybe they buy a new computer for their kids who are about to go to college.  Maybe they go to a restaurant or, heaven forbid, take a vacation once in a while.

And what that means is then businesses have more customers, and businesses hire more workers, and everybody does better.  You get what’s called a virtuous cycle of everybody feeling more confident about the economy because everybody has got a stake in the economy.

See, I don’t believe in an economy from the top down; I believe that the economy grows from the middle class out and from the bottom up.  (Applause.)  And when everybody is doing well and everybody has got a fair shot, everybody ends up doing better.  That’s how we grow this economy.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

So there are differences in this election on almost every issue.  When the automakers were on the brink of collapse, Governor Romney said “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said, let’s bet on American workers.  (Applause.)  And three and a half years later, the auto industry has come roaring back.

So now, I want to make sure that American manufacturing, advanced hi-tech manufacturing, is taking root right here in America — not in China, not in Germany — right here in Iowa, right here in Oskaloosa, right here in the United States of America.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  Oscaloosa!

THE PRESIDENT:  You know, Governor Romney, he likes to brag about his private sector experience.  His main private sector experience — he did make a lot of money — was investing in companies, some of which were called “pioneers” of outsourcing.  I don’t want a pioneer of outsourcing.  I want somebody who is fighting for insourcing.  I want to bring business back to America.  (Applause.)

I want to stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  Let’s give them to companies that are investing right here in Iowa and right here in the United States of America, hiring American workers, making American products that we’re selling around the world stamped with three proud words:  Made in America.  That’s what I believe in.  That’s why I’m running.  (Applause.)

Let me give you another example.  We’re at a moment right now when homegrown energy, like wind energy, is creating new jobs all across Iowa and all across the country.  And guess what, Governor Romney said let’s end the tax credits for wind energy production.  Let’s get rid of them.

He said that new sources of energy like wind are “imaginary”.  His running mate calls them a “fad.”  During a speech a few months ago, Governor Romney even explained his energy policy this way — I’m quoting here — “You can’t drive a car with a windmill on it.”  (Laughter.)  That’s what he said about wind power.  “You can’t drive a car with a windmill on it.”  Now, I don’t know if he has actually tried that.  I know he has had other things on his car.  (Laughter and applause.)

But if he wants to learn something about wind, all he has got to do is pay attention to what you’ve been doing here in Iowa.  (Applause.)  If he saw what you’ve been doing, he’d see that there are places like Newton, where a few years ago the Maytag plant closed down, jobs dried up.  Folks are now back to work manufacturing these enormous new towers and blades for some of the most sophisticated, high-tech wind turbines on the planet.  The wind industry now supports 7,000 jobs here in Iowa — 75,000 jobs across the country.  (Applause.)  These jobs aren’t a “fad”.  These are good jobs, and they’re a source of pride that we need to fight for.

And if Governor Romney understood what you’ve been doing, he’d know that we used to have to import most of the parts were used for wind turbines — they’re now being made here in America, by American workers in American factories.  That’s not “imaginary” — that’s real.  (Applause.)  That’s part of what we’re fighting for in this election.

If he knew what you’ve been doing, he’d know that 20 percent of Iowa’s electricity now comes from wind, powering our homes and our factories and our businesses in a way that is clean and renewable.  In fact, over the past 4 years, we’ve doubled the amount of electricity America generates for wind.  Across America, we’ve built the equivalent of 12 new Hoover Dams’ worth of wind energy.  Think about that.  Think about that.  (Applause.)

So Governor Romney may have figured out that you can’t drive a car with a windmill on it, but he doesn’t seem to know that America now has enough wind turbines installed to generate enough electricity from wind to power nearly 13 million homes with clean energy.  That’s how we leave something better for the next generation.  That’s worth fighting for.  That’s what’s at stake right now.  (Applause.)

So I want to stop giving $4 billion in taxpayer subsidies that are going to oil companies that are making huge profits and have been subsidized for a hundred years, and let’s keep on investing in the new homegrown energy that’s creating jobs right here in Iowa.  That’s a difference in this election.  That’s why I’m running for President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

We’ve got a whole lot of differences between me and Governor Romney.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  You’re better!  You are better!  You are better!

THE PRESIDENT:  You know, I’ve got to say I agree with that.  (Laughter.)  My ideas are, at least.

Look, in 2008, I said we’d end the war in Iraq — we did.  (Applause.)  We said that we’d go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — we did.  (Applause.)  We are now bringing troops home from Afghanistan.  (Applause.)  America is safer and more secure than when I came into office, because of the extraordinary sacrifices of our men and women in uniform.  (Applause.)

That’s why we’ve invested so much in making sure that the VA is doing its job, making sure that our veterans get the benefits that they have earned.  Because they shouldn’t have to fight for a job or a roof over their heads after they’ve fought for us.  We’ve got to serve them as well as they’ve served us.  (Applause.)

But as they’re now coming home, I want to take about half the money that we’re saving after a decade of war and let’s help put veterans and Americans back to work rebuilding America, doing some nation-building here at home.  (Applause.)  Let’s rebuild our ports and our roads and our bridges and our airports.  We can put folks back to work right now.  It’s good for the economy now.  It will be good for the economy 10 years from now and 20 years from now.

I want to set up a Veterans Jobs Corps that helps local communities hire veterans for firefighters and cops in communities that need them most.  (Applause.)  Those are smart investments in the future.  Governor Romney may have a different idea.  I want to put folks back to work rebuilding America.  And now is the time to do it.

His other idea is, let’s get rid of Obamacare; he says, I’m going to “kill it.”  Well, let me tell you something, it’s true I do care.  So I don’t mind folks calling it Obamacare.  (Applause.)  And what I’ve said is that in a country as rich as ours, we should not see anybody going bankrupt when they get sick.  (Applause.)

The Supreme Court has now spoken.  We are moving forward with this law.  Six and a half million young people can now stay on their parent’s plan.  (Applause.)  Insurance companies can’t deny you coverage because of a preexisting condition.  (Applause.)  Insurance companies can’t drop your coverage when you need it the most.  (Applause.)  For a lot of rural communities, a lot of farmers, it’s hard buying health insurance on your own — you’re now going to be able to pool with other folks so you can get discounted rates just like people who work for big companies.  That will help a lot of communities all across Iowa.  (Applause.)

So we’re not going to go backwards and refight the same fights we had over the last three years.  We’re going forward.  We’re not going backwards.  We don’t need to have those same arguments in Washington.  What we need to do is go ahead and implement this law, and make sure it works.  And if anybody has got good ideas to help further lower health care costs, I’m happy to work with them.  But we’re not going backwards.  We’re going forwards.  That’s what America needs right now.  (Applause.)

I’m running to make sure that we’ve got the best education system in the world.  I want to help local communities hire the best teachers — especially in math and science — give 2 million more slots available in community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs that businesses are hiring for right now.  And I want to make college more affordable for every single young person in America.  (Applause.)  We’ve already done a lot of work making sure that they’re getting help, but I’m also going to work with the colleges and universities to lower tuition once and for all.  Because a higher education is not a luxury in this economy, it is an economic necessity and I want to make sure opportunities are open for everybody, not just for the few.  (Applause.)

All these issues — bringing manufacturing back, helping young people go to school, giving you more health care security — all these issues tie together.  It goes back to what made this country great.  And when I think about my own life, when I think about Michelle’s life — we didn’t come from wealth.  We didn’t come from fame.  But we were lucky enough to be born in a country where here, everybody gets a fair shot, everybody does their fair share, everybody plays by the same set of rules — no matter what you look like, no matter where you come from, no matter what your last name is, you can make it here if you try.  That’s the story of America.  That’s your story.

Your parents, your grandparents, your great-grandparents — they went through struggles.  They went through hardship.  Nothing was given to them.  But they did live in a country where you had a shot.  And we now have an obligation to pass that on to the next generation.  That’s what we have to fight for.

And over the next three months, you’re going to see more TV advertising than you’ve ever seen in your life.  And these folks are spending more money — they’ve got people writing $10 million checks.  And almost all the ads are the same; they basically say, the economy is not where it needs to be and it’s Obama’s fault.  They just kind of repeat that over and over and over again.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  And it’s not!

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, you know what, let me tell you something.  That may be a plan to win an election, but it’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to make our future better.  It’s not a plan to revive the middle class.  They don’t have that plan.  I do have that plan.  (Applause.)

But I’m going to need your help.  I’m going to need everybody here registering to vote.  I’m going to need you to get your friends and neighbors to register to vote.  You can get forms online.  You can go to gottaregister.com — that’s gotta, g-o-t-t-a.  (Laughter.)

But what I learned from you here in Iowa in 2008 is other folks may outspend me, folks may write me off, but when you’ve got ordinary folks pulling together, cutting through the nonsense and focuses on what’s important — when you guys get involved — you can’t be stopped.  Nothing can stop you.  (Applause.)

You will decide the future of this country.  And I’m asking for your help.  Because we’ve got more schools to build, we’ve got more teachers to hire.  We’ve got more troops who have got to come home.  We’ve got more manufacturing plants that we’ve got to build.  We’ve got more Americans we need to put back to work, and we’ve got more doors of opportunity that we have to open for all Americans.

And if you’re willing to stand with me and work with me and make phone calls with me and knock on some doors with me, then we can finish what we started in 2008.  (Applause.)  We can make this middle class strong again.  We can make sure that the future is bright for our kids again.  And we can remind the world just why it is the United States of America is the greatest nation on Earth

God bless you, and God bless the United States of America.  Thank you.  (Applause.)

END
12:04 P.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz August 13, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event at Herman Park in Boone, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at Campaign Event — Boone, IA

Source: WH, 8-13-12 

Herman Park
Boone, Iowa

6:10 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, everybody!  (Applause.)  Thank you!  It’s good to be back!  Thank you so much.  (Applause.)  It is good to be back in Iowa, and it’s good to be back in Boone County!  (Applause.)

A couple of folks I want to acknowledge — first of all, your outstanding former governor and now I think the best Secretary of Agriculture we’ve ever had — Tom Vilsack.  (Applause.)  A great friend of mine, my co-chair for my campaign when I was just getting started in 2007-2008 — he took a risk on me when nobody could pronounce my name — Tom Miller is in the house, Attorney General of the great state of Iowa.  (Applause.) And please give Dave a big round of applause for the great introduction.  (Applause.)

Dave may have mentioned he is a music teacher.  And I told him that Malia and Sasha have been practicing their piano.  (Laughter.)  And Malia plays a little flute.  But he mentioned that he thought — he had heard me sing, and he thought that I had really good pitch.  (Applause.)  So Dave says he’s got a band and maybe after I’m finished with the presidency, he said maybe I could be front man for the band.  (Applause.)  He said maybe I could be lead singer.  That would be all right.  (Applause.)

But, listen, it is wonderful to be back in Iowa.  It is wonderful to see some familiar faces and some good friends on a beautiful summer day.  It was on your front porches and in some of your backyards where our movement for change started.  (Applause.)  We spent a lot of time in Iowa, and I felt like an adopted son of Iowa.  (Applause.)  We took bus tours all throughout the state — although I’ve got to admit the bus wasn’t as nice as the one I’ve got now.  (Laughter.)  And we went to school gyms and family farms and small businesses all across the state.

But here’s the thing — our journey is not done.  It’s not done.  So I’m going to spend the next three days driving all the way across the state, just like we did in 2007 — from Council Bluffs all the way to the Quad Cities — (applause) — and I’m going to work just as hard, maybe harder, in this campaign as I did in the last one because the choice that you in November couldn’t be bigger.

It is not just a choice between two candidates or two political parties.  But more than any election in recent memory, this is a choice between two fundamentally different visions about how we move this country forward.  (Applause.)  And the direction that we choose — the direction that you choose when you walk into that voting booth in November is going to have an impact not just on your lives, but on the lives of these young people here, the lives of your children, the lives of your grandchildren for decades to come.

Think about it.  When we came together four years ago — and it wasn’t just Democrats, we had independents and some Republicans get involved — the idea was to restore the basic bargain that made this country great, the basic idea that says if work hard in this country then you can get ahead; that if you put in the effort and you are responsible, then you can find a job that pays the bills.  You can have a home that you call your own. You won’t go bankrupt when you get sick.  You can retire with some dignity and some respect.  And maybe most importantly, you know that your kids can get a great education and they can dream bigger and do even better than you did.  (Applause.)

That is the core of the American Dream.  That’s the American promise.  (Applause.)  Now, the problem is, is that we had gone through a decade where that promise wasn’t being met, it wasn’t being kept.  So we had gone through a decade where jobs were being shipped overseas, where you were working harder but you were bringing in less.  Costs of college, costs of health care were all going up — cost of food, cost of gas all were going up. We ran two wars on a credit card.  Tax cuts we didn’t need and that didn’t create jobs.  And it all culminated in the worst financial crisis since the Great Depression.

So we knew that meeting these challenges that had been building up for over a decade, that it wasn’t going to be easy.  We knew it was going to take more than one year, or one term, or even one President.  But what we also knew was that Americans are tougher than tough times.  And so, even though this crisis that hit us in 2008 and 2009 was bad — even though a lot of folks lost their jobs and a lot of folks lost homes and a lot of folks lost savings, so that the middle class felt even more under the gun than they were before — what we knew was that the American people are resilient and we are tough.  (Applause.)

And so, for the last three and a half years we’ve rolled up our sleeves and we’ve worked hard.  And small businesses have kept their doors open.  And folks, even if they got laid off, they’ve retrained to find new jobs.  And we created 4.5 million new jobs, half a million more in manufacturing.  The auto industry is back on top.  (Applause.)

And so, we’ve made progress but we’ve got a lot more work to do.  We’ve got a lot more work to do.

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  We can do it!

THE PRESIDENT:  We can do it.  I agree.  (Applause.)  We can.

Now, here’s the thing.  Some people, they’re naysayers and they say, oh, America is declining.  And they try to paint things as dark as possible, especially during election time.  But here’s what I want everybody to know.  We’ve got so many things going for us compared to the rest of the world.  We’ve still got the best workers in the world.  We’ve got the best entrepreneurs in the world.  We’ve got the best scientists and the best researchers in the world.  We’ve got the best colleges and the best universities in the world.  (Applause.)  We know how to work hard.  And we’re a young country and we’re a country that draws on the diversity of folks who want to come here from all around the world to be part of this American Dream.  And most importantly, the crisis has not changed our character.  It hasn’t changed who we are.  It hasn’t changed our sense of determination and our sense of neighborliness and our understanding that we’re in this thing together.

And so we’ve come together, just like we did in 2008, because our mission is not yet finished.  We are here to build an economy where hard work pays off.  And so, no matter who you are or what you look like or where you come from, you can make it if you try here in America.  (Applause.)

That’s what this campaign is about and that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States of America.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE:  Four more years!  Four more years!

THE PRESIDENT:  Just as I said that we’ve got a lot of things going for us, there aren’t any quick fixes or easy solutions to some of our challenges.  We’re going to have to keep working.  We’re going to meet these challenges.  But the main problem we’ve got is not a lack of good ideas.  It’s not that we don’t have good solutions to our problems.  The big problem we’ve got right now is politics in Washington.  (Applause.)  The big problem we’ve got is one party just thinks that compromise is a dirty word.  And they’ve got an economic theory that basically wants to go back to the old top-down economics that got us into this mess in the first place.

Now, look, over the weekend my opponent chose as his running mate the ideological leader of the Republicans in Congress.  And I’ve gotten to know Congressman Ryan.  He’s a good man.  He’s a family man.  He’s a very articulate spokesperson for Governor Romney’s vision.  The problem is it’s the wrong vision for America.  It’s a vision that I fundamentally disagree with.  (Applause.)

Their main recipe for solving America’s problems is getting rid of regulations on big corporations and big banks, and then giving more tax breaks to the wealthiest Americans.  And their theory is that somehow that’s going to lead to jobs and prosperity for everybody.  In fact, the centerpiece of Governor Romney’s entire economic plan is a new — you heard this from Dave — is a new $5 trillion tax cut, a lot of it going to the wealthiest Americans.

Now, keep in mind, these are the folks who say the deficit and the debt are the biggest problem we’ve got.  And yet, they now want to give a $5 trillion tax cut.  I know the numbers get so big, but I just want you to get a sense — our entire defense budget annually is $500 billion.  So what this means is, a $5 trillion tax break over 10 years, that’s the equivalent of the entire defense budget going out as a tax cut every single year.

Now, keep in mind that this is going disproportionately to the wealthiest Americans.  Last week, we found out that Governor Romney expects you, middle-class families, to pick up the tab for this big tax cut.

AUDIENCE:  No!

THE PRESIDENT:  And please don’t take my word for it.  You can go to their website and look at their plan.  And then independent economists have looked at this thing and they said that Governor Romney’s tax plan would actually raise taxes on middle-class families with children by an average of $2,000.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, keep in mind, this is not $2,000 to reduce the deficit, or to grow jobs, or to invest in education, or make college more affordable, or to rebuild our roads.  This is $2,000 to give another $250,000 tax cut to people making more than $3 million a year.

AUDIENCE:  Booo —

THE PRESIDENT:  Now, let me just see a show of hands.  How many folks are making more than $3 million a year?  (Laughter.)  Okay, this guy back here.  (Laughter.)  I’m looking for a campaign contribution.  (Laughter and applause.)  Let me tell you something — they have tried to sell us this trickle-down fairy dust before.  And it did not work then; it won’t work now.  It’s not a plan to create jobs.  It’s not a plan to cut the deficit.  And it’s not a plan to move our economy forward.

We don’t need more tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans.  We don’t need a tax cut for Mr. Romney.  We don’t need a tax cut for me.  We need tax relief for middle-class families who are out there working, to make sure that their kids are healthy and their kids can go to college.  (Applause.)

That’s the choice in this election.  That’s why I’m running for President — because I’ve got a different idea.  I’ve got a different idea than Mr. Romney.

When I came into office, I promised that I would cut middle-class taxes.  And you know what, I’ve kept that promise.  (Applause.)

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  You did!

THE PRESIDENT:  When you hear these Republicans saying that, oh, Obama is all about spending and raising taxes — let me tell you, the typical family is paying $3,600 less in taxes than when I came into office.  (Applause.)  That’s the truth.  That’s a fact.

So now I want to keep taxes right where they are on the first $250,000 of everybody’s income.  So if your family makes $250,000 a year or less — like 98 percent of Americans — you won’t see your income taxes increase by a single dime next year under my plan.  Not one dime.  (Applause.)

Now, if you’re fortunate enough to be in the other 2 percent, you’ll still get a tax cut for your first $250,000 worth of income.  But after that, we’re asking you to contribute a little bit more so we can pay down our deficit and invest in things like education that help our economy grow.  (Applause.)

I’ll make sure the government does its part by cutting away spending we don’t need.  We’ve already cut a trillion dollars of spending we didn’t need and we can do more.  I want to do another trillion, trillion and a half of cuts.

But we’ve also got to match that with folks like me and Governor Romney doing our fair share.  And all we’re asking is that we go back to the same rates that we paid under Bill Clinton.  (Applause.)  And you know what, that was a time when our economy created nearly 23 million new jobs, the biggest budget surplus in history, and millionaires did pretty good too.
See, what happens is that when a teacher or a construction worker or a family farm or a receptionist or a nurse, when they’ve got a little extra money, what do you do?  You end up spending it on things you need.  So maybe you haven’t got a new car in 10, 15 years — you go out and buy a car.  Or maybe the washing machine is broke and you decide to buy a new washing machine.  Maybe you go out to a restaurant on a special occasion. Maybe you take a vacation once in a while.  That money goes into the economy; businesses have more customers; they hire more workers and everybody is better off from top to bottom.

I don’t believe in top-down economics.  I believe in middle class-out economics.  I believe in bottom-up economics.  That’s how you grow an economy.  That’s the choice in this election.  And that’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

There’s a difference between me and Mr. Romney on almost every issue.  When the American auto industry was on the brink of collapse, more than 1 million jobs were on the line, Governor Romney said let’s “let Detroit go bankrupt.”  I said let’s bet on the American worker.  And three years later, the American auto industry is back on top.  GM is number one again.  (Applause.)
Now, so I want to make sure that hi-tech manufacturing jobs are taking root right here in Boone — not in China, not in Germany.

Governor Romney, he likes to tout his private sector experience.  But a lot of that experience is investing in companies that were called “pioneers” of outsourcing.  We don’t need more outsourcing.  We need some insourcing.  (Applause.)
I want to take away tax breaks.  Let’s stop giving tax breaks to companies that are shipping jobs overseas.  Let’s give those tax breaks to companies that are investing right here in Iowa, right here in the United States of America.  (Applause.)  That’s the choice in this election.

My opponent and I disagree when it comes to homegrown energy like wind.  Wind power is creating new jobs all across Iowa.  But Governor Romney says he wants to end the tax credit for wind energy producers.  Now, America generates more than twice as much electricity from wind than when I took office.  (Applause.)  That’s right.  The wind industry supports about 7,000 jobs right here in Iowa.  Without these wind energy tax credits, those jobs are at risk — 37,000 jobs across the country would be at risk.

So my attitude is let’s stop giving taxpayer subsidies to oil companies that don’t need them, and let’s invest in clean energy that will put people back to work right here in Iowa.  That’s a choice in this election.  (Applause.)

I’m running because in 2008, I promised to end the war in Iraq — and I did.  (Applause.)  I promised to go after al Qaeda and bin Laden — and we did.  (Applause.)  We’re putting a timeline to get our troops out of Afghanistan and put Afghans in charge of their own security.  So all of this is possible only because of the extraordinary sacrifice and service of our men and women in uniform.  And we are so proud of them.  (Applause.)

Now, we’ve got to do right by them.  We’ve got to make sure we’re serving our veterans as well as they’ve served us.  (Applause.)  That’s why we’ve put more money into the VA, making sure that folks are getting the benefits that they have earned, whether it’s the wounds that are seen or the wounds that are unseen.

But it also means that after a decade of war, we need to do some nation-building here at home, so that all our men and women in uniform are coming home to good-paying jobs.  (Applause.)
That’s why I’ve said let’s take half the money that we were spending on war and let’s put folks back to work right here in the United States of America.  (Applause.)  Let’s put them back to work rebuilding schools and rebuilding roads and rebuilding bridges.  (Applause.)  And let’s create a Veterans Jobs Corp to help hire veterans to become cops and firefighters in communities that need them the most.  (Applause.)

That’s the America we want to build.  That’s the choice in this election.  That’s why I’m running for a second term as President of the United States.  (Applause.)

I’m running because I want to make sure that once again, America has the best education system in the world.  (Applause.) So I want to help our schools hire and reward the best teachers, especially in math and science.  I want to give 2 million more Americans a chance to go to community colleges to get trained for the jobs that businesses are hiring for right now.  (Applause.)

And we have a plan to push colleges and universities to bring down their cost of tuition, because young people, they can’t be burdened with tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of debt when they go to school.  A higher education isn’t a luxury anymore.  It is an economic necessity in the 21st century.  And we are going to help them get the education that they need.  (Applause.)

Across the board, Governor Romney and I just see the world differently.  When it comes to housing, I want to make sure that everybody who hasn’t yet taken advantage of these historically low interest rates has a chance to refinance their homes.  It can save folks up to $3,000.  Governor Romney’s plan, he said just let the housing market bottom out.  That’s not a solution.  That’s part of the problem.

He has got a different view than I do in terms of how we move this country forward.  When it comes to health care, I guess he used to agree with me because he had the same health care plan that I do in Massachusetts.  (Applause.)  And, by the way, that plan is working pretty good.  (Applause.)

Now, he says he wants to kill Obamacare.  Well, first of all, I don’t mind it being called Obamacare because, it’s true, I do care.  That’s why I passed the bill.  I do care.  (Applause.) I care about folks who have preexisting conditions and couldn’t get insurance.  That’s why we passed the bill.  (Applause.)  I care about the 6.5 million young people who can now stay on their parent’s plan because of this bill.  (Applause.)  I care about the seniors who were paying too much for their prescription drugs.  We’re closing the doughnut hole because of this bill and lowering their prescription drug costs.  (Applause.)

So I don’t believe that you should go broke when you get sick in this country.  And I’ll work with anybody who wants to continue to improve our health care system.  But the Supreme Court has spoken — the law is here to stay.  We’re not spending the next four years refighting that battle.  (Applause.)  We’re moving forward.  We’re not going backwards.  That’s a choice in this election.  (Applause.)

So, Boone, all these things — whether it’s bringing manufacturing jobs back, putting folks back to work in construction, protecting your health care, making sure our kids are getting the best education possible and they can afford to go to college — all these things that make up that American Dream, that make up a middle-class life, they all tie together.  They’re central to that idea that made this country great, the promise that if you work hard you get ahead; that everybody has a fair shot and everybody is doing their fair share and everybody is playing by the same set of rules.

It’s the promise that our parents and our grandparents passed down to us.  That’s the promise that allowed me as the child of a single mom to become President of the United States.  (Applause.)  It’s the promise that allowed Michelle, whose dad was a blue-collar worker and her mom was a secretary, to become the First Lady.  (Applause.)  It’s the promise that all of you have seen in your own lives.  And now, it’s time for us to pass that down to our kids and our grandkids.

So over the next three months, the other side will spend more money than you have ever seen running the same ad over and over again, basically, which says, the economy is not where it should be and it’s Obama’s fault.  They just repeat it over and over again.  They’ve got different variations, but it’s all the same theme.  And —

AUDIENCE MEMBER:  They’re not right!

THE PRESIDENT:  Well, they’re not constrained by the facts, in terms of these ads that they run.  (Applause.)  They’ll just make stuff up.  And that may be a plan to win the election, but the reason they’ve got to do that is because they know they don’t have a plan to create jobs.  They don’t have a plan to grow the economy.  They don’t have a plan to revive the middle class.  What they’re selling, you’re not buying.  That’s why they don’t talk about it.

I’ve got that plan.  And we can make it work, but I’m going to need your help.  I‘ve got to make sure everybody here is registered to vote.  I’ve got to make sure everybody is getting their friends and their neighbors, their family members to register to vote.  (Applause.)  You can get a voter registration form online.  You go to GottaRegister.com.  That’s gotta — g-o-t-t-a –GottaRegister.com.

But if you guys get involved, we can’t lose.  I’ve been outspent before and I’ve been counted out before.  But the reason I love this state is because all of you gave me a chance.  (Applause.)  I had a chance to talk to you and meet you, and share stories with you.

And I used to say back in 2088 that I’m not a perfect man and I won’t be a perfect President.  But I told you I’d always tell you what I thought, always tell you where I stood, and I’d fight every single day as hard as I knew how for you.  And the reason is because I see myself in you.  (Applause.)  When I see your grandparents, I see my grandparents.  And when I see your kids, I see Malia and Sasha.

And we know what it’s like to work and to fight hard to get ahead.  And I want everybody in America to have that same chance that I had.  Because we have come too far to turn back now, Iowa. (Applause.)  We’ve got too many good jobs to create.  We’ve got too many great teachers to hire.  We’ve got too many schools to rebuild.  We’ve got too many students who need to get a college education.  (Applause.)  We’ve got too many wind farms to build.  We’ve got more troops we’ve got to bring back home.  We’ve got to open up more doors to opportunity.  (Applause.)

And if you’ll stand with me and work with me, and organize with me and knock on doors with me, Boone, I promise you, we will win Iowa and we will win this election.  (Applause.)  And we’ll remind the world why this is the greatest nation on Earth.  (Applause.)

God bless you, and God bless America.  (Applause.)

END
5:40 P.M. CDT

Full Text Campaign Buzz August 13, 2012: President Barack Obama’s Speech at a Campaign Event at McIntosh Family Farm, Missouri Valley, Iowa

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

Remarks by the President at McIntosh Family Farms, Missouri Valley, Iowa

Source: WH, 8-13-12

McIntosh Family Farm
Missouri Valley, Iowa

1:10 P.M. CDT

THE PRESIDENT:  Today we are here at the McIntosh Family Farms, here in Missouri Valley, Iowa, and we just got a tour from Dean, Don, Richard and Roger.  And like a lot of families in this area and across America, the McIntoshes are suffering under one of the worst droughts in 50 years.

We’ve just been through the warmest 12-month period ever recorded, and right now more than 60 percent of the country is under drought conditions.  It’s hot, it’s dry, and the summer is not over yet.

Things are especially tough for farmers and ranchers, like the McIntoshes, who depend on a good growing season to pay the bills and keep a roof over their heads.  The McIntosh family has been farming in the Missouri Valley for 96 years, so they’ve seen just about everything, but this is the worst drought they can remember in decades.  As a result, their corn yield is off by about a third, and some of their neighbors in surrounding areas are struggling even worse.

Here in Iowa, almost half of the corn crop and more than a third of the soybean crop is in poor or very poor condition.  Livestock producers are having trouble feeding their herds.  Crops and livestock are a $30 billion business in Iowa, and that’s a huge chunk of the economy that’s being put at risk.  And states all across the heartland have it just as bad.

Now, the best way to help these states is for Congress to act.  They need to pass a farm bill that not only helps farmers and ranchers respond to natural disasters, but also makes necessary reforms and gives them some long-term certainty.  But the folks suffering from this drought can’t wait for Congress to do its job.  So in the meantime, I’ve made sure that my administration, under the leadership of Secretary Tom Vilsack, is doing everything we can to provide relief to those who need it.

I’ve directed the Department of Agriculture and the Small Business Administration to help give farmers and small businesses across 32 states access to low-interest emergency loans.  We’ve opened up federal land for grazing.  We’re working with insurance companies to give farmers a short grace period on their premiums, since money will be tight for a lot of families at the end of the crop year.  And last week, we announced another $30 million to help get more water to livestock and restore land affected by the drought.

Today we’re going to go even further, and we’re focusing on helping people who make their living by bringing cattle, pigs, sheep, and other animals to market.  The way things work right now, farmers who raise crops are eligible for subsidized insurance to help cushion the blow if disaster strikes.  But livestock producers don’t have that option.  So when grasslands dry up and they’ve got to sell their animals early, it’s a huge financial blow and can affect markets all across the country.  We can make a difference, though, and here’s what we’re going to do.

It turns out that the federal government buys a lot of meat for military bases, hospitals, colleges, food banks and cafeterias.  And because of the drought, there are a lot of folks out there that are trying to sell meat right now.  So just like you might buy more chicken when it’s on sale and freeze it, we are going to stock up.  Prizes are low; farmers and ranchers need help; so it makes sense.  It makes sense for farmers who get to sell more of their product, and it makes sense for taxpayers who will save money because we’re getting food we would have bought anyway at a better price.

And we’re not just talking about a few strips of bacon here. Today the Department of Agriculture announced that it will buy up to $100 million worth of pork products, $50 million worth of chicken, and $20 million worth of lamb and farm-raised catfish.  And the Department of Defense, which bought about 94 million pounds of beef and 64 million pounds of pork last year, will encourage their vendors to buy more now and freeze if for later.

Understand this won’t solve the problem.  We can’t make it rain.  But this will help families like the McIntoshes in states across the country, including here in Iowa.  And we’re going to keep doing what we can to help because that’s what we do.  We are Americans.  We take care of each other.  And when our neighbors hit a rough patch, we step up and help out.

So my message to the McIntoshes and everybody who is suffering through the drought, we understand that we depend on you, America depends on you to put food on the table and feed our families, and as a consequence, we’re going to make sure that we’re there for you — not just today, but every day until this drought passes.  That is a promise.  And as President, I’ll do everything in my power to make sure that you get the relief that you deserve.

So, thank you very much, everybody.  God bless you, and God bless America.  (Applause.)

END
1:16 P.M. CDT

%d bloggers like this: