OTD in History… July 12, 1984, Democrat Mondale chooses Geraldine Ferraro as his vice presidential running mate

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OTD in History… July 12, 1984, Democrat Mondale chooses Geraldine Ferraro as his vice presidential running mate

By Bonnie K. Goodman, BA, MLIS

Source: Getty Images

On this day in history July 12, 1984, Democratic presidential nominee Walter Mondale announces he chose Queens, New York Representative Geraldine A. Ferraro, 48 as his vice presidential running mate, the first time a woman was a nominee on a major party ticket. Mondale announced his running mate at the State Capitol in Saint Paul in his home state of Minnesota. Mondale lagging in the polls hoped that adding a woman to the ticket would boost his standing; he was considering both Ferraro and then San Francisco Mayor Dianne Feinstein.

In his announcement, Mondale expressed, “I looked for the best Vice President and I found her in Gerry Ferraro…. This is an exciting choice.” Mondale emphasized his historic decision, saying, ‘’History speaks to us today. Our founders said in the Constitution, ‘We the people’ — not just the rich, or men, or white, but all of us. Our message is that America is for everyone who works hard and contributes to our blessed country.’’

Ferraro also noted the historical element of her nomination, stating, ‘’When Fritz Mondale asked me to be his running mate he sent a powerful signal about the direction he wants to lead our country. American history is about doors being open, doors of opportunity for everyone no matter who you are, as long as you ‘re willing to earn it. There’s an electricity in the air, an excitement, a sense of new possibilities and of pride.’’

The former vice president under Jimmy Carter faced a tough opponent in Republican incumbent Ronald Reagan and his running mate Vice President George H. W. Bush. Reagan rehabilitation of the economy from the recession and tough stance on Communism gained him favor with American voters as he could proudly say it was “It’s Morning Again in America.” The Mondale-Ferraro ticket would lose in the 1984 election to incumbent Reagan and Bush, where the Republican ticket won in the biggest landslide in American history, with Mondale only winning Minnesota.

It would take another 24 years for a woman to appear on a major party ticket when in 2008 Republican John McCain chose Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his running mate. McCain and Palin would lose to the Democratic ticket of Illinois Senator Barack Obama and Delaware Senator Joe Biden, where Obama became the first African American nominee and president in American history. In 2016, women would get closer, with the Democratic Party choosing former First Lady and 2008 candidate Hillary Clinton as their nominee for president, the glass ceiling broke more, but not enough, Clinton would win the popular vote but lose the Electoral College vote to Republican Donald Trump.

Bonnie K. Goodman has a BA and MLIS from McGill University and has done graduate work in religion at Concordia University. She is a journalist, librarian, historian & editor, and a former Features Editor at the History News Network & reporter at Examiner.com where she covered politics, universities, religion and news. She has a dozen years experience in education & political journalism.

Political Headlines February 4, 2013: Allida Black: Founder of Hillary Clinton SuperPAC: ‘No Doubt She’s Gonna Run’ in Campaign 2016

POLITICAL HEADLINES

https://historymusings.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/pol_headlines.jpg?w=600

OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 113TH CONGRESS:

THE HEADLINES….

Founder of Hillary Clinton SuperPAC: ‘No Doubt She’s Gonna Run’ in 2016

Source: ABC News Radio, 2-4-13

ABC/Martin H. Simon

Hillary Clinton had not even stepped down from her post as Secretary of State, when a superPAC supporting her run for president in 2016 was filed with the Federal Election Commission.  The superPAC’s website launched over the weekend.

Allida Black is the chair and founder of the group, and says she is, as the superPAC is named, “Ready for Hillary.”

“I’ve been waiting for Hillary all my life.  But I am more than ready this time,” says Black, who campaigned for Clinton in 14 states in 2008….READ MORE

Campaign Headlines November 6, 2012: What Time Are My State’s Election Polls Open?

CAMPAIGN 2012

CAMPAIGN BUZZ 2012

THE HEADLINES….

What Time Are My State’s Election Polls Open?

Source: ABC News Radio, 11-5-12

Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images

Below is each state’s poll hours and website for information on elections, compiled by ABC News. For more, see our election map HERE.

Alabama

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Alaska

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Alaska Time zone and the Hawaii-Aleutian Time zone.

More info HERE.

Arizona

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

Arkansas

Polls are open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

California

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Time.

More info HERE.

Colorado

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

Connecticut

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Delaware

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

District of Columbia

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Florida

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in Eastern and Central Time zones.

More info HERE.

Georgia

Polls are open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Hawaii

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Hawaii Time.

More info HERE.

Idaho

Polls are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. in the Mountain and Pacific Time zones.

More info HERE.

Illinois

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Indiana

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Iowa

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. Central time.

More info HERE.

Kansas

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Kentucky

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern and Central Time.

More info HERE.

Louisiana

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Maine

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m. Eastern Time in municipalities with a population less than 500. For municipalities with a population of more than 500, polls are open from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m.

More info HERE.

Maryland

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Massachusetts

Most polling stations are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time, with some municipalities opening as early as 5:45 a.m.

More info HERE.

Michigan

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central and Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Minnesota

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time, although some smaller municipalities may stay open until 10 p.m.

More info HERE.

Mississippi

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Missouri

Polls are open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Montana

Polling places vary across the state.

More info HERE.

Nebraska

Polls are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time, and 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

Nevada

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Pacific Time.

More info HERE.

New Hampshire

Polling times vary across the state.

More info HERE.

New Jersey

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

New Mexico

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

New York

Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

North Carolina

Polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

North Dakota

Polling times vary.

More info HERE.

Ohio

Polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Oklahoma

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Oregon

In person voting will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Pacific Time.

More info HERE.

Pennsylvania

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Rhode Island

Most polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

South Carolina

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

South Dakota

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the Central and Mountain Time zones.

More info HERE.

Tennessee

Most polls will be open between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. in the Eastern and Central Time zones.

More info HERE.

Texas

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Utah

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

Vermont

Polls will be open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Virginia

Polls will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time.

More info HERE.

Washington

Washington is a mail in ballot state.

More info HERE.

West Virginia

Polls will be open from 6:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Wisconsin

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Central Time.

More info HERE.

Wyoming

Polls will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mountain Time.

More info HERE.

Featured Historians Julian E. Zelizer: Americans want security for 2012

FEATURED HISTORIANS

Julian E. Zelizer: Americans want security for 2012

Source: Julian E. Zelizer, CNN, 8-15-11
tzleft.zelizer_newpic.jpg
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Julian Zelizer: Economic security is going to be defining theme of 2012 race
  • Americans want to know jobs are safe and available, he says
  • Zelizer: Neither party has done a good job developing policies for economic security
  • He says FDR provided security to U.S., while Ford and Carter didn’t

Julian E. Zelizer is a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University. He is the author of “Jimmy Carter” (Times Books) and editor of a book assessing former President George W. Bush’s administration, published by Princeton University Press.

Just as the 2004 presidential election was all about the concept of security, the same term will shape the campaigns of 2012.

But this time around, the issue is not national security and the threat of terrorists but the search for security amid the ongoing struggles that Americans have faced with the economy.

High unemployment, laggard economic growth and a turbulent stock market have left many middle class Americans terrified about what comes next. Almost three-quarters of Americans, according to a recent Reuters/Ipsos poll, said that the country is moving in the wrong direction.

During the 2012 election, voters will be looking for a candidate who can restore some sense of economic security: a candidate who can provide them with confidence that their jobs won’t disappear (and that new jobs will emerge for those without them) and that their income will remain steady….

Republicans have not provided much of a vision of how they would restore economic security for the middle class. They have focused on the traditional conservative magic bullet solutions of deficit reduction and government spending cuts — without tax increases — neither of which would have any major impact on the current unemployment rates or address the underlying challenges that the economy has been facing for over a decade.

Today’s candidates from both parties are closer to their predecessors in the 1970s than the 1930s. Political leaders are having trouble providing guidance and hope as a devastating economy has turned life into a constant struggle for many Americans. In 2012, the nation will have a chance to hear what each party plans to do to turn things around. The candidate who can offer a more compelling case is likely to end up in the White House.

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