Political Headlines September 9, 2013: President Barack Obama’s Syria Media Blitz Includes All Major News Programs

POLITICAL HEADLINES

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OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 113TH CONGRESS:

THE HEADLINES….

Obama’s Syria Media Blitz Includes All Major News Programs

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

Before President Obama makes his case to the nation on Tuesday for military action against Syria, he’ll sit down with the anchors of the major U.S. news networks and PBS on Monday in separate one-on-one interviews….READ MORE

Political Musings September 8, 2013: President Barack Obama’s Syria strike PR includes weekly address, interviews & televised speech

POLITICAL MUSINGS

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OBAMA PRESIDENCY & THE 113TH CONGRESS:

OP-EDS & ARTICLES

Obama’s Syria strike PR includes weekly address, interviews & televised speech (Video)

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Video
President Barack Obama launched a campaign to gain support for a military strike against Syria; he devoted his weekly address released on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2013 to the Syria crisis, will be interviewed on Monday, Sept. 9 by six…READ MORE

History Buzz July 15, 2010: William Stewart Simkins & the UT Dorm Controversy & Niall Ferguson on America’s Decline

HISTORY BUZZ:

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

IN FOCUS: HNN on Facebook & Twitter

IN FOCUS: July 4th Myths & History

  • T.H. Breen: The Secret Founding Fathers: Enough about Washington, Jefferson and the other Founding Fathers, says historian T.H. Breen, on July 4th we should celebrate the forgotten, ordinary men who took to the streets to fight British tyranny—and are the bedrock of our republican values…. – The Daily Beast, 7-3-10
  • T.H. Breen: ‘American Insurgents’ fired first shots of Revolutionary War: Common men — and some women, too — set the stage and paved the path that led to the Revolutionary War and America’s independence from England.
    Author T.H. Breen tells readers of “American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People” (Hill and Wang, $27) that a bevy of common men — and some women, too — set the stage and paved the path that led to the Revolutionary War. What’s more, they were doing it a few years in advance of the bigwigs who get the credit.
    Famous names, such as Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Adams, John Adams, Thomas Paine, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington owe much to others who struggled for independence in the years leading up to 1776…. – News OK, 7-3-10
  • Obama celebrates July 4th at White House barbecue: Calling the Declaration of Independence more than words on an aging parchment, President Barack Obama marked the Fourth of July on Sunday by urging Americans to live the principles that founded the nation as well as celebrate them.
    “This is the day when we celebrate the very essence of America and the spirit that has defined us as a people and as a nation for more than two centuries,” Obama told guests at a South Lawn barbecue honoring service members and their families. “We celebrate the principles that are timeless, tenets first declared by men of property and wealth but which gave rise to what Lincoln called a new birth of freedom in America — civil rights and voting rights, workers’ rights and women’s rights, and the rights of every American,” he said. “And on this day that is uniquely American we are reminded that our Declaration, our example, made us a beacon to the world.” “Now, of course I’ll admit that the backyard’s a little bigger here, but it’s the same spirit,” Obama said to laughter. “Michelle and I couldn’t imagine a better way to celebrate America’s birthday than with America’s extraordinary men and women in uniform and their families.” “Today we also celebrate all of you, the men and women of our armed forces, who defend this country we love,” he told the enthusiastic group…. – AP, 7-4-10
  • 4th of July: Facts about the Declaration of Independence:
    On July 2 the Continental Congress voted to declare independence from Great Britain and on 4th of July 1776 the same Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence. The Founding Fathers signed the document in August, after it was finished….
    Another fact about this important day in the United States of America’s history is that Thomas Jefferson (3rd U.S President) and John Adams (2nd U.S. President) both died on 4th of July 1826, when the country was celebrating 50th anniversary of the signing.
    Although the capital city of the United States of America is Washington named after the great president, George Washington, the first U.S President, did not sign the Declaration of Independence because he was head of the Continental Army and no longer a member in the Continental Congress.
    The first anniversary resulted in a huge party in Philadelphia in 1777. There were fireworks, cannons, barbecues and toasts. – Providing News, 7-4-10
  • Thomas Jefferson made slip in Declaration: Library of Congress officials say Thomas Jefferson made a Freudian slip while penning a rough draft of the Declaration of Independence. In an early draft of the document Jefferson referred to the American population as “subjects,” replacing that term with the word “citizens,” which he then used frequently throughout the final draft. The document is normally kept under lock and key in one of the Library’s vaults. On Friday morning, the first time officials revealed the wording glitch, it traveled under police escort for a demonstration of the high-tech imaging. It was the first time in 15 years that the document was unveiled outside of its oxygen-free safe…. – A copy of the rough draft of the Declaration can be viewed online at http://www.myLOC.gov….- AP, 7-2-104th of July quotes: Best Independence Day quotes and sayings:
  • The United States is the only country with a known birthday. (James G. Blaine)
  • This nation will remain the land of the free only so long as it is the home of the brave. (Elmer Davis)
  • Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. (Abraham Lincoln)
  • We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it. (William Faulkner)
  • It is the love of country that has lighted and that keeps glowing the holy fire of patriotism. (J. Horace McFarland)
  • America is a tune. It must be sung together. (Gerald Stanley Lee)
  • The winds that blow through the wide sky in these mounts, the winds that sweep from Canada to Mexico, from the Pacific to the Atlantic – have always blown on free men. (Franklin D. Roosevelt)
  • Where liberty dwells, there is my country. (Benjamin Franklin)
  • Sometimes people call me an idealist. Well, that is the way I know I am an American. America is the only idealistic nation in the world. (Woodrow Wilson) – Providing News, 7-4-10
  • Local NYer standing up for Horatio Gates: For a 14th straight year, James S. Kaplan spent the Fourth of July walking in the middle of the night among ghosts of the American Revolution…. – NYT (7-5-10)
  • Fifth of July is also a day to celebrate, say historians: The unassuming date could also merit respect for providing a pair of tidy bookends in the United States labor movement. In 1934, police officers in San Francisco opened fire on striking longshoreman in one of the country’s most significant and violent labor clashes. On the same date a year later, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the National Labor Relations Act, guaranteeing the rights of employees to organize and to bargain collectively with their employers.
    “That’s a big moment in American labor history, absolutely,” said Joshua B. Freeman, a labor historian at the City University of New York…. NYT (7-5-10)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

HISTORY NEWS:

  • Amazement at the speed and efficacy of historical scholarship in UT dorm case: Russell’s paper — published on the Social Science Research Network — drew attention to William Stewart Simkins (1842-1929), for whom a dormitory at the University of Texas at Austin was named in the 1950s. Simkins was a longtime law professor at Texas, but before that, he and his brother helped organize the Florida branch of the Ku Klux Klan — an organization he defended throughout his life, including while serving as a law professor. Russell’s paper led to public discussion in Austin of the appropriateness of naming a university building for a Klan leader. On Friday, William Powers Jr., president of the University of Texas at Austin, announced that he will ask the university system’s Board of Regents this month to change the name…. – Inside Higher Ed (7-12-10)
  • Taiwanese historian sentenced to prison for libel: Chen Feng-yang, chairperson of the history department at National Taiwan Normal University (NTNU), was found guilty of defamation charges brought by Lu Jian-rong, an ex-adjunct history professor at NTNU, after Chen allegedly attacked Lu’s reputation on NTNU’s website by calling him “a historian rotten from the roots” who is “malicious, sinful, and unforgivable” the court said…. – China Post (Taiwan) (7-9-10)
  • UMN’s graduate programs face ‘right-sizing’ in tough times: Faced with its own money troubles, the University of Minnesota is turning away more graduate students who would get financial help such as teaching positions. Still welcome are those who pay their own way or pursue in-demand studies such as biomedical sciences…. – Minneapolis Star Tribune (7-8-10)
  • Niall Ferguson: Historian warns of sudden collapse of American ‘empire’: Harvard professor and prolific author Niall Ferguson opened the 2010 Aspen Ideas Festival Monday with a stark warning about the increasing prospect of the American “empire” suddenly collapsing due to the country’s rising debt level…. – Aspen Daily News (7-6-10)
  • New Ed. Dept. report documents the end of tenure: Some time this fall, the U.S. Education Department will publish a report that documents the death of tenure. Innocuously titled “Employees in Postsecondary Institutions, Fall 2009,” the report won’t say it’s about the demise of tenure. But that’s what it will show. Over just three decades, the proportion of college instructors who are tenured or on the tenure track plummeted: from 57 percent in 1975 to 31 percent in 2007…. – CHE (7-4-10)
  • Review of Harvard Scholar’s Arrest Cites Failure to Communicate: A new review of the arrest of a prominent scholar in black studies at his own home last July blames the incident on “failed communications” between the police officer and the scholar…. – CHE (6-30-10)
  • University of Colorado Professor Uncovers First Holocaust Liberation Photos, Highlights Overlapping Narratives: David Shneer, associate professor of history and director of the Program in Jewish Studies at the University of Colorado at Boulder, benefited from that openness. He began researching the issue in 2002, when he visited a photography gallery in Moscow. The exhibition was titled “Women at War,” and Shneer noticed that the photographers’ names sounded Jewish. He asked the curator, who said, “Of course they’re Jewish. All the photographers were Jewish.” Before the war, many of those developing the profession of Soviet photojournalism were Jewish, Shneer noted…. – AScribe.org (7-1-10)

OP-EDs:

  • Sean Wilentz and Julian E. Zelizer: Teaching ‘W’ as History The challenges of the recent past in the classroom: Even before the 2008 election, debate had begun about how President George W. Bush would be remembered in American history. There were many reasons that so many people were so quickly interested in Bush’s historical reputation. Given how intensely polarized voters were about his presidency, it was natural that experts and pundits would scramble to evaluate it. Bush’s spectacular highs and lows—the stratospheric rise in his public approval following the attacks of September 11, 2001… – Chronicle of Higher Ed, 7-11-10
  • Greg Mitchell: Andrew Bacevich, His Lost Son, and Obama’s War in AfghanistanThe Nation (7-8-10)
  • Joe Conason: Sure, listen to Niall Ferguson — but always ignore his bad advice: As a celebrity intellectual, Ferguson much prefers the broad, bold stroke to the careful detail, so it is scarcely surprising that he endorsed Wisconsin Republican Paul Ryan’s “wonderful” budget template, confident that his audience in Aspen would know almost nothing about that document…. – Salon (7-7-10)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Charles Ogletree tackles Henry Louis Gates’ arrest in new book: Harvard law professor and author Charles Ogletree, a longtime friend and colleague of Gates’, who also served as his legal counsel in the case, examines the incident and its legal and social implications in “The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America.”
    The book is about much more than the arrest of an acclaimed black professor. Ogletree focuses on the long, troubled relationship between police and black men, as well as racial profiling by law enforcement and black Americans’ continuing quest for racial fairness in the criminal justice system and in everyday life. – Philadelphia Inquirer, 7-14-10
  • BARRY STRAUSS: A Failed Rebel’s Long Shadow: Now comes a distinguished contribution to the field by the British journalist and classicist Peter Stothard. “Spartacus Road” is a work of history, telling us of Spartacus’ life and legend, but it is also a travel book, as Mr. Stothard follows Spartacus’ rebellious path through 2,000 miles of Italian countryside…. – WSJ, 7-10-10
  • Niall Ferguson’s “High Financier: The Lives and Time of Siegmund Warburg”:
    There’s a saying in publishing that the only brand is the author. Unquestionably Niall Ferguson is a brand, thanks to sweeping, Big Picture, Big Idea books such as “Colossus” and “The Ascent of Money.” With Ferguson, we expect provocative interpretations of epochs, empires and civilizations. Not this time. In “High Financier,” Ferguson follows a solitary capitalist into the weeds and flowers of his financial garden. This is no failing, of course; biography is simply a different enterprise. Rather than overarching, it often must be minute and particular. And Siegmund Warburg was extremely particular…. – WaPo, 7-9-10
  • Jane Brox: Shining a light on the way artificial light has changed our lives: BRILLIANT The Evolution of Artificial Light
    But, Jane Brox asks, at what cost? Though she celebrates human ingenuity and technical advances in “Brilliant,” her history of artificial light, Brox also presents damning evidence that in our millennia-long quest for ever more and brighter light, we’ve despoiled the natural world, abandoned our self-sufficiency and trained ourselves to sleep and dream less while working more. It’s time, Brox urges, to “think rationally about light and what it means to us.” Yes, the history of artificial light has its dark side, for those who aren’t too dazzled to detect it…. – WaPo, 7-9-10
  • Christiane Bird: Book review of “The Sultan’s Shadow,” about a 19th-century Arab princess: THE SULTAN’S SHADOW One Family’s Rule at the Crossroads of East and West
    Christiane Bird’s account of the Al Busaidi sultans in Oman and Zanzibar during the 19th century is, she says, “a tale rich with modern-day themes: Islam vs. Christianity, religion vs. secularism, women’s rights, human rights, multiculturalism, and a nation’s right to construct its own destiny.” In truth those themes are not quite so visible in “The Sultan’s Shadow” as its author would have us believe, for despite her lucid prose and dogged research, the book never comes together into a coherent whole. Instead, it is an oddly arranged miscellany, some parts of which are exceptionally interesting, but she never manages to connect them to each other in a convincing fashion…. – WaPo, 7-9-10
  • Reviews of ‘Romancing Miss Bronte,’ ‘Charlotte and Emily,’ ‘Jane Slayre’ – WaPo, 7-13-10
  • Kim Washburn: New Palin Biography Aimed At 9- To 12-Year-Olds ‘Speaking Up’ Set For September ReleaseWFTV, 7-9-10
  • Jack Rakove on Gary B. Nash: The Ring and the Crack: The Liberty Bell Yale University Press, 242 pp., $24
    It would be easy to assume that the flag and the anthem have always been the central cultural symbols of our nationality. But in fact that has not been the case, writes Gary Nash, in this fast-moving and engaging history of a different and, he argues, superior, symbol: the Liberty Bell in Philadelphia. The Pledge of Allegiance to the flag was not composed until 1892, eventually becoming the source of daily school recitals and occasional litigation, from the Jehovah’s Witnesses of the late 1930s and early 1940s to the atheist Michael Newdow’s more recent judicial quest. Then, too, the Stars and Stripes went through a long post-Civil War period as something less than a banner of universal nationality. Perhaps even now, lingering Southern attachment to the rival Stars and Bars may embody more than Confederate re-enactors’ cultural fondness for the Lost Cause. And while the “Star Spangled Banner” was composed back in 1814, only in 1931 did it acquire its official status as national anthem…. – TNR, 7-2-10

FEATURES:

  • Historian calls on new generation: “There’s a lot of what we do not know.” That’s what Dr. Mitch Kachun said about Collins in one of his two speeches at the Juneteenth celebration at Brandon Park on Saturday. Kachun, a professor of history at Western Michigan University, has extensively researched local African-American author and teacher Julia Collins. The professor expressed being gratified he could take part in helping to finally recognize Collins’ work after 140 years. He said his research was done so he could help better understand and appreciate her life…. – Sun Gazette, 6-20-10
  • Brian Black: A Look At The U.S.’s Man-Made Environmental Disasters: …Here are some of the country’s most notable environmental disasters with human influence, both large-scale and small-scale, and how the government has dealt with them…. – National Journal (7-8-10)
  • A walk through history: UTEP effort highlights Hispanics’ significance: As far as historian David Romo is concerned, the streets of South El Paso represent a living textbook that can help students understand the complexities of the Mexican Revolution of 1910.
    “The role of El Paso in the revolution by any criteria should be part of not only the El Paso school curriculum but the national curriculum,” Romo said. “Unfortunately, it’s mostly ignored by the textbooks.”…. – El Paso Times (7-6-10)
  • Census historian weighs in on electronic future of census: As hundreds of thousands of workers knock on doors this summer to collect information for the 2010 Census, momentum is mounting to drag future Censuses into the 21st century….
    “Using the Postal Service was an enormous innovation in 1970″ when Census forms were first mailed (previous Censuses were door-to-door surveys), says Margo Anderson, a professor of history and urban studies at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and an expert on Census history. “We’re 40 years later, and the mail isn’t the official way most people get their information or communicate. It’s really outmoded.”… – USA Today (7-6-10)
  • Soccer historian tells of South African soccer’s origins among political prisoners: “These men believed that there would be a free South Africa while they were still alive,” said Chuck Korr, an emeritus professor of history at the University of Missouri at St. Louis and the author of a book about the soccer league called “More Than Just a Game.”… – NYT (7-5-10)

PROFILES:

  • Easton historian worked on Emmy-nominated The Pacific: Donald L. Miller, a Lafayette College history professor, was the only person on the project who personally interviewed Eugene Sledge, one of three Marines who fought in the Pacific on whom the series is based…. – The Morning Call, 7-8-10
  • As a historian in the House, Fred Beuttler puts current events in perspective: Historians do not do breaking news. Historians do not do the latest scandal scoops, election-night projections, or instant updates of Washington’s winners and losers. So it is no surprise that the media’s demand for historians is scant. But every now and then, when the breaking political news from Capitol Hill is in dire need of historical context, journalists and politicians alike go looking for Fred Beuttler… – WaPo (7-6-10)
  • 21st-century technology helps Princeton U historian John Haldon study Byzantine era: Princeton University historian John Haldon, a leading authority on medieval Byzantine history, can’t really remember a time when history didn’t intrigue him…. These days, Haldon is a professor of Byzantine history and Hellenic studies at Princeton…. NJ.com (7-5-10)
  • Kelly Lytle Hernández: UCLA professor chronicles rise of U.S. Border Patrol in new book: However, by the middle of the 20th century, the U.S. Border Patrol had shifted its focus and was concentrating its efforts on policing undocumented Mexican immigrants, a practice that continues to this day, UCLA historian Kelly Lytle Hernández writes in “Migra!: A History of the U.S. Border Patrol” (University of California Press, 2010).
    Drawing on long-neglected archival sources in both the U.S. and Mexico, Lytle Hernández uncovers the little-known history of how Mexican immigrants slowly became the primary focus of U.S. immigration law enforcement and demonstrates how racial profiling of Mexicans developed in the Border Patrol’s enforcement of the nation’s immigration laws…. – UCLA Newsroom, 6-17-10

QUOTES:

  • Richard Norton Smith, David Greenberg: When Adversity Comes Calling, Some Actually Answer the Door: As a self-styled student of American history, Mr. Blagojevich would have a hard time comparing himself to Abraham Lincoln, George Washington, Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy or even Gerald Ford when it comes to dealing with duress… – NYT, 7-11-10
  • Walter Wark: Spy Swaps Not a Cold War Relic: The Soviet Union is now gone, and Berlin is a single city in a reunited Germany. But, as intelligence historian Walter Wark of the University of Toronto says, the latest exchange shows that spy swaps have not gone out of date.
    “We have a tendency to forget that spying goes on as usual, and when spying goes on as usual, sooner or later there will be occasion to do a spy swap,” Wark said. “But it’s gone out of our consciousness, I think is the only thing that’s really remarkable about this. It’s not that it should happen. It’s just that kind of, with all the other dangers that we’re facing in a 21st century world, we’ve forgotten about espionage,” he said…. – VoA News (7-9-10)

INTERVIEWS:

  • Niall Ferguson aims to shake up history curriculum with TV and war games: History should be fun. More TV should be watched in the classroom, and children should learn through playing war games. The Harvard academic Niall Ferguson, who has been invited by the government to revitalise the curriculum, today sets set out a vision of “doing for history what Jamie Oliver has done for school food – make it healthy, and so they actually want to eat it”…. – Guardian (UK) (7-9-10)
  • Russian spy swap: Jeffrey Burds explainsWaPo (7-8-10)
  • Environmental historian Brian Black talks about impacts of oil spillPenn State Live (6-30-10)
  • The end of the Soviet Union was not inevitable, says Norman StoneU.S. News & World Report (7-1-10)

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • Obama Nominates Larry Palmer, former historian, as U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela: U.S. President Barack Obama on Monday nominated Ambassador Larry Leon Palmer — formerly the US Ambassador to Honduras — as the new U.S. Ambassador to Venezuela…. – Latin American Herald Tribune (6-30-10)
  • National Park Service Names New Cultural Resources Head: National Park Service (NPS) Director Jonathan Jarvis recently named Stephanie Smith Toothman, Ph.D., as the Service’s new Associate Director for Cultural Resources… – Lee White at the National Coalition for history (6-28-10)
  • New Director of Education Named at the Smithsonian: Claudine K. Brown has been named director of education for the Smithsonian Institution, effective June 20…. – Lee White at the National Coalition for History (6-28-10)

SPOTTED:

  • James McPherson: Historian makes Gettysburg spring to life: As I prepared last week for a tour of Civil War historic sites with 40 history teachers from northwestern Minnesota, I looked at the itinerary and wondered if I would get anything out of touring battlefields….
    The day climaxed when our group of teachers, lead by General McPherson, replicated Pickett’s Charge, the famous and futile attempt by General Lee to break the Union middle by sending a mile-wide swath of 13,000 men into the teeth of the Federal guns…. – Detroit Lakes Online, 7-2-10

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • July 28, 2010: Evan Thomas, Award-Winning Journalist, Historian to Lecture at Ventfort Hall: Known nationally and internationally as one of the most respected award-winning journalists and historians writing today, Newsweek’s Editor-at-Large Evan Thomas will appear at Ventfort Hall Mansion and Gilded Age Museum on Wednesday, July 28, as part of its 2010 Summer Lecture Series. He will discuss the subject of his new book, “The War Lovers: Roosevelt, Lodge, Hearst, and the Rush to Empire, 1898.” Thomas will be on hand to autograph copies during the subsequent Victorian Tea…. – Iberkshires, 7-13-10
  • September 17-18, 2010 at Notre Dame University: Conference aims to bring medieval, early modern and Latin American historians together: An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Notre Dame this fall is making a final call for papers to explore the issue surrounding similarities between late-medieval Iberia and its colonies in the New World. “From Iberian Kingdoms to Atlantic Empires: Spain, Portugal, and the New World, 1250-1700″ is being hosted by the university’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies and will take place on September 17-18, 2010. Medieval News, 4-29-10
  • Jeff Shesol to give Jackson Lecture at the Chautauqua Institution: Historian, presidential speechwriter and author Jeff Shesol will deliver Chautauqua Institution’s sixth annual Robert H. Jackson Lecture on the Supreme Court of the United States. Jeff Shesol will give the Jackson Lecture on Wednesday, August 18, 2010, at 4:00 p.m. in Chautauqua’s Hall of Philosophy…. – John Q. Barrett at the Jackson List (6-14-10)
  • Thousands of Studs Terkel interviews going online: The Library of Congress will digitize the Studs Terkel Oral History Archive, according to the agreement, while the museum will retain ownership of the roughly 5,500 interviews in the archive and the copyrights to the content. Project officials expect digitizing the collection to take more than two years…. – NYT, 5-13-10
  • Digital Southern Historical Collection: The 41,626 scans reproduce diaries, letters, business records, and photographs that provide a window into the lives of Americans in the South from the 18th through mid-20th centuries.

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • Jane Brox: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, (Hardcover), July 8, 2010.
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, (Hardcover), July 30, 2010.
  • Richard Toye: Churchill’s Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made, (Hardcover), August 3, 2010.
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist Papers, (Hardcover), August 16, 2010 Christopher Tomlins, Freedom Bound: Law, Labor, and Civic Identity in Colonizing English America, 1580-1865 (Paperback and Hardcover), September 1, 2010
  • Holger Hoock: Empires of the Imagination: Politics, War, and the Arts in the British World, 1750-1850, (Hardcover), September 1, 2010
  • Anna Whitelock: Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, (Hardcover), September 7, 2010
  • James L. Swanson: Bloody Crimes: The Chase for Jefferson Davis and the Death Pageant for Lincoln’s Corpse, (Hardcover), September 28, 2010
  • Timothy Snyder: The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (First Trade Paper Edition), (Paperback), September 28, 2010
  • Ron Chernow: Washington: A Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • George William Van Cleve: A Slaveholders’ Union: Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic, (Hardcover), October 1, 2010.
  • John Keegan: The American Civil War: A Military History, (Paperback), October 5, 2010
  • Bill Bryson: At Home: A Short History of Private Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • Robert M. Poole: On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery, (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Robert Leckie: Challenge for the Pacific: Guadalcanal: The Turning Point of the War, (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Manning Marable: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, (Hardcover), November 9, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • G. J. Barker-Benfield: Abigail and John Adams: The Americanization of Sensibility, (Hardcover), November 15, 2010
  • Edmund Morris: Colonel Roosevelt, (Hardcover), November 23, 2010
  • Michael Goldfarb: Emancipation: How Liberating Europe’s Jews from the Ghetto Led to Revolution and Renaissance, (Paperback), November 23, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • Stan Katz: Barry D. Karl and the Historical Profession: My friend and long-time historical collaborator Barry Karl died while undergoing emergency open-heart surgery in Chicago early this week. Barry would have celebrated his eighty-third birthday on the 23rd of this month — which will be the date of the first birthday of his only grandchild, Ethan. It is too bad that he could not have lived longer, but he had a long, successful and interesting career…. – Stan Katz in the CHE (7-11-10)
  • Ramon Eduardo Ruiz dies at 88; historian of Mexico and Latin America at UC San Diego: Ramon Eduardo Ruiz, a renowned historian of Mexico and Latin America whose books included in-depth studies of the Mexican and Cuban revolutions, has died. He was 88…. – LA Times (7-10-10)
  • Lawrence Holiday Harris, historian and diplomat, dies at 89: Lawrence Harris, who had careers as an American diplomat, an army officer and a college professor, visited 52 countries and every continent…. – Atlanta Journal-Constitution (7-7-10)
  • Ann Waldron, Biographer of Southern Writers, Is Dead at 85: Ann Waldron, who wrote biographies of Southern writers and books for children and young adults, but then — at 78 — decided that she’d rather concoct tales about gruesome murders on the campus of Princeton University, died Friday at her home in Princeton, N.J. She was 85…. – NYT (7-6-10)
  • Death of historian and art author Carola Hicks, 68: A famous Cambridge art historian has died at the age of 68…. – Cambridge News (UK) (6-28-10)

History Buzz June 7-14, 2010: Robert Remini Retires as House Historian, Reviewing Nathaniel Philbrick

HISTORY BUZZ:

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

    This Week’s Political Highlights

  • Pelosi Announces Retirement of House Historian, Search Committee: Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced today that Dr. Robert V. Remini, the House Historian, has chosen to retire from the post on August 31. Dr. Remini has served as Historian for the past five years, having reestablished the office in 2005.
    “Dr. Remini has been a tremendous asset to the House of Representatives,” Speaker Pelosi said. “It has been an honor to have so distinguished an historian serving the House for the past five years. He has worked diligently to initiate the House Fellows Program and an oral history program for current and former Members. On behalf of my colleagues, I want to thank Dr. Remini for his service and wish him the best in his future endeavors.”…. – PRNewswire-USNewswire, 6-11-10
  • Barbara Weinstein, Sean Wilentz, David Greenberg, Tony Michels: Historians for KaganNew Yorker, 6-7-10

IN FOCUS:

  • Who Is Crying Wolf? Developing Controversy over New Program: Some prominent liberal academics are soliciting short essays from faculty members and graduate students to document a pattern in American history of major social advances being opposed by conservatives who “cry wolf” about the impact of proposed reforms. The campaign — known as the “Cry Wolf Project” — hasn’t been officially announced. But conservative bloggers obtained some of the solicitations of essays and published them this week, along with considerable criticism.
    A series of posts on Andrew Breitbart’s Big Journalism Web site have called the program “Academia-Gate” and suggested that the effort is inappropriately political. The creators of Cry Wolf, meanwhile, say that what they are doing is awfully similar to the ways that right-leaning scholars have used academic work to advance their causes over the years.
    The goal of Cry Wolf is to build an online database of short essays showing examples of crying wolf by the right. If people today are reminded that conservatives in the past predicted devastating impacts from minimum wage laws, or requiring cars to have seat belts, or Social Security, the theory goes, they may be more skeptical if they hear, say, that the Obama health care plan will result in the creation of death panels. A letter seeking these 2,000 word essays — and offering to pay $1,000 for them — has been circulating among liberal academics (and at least one who sent it off to conservative bloggers)…. – Inside Higher Ed (6-11-10)
  • “Cry Wolf” draws the ire of Breitbart’s Big Hollywood: But if you haven’t thought of the labor movement as a cerebral bunch, think again. Meet Peter Dreier, Donald Cohen, Nelson Lichtenstein, and their syndicate of progressive university professors – the “intellectual infrastructure” of the progressive labor movement… – Andrew Breitbart Presents Big Hollywood, 6-9-10
  • Controversy continues to dog Lincoln scholar Frank J. WilliamsHNN Staff (6-7-10)
  • Flotilla raid could be fatal blow to Turkey-Israel friendship, says Israeli historian: “At the moment, the street and the government seem to be united in their antipathy for Israel,” said Ofra Bengio, a professor of history at Tel Aviv University and author of The Turkish-Israeli Relationship: Changing Ties of Middle Eastern Outsiders…. “It was our misfortune to play into the hands of militants,” Prof. Bengio said. “There’s no doubt that Erdogan is riding high in the eyes of the public,” Prof. Bengio said. “If there’s going to be reconciliation between our countries, it will have to take place behind the scenes. The street is just too volatile.”… Globe and Mail (6-3-10)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

HISTORY NEWS:

  • Scholar asks if the Crusaders had a Muslim ally in the First Crusade: A new article is examining the relationship between Islamic states and the Crusader army during the First Crusade (1096-99) and suggests that the Fatimid kingdom of Egypt did attempt to ally with the Crusaders. The article, “Fatimids, Crusaders and the Fall of Islamic Jerusalem: Foes or Allies?” was written by Maher Y. Abu-Munshar in the latest issue of Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medieval Mediterranean…. – Medieval News (6-3-10)
  • Leading Polish historian, killed in Katyn crash, now the victim of credit card theft: The Russian Federal Investigation Committee of the prosecutor’s office said four conscripts had been detained for allegedly using the credit card of Andrzej Przewoznik, a leading historian who was killed in the accident…. – Telegraph (UK) (6-8-10)
  • Raza studies author says “occupied” does not mean “to take over” in Arizona embroglio: “Occupied America.” It’s the title of a textbook at the center of a new Arizona law that targets ethnic studies programs in public schools. That textbook is used by TUSD in an ethic studies class. So, what exactly does “occupied” mean? Rudy Acuòa, Ph.D., is the book’s author. He says the word “occupied” means “to have a history” which he says his book teaches. Acuna says “occupied” does not mean “to take over.” Hence, the reason he says he titled his book “Occupied America” and not “Occupied Mexico.”… – KGUN 9 (AZ) (6-5-10)
  • Arizona Immigration Law No Different from the Past, Says Texas Tech Historian: Miguel Levario, an assistant professor of history, says that even since the days of the Gold Rush when Mexican- American residents of California were required to carry ID cards, the Arizona law is just the latest in a series of laws and events targeted specifically at Mexican-Americans…. – Texas Tech Today (6-4-10)
  • Historian tapped as running mate for GOP governor candidate in South Dakota: South Dakota gubernatorial candidate Gordon Howie announced today that he has asked former Sioux Falls mayoral candidate and alderman Kermit Staggers to be his running mate in his bid for governor of South Dakota on the Republican ticket. Staggers has served in the South Dakota legislature as well as the Sioux Falls city council. He has a PhD in American History and is a professor of History and Political Science at the University of Sioux Falls…. – Dakota Voice (6-2-10)
  • Rightwing historian Niall Ferguson given school curriculum role: Niall Ferguson, the British historian most closely associated with a rightwing, Eurocentric vision of western ascendancy, is to work with the Conservatives to overhaul history in schools…. – Guardian (UK) (5-30-10)

OP-EDs:

  • Thomas J. Sugrue: The myth of post-racial America: Was the election of Barack Obama the turning point in America’s racial development? Is the United States now set on a path to realize all its hopes and dreams of the civil rights era and narrow the divisions between the races? Thomas J. Sugrue, a professor of history and sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, isn’t so sure. In “Not Even Past: Barack Obama and the Burden of Race,” Sugrue explores the question of race in Obama’s America and finds that much progress is still needed before the nation can truly call itself post-racial…. – WaPo, 6-10-10
  • Laurie Penny: Niall Ferguson and Michael Gove: The Tories want our children to be proud of Britain’s imperial past. When right-wing colonial historian Niall Ferguson told the Hay Festival last weekend that he would like to revise the school history curriculum to include “the rise of western domination of the world” as the “big story” of the last 500 years, Education Secretary Michael Gove leapt to his feet to praise Ferguson’s “exciting” ideas – and offer him the job. Ferguson is a poster-boy for big stories about big empire, his books and broadcasting weaving Boys’ Own-style tales about the British charging into the jungle and jolly well sorting out the natives…. – Laurie Penny at The New Statesman (6-1-10)
  • Jay Driskell: Petitioning the AHA to Use INMEX to Avoid Labor DisputesJay Driskell in an Open Letter (5-31-10)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Nathaniel Philbrick, S. C. Gwynne: Men on Horseback Nathaniel Philbrick: THE LAST STAND Custer, Sitting Bull and the Battle of the Little Bighorn Excerpt S. C. Gwynne: EMPIRE OF THE SUMMER MOON Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History Exerpt In “The Last Stand,” Nathaniel Philbrick, the author of the popular histories “Mayflower” and “In the Heart of the Sea,” offers an account of the Battle of the Little Bighorn that gives appropriate space to Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Maj. Marcus Reno and others who fought that day. But really, Custer steals the show.
    If Custer illustrates how the spotlight of history sometimes shines on the wrong actor, Quanah Parker exemplifies the more deserving who get left in the shadows. One hopes a better fate awaits “Empire of the Summer Moon,” S. C. Gwynne’s transcendent history of Parker and the Comanche nation he led in the mid- to late 1800s… The deeper, richer story that unfolds in “Empire of the Summer Moon” is nothing short of a revelation. Gwynne, a former editor at Time and Texas Monthly, doesn’t merely retell the story of Parker’s life. He pulls his readers through an American frontier roiling with extreme violence, political intrigue, bravery, anguish, corruption, love, knives, rifles and arrows. Lots and lots of arrows. This book will leave dust and blood on your jeans…. – NYT, 6-13-10
  • DAVID OSHINSKY: The View From Inside Review of Wilbert Rideau IN THE PLACE OF JUSTICE A Story of Punishment and Deliverance Few people know this better than Wilbert Rideau. Convicted of the murder of a white bank teller in 1961, Rideau, who is black, spent 44 years in prison, most of them at Angola, before being released. His painfully candid memoir, “In the Place of Justice,” is indeed, as its subtitle promises, “a story of punishment and deliverance,” told by a high school dropout who escaped Angola’s electric chair to become an award-winning prison journalist. As such, Rideau is the rarest of American commodities — a man who exited a penitentiary in better shape than when he arrived…. – 6-13-10 Excerpt
  • Justin Vaïsse: Leave No War Behind NEOCONSERVATISM The Biography of a Movement This definitional question, and in particular neoconservatism’s extraordinary transformation, is the principal subject of “Neoconservatism: The Biography of a Movement,” by Justin Vaïsse, a French expert on American foreign policy who is currently a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. It is essential reading for anyone wishing to understand the contours of our recent political past. Vaïsse is a historian of ideas. “Neoconservatism” demonstrates, among other things, that ideas really do make a difference in our lives…. – NYT, 6-13-10
  • HISTORY: ‘Last Call,’ a history of Prohibition, by Daniel Okrent: LAST CALL The Rise and Fall of Prohibition As Daniel Okrent demonstrates in “Last Call,” his witty and exhaustive new history of Prohibition, the so-called Noble Experiment created nothing like a virtuous teetotaler’s paradise. The 18th Amendment, in fact, didn’t so much end the country’s drinking culture as merely change its ethos, replacing the male-dominated saloon with the sexually integrated speakeasy and turning a public pastime into a surreptitious exercise in cynicism and hypocrisy. “The drys had their law,” as Okrent observes, “and the wets would have their liquor.” And the bootleggers would have their obscene and blood-soaked profits, blissfully free of state and federal taxes…. – WaPo, 6-11-10
  • POLITICS Book review: ‘The Upper House’ by Terence Samuel: THE UPPER HOUSE A Journey Behind the Closed Doors of the U.S. Senate Terence Samuel’s “The Upper House” explores the inner workings of the U.S. Senate through the lives of several current senators, including Senate Majority leader Harry Reid, Tennessee Republican Bob Corker and Minnesota Democrat Amy Klobuchar. He describes the near impossibility senators face in fulfilling all the promises made during a campaign and explains why voters get frustrated when an election does not produce the immediate change for which they worked, voted and hoped. WaPo, 6-11-10
  • BIOGRAPHY Book review: Ronald M. Peters, Jr., and Cindy Simon Rosenthal: ‘Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the New American Politics,’ reviewed by Norm Ornstein: …We can expect a wave of books about Pelosi; the first to emerge since her health reform triumph is not by journalists, either of the tell-all or political-beat variety, but by two political scientists from the University of Oklahoma. Both Ronald Peters and Cindy Rosenthal are experts on congressional leadership and history; their book is thus more than a biography of Pelosi, and more than an account of her tenure so far as speaker. Peters and Rosenthal try also to put Pelosi into the broader context of contemporary American politics and Congress…. – WaPo, 6-11-10
  • The 1970s get a second look by historians: The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective Above all else, the 1970s marked the moment when world leaders and ordinary citizens alike woke up with a jolt to their common status as inhabitants of an interconnected world — and understood, in the process, that this didn’t necessarily make the planet a more predictable place. “This is the decade when things start to unravel,” says Harvard historian Charles Maier, one of the editors of the new book The Shock of the Global: The 1970s in Perspective. In his essay in the book, historian Daniel Sargent offers a citation from 1975: “Old international patterns are crumbling … The world has become interdependent in economics, in communications, and in human aspirations.” The writer was Henry Kissinger… – Foreign Policy (6-1-10)
  • Dan Epstein: How Green Was Their AstroTurf: BIG HAIR AND PLASTIC GRASS A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s Incomprehensibly, if you read Dan Epstein’s “Big Hair and Plastic Grass: A Funky Ride Through Baseball and America in the Swinging ’70s,” that singular event took place almost three years later, at the 1971 All-Star Game. He gets Tiger Stadium right, but nothing else….
    Baseball fans come factory-equipped with high expectations. We set ourselves up to be disappointed. But usually that disappointment is delivered by $200 million cleanup hitters, overweight starters or Billy Beane. Not writers entrusted to feed our baseball-history tapeworm. In a book that could and should have been a valuable compendium of an under­documented decade, the Feliciano gaffe appears on Page 38. When an author pulls that big a rock that early, you start reading differently. We don’t want to be copy editors. We’d rather not keep score…. – NYT, 6-6-10
  • Nathaniel Philbrick breathes new life into the hoary tale of Custer’s Last Stand: THE LAST STAND Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn Nathaniel Philbrick’s new book, “The Last Stand,” is popular history, and it’s not fair to expect him to bring new evidence to light. To be sure, there’s the more or less obligatory reference to a new source — an unpublished account by the daughter of one of Custer’s soldiers, quoting from her father’s private papers — but Philbrick wisely doesn’t try to convince the reader that this is important material; it’s a touch here and there of marginalia. The only fair questions are whether his account is well researched, his judgments reasonable and his writing engaging. The answers are yes, yes and yes. Moreover, the book is a model of organization, with lots of maps and photographs and extensive endnotes properly delineating Philbrick’s sources much more clearly than is usual in this kind of work…. – WaPo, 6-4-10
  • Gary B. Nash’s history of “The Liberty Bell”: It is an unlikely central character for a book: A silent, 250-year-old bell. Yet in “The Liberty Bell,” a biography of our nation’s “nearly sacred totem,” Gary B. Nash provides a stirring historical account of the icon that is America’s “Rosetta Stone or . . . Holy Grail.”…. – WaPo, 6-6-10
  • Jack Rakove: Looking for a ‘New’ Narrative of Founding Fathers: Revolutionaries: A New History of the Invention of America Into this hot fug comes Jack Rakove’s new book, “Revolutionaries,” which bears the subtitle “A New History of the Invention of America.” Mr. Rakove is a professor of history, American studies and political science at Stanford University. He was also the winner, in 1997, of a Pulitzer Prize for his book “Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution.” He sounds like an interesting man, the kind who sometimes gets his boots muddy. He has been an expert witness in Indian land claims litigation…. – NYT, 5-30-10

FEATURES:

  • Ruth Harris: Letters reveal key role played by ‘passionate’ wife in securing justice for Alfred Dreyfus: Fresh light has been thrown on the Dreyfus Affair, the cause célèbre that divided France and shook the world in the late 19th century, by the discovery of thousands of unpublished letters. Following the exile of Captain Alfred Dreyfus after his wrongful conviction for spying for Germany against France, his wife, Lucie, was portrayed as a bourgeois heroine, the epitome of the dutiful Victorian spouse. But, according to her letters, she was a passionate woman whose undying love for her husband rescued him from the brink of suicide… – Guardian (UK) (6-6-10)
  • Conservative class on Founding Fathers’ answers to current woes gains popularity: Earl Taylor has spent 31 years teaching that “the Founding Fathers have answers to nearly every problem we have in America today.” Only in recent months has he found so many eager students. Two years ago, Taylor, who is president of the National Center for Constitutional Studies, made about 35 trips to speak to small church groups and political gatherings. This year, he has received so many requests that he enlisted 15 volunteer instructors, who are on pace to hold more than 180 sessions reaching thousands of people. “We’re trying to flood the nation . . . and it’s happening,” said Taylor, 63, a charter school principal…. – WaPo (6-7-10)
  • Shaping Gotham’s Past with Richard Rabinowitz: Elegantly dressed in a three-piece suit, gray hair framing his square-rimmed glasses, Richard Rabinowitz once met me on a blustery spring afternoon outside the New-York Historical Society, the 206-year-old institution where he has helped shape the way that hundreds of thousands of New Yorkers see their city’s past. Best known as curator of Slavery in New York, an acclaimed NYHS exhibit that exposed the ties between enslaved African labor and New York City’s wealth, the 65-year-old has spent more than four decades creating history exhibits for general audiences in the United States and abroad…. – The Atlantic (6-1-10)

QUOTES:

  • American people cynical and uninvolved, says historian: “This spill, it’s another blow to the body politic,” says John Baick, professor of history at Western New England College in Springfield, Mass. It is, he says, another excuse to be cynical and uninvolved — “exactly the opposite of what has always been the American zeitgeist, a sense that we, collectively and through our institutions, can be something greater than ourselves.”… “If people don’t believe, if people don’t give, if people don’t trust, they will pick the politicians who are the loudest rather than the most sincere,” said Baick, the history professor. “They will pick the rabble rouser rather than the technocrat who gets things done.”… – AP (6-7-10)
  • Randolph Roth says that Juárez murder rate like that of civil war: “Whenever you have a real struggle for power — civil wars, revolutions — organized gangs can get very, very bad like you have in Juárez today,” Roth said. “It’s very rare to see the rates like this in a developed country. It’s very sad.” Roth is a professor of history and sociology at Ohio State University who created a historical database examining U.S. homicide rates from different time periods and places. He is author of the book “American Homicide.”… – El Paso Times (6-7-10)
  • Tom Asbridge: Christians and Muslims are distorting crusades, says historian: “This is a manipulation of history, not a reality. I believe there is no division linking the medieval past and the conflict of the crusades with the modern world,” he said. “[It's a] misunderstanding which goes back to the 19th century and western triumphalism in emerging colonialism, and the tendency of western historians to start to glorify the crusades as a proto-colonial enterprise, an [obsession] with Richard the Lionheart and a burgeoning interest in [Muslim leader] Saladin as almost the noble savage.”… – Guardian (UK) (6-2-10)

INTERVIEWS:

  • 5 Questions for Patrick J. Charles on Gun Control and the Second Amendment: Gun control and the Second Amendment are highly emotional and controversial issues in the United States. As a potentially landmark ruling in McDonald v. City of Chicago is shortly to be announced by the Supreme Court before its current term ends in June, Patrick J. Charles, author of The Second Amendment: The Intent and Its Interpretation by the States and the Supreme Court (McFarland, 2009) and Britannica’s new entries on both subjects, has kindly agreed to answer the following questions posed by Britannica executive editor Michael Levy…. – Britannica Blog (6-1-10)

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • American Historian Wins Norway’s Holberg Prize: The historian Natalie Zemon Davis, probably best known for her work “The Return of Martin Guerre,” which was made into a 1982 film with Gérard Depardieu, won Norway’s 4.5 million kroner ($680,000) Holberg Prize on Wednesday for her narrative approach to history, The Associated Press reported…. – NYT, 6-10-10
  • John van Engen wins Grundler Prize: Western Michigan University has awarded the prestigious Grundler Prize to a University of Notre Dame scholar for his book, Sisters and Brothers of the Common Life: The Devotio Moderna and the World of the Later Middle Ages…. – Medieval News (6-8-10)
  • Historians among 2010 ACLS Fellows: The American Council of Learned Societies recently announced the winners of its 2010 fellowship competition. Over $15 million was awarded to more than 380 scholars, including many historians. ACLS fellowships and grants are awarded to individual scholars for excellence in research in the humanities and related social sciences. The complete list of winners is available on the ACLS web site. Among the winners are the following historians…. – David Darlington at AHA Blog (6-8-10)
  • Kiron K. Skinner International-Relations Professor to Advise on Bush Oral-History Project: Skinner has been chosen to serve on the advisory board for the George W. Bush Oral History Project, to be conducted by the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia. The center has done similar projects on each president since Jimmy Carter…. – CHE (5-30-10)

SPOTTED:

  • Historian Spence Delivers 2010 NEH Jefferson Lecture: On May 20, Jonathan Spence, one of the world’s leading experts on Chinese history and culture, delivered the 2010 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities. The annual lecture, sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), is the most prestigious honor the federal government bestows for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities. To read the lecture, click here. In the lecture, “When Minds Met: China and the West in the Seventeenth Century,” Spence explored the many ways that one of the first Chinese travelers to reach Europe shared his ideas with the Westerners he met…. – Lee White at the National Coalition for History (6-4-10)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • September 17-18, 2010 at Notre Dame University: Conference aims to bring medieval, early modern and Latin American historians together: An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Notre Dame this fall is making a final call for papers to explore the issue surrounding similarities between late-medieval Iberia and its colonies in the New World. “From Iberian Kingdoms to Atlantic Empires: Spain, Portugal, and the New World, 1250-1700″ is being hosted by the university’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies and will take place on September 17-18, 2010. Medieval News, 4-29-10
  • Thousands of Studs Terkel interviews going online: The Library of Congress will digitize the Studs Terkel Oral History Archive, according to the agreement, while the museum will retain ownership of the roughly 5,500 interviews in the archive and the copyrights to the content. Project officials expect digitizing the collection to take more than two years…. – NYT, 5-13-10
  • Digital Southern Historical Collection: The 41,626 scans reproduce diaries, letters, business records, and photographs that provide a window into the lives of Americans in the South from the 18th through mid-20th centuries.

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • John Mosier: Deathride: Hitler vs. Stalin – The Eastern Front, 1941-1945, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Evan D. G. Fraser: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Ruth Harris: Dreyfus: Politics, Emotion, and the Scandal of the Century (REV), (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • James Mauro: Twilight at the World of Tomorrow: Genius, Madness, Murder, and the 1939 World’s Fair on the Brink of War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010.
  • William Marvel: The Great Task Remaining: The Third Year of Lincoln’s War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • Suzann Ledbetter: Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women, (Hardcover), June 28, 2010.
  • Julie Flavell: When London Was Capital of America, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Donald P. Ryan: Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Jane Brox: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, (Hardcover), July 8, 2010.
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, (Hardcover), July 30, 2010.
  • Richard Toye: Churchill’s Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made, (Hardcover), August 3, 2010.
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist Papers, (Hardcover), August 16, 2010
  • Holger Hoock: Empires of the Imagination: Politics, War, and the Arts in the British World, 1750-1850, (Hardcover), September 1, 2010
  • Anna Whitelock: Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, (Hardcover), September 7, 2010
  • James L. Swanson: Bloody Crimes: The Chase for Jefferson Davis and the Death Pageant for Lincoln’s Corpse, (Hardcover), September 28, 2010
  • Timothy Snyder: The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (First Trade Paper Edition), (Paperback), September 28, 2010
  • Ron Chernow: Washington: A Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • George William Van Cleve: A Slaveholders’ Union: Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic, (Hardcover), October 1, 2010.
  • John Keegan: The American Civil War: A Military History, (Paperback), October 5, 2010
  • Bill Bryson: At Home: A Short History of Private Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • Robert M. Poole: On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery, (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Robert Leckie: Challenge for the Pacific: Guadalcanal: The Turning Point of the War, (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Manning Marable: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, (Hardcover), November 9, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • G. J. Barker-Benfield: Abigail and John Adams: The Americanization of Sensibility, (Hardcover), November 15, 2010
  • Edmund Morris: Colonel Roosevelt, (Hardcover), November 23, 2010
  • Michael Goldfarb: Emancipation: How Liberating Europe’s Jews from the Ghetto Led to Revolution and Renaissance, (Paperback), November 23, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • David Valaik, emeritus professor at Canisius College, dies at 74: David Valaik, PhD, an emeritus professor of history at Canisius College, died on Friday, June 4. He was 74…. – Canisius College (6-8-10)
  • Honored scholar Norman A. Graebner dies at 94: Norman A. Graebner, a former University of Virginia professor who was known for his love of teaching and esteemed for his knowledge on American diplomatic history, died on May 10 at the Colonnades in Charlottesville. He was 94… – Charlottesville Daily Progress (6-7-10)
  • Lila Weinberg, Chicago historian and author, dies: Lila Weinberg, a Chicago historian, author, teacher and editor, has died. Weinberg, who died May 29 at the age of 91 from complications of cancer, collaborated with her late husband, Arthur, on six books on social history, including two on attorney Clarence Darrow. One of the books, “Clarence Darrow: Attorney for the Damned,” spent 19 weeks on The New York Times best-seller list in 1957. Arthur Weinberg died in 1989…. – Jewish Telegraphic Agency (6-1-10)

History Buzz: May 31, 2010: Martin Luther King, Jr., Thomas Fleming, Michael Bellesiles, & Jonathan Alter on Obama in the News

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

IN FOCUS

  • Michael A. Bellesiles Contraversial New Book “1877: America’s Year of Living Violently”HNN
  • Thomas Fleming “Channelling George Washington” Series – HNN
  • Orlando Figes Contraversay: Who gives a Figes for Orlando? – Sydney Morning Herald, 5-18-10

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History….

  • Malcolm and Martin, closer than we ever thought: As the 85th birthday of Malcolm X is marked on Wednesday, history has freeze-framed him as the angry black separatist who saw whites as blue-eyed devils. Yet near the end of his life, Malcolm X was becoming more like King — and King was becoming more like him. “In the last years of their lives, they were starting to move toward one another,” says David Howard-Pitney, who recounted the Capitol Hill meeting in his book “Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and the Civil Rights Struggle of the 1950s and 1960s.” “While Malcolm is moderating from his earlier position, King is becoming more militant,” Pitney says…. – CNN, 5-19-10

HISTORY NEWS:

  • Controversy over medieval conference location in Arizona: The site of next year’s annual meeting of the Medieval Academy of America is in doubt after scholars raised objections that it is being held in Arizona, the US state which recently passed controversial legislation against illegal immigration. As several scholars have made calls for the conference to be boycotted, officials with the academy have confirmed that they are examining several options, including moving the meeting out-of-state… – Medieval News, 5-24-10
  • Why Arizona targeted ethnic studies: Earlier this month Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law a bill that had been pushed by Tom Horne, Arizona’s longtime secretary of education,who took a disliking to the program several years ago. The bill prohibits any class in the state from promoting either the overthrow of the U.S. government or resentment toward a race or class of people, and that advocates ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals, and — here’s the big one — that are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group. The Tucson program offers specialized courses in African-American, Mexican-American and Native-American studies that focus on history and literature and includes information about the influence of a particular ethnic group… – WaPo, 5-25-10
  • Historian Stuart Macintyre slams Australian school course: Professor Macintyre told The Australian the consultation process set up by the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority had become derailed by “capricious” decisions made to change the course without reference to the expert advisory groups or the writers…. – The Australian (5-25-10)
  • Company, Harvard prof work on Web-linked textbook, WWII game: “Today’s students want to be engaged, and those who play strategy games know more about history than those who just read today’s textbooks,” said Ferguson. “The interactive approach to learning history is going to be a game-changer.”… – Boston Herald, 5-24-10
  • More conservative textbook curriculum OK’d: In a landmark move that will shape the future education of millions of Texas schoolchildren, the State Board of Education on Friday approved new curriculum standards for U.S. history and other social studies courses that reflect a more conservative tone than in the past. Split along party lines, the board delivered a pair of 9-5 votes to adopt the new standards, which will dictate what is taught in all Texas schools and provide the basis for future textbooks and student achievement tests over the next decade…. – The Dallas Morning News, 5-22-10
  • Texas State Board of Education Approves Controversial Social Studies Curriculum Changes: On Friday, the members of the Texas State Board of Education voted 9-5 on social studies curriculum standards for Texas Public Schools. Proposed revisions to textbooks will largely eliminate the civil rights movement from the curriculum. Former U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige and NAACP President and CEO Ben Jealous were among those who spoke before the board earlier in the week. Paige, who served as Education Secretary during President George W. Bush’s first term, implored the board members to take more time to consider the new standards, saying they will diminish the importance of civil rights and slavery…. – Diverse Issues in Higher Education, 5-24-10
  • AHA Calls on the Texas State Board of Education to Reconsider TEKS Social Studies Amendments – AHA Press Release, 5-18-10
  • New Report Shows Little Growth in Salaries for History Faculty: Historians in academia saw little, if any improvement in their wages over the past academic year, as average salaries for regular full-time faculty at most ranks grew by less than 1 percent according to a new study from the College and University Personnel Association for Human Resources (CUPA–HR). This represents the smallest average increase in salaries for historians in 15 years…. – Robert Townsend in Perspectives, 4-22-10
  • Historian helps to save Lake Ontario steamship: An iconic photo taken by historian Mike Filey shows three canoeists paddling out of a partly submerged, abandoned Toronto ferry…. In this case instead of being scrapped, the century-old paddlewheeler was raised and refitted after Filey and his wife, Yarmila, launched a bid to save the vessel after seeing it “literally rotting” in a Toronto island lagoon…. – Toronto Sun, 5-17-10

OP-EDs:

  • Joe Mozingo: An old diary throws him a curve: He could grasp having a black ancestor way back in the 1600s. But in the 1800s? A slave? It had to be a mistake. What would his family think?… – LAT, 5-22-10

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • DAVID OSHINSKY on Daniel Okrent: Temperance to Excess: LAST CALL The Rise and Fall of Prohibition “Last Call,” by Daniel Okrent, provides the sobering answers. Okrent, the author of four previous books and the first public editor of The New York Times, views Prohibition as one skirmish in a larger war waged by small- town white Protestants who felt besieged by the forces of change then sweeping their nation — a theory first proposed by the historian Richard Hofstadter more than five decades ago. Though much has been written about Prohibition since then, Okrent offers a remarkably original account, showing how its proponents combined the nativist fears of many Americans with legitimate concerns about the evils of alcohol to mold a movement powerful enough to amend the United States Constitution…. – NYT, 5-23-10
  • Nick Bunker: Founding Entrepreneurs: MAKING HASTE FROM BABYLON The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World: A New History Maybe the most important point that Bunker highlights concerns the interplay between the Pilgrims’ faith and their education, political standing and financial position…. – NYT, 5-23-10Excerpt
  • Hampton Sides: Death of a Dream: HELLHOUND ON HIS TRAIL The Stalking of Martin Luther King Jr. and the International Hunt for His Assassin There’s still a line between narrative history and entertainment, in other words, and Hampton Sides flirts with it in his new book about James Earl Ray and Martin Luther King, “Hellhound on His Trail: The Stalking of Martin Luther King Jr. and the International Hunt for His ­Assassin.” If that sounds like a graphic novel, well, you’re getting the drift. Sides, whose books include “Ghost Soldiers,” a World War II drama, and “Blood and Thunder,” on the conquest of the American West, is not overly interested in new research, thorough­going analysis or traditional bio­graphy. He wants to deliver a heart-pounding nonfiction thriller. This must be the first book on King that owes less to Taylor Branch than Robert Ludlum…. – NYT, 5-16-10Excerpt
  • Jonathan Alter: Penetrating the Process of Obama’s Decisions: THE PROMISE President Obama, Year One Alter’s book “The Promise” actually does give us a new perspective on the 44th president by providing a detailed look at his decision-making process on issues like health care and the Afghanistan war, and a keen sense of what it’s like to work in his White House, day by day.
    It’s an effective and often revealing approach reminiscent of Mr. Alter’s 2006 book, “The Defining Moment: FDR’s Hundred Days and the Triumph of Hope” (a book that Mr. Obama reportedly read before taking office), and Richard Reeves’s 1993 book, “President Kennedy: Profile of Power,” though obviously without the kind of retrospective wisdom possible decades after the completion of those presidents’ tenures…. – NYT, 5-13-10
  • Jonathan Alter: Interim Report: THE PROMISE President Obama, Year One One of the earliest off the mark is Jonathan Alter…. “The Promise” offers an excellent opportunity to appraise Obama’s initial efforts. Drawing on interviews with over 200 people, including the president and his top aides, Alter examines everything from the economic bailouts to the military surge in Afghanistan.
    Throughout, he seeks to avoid what he refers to as the “polemics of punditry.” This endows his narrative with a lapidary tone that is mercifully free of the breathless sensationalism of recent campaign books, but it also results, at times, in a somewhat cloistered quality… – NYT, 5-30-10
  • David Farber: The Rise of Conservatism, in Historical Scholarship: Now, among the latest entrants to the growing list of books on the right comes David Farber’s The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism: A Short History, new from Princeton University Press…. – CHE, 5-26-10
  • The birth control pill’s legacy at 50: Talking with Elaine Tyler May: As May writes in her new book, “America + the Pill,” that is perhaps the one expectation that the Pill has actually fulfilled 50 years later. It was not the miracle drug that solved the population explosion and world poverty; nor did it help defeat communism, as many of its advocates hoped. Its primary legacy today is that it gives the women lucky enough to get it the power to control the creation of life in their bodies — and the chance to reach for their dreams. “The Pill was hugely important in allowing women to control their fertility and their lives,” said May, a professor of history and American studies at the University of Minnesota…. – Minneapolis Star-Tribune, 5-24-10
  • David J. Garrow: Book review: ‘Hellhound on His Trail: The Stalking of Martin Luther King Jr. and the International Hunt for His Assassin,’ by Hampton Sides: Sides, a Memphis native, divides his book into four strands. The first one traces Ray’s activities following his April 1967 escape from a Missouri prison through the assassination a year later and his flight first to Canada and then to Europe. A second strand follows King’s road to Memphis, and a third paints the city’s racial divisions. The final strand tracks the FBI’s intense hostility toward King and covers its dogged investigation, including forensic success in identifying Ray and the pursuit of the assassin as he makes a bumbling effort to reach white-ruled Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)…. – WaPo, 5-14-10
  • Selina Hastings’s ‘The Secret Lives of Somerset Maugham,’ reviewed by Michael Dirda: During the second half of his life, William Somerset Maugham (1874-1965) was the most famous writer in the world. Not only did readers love his sardonic tales of sexual passion and dark secrets, of desperation and sudden violence, but so did Hollywood: More of his stories, novels and plays have been filmed than those of any other author. Just one short story, “Rain” — about the prostitute Sadie Thompson and the preacher obsessed with saving her — has provided star turns for Tallulah Bankhead, Gloria Swanson, Joan Crawford and Rita Hayworth, among others. As this excellent biography by Selina Hastings makes clear, Somerset Maugham lived a life of quite astonishing richness and variety…. – WaPo, 5-19-10
  • In the beginning with Obama Jonathan Alter’s report just the first chapter of presidential work in progress: Which brings us to where we are. President Obama’s first year in office is done. We are hearing what many think about that. It is not a bad time to wonder what Alter thinks of it. And he obliges us with The Promise (Simon & Schuster, $28). Journalism has been called “literature in a hurry.” Alter’s book is history in a hurry, as he freely admits, but is a good first step for putting events in order and figuring things out…. – Chicago Sun-Times, 5-16-10

FEATURES:

  • Oscar Martinez: University of Arizona historians asks why Mexico is poorer than the U.S.: Martinez, 67, is a regents professor of history at the University of Arizona, Tucson. He’s finishing his latest book, titled “Why Mexico is Poorer than the United States.” It makes the case that there is a logical, empirically measurable set of answers. “It is greatly exaggerated that Mexico is a rich country with regard to raw materials and resources. The reality is that Mexico is one of the poorest countries in terms of land,” he said. “The difference is the United States has the best space on the planet.”… – El Paso Inc., 5-25-10
  • Will Bagley: My brother, the historian by Pat Bagley: This week one of Utah and the West’s most eminent historians turns 60. He has won dozens of awards, been awarded prestigious fellowships and lectured as far afield as Italy. He even appeared with Russell Crowe in the remake of the Western classic, “3:10 to Yuma.” (OK, he’s in the companion DVD, elucidating on the history of Old West outlawry.) Will Bagley also happens to be my brother. For years he wrote a column in this space called “History Matters.” It was a good label. On one level it alludes to sifting evidence for the salient fact; on another it means that history is not bunk. To Will, history is not dead. I have seen him wade into a discussion and passionately defend the honor and reputation of someone he felt was being slighted. That the person in question is dead and long past caring is beside the point. His best-known work to date, Blood of the Prophets , is a gripping narrative of the Mountain Meadows Massacre, the largest white-on-white murder in north America. As it deals with Mormons, Gentiles, a U.S. Army marching on Utah and the LDS Church hierarchy, it wasn’t a task for a shrinking violet…. – The Salt Lake Tribune, 5-21-10
  • From Tory to Turkey: Maverick historian Norman Stone storms back with partisan epic of Cold War world: It isn’t every day that one interviews a figure described on an official British Council website as “notorious”. That badge, which this fearsome foe of drippy-liberal state culture will wear with pride, comes inadvertently via Robert Harris. In his novel Archangel, Harris created the “dissolute historian” (© the British Council and our taxes) Fluke Kelso: an “engaging, wilful, impassioned and irreverent” maverick on the trail of Stalin’s secret papers…. – Independent (UK), 5-14-10

QUOTES:

  • Robert Dallek: The character issue is “always out there”: As a general matter, the character issue never seems to go away. “It’s always out there,” says historian Robert Dallek… – U.S. News & World Report, 5-27-10
  • MN Historian Calls Ft. Snelling ‘Site Of Genocide’: Waziyatawin, of Granite Falls, holds a doctorate in history from Cornell. She says Fort Snelling needs an extreme makeover. She wants it torn down. “It feels like a constant assault on our Dakota humanity,” said Waziyatawin. “I don’t want the Fort sitting on that site of genocide,” she said. “I don’t want the American flag flying high. I don’t want soldiers reenacting marching out to that site and firing cannons every day.”… – WCCO (MN), 5-27-10
  • Stalin projected Moscow University’s Museum of Earth Sciences as church, says historian: “On Stalin’s idea, this hall was built as a kind of chapel, a kind of church, where only elite is allowed,” historian Olga Zinovyeva told TV Center…. – Interfax (RU), 5-19-10
  • Nancy F. Koehn: Harvard Business School historian compares Bono to Abraham Lincoln: Nancy F. Koehn, a historian, at the Harvard Business School, and author, celebrated U2′s Bono’s 50th birthday by celebrating the Irish musician and campaigner for his great skills as a leader. She said “Bono, like Abraham Lincoln 150 years ago, has not let himself become isolated in an elite atmosphere. He has used his touring and travels as classrooms to help him understand the hopes, dreams and tribulations of his fellow citizens, whom he often calls his brothers and sisters. And he has used this knowledge to light his way, his music and his leadership.”… – Irish Central, 5-14-10
  • Mark Mancall on the idea of public space in a democracy: However the idea of public space, professor of history, emeritus, Stanford university, California, Mark Mancall said, has never been fully achieved anywhere, according to historians. “Gender, ethnic differences, class groupings, all participated in defining who could enter public space,” said the professor, who is the director of the royal education council, Thimphu, during the first of a series of discussions on media and democracy that the Bhutan centre for media and democracy organised yesterday. Kuensel Newspaper, 5-14-10
  • USSR planned nuclear attack on China in 1969 , claims Chinese historian: Liu Chenshan, the author of a series of articles that chronicle the five times China has faced a nuclear threat since 1949, wrote that the most serious threat came in 1969 at the height of a bitter border dispute between Moscow and Beijing that left more than one thousand people dead on both sides. He said Soviet diplomats warned Washington of Moscow’s plans “to wipe out the Chinese threat and get rid of this modern adventurer,” with a nuclear strike, asking the US to remain neutral…. – Telegraph (UK), 5-13-10

INTERVIEWS:

  • Jamie Glazov interviews Olga Velikanova: Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Olga Velikanova, an Assistant Professor of Russian History at the University of North Texas. She was among the first scholars to work with declassified Communist Party and secret police archives. Her research about everyday Stalinism, the cult of Lenin and Russian popular opinion has been broadcast by the BBC, Finnish and Russian radio and TV, as well as the History Channel in Canada. She is the author of Making of an Idol: On Uses of Lenin, The Public Perception of the Cult of Lenin Based on the Archival Materials and The Myth of the Besieged Fortress: Soviet Mass Perception in the 1920s-1930s. She is a recipient of many awards from different international research foundations…. – FrontPageMag, 5-24-10

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • The Emerson Prize 2010 Winners: The Emerson Prize is awarded annually to students published in The Concord Review during the previous year who have shown outstanding academic promise in history at the high school level. Since 1995, 74 students have won the Emerson Prize. The five laureates this year were from Ohio, New York, New York, Washington, DC, and Wisconsin. Past laureates have come from Czechoslovakia, Canada, Louisiana, Florida, California, Tennessee, Vermont, Maryland, New Zealand, Texas, Russia, Washington State, Tennessee, Connecticut, Singapore, New Hampshire, Illinois, Japan, and New York.
    2010 Jane Abbottsmith, of Summit Country Day School, in Cincinnati, Ohio (now at Princeton).
    2010 Colin Rhys Hill, of Atlanta International School in Atlanta, Georgia, (now at Christ Church College, Oxford). 2010 Amalia Skilton, of Tempe Preparatory Academy in Tempe, Arizona, (now at Yale).
    2010 Alexander Zou, of Monte Vista High School in Danville, California, (now at Pomona).
    2010 Liang En Wee, of the Hwa Chang Institution in Singapore, (now at the National University of Singapore). – The Concord Review
  • Women behind the rise of the house of Orange-Nassau: WHEN the house of Orange-Nassau finally became monarchs in The Netherlands in 1815, it was the result of hundreds of years of manoeuvring: battles physical and political and, Susan Broomhall contends, a solid effort by generations of the family’s women. “The male line was really weak, they died in battle or were minors for many years,” says Broomhall, a professor of history at the University of Western Australia. “It was the women who kept reminding people of the family through systematically promoting it, so when The Netherlands decided on a monarchy, their family was the obvious choice.” The family still rules, via Queen Beatrix. A $450,000, four-year Australian Research Council grant will help Broomhall and colleague Jacqueline Van Gent tease out the scope of the women’s influence…. – The Australian, 5-26-10
  • Thomas Fleming receives best book award from American Revolution Round Table of New York: The American Revolution Round Table of New York has announced that Thomas Fleming’s The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers has won its 2009 award for best book on the American Revolution. A plaque will be presented to Mr. Fleming at the June 1 meeting of the Round Table at New York City’s Princeton Club. His editor, Elisabeth Kallick Dyssegaard, currently the editor-in-chief of Hyperion Books, will also be recognized at the ceremony. Previous winners include Mary Beth Norton, James Thomas Flexner, and Willard Sterne Randall…. – HNN, 5-19-10

SPOTTED:

  • History, Not Politics, at Jonathan Spence Jefferson Lecture: Jonathan Spence came here to deliver a speech, but don’t let that fool you: his address — the 39th Annual Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities, which took place Thursday — in no way resembled the sort typically associated with D.C…. – Inside Higher Ed, 5-21-10
  • Historian probes native perceptions of foreign diseases: Dr. Kevin Terraciano, professor of history and chair of the Latin American Studies Program at University of California, Los Angeles, gave the 2010 Jonas A. “Steine” Jonasson Endowed Lecture to a crowd of more than 60 people on May 12. “Most studies on the spread of disease beginning in 1520 are focused on the types of disease and how they were spread,” Terraciano said. “But I want to explore what the indigenous people of the time thought the cause and spread of disease was.” Linfield News, 5-14-10

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • September 17-18, 2010 at Notre Dame University: Conference aims to bring medieval, early modern and Latin American historians together: An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Notre Dame this fall is making a final call for papers to explore the issue surrounding similarities between late-medieval Iberia and its colonies in the New World. “From Iberian Kingdoms to Atlantic Empires: Spain, Portugal, and the New World, 1250-1700″ is being hosted by the university’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies and will take place on September 17-18, 2010. Medieval News, 4-29-10
  • Thousands of Studs Terkel interviews going online: The Library of Congress will digitize the Studs Terkel Oral History Archive, according to the agreement, while the museum will retain ownership of the roughly 5,500 interviews in the archive and the copyrights to the content. Project officials expect digitizing the collection to take more than two years…. – NYT, 5-13-10
  • Digital Southern Historical Collection: The 41,626 scans reproduce diaries, letters, business records, and photographs that provide a window into the lives of Americans in the South from the 18th through mid-20th centuries.

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • Larry Schweikart: 7 Events that Made America America: And Proved that the Founding Fathers Were Right All Along, (Hardcover) June 1, 2010
  • Spencer Wells: Pandora’s Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization, (Hardcover), June 8, 2010
  • John Mosier: Deathride: Hitler vs. Stalin – The Eastern Front, 1941-1945, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Evan D. G. Fraser: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Ruth Harris: Dreyfus: Politics, Emotion, and the Scandal of the Century (REV), (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • James Mauro: Twilight at the World of Tomorrow: Genius, Madness, Murder, and the 1939 World’s Fair on the Brink of War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010.
  • William Marvel: The Great Task Remaining: The Third Year of Lincoln’s War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • Suzann Ledbetter: Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women, (Hardcover), June 28, 2010.
  • Julie Flavell: When London Was Capital of America, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Donald P. Ryan: Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Jane Brox: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, (Hardcover), July 8, 2010.
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, (Hardcover), July 30, 2010.
  • Richard Toye: Churchill’s Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made, (Hardcover), August 3, 2010.
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist Papers, (Hardcover), August 16, 2010
  • Holger Hoock: Empires of the Imagination: Politics, War, and the Arts in the British World, 1750-1850, (Hardcover), September 1, 2010
  • Anna Whitelock: Mary Tudor: Princess, Bastard, Queen, (Hardcover), September 7, 2010
  • James L. Swanson: Bloody Crimes: The Chase for Jefferson Davis and the Death Pageant for Lincoln’s Corpse, (Hardcover), September 28, 2010
  • Timothy Snyder: The Red Prince: The Secret Lives of a Habsburg Archduke (First Trade Paper Edition), (Paperback), September 28, 2010
  • Ron Chernow: Washington: A Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • George William Van Cleve: A Slaveholders’ Union: Slavery, Politics, and the Constitution in the Early American Republic, (Hardcover), October 1, 2010.
  • John Keegan: The American Civil War: A Military History, (Paperback), October 5, 2010
  • Bill Bryson: At Home: A Short History of Private Life, (Hardcover), October 5, 2010
  • Robert M. Poole: On Hallowed Ground: The Story of Arlington National Cemetery , (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Robert Leckie: Challenge for the Pacific: Guadalcanal: The Turning Point of the War , (Paperback), October 26, 2010
  • Manning Marable: Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, (Hardcover), November 9, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • Elizabeth White: The Socialist Alternative to Bolshevik Russia: The Socialist Revolutionary Party, 1917-39, (Hardcover), November 10, 2010
  • G. J. Barker-Benfield: Abigail and John Adams: The Americanization of Sensibility, (Hardcover), November 15, 2010
  • Edmund Morris: Colonel Roosevelt, (Hardcover), November 23, 2010
  • Michael Goldfarb: Emancipation: How Liberating Europe’s Jews from the Ghetto Led to Revolution and Renaissance, (Paperback), November 23, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • Norman A. Graebner, diplomatic historian, dies at 94: Norman A. Graebner, 94, who shaped the field of diplomatic history with his critiques of American foreign policy, died May 10 at the Colonnades retirement community in Charlottesville after a stroke…. – WaPo, 5-14-10

History Buzz, Apr 26-May 10, 2010: Stephen Ambrose, Diane Ravitch & Niall Ferguson in the News

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

HISTORY BUZZ:

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

IN FOCUS:

  • Stephen Ambrose’s Work Faces New Scrutiny: The late historian Stephen E. Ambrose rose to fame on the strength of an authorized biography that he claimed included details from “hundreds of hours” of interviews with former President Dwight David Eisenhower. But Richard Rayner, a writer for The New Yorker, reports today that during his research Ambrose apparently had only limited access to Eisenhower, and that archived datebooks and other records conflict with some of the times Ambrose claimed he had sat down with the former five-star general…. AOL News, 4-26-10
  • Thomas Fleming “Channelling George Washington” Series – HNN
  • Orlando Figes Contraversay: Who gives a Figes for Orlando? – Sydney Morning Herald, 5-18-10

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

HISTORY NEWS:

  • Naomi Oreskes finds that out of 928 articles on climate change, 0 challenge consensus: …A study by Naomi Oreskes, professor of history and science studies at the University of California-San Diego, found 928 peer-reviewed articles on climate change; none opposed the unanimous conclusion that human-released greenhouse gases are affecting our climate…. – Kansas City Star, 5-9-10
  • The Twitter Archive at the Library of Congress: When the Library of Congress announced this month that it had recently acquired Twitter’s entire archive of public tweets, the snarkosphere quickly broke out the popular refrain “Nobody cares that you just watched ‘Lost.’” Television tweets are always the shorthand by which naysayers express how idiotic they find Twitter, the microblogging site on which millions of users share their thoughts and activities in 140 characters or fewer.
    The purview of historians has always been the tangible: letters, journals, official documents.
    But on the other hand, says Michael Beschloss, historian and author of “Presidential Courage,” “What historian today wouldn’t give his right arm to have the adult Madison’s contemporaneous Twitters about the secret debates inside the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia?” – WaPo, 5-7-10
  • Europe pressed on slavery reparations by historians: Historians and anti-racism campaigners are to urge the countries that oversaw and profited from the Atlantic slave trade to recognise it as a crime against humanity, opening the way for reparations… – AFP, 5-4-10
  • Va. seeks balance in marking Civil War’s 150th anniversary, tapping Kennedy-era historian: …At last, President John F. Kennedy called on a 31-year-old historian to take over as the centennial’s executive director, refocusing it on sober education. Virginia has turned to the same man — James I. Robertson Jr., a history professor at Virginia Tech and a Civil War expert — to help the state avoid the same kinds of problems as it prepares to mark next year’s 150th anniversary of the start of the war…. – WaPo, 5-3-10
  • Cultural Memory and the Resources of the Past, 400-1000 research project gets funding: A new research collaboration involving historians from Cambridge is to examine how early medieval societies used the past to form ideas about identity which continue to affect our own present. The project will cover six centuries of western European history, from 400 to 1000 AD, and will investigate how earlier cultural traditions, coupled with other sources, such as the Bible, influenced the formation of state identities following the deposition of the last Roman emperor in the West in the fifth century…. – Medieval News, 4-28-10
  • Historians say state should toss proposal: Historians complained of so many problems with the State Board of Education’s proposed social studies curriculum standards that they urged Texas lawmakers Wednesday to ask the board to start over…. – Houston Chronicle, 4-28-10

OP-EDs:

  • Jonathan Jones: Is academic snobbery to blame in the Orlando Figes affair?: I have a horrible feeling that behind this disaster lies a rebirth of insular academic snobbery, the resentment of a popular historian. I find myself thinking of the episode of Peep Show in which an academic urges Mark Corrigan to write an attack on Simon Schama – “and his interesting, accessible books”…. – Guardian (UK), 4-29-10

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • New Obama book by Newsweek senior editor Jonathan Alter airs private flares of temper: President Obama may cultivate an image as the unflappable Mr. Cool, but he can get hot under the collar too, according to a new book.
    In “The Promise: President Obama, Year One,” by Newsweek senior editor Jonathan Alter, the author recounts a series of private blow-ups – including a particularly fiery one involving the nation’s top military brass…. – NY Daily News, 5-8-10
  • HISTORY Book review of “Goodbye Wives and Daughters,” by Susan Kushner Resnick: The coal-mining tragedy depicted in “Goodbye Wifes and Daughters” occurred nearly 70 years ago but is still an eerily familiar storyline in 2010. While mine safety and regulation have vastly improved, recent headlines out of West Virginia make journalist Susan Kushner Resnick’s excavation of the 1943 explosion that killed 75 men in Bearcreek, Mont., seem not so distant from present-day disasters. WaPo, 5-7-10
  • Book reviews: ‘History in Blue’ by Allan T. Duffin, ‘A Few Good Women’ by Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee: HISTORY IN BLUE 160 Years of Women Police, Sheriffs, Detectives, and State Troopers, A FEW GOOD WOMEN America’s Military Women from World War I to the War in Iraq and Afghanistan
    In “Woman in the Nineteenth Century” (1845), Margaret Fuller set out the original feminist proclamation about women’s access to work: “We would have every arbitrary barrier thrown down. We would have every path laid open to woman as freely as to man.”
    Both “History in Blue,” by Allan T. Duffin, and “A Few Good Women,” by Evelyn M. Monahan and Rosemary Neidel- Greenlee, document women’s work history and provide fascinating individual stories…. – WaPo, 5-7-10
  • Diane Ravitch: The Education of Diane Ravitch THE DEATH AND LIFE OF THE GREAT AMERICAN SCHOOL SYSTEM How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education Ravitch’s offer to guide us through this mess comes with a catch: she has changed her mind. Once an advocate of choice and testing, in “The Death and Life of the Great American School System” she throws cold water on both. Along the way she casts a skeptical eye on the results claimed by such often-praised school reformers as New York’s Anthony Alvarado and San Diego’s Alan Bersin, reviews a sheaf of academic studies of school effectiveness and delivers the most damning criticism I have ever read of the role philanthropic institutions sometimes play in our society. “Never before,” she writes of the Gates Foundation, was there an entity “that gave grants to almost every major think tank and advocacy group in the field of education, leaving no one willing to criticize its vast power and unchecked influence.”… – NYT, 5-6-10
  • Woodward book on Obama coming in September: A Bob Woodward book on the Obama administration is coming out in September…. AP, 5-5-10
  • Ruth Marcus reviews Laura Bush’s memoir, ‘Spoken From the Heart’: Laura has always seemed the more interesting Bush. Certainly, the more mysterious. With George W., what you see is what you get. He is not a complicated man. But Laura leaves you wondering about the layers beneath that serene exterior. What is she thinking? What private rebellions are simmering, what resentments submerged? What forged the bond, seemingly as strong as it was unlikely, between the librarian who named her cat Dewey, after the decimal system, and the jock-turned-oilman who was soon to turn, inevitably, to the family business of politics? Laura Bush’s autobiography, “Spoken From the Heart,” begins promisingly enough for anyone hoping to penetrate that surface…. – WaPo, 5-2-10
  • HISTORY Book review of “The War Lovers: Roosevelt, Lodge, Hearst, the Rush to Empire, 1898″ by Evan Thomas: More than a century before a recent president, who had never seen combat, led the United States into war with Iraq, a pair of politicians similarly unscarred by war created the playbook that has been used ever since. The prototype conflict was the Spanish-American War of 1898, studied by every school child as America’s thunderous entry onto the world stage and its first foray into colonial rule. So much has been written about this seminal moment that journalist and author Evan Thomas faced a daunting task in undertaking “The War Lovers.” After all, what could be said that hasn’t already been covered in the some 400 or so books? Plenty, it turns out…. – WaPo, 5-2-10
  • Jim Baggott: If You Build It . . .: THE FIRST WAR OF PHYSICS The Secret History of the Atom Bomb, 1939-1949 Jim Baggott, a popular British science writer, sets out in “The First War of Physics” to tell the story of the early stages of the nuclear arms race…. – NYT, 5-9-10
  • LAUREL THATCHER ULRICH on Marla R. Miller: Star-Spangled Story: BETSY ROSS AND THE MAKING OF AMERICA Marla R. Miller, who teaches American history at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, believes that Claypoole “planted the seeds of her own mythology in the 1820s and ’30s as she regaled her children and grandchildren with tales from her youth, her work, and of life in Revolutionary Philadelphia.” In an engaging biography, Miller shows that even though the flag story is riddled with improbabilities, the life of the woman who came to be known as Betsy Ross is worth recovering. Piecing together shards of evidence from “newspaper advertisements, household receipts, meeting minutes, treasurer’s reports, shop accounts and ledgers, probate records, tools and artifacts . . . and oral traditions,” Miller connects her heroine with most of the major events in Philadelphia’s early history, from the building of the city in the years when Elizabeth’s great-­grandfather was establishing himself as a master carpenter to the yellow fever epidemic that in 1793 killed her parents.
    Through skillful use of small details, Miller sustains her repeated assertion that the future Betsy Ross was often “only a handshake away” from the men who made the Revolution…. – NYT, 5-9-10

FEATURES:

  • From Tory to Turkey: Maverick historian Norman Stone storms back with partisan epic of Cold War world: It isn’t every day that one interviews a figure described on an official British Council website as “notorious”. That badge, which this fearsome foe of drippy-liberal state culture will wear with pride, comes inadvertently via Robert Harris. In his novel Archangel, Harris created the “dissolute historian” (© the British Council and our taxes) Fluke Kelso: an “engaging, wilful, impassioned and irreverent” maverick on the trail of Stalin’s secret papers…. – Independent (UK), 5-14-10

QUOTES:

  • Yuan Tengfei: Celebrity Chinese historian severely criticizes Mao on state TV: “If you want to see Mao, you can go to his mausoleum at the Tiananmen Square. But don’t forget it’s a Chinese version of the Yasukuni Shrine, which glorifies Mao, under whose hands many people were massacred,” the report quoted Yuan Tengfei, a history teacher at Beijing’s Jinghua School, as saying in a 110-minute special TV lecture at the state television, CCTV. “The only thing Mao did right since he founded the new China in 1949 was his death,” Yuan was quoted as saying…. – Tibetan Review, 5-11-10
  • British political historian explains the role of class in UK elections: Steven Fielding, a professor of political history and the director of the Center for British Politics at the University of Nottingham. Mr. Fielding said that viewers who see politicians performing on television start to regard them, in a sense, as protagonists in fictional dramas. “It’s not that they confuse them with TV characters, but that they see them in the same framework,” he said. “The leaders’ debates exaggerate that by encouraging voters to focus on the minutiae rather than on the policy.”… – NYT, 4-30-10

INTERVIEWS:

  • “In the eyes of the majority, Stalin is a winner,” says Russian historian Nikolai Svanidze: Historian Nikolai Svanidze spoke to SPIEGEL about the reasons for Stalin’s popularity in Russia. He argues that the archives need to be opened in order to reveal the dictator’s crimes and explains why President Dmitry Medvedev and Prime Minister Vladimir Putin have very different approaches to Russian history….. – Spiegel Online, 5-6-10
  • Harvey Klehr sits down with FrontPageMag: Frontpage Interview’s guest today is Harvey Klehr, Andrew Mellon Professor of Politics and History at Emory University. He is the author of the new book, The Communist Experience in America: A Political and Social History…. – Jaime Glazov at FrontPageMag, 5-6-10
  • Q&A with Niall Ferguson: Niall Ferguson’s resumé could put you to sleep. He’s a senior fellow here, a professor of this or that there. But despite hanging out with the elbow-patch crowd, this Scottish intellectual and author smoothly blends history, finance and politics all into one understandable package. At times he is humorous, at others frightful. His relationship with Ayaan Hirsi Ali, a Somali-Dutch intellectual who has a death threat looming over her head after she was critical of Islam, also lends him an air of controversy. Mr. Ferguson, whose latest bestseller is The Ascent of Money: The Financial History of the World, was in Calgary this past week as the headliner at the Teatro salon speaker series. He touched on everything from why he thinks the International Monetary Fund will soon be bailing out Britain, to why the United States must now tread carefully around the globe or risk the wrath of China. And he shared his thoughts on money and power and who he thinks will win the U.K. election…. – Financial Post, 5-1-10

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • Z Street lobbying group awards Daniel Pipes prize for peace plan: Z STREET awarded Daniel Pipes, the Director of the Middle East Forum and pre-eminent Middle East scholar, its first annual Z STREET Peace Plan Prize for his article, “My Peace Plan: an Israeli Victory.” Z STREET is a staunchly pro-Israel organization… – Press Release, 5-10-10
  • Canadian Military Historian Knighted By the Netherlands: As Canada and its Second World War allies prepare to celebrate the 65th Anniversary of Victory in Europe (VE) Day on May 8, the Netherlands is honouring a Canadian military historian with a knighthood. Dr. Dean Oliver, director of research and exhibitions at the Canadian War Museum, has received the Dutch honour, Knight in the Order of Orange-Nassau…. – Epoch Times, 5-5-10
  • Caferro and Gerstel awarded Guggenheim Fellowships: William Caferro, a professor of history at Vanderbilt University, and Sharon E.J. Gerstel, Professor of Byzantine Art and Archaeology at UCLA, have been named 2010 Fellows by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation…. – Medieval News, 4-28-10
  • Ernest Freeberg named winner of the 2010 Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award: Ernest Freeberg will receive the 2010 Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award, presented by the Intellectual Freedom Round Table (IFRT) of the American Library Association (ALA). Freeberg was selected for his book,”Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent” (Harvard University Press, 2008)… – Press Release, 4-6-10

SPOTTED:

  • Turkish Scholar Taner Akcam Advocates Change in Policy of Genocide Denial: Dr. Taner Akcam, one of the first Turkish scholars to acknowledge the Armenian Genocide, delivered two important lectures in Southern California last week. Based on historical research, he analyzed the underpinnings of Turkey’s denial of the Armenian Genocide and proposed solutions for its official acknowledgment…. – Panorama.am (5-11-10)
  • K.C. Johnson, Steve Gillon to appear in Bank of America ad on “History”NYT (5-5-10)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • September 17-18, 2010 at Notre Dame University: Conference aims to bring medieval, early modern and Latin American historians together: An interdisciplinary conference to be held at the University of Notre Dame this fall is making a final call for papers to explore the issue surrounding similarities between late-medieval Iberia and its colonies in the New World. “From Iberian Kingdoms to Atlantic Empires: Spain, Portugal, and the New World, 1250-1700″ is being hosted by the university’s Nanovic Institute for European Studies and will take place on September 17-18, 2010. Medieval News, 4-29-10
  • Digital Southern Historical Collection: The 41,626 scans reproduce diaries, letters, business records, and photographs that provide a window into the lives of Americans in the South from the 18th through mid-20th centuries.
  • Oxford University Press to publish OAH’s Journal of American History and Magazine of History: Oxford University Press (OUP) is honored to have been selected by the Organization of American Historians to be the publisher of the Journal of American History and the Magazine of History…. – OUP Press Release, 5-6-10
  • Pizarro: Pulitzer Prize-winning historian to speak at YWCA event: The YWCA of Silicon Valley will feature Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin at its 20th annual fundraising luncheon this fall. Goodwin’s 2005 book on the Lincoln presidency, “Team of Rivals,” is often cited as a favorite of President Barack Obama’s. And I’d expect she’ll have interesting perspectives on current history, given that the Nov. 16 luncheon comes just two weeks after this year’s midterm elections…. – SJ Mercury News, 5-2-10

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • Kelly Hart: The Mistresses of Henry VIII, (Paperback) May 1, 2010
  • David S. Heidler: Henry Clay: The Essential American, (Hardcover), May 4, 2010
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn, May 4, 2010
  • Mark Puls: Henry Knox: Visionary General of the American Revolution, (Paperback) May 11, 2010
  • T. H. Breen: American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People, (Hardcover), May 11, 2010
  • Alexandra Popoff: Sophia Tolstoy: A Biography, (Hardcover) May 11, 2010
  • John D. Lukacs: Escape From Davao: The Forgotten Story of the Most Daring Prison Break of the Pacific War, (Hardcover), May 11, 2010
  • S. C. Gwynne: Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History, (Hardcover) May 25, 2010
  • Steven E. Woodworth: The Chickamauga Campaign (1st Edition), (Hardcover), May 28, 2010
  • Larry Schweikart: 7 Events that Made America America: And Proved that the Founding Fathers Were Right All Along, (Hardcover) June 1, 2010
  • Spencer Wells: Pandora’s Seed: The Unforeseen Cost of Civilization, (Hardcover), June 8, 2010
  • John Mosier: Deathride: Hitler vs. Stalin – The Eastern Front, 1941-1945, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Evan D. G. Fraser: Empires of Food: Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations, (Hardcover), June 15, 2010
  • Ruth Harris: Dreyfus: Politics, Emotion, and the Scandal of the Century (REV), (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • James Mauro: Twilight at the World of Tomorrow: Genius, Madness, Murder, and the 1939 World’s Fair on the Brink of War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010.
  • William Marvel: The Great Task Remaining: The Third Year of Lincoln’s War, (Hardcover), June 22, 2010
  • Suzann Ledbetter: Shady Ladies: Nineteen Surprising and Rebellious American Women, (Hardcover), June 28, 2010.
  • Julie Flavell: When London Was Capital of America, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Donald P. Ryan: Beneath the Sands of Egypt: Adventures of an Unconventional Archaeologist, (Hardcover), June 29, 2010
  • Jane Brox: Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, (Hardcover), July 8, 2010.
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, (Hardcover), July 30, 2010.
  • Richard Toye: Churchill’s Empire: The World That Made Him and the World He Made, (Hardcover), August 3, 2010.
  • Alexander Hamilton: The Federalist Papers, (Hardcover), August 16, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • Eminent historian of Irish ascendancy ascendancy dies at 79: Mark Bence-Jones, the genealogical researcher who has died at the age of 79, was the most eminent historian of the social mores of the Irish ascendancy in its decline over the last 100 years…. – Irish Times, 5-8-10
  • Angus Maddison, Economic Historian, Dies at 83: Some people try to forecast the future. Angus Maddison devoted his life to forecasting the past. Professor Maddison, a British-born economic historian with a compulsion for quantification, spent many of his 83 years calculating the size of economies over the last three millenniums. In one study he estimated the size of the world economy in A.D. 1 as about one five-hundredth of what it was in 2008…. – NYT, 4-30-10

History Buzz: April 26, 2010: Orlando Figes & Stephen Ambrose Embroiled in Controversy

April 26, 2010: Orlando Figes & Stephen Ambrose Embroiled in Controversy

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

    This Week’s Political Highlights

  • Bush memoir: 43′s ‘most critical and historic decisions’: It’s official: George W. Bush’s entry into the ranks of presidential memoirs will be released Nov. 9.
    Decision Points “will be centered on the 14 most critical and historic decisions in the life and public service of the 43rd president of the United States,” says the release from Crown Publishers.
    Among those topics: The disputed 2000 election, 9/11, the Iraq war, the financial crisis, Hurricane Katrina, Afghanistan and Iran. Bush also discusses his decision to quit drinking, his faith and his celebrated and politically active family…. – USA Today, 4-27-10
  • The Unthinkable: A Democratic Challenge To Obama: OK, OK. Of course it’s not going to happen. No Democrat in his or her right mind would contemplate challenging President Obama in 2012. In fact, when the Democratic National Committee issued a press release this month announcing the date for the party’s national convention, DNC Chairman Tim Kaine emphasized — twice — that the Democrats fully intend to renominate President Obama and Vice President Biden. But despite the obvious long odds, anything is possible in American politics. There are historical examples of tough intraparty challenges to incumbent presidents… – NPR, 4-22-10

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History….

  • First Earth Day in U.S. had feel of ’60s, says historian: It was part protest, part celebration, and an estimated 20 million Americans took part. On the first Earth Day, April 22, 1970, millions of people across the U.S. went to large public rallies, listened to political speeches, took part in teach-ins, went to concerts and educational fairs, and helped to clean up their communities. Air and water pollution, nuclear testing and loss of wilderness were major concerns…. – CBC News (4-22-10)

HISTORY NEWS:

  • Martin Barillas: Wikipedia Struggles with Holocaust Disinformation; Ravensfire Deletes Jewish Content: Wikipedia posters continued to struggle with the campaign to delete information about IBM’s involvement in the Holocaust as contributors posted and reposted conflicting theories of what should and should not be allowed to appear in the Internet encyclopedia…. – Cutting Edge News (4-26-10)
  • Orlando Figes: Phoney reviewer Figes has history of litigious quarrels: …The professor of Russian history at Birkbeck, University of London, who has previously been engaged in at least two legal disputes with other historians, has been accused and cleared of plagiarism, and received hate mail while an academic at Cambridge. One colleague who did not want to be named described the most recent episode as “the tip of the iceberg”…. – Independent (UK) (4-25-10)
  • Oliver Kamm: Figes’ Furies – Times Online (UK) (4-25-10)
  • Orlando Figes admits: ‘It was me’: For a week now, an extraordinary row has had Britain’s academe in turmoil with threats of libel writs and the bloodying of distinguished reputations.
    But now, in an astonishing twist to the saga, I can reveal that the offending reviews on Amazon were not, after all, written by Figes’s wife, Stephanie, herself a Cambridge University law lecturer…. The Daily Mail (UK) (4-23-10)
  • Poison pen reviews were mine, confesses historian Orlando Figes Guardian (UK) (4-23-10)
  • Another Blow to the Reputation of Stephen Ambrose: In 2002, Ambrose was accused of lifting passages for The Wild Blue: The Men and Boys Who Flew the B-24s over Germany from the work of the historian Thomas Childers. Citing faulty citations, Ambrose apologized, and his publisher promised to put the sentences in question in quotes in future editions. But shortly after, other accusations arose: about passages in books like his Crazy Horse and Custer, Citizen Soldiers, and a volume of his three-volume biography Nixon. Ambrose responded that the relevant material was cited in his footnotes…. – Chronicle of Higher Education (4-23-10)
  • Richard Rayner: Stephen Ambrose exaggerated his relationship with Eisenhower The New Yorker (4-26-10)
  • Harlem Center’s Director to Retire in Early 2011: Howard Dodson, whose wide-ranging acquisitions and major exhibitions have raised the profile of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture and burnished its reputation as the premier institution of its kind, plans to retire as its director in 2011. Howard Dodson turned a research library known mostly to scholars into an institution open to anyone interested in black culture…. – NYT, 4-19-10
  • Historians Call on Texas State Board of Education to Delay Vote: Historians from the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Texas at El Paso have written an Open Letter to the Texas State Board of Education. The letter identifies specific problems with the proposed changes to the state’s social studies standards and recommends that the board delay adoption of the standards in order to solicit additional feedback from “qualified, credentialed content experts from the state’s colleges and universities” and the general public…. – Keith Erekson (4-14-10)

OP-EDs:

  • HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.: Ending the Slavery Blame-Game: THANKS to an unlikely confluence of history and genetics — the fact that he is African-American and president — Barack Obama has a unique opportunity to reshape the debate over one of the most contentious issues of America’s racial legacy: reparations, the idea that the descendants of American slaves should receive compensation for their ancestors’ unpaid labor and bondage…. – NYT, 4-22-10
  • Jon Wiener: Stephen Ambrose, Another Historian in Trouble: In his first and biggest Ike book, “The Supreme Commander,” published in 1970, Ambrose listed nine interviews with the former president. But according to Richard Rayner of The New Yorker, that’s not true. The deputy director of the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum in Abilene, Kansas, Tim Rives, told Rayer that Ike saw Ambrose only three times, for a total of less than five hours, and that the two men were never alone together. The Nation (4-20-10)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Laura Bush Opens Up About Fatal Crash: Spoken From the Heart Laura Bush has finally opened up publicly about the mysterious car accident she had when she was 17, a crash that claimed the life of a high school friend on a dark country road in Midland, Tex. In her new book, “Spoken From the Heart,” Ms. Bush describes in vivid detail the circumstances surrounding the crash, which has haunted her for most of her adult life and which became the subject of questions and speculation when it was revealed during her husband’s first presidential run. A copy of the book, scheduled for release in early May, was obtained by The New York Times at a bookstore… – NYT, 4-28-10
  • Graham Robb: A Pointillist Tour, Revolution to Riots: PARISIANS An Adventure History of Paris “Parisians: An Adventure History of Paris” arrives with an odd subtitle (adventure history?) that makes it sound as if it were written on a skateboard and sponsored by Mountain Dew. Here’s what this book really is: a pointillist and defiantly nonlinear history of Paris from the dawn of the French Revolution through the 2005 riots in Clichy-sous- Bois, told from a variety of unlikely perspectives and focusing on lesser-known but reverberating moments in the city’s history…. – NYT, 4-28-10 Excerpt
  • Assessing Jewish Identity of Author Killed by Nazis: Némirovsky’s personal story contains plenty of drama, including the desperate, heart-rending attempts by her husband, Michel Epstein, to save her. He too died at Auschwitz. But along with the belated publication came charges from a handful of critics that Némirovsky, killed because she was a Jew, was herself an anti-Semite who courted extreme right-wing friends and wrote ugly caricatured portraits of Jews. Next month a new biography, “The Life of Irène Némirovsky: Author of Suite Française,” and a collection of her short stories are being published for the first time in English in the United States, giving Americans another opportunity to assess Némirovsky’s life and work…. NYT, 4-26-10
  • Book review of “Crossing Mandelbaum Gate: Coming of Age Between the Arabs and Israelis, 1956-1978″ by Kai Bird: “Crossing Mandelbaum Gate” is a fascinating book about a crucial period in the Middle East, but as a memoir it fails on the promise of its subtitle. Bird turns a beacon on the exhilarating places in which he grew up. If only he had shone the same beacon on himself…. – WaPo, 4-25-10
  • Rove and Romney on the Republican Party After Bush: Karl Rove, COURAGE AND CONSEQUENCE My Life as a Conservative in the Fight, Mitt Romney, NO APOLOGY The Case for American Greatness NYT, 4-22-10
  • Alan Brinkley “A Magazine Master Builder”: THE PUBLISHER Henry Luce and His American Century …Luce’s success story would be sheer romance if it could surmount one basic problem: Luce himself. On the evidence of “The Publisher,” Alan Brinkley’s graceful and judicious biography, Luce began as an arrogant, awkward boy and did not grow any more beguiling as his fortunes rose. He made up in pretension what he lacked in personal charm, and he was “able to attract the respect but not usually the genuine affection of those around him.” … – NYT, 4-19-10
  • Jonathan Yardley reviews ‘The Publisher,’ by Alan Brinkley: THE PUBLISHER Henry Luce and His American Century …Luce was a complicated, difficult man, by no stretch of the imagination a nice guy. Brinkley is very good on his tangled relationships with women — especially his equally famous and equally difficult second wife, Clare Boothe Luce — as well as with the men who worked with, which is to say under, him. My only qualm about this otherwise superb book is that it does not convey much sense of what life was like in his empire… – WaPo, 4-18-10
  • DAVID S. REYNOLDS on Leo Damrosch “Tocqueville: The Life”: TOCQUEVILLE’S DISCOVERY OF AMERICA In “Tocqueville’s Discovery of America,” Leo Damrosch, the Ernest Bernbaum professor of literature at Harvard, reveals the man behind the sage. Damrosch shows us that “Democracy in America” was the outcome of a nine-month tour of the United States that Tocqueville, a temperamental, randy 25-year-old French apprentice magistrate of aristocratic background, took in 1831-32 with his friend Gustave de Beaumont…. – NYT, 4-18-10
  • Book review: Aaron Leitko reviews “The Poker Bride,” by Christopher Corbett: THE POKER BRIDE The First Chinese in the Wild West In his exhaustively researched “The Poker Bride,” Christopher Corbett tells how Bemis — a Chinese woman who probably arrived in the United States as a concubine — wound up living on a remote patch of Idaho wilderness for more than 50 years with a Connecticut-born gambler who had won her in a poker game. By the time she finally descended from the mountains in 1923, she had become a relic of a different era, a kind of modern Rip Van Winkle…. – WaPo, 4-18-10
  • Roger Ekrich makes history more interesting in telling true story of “Kidnapped”: According to my research, every 11-year-old has read Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson. What I didn’t know when I was 11—and, in fact, didn’t know until a couple of weeks ago—is that Kidnapped was based on a true story…. That true story is told in a new book, Birthright: The True Story That Inspired Kidnapped, by Roger Ekirch, a history professor at Virginia Tech. Mr. Ekirch spoke about the book yesterday at the Library of Congress…. – Chronicle of Higher Education (4-16-10)
  • Schlesinger Interviews With Jacqueline Kennedy to Be Published: Nearly seven hours of unreleased interviews with Jacqueline Kennedy, recorded just months after the death of President John F. Kennedy and intended for deposit in a future presidential library, will be released as a book, the publisher Hyperion said on Tuesday…. – NYT (4-13-10)
  • GARRY WILLS on David Remnick: “Behind Obama’s Cool”: THE BRIDGE The Life and Rise of Barack Obama David Remnick, in this exhaustively researched life of Obama before he became president, quotes many interviews in which Obama made the same or similar points. Accused of not being black enough, he could show that he has more direct ties to Africa than most ­African-Americans have. Suspected of not being American enough, he appealed to his mother’s Midwest origins and accent. Touring conservative little towns in southern Illinois, he could speak the language of the Kansan grandparents who raised him. He is a bit of a chameleon or shape-shifter, but he does not come across as insincere — that is the importance of his famous “cool.” He does not have the hot eagerness of the con man. Though his own background is out of the ordinary, he has the skill to submerge it in other people’s narratives, even those that seem distant from his own…. – NYT, 4-11-10 Excerpt

FEATURES:

  • TCNJ profs say they’ve solved Civil War mystery: A literary mystery that has lingered since the Civil War has apparently been solved by a pair of professors from The College of New Jersey. Their findings ended up as a new book, “A Secession Crisis Enigma,” by Daniel Crofts, a professor of history who turned to David Holmes, professor of statistics, while looking for an answer to a longstanding question. They wanted to determine who was the author of “The Diary of a Public Man,” which was published anonymously in four installments in the 1879 “North American Review.”… NJ.com (4-24-10)
  • It’s war: Anzac Day dissenters create bitter split between historians: A furore has erupted over Australia’s Anzac Day legacy, with the authors of a new book which questions the day’s origins accused by a rival historian of failing to acknowledge the preeminent scholar in the field. Crikey (AU) (4-19-10)
  • Smithsonian exhibit brings the Apollo Theater to D.C: About 100 items are on view at the National Museum of American History, representing big names from entertainment today and from decades past.
    Michael Jackson’s fedora, Ella Fitzgerald’s yellow dress and Louis Armstrong’s trumpet are together in a Smithsonian exhibit celebrating the famed Apollo Theater that helped these stars to shine. The not-yet-built National Museum of African American History and Culture is bringing New York’s Harlem to the nation’s capital with the first-ever exhibit focused on the Apollo, where many musical careers were launched. It opens Friday at the National Museum of American History. About 100 items are on view, representing big names from entertainment today and from decades past…. – USA Today, 4-25-10

QUOTES:

  • Roots of Islamic fundamentalism lie in Nazi propaganda for Arab world, Jeffrey Herf claims: “Nazi Propaganda for the Arab World” “The conflict between Israel and the Palestinians would have been over long ago were it not for the uncompromising, religiously inspired hatred of the Jews that was articulated and given assistance by Nazi propagandists and continued after the war by Islamists of various sorts,” said Jeffrey Herf, a history professor at the University of Maryland. – Telegraph (UK) (4-21-10)
  • JAMES ROSEN, FOX NEWS CORRESPONDENT: An accomplished author himself, President Obama appears irresistible to his fellow literati.
    JAY WINKIK, PRESIDENTIAL HISTORIAN: And he captivates the imagination. And I think it’s safe to say that the White House Press Corps has been galvanized by him. And perhaps one could also add to that. There’s a touch of bias where he may reflect the sentiments of many in the White House Press Corps…. – Fox News, 4-10
  • Historians weigh in on the Tea Party in the NYT: “The story they’re telling is that somehow the authentic, real America is being polluted,” said Rick Perlstein, the author of books about the Goldwater and Nixon years…. – NYT (4-16-10)
  • Gary Cross: For some 20-somethings, growing up is hard to do, says Penn State historian: Gary Cross is a professor of history at Penn State University whose most recent book, “Men to Boys: The Making of Modern Immaturity,” addresses just that.
    “This trend has been building up over the last 50 years to where today it really is hard to see [role] models, to recognize these models of maturity,” he said. “Men have, in effect, slowly and not always steadily rebelled against the role of being providers and being sacrificers.”
    Now, “Men who are in their mid-20s are more independent for a longer period than before because of the rise in the age of marriage. In 1970, when I was 24, men married at 22. Now they’re married at 28; that’s a big difference,” Dr. Cross said. “Part of it is the way boys have always been indulged more than girls in the typical family,” Dr. Cross said. “One thing that has struck me is, early in the 20th century, how indulgent they were of openly naughty boys. Not so much with the girls.”… – Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (4-14-10)

INTERVIEWS:

  • A Primer on China from Jeffrey Wasserstrom: In China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know, just published by Oxford University Press, Jeffrey N. Wasserstrom provides answers to a wide range of commonly asked questions about the world’s most populous country. The excerpt below describes two of the topics the book addresses: nationalism and the web…. – Forbes (4-21-10)
  • Award-wining historian Natalie Zemon Davis talks to American Prospect: Natalie Zemon Davis will be awarded the 2010 Holberg International Memorial Prize on June 9 for the way in which her work “shows how particular events can be narrated and analyzed so as to reveal deeper historical tendencies and underlying patterns of thought and action.” Davis describes her work as anthropological in nature. Rather than tell the political story of a time and place, concentrating on an elite narrative, Davis’ work is often from the point of view of those less likely to keep records of their lives. TAP spoke with Davis, an 81-year-old professor emerita of history at Princeton University and current adjunct professor of history at the University of Toronto, about her innovative approach to history…. – The American Prospect (4-9-10)

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • American Academy of Arts and Sciences Announces 2010 Class of Fellows and Foreign Honorary Members: Ervand Abrahamian, City University of New York
    Robert P. Brenner, University of California, Los Angeles
    Paul H. Freedman, Yale University
    Jan E. Goldstein, University of Chicago
    Greg Grandin, New York University
    Carla Hesse, University of California, Berkeley
    Daniel Walker Howe, University of California, Los Angeles
    Donald W. Meinig, Syracuse University
    Heinrich von Staden, Institute for Advanced Study – AAAS Press Release (4-19-10)
  • University of Glasgow creates first Chair of Gaelic in Scotland: Professor Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh has been named as the first ever established Chair of Gaelic in Scotland by the University of Glasgow. The Chair has been created to recognise the University as a centre of excellence for the study of Celtic and Gaelic…. – Medieval News (4-16-10)
  • Historians on the 2010 List of Guggenheim Fellows: Andrew Apter, Joshua Brown, Antoinette Burton, William Caferro, Hasia R. Diner, Caroline Elkins, Walter Johnson, Pieter M. Judson, Jeffrey C. Kinkley, Thomas Kühne, Ms. Maggie Nelson, Susan Schulten, John Fabian Witt – Tenured Radical (4-15-10)
  • Pulitzer Prize in History awarded to Liaquat Ahamed: HISTORY: “Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World” by Liaquat Ahamed – A Harvard graduate [who] was born in Kenya, Ahamed dreamed of being a writer while he worked as an investment manager. “Lords of Finance” is a compelling account of how the actions of four bankers triggered the Depression and ultimately turned the United States into the world’s financial leader, the Pulitzer board said…. – AP (4-12-10)
  • Ernest Freeberg named winner of the 2010 Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award: Ernest Freeberg will receive the 2010 Eli M. Oboler Memorial Award, presented by the Intellectual Freedom Round Table (IFRT) of the American Library Association (ALA). Freeberg was selected for his book,“Democracy’s Prisoner: Eugene V. Debs, the Great War, and the Right to Dissent” (Harvard University Press, 2008). Press Release (4-6-10)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • History Doctoral Programs Site Updated at AHA Website: The AHA’s History Doctoral Programs web site has now been updated to include current information on students, faculty, and departments as a whole. In addition to department-level fixes, the site has also been updated to include links to a wealth of additional information about universities in the United States… Robert Townsend at AHA Blog (4-6-10)AHA

ON TV:

  • 12-hour ‘America’ series gives ‘an aerial view of history’: History Channel has enjoyed bountiful ratings of late focusing on contemporary topics. But it returns to more traditional roots with its biggest project yet, America The Story of Us. Through dramatic re-creations and computer-generated imagery, the six-night, 12-hour series (premiering Sunday, 9 ET/PT, and continuing through May 30) covers 400 years of U.S. settlement and growth. But an American history series — the first comprehensive TV effort since Alistair Cooke’s America for PBS in 1972 — had been contemplated for about 18 months. The Story of Us crystallized during Barack Obama’s presidential inauguration.
    “Watching that was an historic moment. But so was the economic crisis, the wars the nation was fighting,” says History Channel general manager Nancy Dubuc. “Ideas came up about where are we going in America and how we got there, and how to hit all the touch-points in a way that entertains and inspires.” Obama filmed a 90-second spot to launch the series, which is narrated by actor Liev Schreiber. Observations by historians, politicians, actors and cultural observers are interspersed, including former secretary of State Colin Powell, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani, Oscar winner Meryl Streep and Harvard University historian Henry Louis Gates Jr…. – USA Today, 4-22-10
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • Hampton Sides: Hellhound on His Trail: The Stalking of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the International Hunt for His Assassin, (Hardcover) April 27, 2010
  • Max Hastings: Winston’s War: Churchill, 1940-1945, (Hardcover) April 27, 2010
  • Bradley Gottfried: The Maps of Gettysburg: An Atlas of the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 – July 13, 1863, (Hardcover) April 19, 2010
  • Kelly Hart: The Mistresses of Henry VIII, (Paperback) May 1, 2010
  • David S. Heidler: Henry Clay: The Essential American, (Hardcover), May 4, 2010
  • Nathaniel Philbrick: The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn, May 4, 2010
  • Mark Puls: Henry Knox: Visionary General of the American Revolution, (Paperback) May 11, 2010
  • Alexandra Popoff: Sophia Tolstoy: A Biography, (Hardcover) May 11, 2010
  • John D. Lukacs: Escape From Davao: The Forgotten Story of the Most Daring Prison Break of the Pacific War, (Hardcover), May 11, 2010
  • S. C. Gwynne: Empire of the Summer Moon: Quanah Parker and the Rise and Fall of the Comanches, the Most Powerful Indian Tribe in American History, (Hardcover) May 25, 2010
  • Steven E. Woodworth: The Chickamauga Campaign (1st Edition), (Hardcover), May 28, 2010
  • Larry Schweikart: 7 Events that Made America America: And Proved that the Founding Fathers Were Right All Along, (Hardcover) June 1, 2010

DEPARTED:

History Buzz: April 11, 2010: Historians Weigh in on Congress Passing Health Reform & Confederate History Month

April 11, 2010: Historians Weigh in on Congress Passing Health Reform & Confederate History Month

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

    This Week’s Political Highlights

  • Alan Brinkley concerned about “current surge of fear and loathing toward Obama”: “There was a lot of hatred in the 1930s,” says Alan Brinkley, the Columbia University historian and expert on populist movements. But the current surge of fear and loathing toward Obama is “scary,” he says. “There’s a big dose of race behind the real crazies, the ones who take their guns to public meetings. I can’t see this happening if McCain were president, or [any] white male.” – Newsweek (4-9-10)
  • Obama learning from LBJ, according to presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Newsweek (3-26-10)
  • Pelosi may enter history as one of the great House speakers, according to scholars: “She may get a stellar entry in the history books, but that entry will not include the word ‘bipartisan,’ ” said John J. Pitney Jr., a political scientist at Claremont McKenna College….
    “There is nothing to strengthen a politician like a big victory,” said Julian Zelizer, a congressional historian at Princeton University…. – LA Times (3-23-10)
  • Republicans kick off repeal attempt, says Julian Zelizer: “You have a window where they can try to raise doubts about what’s about to happen,” says Julian Zelizer, a professor of history and public affairs at Princeton University in New Jersey…. “No one would have imagined the conservatives would be so energized a year after 2008,” says Mr. Zelizer. “Now we’re talking about a possible Republican takeover of Congress. And they almost killed Obama’s biggest program.” – CS Monitor (3-22-10)
  • States’ rights a rallying cry for lawmakers and scholars: “Everything we’ve tried to keep the federal government confined to rational limits has been a failure, an utter, unrelenting failure — so why not try something else?” said Thomas E. Woods Jr., a senior fellow at the Ludwig von Mises Institute, a nonprofit group in Auburn, Ala., that researches what it calls “the scholarship of liberty.”… – NYT (3-16-10)

IN FOCUS:

  • Virginia governor amends Confederate history proclamation to include slavery: After a barrage of nationwide criticism for excluding slavery from his Confederate History Month proclamation, Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell (R) on Wednesday conceded that it was “a major omission” and amended the document to acknowledge the state’s complicated past. A day earlier, McDonnell said he left out any reference to slavery in the original seven-paragraph proclamation because he wanted to include issues he thought were most “significant” to Virginia. He also said the document was designed to promote tourism in the state, which next year marks the 150th anniversary of the start of the Civil War. However, Wednesday afternoon the governor issued a mea culpa for the document’s exclusion of slavery. “The proclamation issued by this Office designating April as Confederate History Month contained a major omission,” McDonnell said in a statement. “The failure to include any reference to slavery was a mistake, and for that I apologize to any fellow Virginian who has been offended or disappointed.”… – WaPo, 4-7-10

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

HISTORY NEWS:

  • James McPherson: As Texas messes with history, worry that it’ll multiply: A lot of attention has been focused on Texas in recent weeks, because state officials decided to rewrite social studies curriculum and force kids to learn a distorted view of the country’s past….
    “One can only regret the conservative pressure groups and members of the Texas education board that have forced certain changes in high school history textbooks used in the state.”… – WaPo (4-5-10)
  • Some right-wingers ignore facts as they rewrite U.S. history: The right is rewriting history. “We are adding balance,” Texas school board member Don McLeroy said. “History has already been skewed. Academia is skewed too far to the left.”…
    “History in the popular world is always a political football,” said Alan Brinkley , a historian at Columbia University… – McClatchy Newspapers (4-1-10)
  • Free Guide to Texas Social Studies Revision Process from University of Texas: The Center for History Teaching & Learning has published a simple and informative free guide to the ongoing K-12 social studies revision process. Texas Social Studies Simplified explains what is going on, why it matters, who is involved, and when the process will be done. It also corrects the many errors circulating in the media about the revision process…. – UTEP Center for History Teaching & Learning (3-31-10)
  • History Coalition Submits Congressional Testimony on FY 2011 NARA & NHPRC Budgets Lee White at the National Coalition for History (3-30-10)
  • Headed for Auction: Back-Channel Gloom on Revolutionary War: “Such a pittance of troops as Great Britain and Ireland can supply will only serve to protract the war, to incur fruitless expense and insure disappointment,” Burgoyne added in a letter in the collection that will be auctioned beginning next month by Sotheby’s in New York. “Our victory has been bought by an uncommon loss of officers, some of them irreparable, and I fear the consequence will not answer the expectations that will be raised in England.” NYT (3-22-10)
  • Niall Ferguson: ‘Rid our schools of junk history’: A leading British historian has called for a Jamie Oliver-style campaign to purge schools of what he calls “junk history”. Niall Ferguson, who teaches at Harvard and presented a Channel 4 series on the world’s financial history, has launched a polemical attack on the subject’s “decline in British schools”, arguing that the discipline is badly taught and undervalued. He says standards are at an all-time low in the classroom and the subject should be compulsory at GCSE.
    Ferguson makes the comments in an essay to be released this week. It begins: “History matters. Many schoolchildren doubt this. But they are wrong, and they need to be persuaded they are wrong.”… – Guardian (UK) (3-21-10)
  • Book by religion historian Wendy Doniger draws criticism by Hindus: Wendy Doniger, a professor of the history of religion at the University of Chicago, has drawn the ire of some Hindus who regard her scholarship as sacrilegious. During a lecture in London in 2003, someone in the audience threw an egg at Doniger to express disagreement with her interpretation of a passage in the Ramayana, a sacred epic… – Inside Higher Ed (3-17-10)
  • Students protest tenure denial to historian Ronald Granieri: On Monday night, nine College seniors in the final stages of writing their honors theses gathered on the third floor of Van Pelt Library. They wanted answers. The seniors are part of a 17-person History honors thesis class that is leading a charge to protest the tenure denial of their thesis seminar advisor, Ronald Granieri. An assistant professor of modern European history, Granieri was recently denied tenure in his second and last chance to apply for the standing. He originally applied last year in his sixth year of teaching at Penn…. – The Daily Pennsylvanian (3-16-10)

OP-EDs:

  • Bill Kovarik: Feudalism in Appalachia: Underground mining is inherently dangerous, but it’s more dangerous now than it needs to be. We don’t know yet the fully explanation for this week’s accident, but several themes are apparent in historic perspective…. – NYT, 4-7-10
  • Sean Patrick Adams: Tragedy’s Deep Roots: Coal mining has always been a dangerous endeavor, regardless of its historical context. The 19th-century coal miners that I study trudged through rat-infested shafts and through dirty pools of standing water to bore holes in coal seams, pack in black powder, and set off a controlled (hopefully) blast to loosen the coal…. – NYT, 4-7-10
  • Why do more people listen to economists than historians?: David Brooks wondered in his New York Times column last week if economists shouldn’t try to become more like historians. That was interesting to read, given that I had just spent time with a bunch of historians (and a few other humanities professors) who were wondering how they could become more like economists…. – Harvard Business Review (3-31-10)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Making It Look Easy at The New Yorker: David Remnick, the editor of The New Yorker, is not one to waste an opportunity. After attending John Updike’s funeral in Massachusetts in February of last year, he stopped by Harvard Law School to interview some of President Obama’s old professors. Despite the exhaustive newspaper coverage of the 44th president, Mr. Remnick suspected he had something to add. “I wrote it simply to see if I could do it,” Mr. Remnick, 51, said in an interview. “Is it really going to interest me, or is it just going to feel like a guy that went to law school, big deal?” Mr. Remnick kept writing, and the result is his sixth book, “The Bridge,” due out Tuesday. The 672-page biography examines Mr. Obama’s life and racial identity, with strands on Kenyan politics, legal scholarship, his mother’s doctoral dissertation on Indonesian blacksmithing, even a transcript of a recording of the teenage Mr. Obama joking with his buddies…. – NYT, 4-5-10
  • Seeking Identity, Shaping a Nation’s: “The Bridge,” the title of David Remnick’s incisive new book on Barack Obama, refers to the bridge in Selma, Ala., where civil rights demonstrators were violently attacked by state troopers on March 7, 1965, in a bloody clash that would galvanize the nation and help lead to the passage of the Voting Rights Act. It refers to the observation made by one of the leaders of that march, John Lewis, that “Barack Obama is what comes at the end of that bridge in Selma” — an observation Congressman Lewis made nearly 44 years later, on the eve of Mr. Obama’s inauguration. And it refers to the hope voiced by many of the president’s supporters that he would be a bridge between the races, between red states and blue states, between conservatives and liberals, between the generations who remember the bitter days of segregation and those who have grown up in a new, increasingly multicultural America… – NYT, 4-6-10
  • Jonathan Yardley reviews “Anything Goes,” by Lucy Moore: ANYTHING GOES A Biography of the Roaring Twenties … If “Anything Goes” is anything, it’s a nitpicker’s delight. As history, it’s something else. – WaPo, 4-4-10
  • Book review: ‘Valley of Death,’ by Ted Morgan: VALLEY OF DEATH The Tragedy at Dien Bien Phu That Led America Into the Vietnam War Ted Morgan, a retired journalist who has written numerous works of history, has now given us two books in one: an intricate, compelling narrative of the horrifying battle of Dien Bien Phu, which raged from March 13 to May 7, 1954, near the Vietnamese-Laotian border, and a parallel account of deliberations among French, American and British leaders over the impending catastrophe and what to do about it while the battle raged, and of the Geneva negotiations that eventually created North and South Vietnam. The battle account draws mainly on reminiscences and primary sources, while the diplomatic one uses memoirs and secondary works effectively…. Morgan gives us military history of a very high quality at both the strategic and tactical levels…. – WaPo, 4-4-10
  • Historic moments in Dakotas by former SDSU professor: …In a new book, “Prairie Republic – The Political Culture of Dakota Territory, 1879-1889,” South Dakota native and historian Jon K. Lauck comes to Turner’s defense by chronicling what he calls the “genuine democratic moments” of thousands of settlers that he said were the seed and soil of statehood.
    In doing so, Lauck attempts to balance and challenge the themes of Yale historian Howard R. Lamar’s 1956 “Dakota Territory – 1860-1889, a Study of Frontier Politics.” Lamar’s work remains a seminal piece of American history, part of a critical examination of the American West during the mid- to late 20th century…. – Argus Leader (3-25-10)
  • Nominations for the least-accurate political memoir ever written: Has Karl Rove played fast and loose with historical fact in his new memoir “Courage and Consequence”? History will decide. But recollections invariably differ — perhaps never more so than in political memoirs. And Rove’s isn’t the first to spark debate over what is the true tide in the affairs of men. In that spirit, we asked a variety of people to name the least accurate political memoirs ever written…. -
    JAMES K. GALBRAITH, a professor at the University of Texas at Austin and author of “The Predator State: How Conservatives Abandoned the Free Market and Why Liberals Should Too.”
    DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, professor of history at Rice University and author, most recently, of “The Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America.” – WaPo, 3-19-10
  • Historic win or not, Democrats could pay a price, according to historians WaPo (3-21-10)

FEATURES:

  • The historian Tony Judt says being paralysed by a wasting disease has made his mind sharper: “It’s not as though I could try being dumb and compare the two sensations,” he says. “But I have to assume it’s a blessing … [although] I’m not sure that it’s mental sharpness that has kept me going so much as sheer bloody-minded willpower — or else the sort of ego that adapts well to overachieving.”… – Times Online (UK) (4-4-10)
  • Pessimism back in fashion in historical circles: Niall Ferguson, one of the more important economic historians of our time, is projecting a fiscal disaster in the United States that will match the one Greece is facing at the moment. He says that, according to White House projections, gross public debt will exceed 100 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP). That worries him a great deal… – Business Times (3-30-10)
  • Religion is now the hottest topic for American historians: The study of religion is too important to be left in the hands of believers. So claims David A. Hollinger, a professor of American history at the University of California at Berkeley, in his response to religion emerging as the hottest topic of study among members of the American Historical Association (AHA)…. – Christianity Today (3-11-10)

QUOTES:

  • Presidential unpredictability can be a good thing for the nation: Presidential historian Michael Beschloss says that Kennedy “feared that the changing political environment was making it more difficult for Americans to practice the kind of leadership that had shaped our past.” Kennedy meant that politics had become too expensive, mechanized and “dominated by professional politicians and public relations men.” – Scripps Howard, 4-5-10
  • Tom Mockaitis Historian of terrorism worried about rise in militia groups: “It doesn’t take a lot of fringe elements in a country this size to do an enormous amount of damage,” said Tom Mockaitis, professor of history and terrorism expert, DePaul University. “What worries me is not the lunatic fringe. It’s the larger core of soft support in which these fish can swim, and say they draw energy from this larger pool of anger,” said Mockaitis…. ABC News (3-30-10)
  • Historians ask which American war has been the longest: Host Bob Schieffer noted that milestone during the March 22, 2010, edition of CBS’ Face the Nation. “March 19th was the seventh anniversary of the Iraq invasion, which began our longest war,” he said. We wondered if it really has been America’s longest war…. – St. Petersburg Times (3-22-10)
  • Historians blast proposed Texas social studies curriculum: “The books that are altered to fit the standards become the best-selling books, and therefore within the next two years they’ll end up in other classrooms,” said Fritz Fischer, chairman of the National Council for History Education, a group devoted to history teaching at the pre-college level. “It’s not a partisan issue, it’s a good history issue.”…
    “I’m made uncomfortable by mandates of this kind for sure,” said Paul S. Boyer, emeritus professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison and the author of several of the most popular U.S. history textbooks, including some that are on the approved list in Texas… – WaPo (3-18-10)

INTERVIEWS:

  • Award-wining historian Natalie Zemon Davis talks to American Prospect: Natalie Zemon Davis will be awarded the 2010 Holberg International Memorial Prize on June 9 for the way in which her work “shows how particular events can be narrated and analyzed so as to reveal deeper historical tendencies and underlying patterns of thought and action.” Davis describes her work as anthropological in nature. Rather than tell the political story of a time and place, concentrating on an elite narrative, Davis’ work is often from the point of view of those less likely to keep records of their lives. TAP spoke with Davis, an 81-year-old professor emerita of history at Princeton University and current adjunct professor of history at the University of Toronto, about her innovative approach to history…. – The American Prospect (4-9-10)

AWARDS &APPOINTMENTS:

  • New AHA Executive Director: Jim Grossman to Succeed Arnita Jones: The American Historical Association is pleased to announce that Dr. James Grossman, currently Vice President for Research and Education at Chicago’s Newberry Library, will succeed Dr. Arnita Jones as the Association’s Executive Director. Dr. Jones will retire at the end of August… – AHA Blog (3-19-10)
  • University of Toronto historian wins prestigious Holberg Prize: Natalie Zemon Davis, professor emerita from Princeton University and now a University of Toronto history scholar whose books have reached a wide audience, has won one of the world’s top academic prizes. The Holberg Prize – established by the Norwegian parliament in 2003 and worth $700,500 US – is awarded for outstanding scholarly work in the arts and humanities, social sciences, law or theology. Philosopher Ian Hacking, also of the University of Toronto, won the prize last year… – EurekAlert (3-16-10)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Major New Russian Archive for World War II: Head of Rosarkhiv Andrei Artizov has announced plans to create an enormous new archive to unite all Russian materials relating to the Second World War. Slated for completion by the 70th anniversary of victory, i.e. 2015, the new collection will include 13 million files…. – Dave Stone at the Russian Front (3-22-10)
  • Project to digitize Canada’s 1812 artifacts: Sarah Maloney has a passion for history. The Port Colborne resident, who has a master’s degree in history from the University of Western Ontario, was one of two people hired to by Brock University to carry out its 1812 Online Digitization Project.
    In the work carried out, Maloney and the other assistant on the project took more than 20,000 photos of artifacts and documents from RiverBrink Art Museum, Grimsby Museum, Jordan Historical Museum, Port Colborne Historical and Marine Museum, Niagara Historical Society and Museum and Niagara Falls museums, which includes Lundy’s Lane Historical Museum. One thousand items revolving around the war will eventually be online at www.1812history.com and our ontario.caas well. More than 800 items can be seen on those websites now and the project wraps up at the end of the month…. – Welland Tribune (Canada) (3-15-10)
  • Princeton University: Symposium explores race and the Obama presidency Tuesday, April 13, 2010, 1 p.m. · Frist Campus Center, Multipurpose Room A: Princeton scholars in the fields of African American Studies, politics, religion, sociology and history will come together Tuesday, April 13, at the University for the symposium “Race, American Politics, and the Presidency of Barack Obama.” The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room A of the Frist Campus Center on the Princeton campus, followed by a public reception.
    Speakers and panelists at the symposium will include Glaude; Larry Bartels, professor of politics and public affairs and director of Princeton’s Center for the Study of Democratic Politics; Daphne Brooks, associate professor of English and African American studies; Kevin Kruse, associate professor of history; Douglas Massey, professor of sociology and public affairs; Imani Perry, professor of African American studies; Jeffrey Stout, professor of religion; and Julian Zelizer, professor of history and public affairs. – Princeton

ON TV:

  • HBO sought Easton professor’s expertise for ‘The Pacific’ war series: A simple question from his 6-year-old granddaughter inspired Easton historian Donald L. Miller to start writing about World War II. Miller, a Lafayette College history professor, has since written three books on the history of World War II. That led him to his latest project, as historical consultant and a writer for HBO’s “The Pacific.”…
    Miller says he was “very pleased” with how the series turned out. He describes it as “very violent, explosively emotional and tremendously gut-wrenching.” “What drew me into the study of war is people are at both their best and worst,” he says. “People do things they didn’t think they were capable of doing. There are tremendous acts of heroism and acts of barbarism.” – Allentown Morning Call (3-14-10)
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

BOOKS COMING SOON:

  • Simon Dixon: Catherine the Great, (Paperback) April 6, 2010
  • J. Todd Moye: Freedom Flyers: The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II, (Hardcover) April 12, 2010
  • Seth G. Jones: In the Graveyard of Empires: America’s War in Afghanistan (Paperback) April 12, 2010
  • Nick Bunker: Making Haste from Babylon: The Mayflower Pilgrims and Their World: A New History, (Hardcover) April 13, 2010
  • Dominic Lieven: Russia Against Napoleon: The True Story of the Campaigns of War and Peace, (Hardcover), April 15, 2010
  • Timothy J. Henderson: The Mexican Wars for Independence, (Paperback) April 13, 2010
  • Hampton Sides: Hellhound on His Trail: The Stalking of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the International Hunt for His Assassin, (Hardcover) April 27, 2010
  • Max Hastings: Winston’s War: Churchill, 1940-1945, (Hardcover) April 27, 2010
  • Bradley Gottfried: The Maps of Gettysburg: An Atlas of the Gettysburg Campaign, June 3 – July 13, 1863, (Hardcover) April 19, 2010
  • Kelly Hart: The Mistresses of Henry VIII, (Paperback) May 1, 2010
  • Mark Puls: Henry Knox: Visionary General of the American Revolution, (Paperback) May 11, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • James F, McMillan, Scottish historian of France, dies at 61: PROFESSOR James F McMillan, Richard Pares Professor of History at the University of Edinburgh, has died at the age of 61. He was an outstanding scholar, an inspirational teacher, a brilliant academic manager and a wonderful colleague: the word “collegial” might have been coined to describe him. The Scotsman (UK) (3-15-10)
  • Kenneth Dover, a Provocative Scholar of Ancient Greek Literature, Dies at 89: Kenneth Dover, an eminent scholar of ancient Greek life, language and literature who became known for his willingness to break longstanding taboos in print, from his frank descriptions of sexual behavior (both the Greeks’ and his own) to his baldly stated desire to bring about the death of a vexing Oxford colleague, died on Sunday in Cupar, Scotland. He was 89… – NYT (3-13-10)
  • Professor Jack Pole’s reassessment of American ‘exceptionalism’: Professor Jack Pole, the historian who died on January 30 aged 87, was a pioneering figure in the study of American political culture whose challenge to the notion of American “exceptionalism” ignited a debate that has yet to burn out… – Telegraph (UK) (3-13-10)

History Buzz: December 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

December 2009: History Buzz Roundup

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES: 2009 IN REVIEW

  • Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman “9/11 to climate change: Historians look back on the decade”: “The new century began on a bang, and it was a shot heard ’round the world,” Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman, a history professor at San Diego State University, said, speaking of the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001… “It’s something that’s really solidified in the past decade,” noted Hoffman, who’s also the author of “In the Lion’s Den: A Novel of the Civil War.” “All kinds of people who were either eager to believe or eager to disbelieve all came to stand at the same spot to realize this is something we have to take seriously.” – AP, 12-7-09
  • Bruce Schulman “9/11 to climate change: Historians look back on the decade”: “People are going to think that 9/11 is a significant historical turning point no matter what happens, because it certainly altered the international order,” said Bruce Schulman, who teaches history at Boston University…. “If in 2004 you told me that in the next election we would elect a black president, I would have said, ‘You’re crazy. That’s not happening maybe for my lifetime,’” Schulman said. “Now…could you imagine that ever again, at least ever again at least in the next 16 or 20 years, we would have two tickets that would be all white males? I don’t think we’ll ever see that again.” AP, 12-7-09
  • Brian Balogh “9/11 to climate change: Historians look back on the decade”: Brian Balogh, a history professor at the University of Virginia, pointed out that 9/11 demonstrated the power of non-state actors and has kept us talking about “homeland security,” a term not widely used before the attacks. Hoffman said 9/11 revealed that the U.S. didn’t have a post-Cold War strategic vision…. Balogh added that the 2000 election contributed to political partisanship because the close race caused each side to use “any weapon in their arsenal.” Nowadays there are fewer political moderates and fewer legislative compromises — a trend exemplified in the current debate over health care reform. Bills emerged from Congress with the support of just one Republican. In the 1960s, Balogh noted, Democrats got more GOP support to pass landmark civil-rights legislation…. “The most dramatic change [of the decade] is, in essence, expecting to have all the information in the world at our fingertips and to be constantly in touch with people whenever we want to be, however we want to be,” said Balogh, who also cohosts a radio show called “BackStory with the American History Guys.” “We’re increasingly connected by what we buy, by what we read, by lifestyles. I think we’re less connected by geography and by our allegiances and attachments to nations.”…. – AP, 12-7-09
  • Julian Zelizer “9/11 to climate change: Historians look back on the decade”: As a result of 9/11, the political polarization was amplified, said Julian Zelizer, a history professor at Princeton University and author of “Arsenal of Democracy: The Politics of National Security — From World War II to the War on Terrorism.” Zelizer said he thinks evolving media technology — and the development of the 24/7 news cycle, thanks in part to the rise of Internet blogging and social-networking sites — has helped increase partisan bickering this decade…. – AP, 12-7-09
  • Daryl Michael Scott “9/11 to climate change: Historians look back on the decade”: “Diversity is leading to a different America,” said Daryl Michael Scott, a history professor at Howard University. “African-Americans have been the largest minority in the country since its founding, and I think it takes place within the 2000s, this formal passing of the guard.”… – AP, 12-7-09
  • 100 Notable Books of 2009: The New York Times Book Review selects outstanding works from the last year – NYT, 11-09
  • The 10 Best Books of 2009 By THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NYT, 12-09
  • The ’00s: Goodbye (at Last) to the Decade From Hell Time, 11-24-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History….

  • 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor far from forgotten: Harold O’Connor, 88, was a Navy Fireman First Class on the USS Thornton, a destroyer seaplane tender, in Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, when the Japanese attacked. “All the torpedo planes were coming right off our fantail,” O’Connor recalls. “I watched the West Virginia go up from two torpedoes that were dropped. All hell was breaking loose. I saw the bombs that hit the Arizona.”… – USA Today, 12-7-09
  • Historian Finds John Brown’s Link To Vermont: To some – 19th century abolitionist John Brown was a folk hero. To others he was a violent terrorist. To this day Brown is considered one of the more controversial figures of the 1800s. December 2, marks the 150th anniversary of Brown’s execution following his failed raid at Harper’s Ferry Virginia…. – Vermont Public Radio (12-1-09)

IN THE NEWS:

  • House uncovered in Nazareth dating to the time of Jesus: Archaeologists in Israel say they have discovered the remains of a home from the time of Jesus in the heart of Nazareth. The Israeli Antiquities Authority said the find “sheds light on the way of life at the time of Jesus” in the Jewish settlement of Nazareth, where Christians believe Jesus grew up…. – CNN, 12-21-09
  • Stanford technology helps scholars get ‘big picture’ of the Enlightenment – Cynthia L. Haven in the Stanford News (12-17-09)
  • Bill to Increase the NHPRC’s Reauthorization is Derailed in the Senate: What was expected to be a non-controversial committee markup of legislation (S. 2872) to reauthorize the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC) resulted instead in the elimination of a proposed significant increase in the Commission’s spending level over the next five years… – Lee White at the website of the National Coalition for History (NCH) (12-18-09)
  • Congress maintaining history budgets – Lee White at the website of the National Coalition for History (NCH) (12-14-09)
  • Historians seek $1.5M for Tecumseh memorial: A group of historians in Thamesville, Ont., say they’ll need $1.5 million to upgrade a memorial for a native American chief who played a key role in the War of 1812…. – CBC News (11-12-09)
  • The John Hope Franklin File: FBI Looked At Esteemed Historian For Communist Ties: The celebrated historian John Hope Franklin was scrutinized by the FBI in the 1960s for supposed links to communists, particularly his opposition to the House Committee on Un-American Activities and his vocal support for W.E.B. Du Bois…. – TPM (Liberal blog) (12-15-09)
  • Stanford history professor questions role of historians as researchers for the defense in such a lawsuit: Four University of Florida graduate students who did research for a tobacco company’s legal defense have been caught in a debate over the role of historians in such cases. The controversy stretches from Gainesville to Palo Alto, Calif., where Stanford University history professor Robert Proctor has publicly identified and criticized historians who work for the tobacco industry. Proctor’s discovery that UF graduate students in history were working for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. attorneys led him to e-mail objections to a UF professor, Betty Smocovitis…. – The Gainesville Sun (12-8-09)
  • A plainer view of our past: Howard Zinn and ‘The People Speak’ TV special – The Philadelphia Inquirer (12-8-09)
  • Maciej Kowalczy: Historian Finds Red Baron’s Death Certificate: A Polish historian says he made a surprising find when poring through World War I archives — the death certificate of Manfred von Richthofen, the German fighter ace known as the “Red Baron.”… – AP (12-7-09)
  • Conservative viewpoint: Doris Kearns Goodwin’s cross into partisan politics – Charlotte Conservative News (12-6-09)
  • Student finds letter ‘a link to Jefferson’: An 1808 letter from Thomas Jefferson turns up during archiving by a University of Delaware graduate student. Student uncovers letter among archives of mementos of elite Delaware family… Thomas Jefferson’s 1808 letter part of archives gift to University of Delaware… “This letter was like a link to Jefferson himself,” student says Library official says, “To hold it in your hands is really quite thrilling”
    In a nondescript conference room tucked inside the library at the University of Delaware, a graduate student found a historian’s equivalent to a needle in a haystack. Amanda Daddona said she discovered a personal letter from Thomas Jefferson amid one of 200 boxes of legal documents, minutes from meetings and day-to-day correspondence of a prominent Delaware family…. – CNN, 12-4-09
  • There has been a rare and surprising archaeological discovery dug up in Tel Dor, Israel: a gemstone engraved with the portrait of Alexander the Great…. – Netscape News
  • Residents, historians work for landmarks in Harlem: Michael Henry Adams, a local historian and graduate of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, agreed, saying, “Harlem is grossly under-landmarked, and so is every black neighborhood in the city.” He added, “If you look at the Upper East Side and Upper West Side, all the places where the richest people live, there’s the most landmarking.”…. – Columbia Spectator (12-3-09)
  • Joy Damousi: Historian examines the lives of war generation (Australia): A prominent Melbourne academic is researching the impact of memories of WWII in Greece and the Civil War on Greek-Australians…. – Greek Reporter (11-30-09)
  • Historians seeks to capture and preserve 100-year farm heritage: For 100 years Henry Armstrong’s family has farmed the same patch of central Montana land, hanging on through the Depression, low wheat prices and the ever-present risk that the next generation would move on… – Google News (11-27-09)
  • Historians are at war over ‘old-fashioned’ flagship series: TELEVISION historian Neil Oliver has been likened to a “pygmy on a giant’s territory” by a leading academic as the bitter row over the BBC’s flagship A History of Scotland series intensifies…. – The Herald Scotland (11-26-09)

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Vikki Bynum vs. John Stauffer: The debate turns ugly: Professor Stauffer is angry at me; I mean really angry. He’s furious that I don’t think more highly of his and Sally Jenkins’s book, State of Jones, but especially that I have the temerity to publicly say so. To get it all off his chest, he just let off more steam on page 2 of the December 10th issue of the Jones County ReView… – Victoria Bynum at the Renegade South blog (12-10-09)
  • Howard Zinn’s show has been “hyped” says Ron Radosh in a highly critical review… – Historian Ron Radosh at his blog (12-12-09)
  • Historian David Reynolds says Obama should pardon John Brown: IT’S important for Americans to recognize our national heroes, even those who have been despised by history. Take John Brown. Today is the 150th anniversary of Brown’s hanging — the grim punishment for his raid weeks earlier on Harpers Ferry, Va. With a small band of abolitionists, Brown had seized the federal arsenal there and freed slaves in the area. His plan was to flee with them to nearby mountains and provoke rebellions in the South. But he stalled too long in the arsenal and was captured. He was brought to trial in a Virginia court, convicted of treason, murder and inciting an insurrection, and hanged on Dec. 2, 1859…. – NYT (12-1-09)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Monica’s back – says Clinton lied: Now the first definitive history of the Clinton scandal is about to arrive — and neither man can be completely happy about his portrayal in its pages… “The Death of American Virtue,” due out in February, asserts that Clinton had yet another extramarital affair, with Susan McDougal of Whitewater fame. Also in the book, Monica Lewinsky tells author Ken Gormley that she believes the president lied under oath when he described their encounters…. – Politico, 12-17-09
  • Stein Tonnesson: Norwegian historian writes about war in Vietnam Vietnam 1946VOV News (12-9-09)
  • WSJ book review of Robert E. Sullivan’s “Macaulay: The Tragedy of Power” WSJ (12-7-09)
  • BEVERLY GAGE on John Milton Cooper Jr. “He Was No Wilsonian” WOODROW WILSON A Biography : When historians rank the American presidents, Woodrow Wilson almost always secures a place in the top 10. This seems to be an honor accorded successful wartime leaders; in the last C-Span Presidents Day poll, the highest three spots belonged to Lincoln, Washington and Franklin Roosevelt, two war presidents and a general. Yet compared with the reputations of other members of that august pantheon, Wilson’s lags far behind. George W. Bush was described as “Wilsonian” after 9/11, but that was hardly meant as a compliment. Barack Obama, like Wilson a scholar, political neophyte and Nobel Peace Prize winner, prefers to be compared to Lincoln and the second Roosevelt, or even to Truman and Reagan — practically any other member of the top ranks. Today, the only major public figure who seems to be interested in Wilson is the Fox News host Glenn Beck, who traces the roots of our current “socialist” predicament back to the dark era of Wilsonian income taxes, war propaganda and obscure monetary symbols…. – NYT, 12-13-09
  • Beth Bailey: Historian’s new book considers America’s all-volunteer Army America’s Army: Making the All-Volunteer ForceTemple University (12-3-09)
  • We join a movement in progress: a review of Cynthia Griggs Fleming’s “Yes We Did?’ If Barack Obama’s 2008 election is history’s answer to Martin Luther King’s 46-year-old “I Have a Dream” speech, then African Americans must be on the cusp of . . . what, exactly? In “Yes We Did?” historian Cynthia Griggs Fleming offers an academic overview of the civil rights movement’s triumphant past and uncertain future…. – The Washington Post (12-4-09)
  • Historian’s says Hudson’s ‘did not discover anything’: Four-hundred years ago, Henry Hudson set sail from Europe in an attempt to discover a new route to Asia by heading east. His mission was not successful, but he traveled along what has become the Hudson River between New York and New Jersey. River Edge resident and local historian Kevin Wright explores the quadricentennial of Hudson’s voyage in his new book, “1609: A Country That Was Never Lost: 400th Anniversary of Henry Hudson’s Visit with North Americans of the Middle Atlantic Coast.”… – North Jersey (11-26-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • Word for Word, First Couplets A History of Odes to the Chief: MUSES Lincoln fares best with poets. Hayes, on the other hand, was remembered for his “unrecorded remarks.”…. – NYT, 12-13-09
  • Vietnam historian Stanley Karnow plans his memoir: Stanley Karnow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian and longtime foreign correspondent, is trying to think of a good title for a planned memoir…. – SF Chronicle (12-8-09)
  • Dusan Batakovic: A Historian of the Present: Dusan Batakovic, 52, a Serbian historian and diplomat, has been handed the most demanding role of his life – to lead the Serbian team at the International Court of Justice in the Hague, in an attempt to dispute the legality of Kosovo’s unilateral proclamation of independence on February 17, 2008… – Balkan Insight (12-7-09)
  • Scholars Nostalgic for the Old South Study the Virtues of Secession, Quietly – The Chronicle of Higher Education (12-6-09)
  • Filmmaker Mike Barber inspired by James Loewen examines ‘White Man’s Burden’ Huffington Post (12-3-09)
  • Horse racing was best before British, says historian: Dr Natalie Zacek, from The University of Manchester says the 1861–1865 Civil War changed American racing forever, by forcing it to modernise using the English model… – The University of Manchester (12-1-09)
  • Historian unearthes Civil War war criminal: Her breath quickened as she caught sight of a name engraved in stone. Could it possibly be him? As Carolyn Stier Ferrell stepped closer, she could see that, yes, she had found her man! At the Odd Fellows Home Cemetery atop Boot Hill in New Providence, Ferrell found the final resting place of Thomas Pratt Turner…. – The Leaf Chronicle (11-29-09)

QUOTED:

  • Ivan the Terrible film ‘slanders Russia’ and should be banned, historian says: Vyacheslav Manyagin has asked Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to outlaw the film, which he claims is an insult to Russian statehood. … “Imagine that they made a film in America about George Washington in which the first US president was portrayed as a bloodthirsty maniac,” Mr Manyagin said. “This film slanders the Russian people and state.”… – Telegraph (UK) (11-28-09)

INTERVIEWED:

  • 20 questions: Historian Thomas Fleming: The Intimate Lives of the Founding Fathers, historian Thomas Fleming examines the personal lives of six familiar names in history: George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison. Fleming examines how their relationships with their wives and families affected their roles in founding the country. Fleming, an author of numerous books, spoke to The Hill about his latest tome…. – The Hill
  • Barbara Berg: Inequality the new normal, historian says: Women’s rights are under attack, says historian Barbara Berg. Yes, women have made tremendous strides but many of their rights have eroded since feminism’s second wave in the 1970s and 1980s, she writes in her new book, Sexism in America: Alive, Well, and Ruining our Future…. – The Star (12-9-09)
  • Jamie Glazov interview with Victor Davis Hanson: The Palin Wonder – Frontpagemag.com
  • Interview with D.N.Jha, eminent historian: “Historians who come in proximity to power change their secular lines” DWIJENDRA NARAYAN JHA, an eminent historian, has campaigned extensively against the communalisation of history. His book Myth of the Holy Cow,wherein he dispelled popular misconceptions that Muslims introduced beef-eating in India, created ripples in political circles. – Frontline (Volume 26) (12-1-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Turkish parliament awards renowned historian: Turkey’s internationally-acclaimed historian Prof. Kemal Karpat has received Turkish parliament’s honorary award…. – World Bulletin (12-9-09)
  • OAH selects new executive director: It is my great pleasure to inform you that the OAH has a new Executive Director. After an extensive process that resulted in 54 applications, Katherine (Kathy) Finley has been selected by the OAH Executive Board at its Fall board meeting…. – Press Release (12-8-09)
  • Mihailo Pantic, Srdjan Pirivatric: Bulgarian president awards Serbian writer and historian: At the awarding ceremony in the Bulgarian Presidency, Pantic was presented with the Holly Brothers Cyril and Methodius award for his contribution to the popularization of the Bulgarian culture in Serbia and promotion of relation between the Bulgarian and Serbian people. Bsanna News (12-4-09)
  • Historian one of 10 human rights award winners (Toronto): Most Torontonians are not familiar with the black experience in Canada, but for Adrienne Shadd, African-Canadian history is in her blood. Shadd is the great-great-grandniece of Mary Ann Shadd Cary, the first black women to publish and edit a newspaper in North America…. – The Toronto Observer (11-26-09)
  • UK diplomat questions post of Jews on Iraq panel: A British diplomat has criticized the appointment of two leading Jewish academics to the UK’s Iraq Inquiry panel, stating it may upset the balance of the inquiry. Sir Oliver Miles, a former British ambassador to Libya, told The Independent newspaper this week that the appointment of Sir Martin Gilbert, the renowned Holocaust historian and Winston Churchill biographer, and Sir Lawrence Freedman, professor of war studies and vice-principal of King’s College London, would be seen as “ammunition” that could be used to call the inquiry a “whitewash.”… – The Jerusalem Post (via OpEdNews) (11-25-09)
  • The re-emergence of historian Richard Hofstadter: Hofstadter, who died in 1970, was at one time amongst America’s pre-eminent historians. He documented the evolution of the country’s political culture and its populist underpinnings from the Revolution to the post- Kennedy-assassination era. It’s no surprise that his work is still generally relevant, but his landmark 1964 essay, The Paranoid Style in American Politics, is Cassandra-like in its prescience. – John Moore in the National Post (11-26-09)

SPOTTED:

  • Rebuttal of Decade-Old Accusations Against Researchers Roils Anthropology Meeting Anew: The annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association opened here on Wednesday, and its official theme is “The End/s of Anthropology.” But people here might suspect that one thing will never end: the controversy surrounding Darkness in El Dorado, a 2000 book that accused two prominent scholars of misdeeds in their work with an indigenous community in South America Darkness in El Dorado: How Scientists and Journalists Devastated the Amazon (W.W. Norton), was written by Patrick Tierney… – The Chronicle of Higher Education (12-3-09)
  • Carpentersville students chat with renowned historian Howard Zinn (Illinois): Between preparing for the premiere of his documentary and promoting it with the likes of Matt Damon and Viggo Mortensen, historian and activist Howard Zinn found some time to speak with students at Dundee-Crown High School on Tuesday…. – The Daily Herald (12-2-09)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Royal Society papers provide science, history resources: The 350th anniversary of Britain’s Royal Society (making it the world’s oldest scientific institution) will be marked by the release of a vast library of papers online from the likes of Sir Isacc Newton and Benjamin Franklin. This isn’t just science nerd stuff, though. This is a treasure trove of history that is easily connected to modern scientific thought. The library itself can be found at trailblazing.royalsociety.org and is remarkable in its extensiveness… – ZD Net, 11-29-09

ON TV:

  • ‘NOVA’ looks at Japanese midget sub in Pearl Harbor attack: The PBS science series “NOVA” plans to broadcast a documentary presenting evidence that a torpedo fired from a Japanese midget submarine may have struck the USS Oklahoma during the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. “Killer Subs in Pearl Harbor” premiers Jan. 5. AP, 12-7-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009
  • Len Colodny: The Forty Years War: The Rise and Fall of the Neocons, from Nixon to Obama, December 8, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times, (Paperback), December 18, 2009
  • C. S. Manegold: Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, December 21, 2009
  • A. N. Wilson: Our Times: The Age of Elizabeth II, December 22, 2009
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2009
  • Alison Weir: The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn, January 5, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • Yosef H. Yerushalmi, Scholar of Jewish History, Dies at 77: Yosef Haim Yerushalmi, a groundbreaking and wide-ranging scholar of Jewish history whose meditation on the tension between collective memory of a people and the more prosaic factual record of the past influenced a generation of thinkers, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. He was 77 and lived in Manhattan. NYT (12-10-09)
  • Historian Shearer Davis Bowman dies at the age of 60 – Richmond Times-Dispatch (8-12-09)
  • Resolute academic who looked into Switzerland’s soul: Jean-François Bergier remembered – Financial Times (12-5-09)
  • Remembering Jean-François Bergier: Swiss historian: “You have to be responsible for your past,” the Swiss historian Jean-François Bergier once said. And he knew exactly how challenging that could be for his country… – Times Online (11-30-09)
  • Studs Terkel: Democracy Now! Tribute – Democracy Now (11-27-09)

Posted on Monday, December 21, 2009 at 1:56 AM

History Buzz Special: Hanukkah 2009, History & Obama


EVAN VUCCI / Associated Press, Rahm Emanuel is flankedby Rabbi Abraham Shemtov(left) and Rabbi Levi Shemtov.

HANUKKAH 2009:

IN HISTORY NEWS….

  • Chanukah II: Obama’s Revenge: After being assailed for just about every imaginable trivial deviation from Bush-era Chanukah celebrations, the Obama White House not only headed off the critics, the organizers managed to go their predecessors a couple better. First, there was the souvenir program, with its front-page welcome: “The President and Mrs. Obama welcome you to the White House in celebration of Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights.”… – JTA, 12-17-09
  • Obama: Hanukkah struggle inspires us: During the ceremony, attended by Jewish community leaders, friends and White House staff, the president promoted ideals of freedom, tolerance and justice. Emphasizing the historical story of Jewish revolt, the president said, “It was more than 2,000 years ago, in the ancient city of Jerusalem, that a small band of believers led by Judah Maccabee rose up and defeated their foreign oppressors – liberating the city and restoring the faith of its people,” according to the White House blog…. – JPost, 12-17-09
  • In the Nation Emanuel lights nation’s menorah: White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel lit the National Menorah yesterday in celebration of Hanukkah. The ceremony marked the 30th anniversary of the first National Menorah lighting in 1979. President Jimmy Carter attended that ceremony…. – Philly Inquirer, 12-14-09
  • Maccabean era correspondence discovered: Some 2,200 years after the Maccabees’ revolt, historians and archaeologists are uncovering new information about their era.
    This year’s biggest discovery is a correspondence between Seleukes IV, whose brother and heir was Antiochus IV Epiphanes of the Chanukah story, and one of Seleukes’ chiefs in Judea found on parts of an ancient stele.
    Professor Dov Gera of Ben-Gurion University, who studied the stone’s inscription, said it confirms the account by the Jewish historian Josephus regarding the tightening grip of the Greek-Syrian empire over its subjects’ religious practices.
    “[The text reveals] Seleukes appointed one of the members of his court as an official to oversee worship in the area and equate religious services throughout the empire,” Gera said. “Such an appointment might have been considered by the Jews to be offensive.”… – Jewish Telegraph Agency (12-10-09)
  • A Senator’s Gift to the Jews, Nonreturnable: The canon of Hanukkah songs written by Mormon senators from Utah just got a little bigger. Senator Orrin G. Hatch, a solemn-faced Republican with a soft spot for Jews and a love of Barbra Streisand, has penned a catchy holiday tune, “Eight Days of Hanukkah.” The video was posted Tuesday night on Tablet, an online magazine of Jewish lifestyle and culture, just in time for Hanukkah. NYT, 12-9-09
  • DAVID BROOKS: The Hanukkah Story: Tonight Jewish kids will light the menorah, spin their dreidels and get their presents, but Hanukkah is the most adult of holidays. It commemorates an event in which the good guys did horrible things, the bad guys did good things and in which everybody is flummoxed by insoluble conflicts that remain with us today. It’s a holiday that accurately reflects how politics is, how history is, how life is…. – NYT, 12-10-09

OBAMA WHITE HOUSE & QUOTES

  • President Obama “By Spirit Alone”: It was more than 2,000 years ago, in the ancient city of Jerusalem, that a small band of believers led by Judah Maccabee rose up and defeated their foreign oppressors – liberating the city and restoring the faith of its people.
    And when it came time to rededicate the Temple, the people of Jerusalem witnessed a second miracle: a small amount of oil – enough to light the Temple for a single night – ended up burning for eight. It was a triumph of the few over the many; of right over might; of the light of freedom over the darkness of despair. And ever since that night, in every corner of the world, Jews have lit the Hanukkah candles as symbols of resilience in times of peace, and in times of persecution – in concentration camps and ghettos; war zones and unfamiliar lands. Their light inspires us to hope beyond hope; to believe that miracles are possible even in the darkest of hours.
    It is this message of Hanukkah that speaks to us no matter what faith we practice or what beliefs we cherish. Today, the same yearning for justice that drove the Maccabees so long ago inspires the protestors who march for peace and equality even when they know they will be beaten and arrested for it. It gives hope to the mother fighting to give her child a bright future even in the face of crushing poverty. And it invites all of us to rededicate ourselves to improving the lives of those around us, spreading the light of freedom and tolerance wherever oppression and prejudice exist.
    This is the lesson we remember tonight – that true acts of strength are possible, in the words of the prophet Zechariah, not by might and not by power, but by spirit alone. WH, 12-16-09
  • Statement by President Obama on Hanukkah: Michelle and I send our warmest wishes to all who are celebrating Hanukkah around the world. The Hanukkah story of the Maccabees and the miracles they witnessed reminds us that faith and perseverance are powerful forces that can sustain us in difficult times and help us overcome even the greatest odds.
    Hanukkah is not only a time to celebrate the faith and customs of the Jewish people, but for people of all faiths to celebrate the common aspirations we share. As families, friends and neighbors gather together to kindle the lights, may Hanukkah’s lessons inspire us all to give thanks for the blessings we enjoy, to find light in times of darkness, and to work together for a brighter, more hopeful tomorrow…. – WH, 12-11-09
  • Obama Issues Hanukkah Message in Hebrew: The White House is facing complaints in Israel that its Hanukkah party does not live up to the standards set by President Obama’s predecessor, George W. Bush. But with the Jewish festival of lights set to begin at sundown on Friday, President Obama has outdone Mr. Bush in at least one respect – he issued a Hanukkah message in Hebrew.
    The English version of the greeting sends “warmest wishes to all who are celebrating Hanukkah around the world,” from Mr. Obama and his wife, Michelle. It recalls the ancient story of the Maccabees, the Jewish rebels who triumphed in battle and rededicated the temple in Jerusalem – a reminder, the message says, that “that faith and perseverance are powerful forces that can sustain us in difficult times and help us overcome even the greatest odds.” Hebrew Message NYT, 12-11-09
  • Israeli President Shimon Peres broadcasts YouTube Chanukah message: “Dear Friends: Yesterday I blessed my Arab citizens because they had their holiday which is called Eid-el Adha, a holiday of good will. Tomorrow, I am going to bless my Christian citizens; they are going to have Christmas. But now, it’s time of Chanukah, our own holiday; full of light, full of optimism, full of hope. Not that everything is so easy and promising, but it’s a clear declaration that finally light will win the day.
    We are going through a difficult period of time. There are many dangers, the Iranians; there are many difficulties, like the negotiations of peace, but I am in charge of optimism. I have the right to be one. Most of the things we have hoped for came true. We continue to hope they will come true as well. We would like to be a contributing people, we can be a contributing people; not only in science and technology, but also in peace and promise. The greatest of them is that all children, ours, the Arabs’, the Christians’ will arrive to a day when their mothers do not have to worry about their safety, which means peace. Light and peace are the two things on which Jewish heritage are based. Thank you. Happy Hanukkah, Chag Chanukah Sameah.” – You Tube
  • A Very Emanuel Chanukah: Rahm Emanuel had a serious message about mutual responsibility to make, in a pithy, punchy speech before he helped light the “national menorah” this evening on the Ellipse in front of the White House. Still, the White House chief of staff being Rahm couldn’t resists a couple of one-liners. Rabbi Levi Shemtov, who directs American Friends of Lubavitch, rushed in a thanks to the performers before calling Emanuel to the stage.
    “The U.S. Air Force Band, the Three Cantors and Dreidl Man,” Emanuel said after taking the microphone, “sounds a little like the title of a Fellini movie.” Emanuel went on to make the lessons of Chanukah a paradigm for the collective responsibility for those not able to defend or care for themselves — Tikkun Olam. “Standing up for what is right, even when it is hard, is not a job for some other people, some other time,” he said. “It is a job for all of us.” And still, expounding on the holiday miracle, he couldn’t resist a dig at his former habitat, Congress. “The oil lasted longer than anyone expected, kind of like the health care debate,” he said… – JTA, 12-13-09

FEATURES

  • CHANUKAH Heroes or rabble-rousers? The real story of the Maccabees: In 165 BCE, a group of warriors led by Judah Maccabee and his band of brothers ushered in a new era in Jewish history when they routed the soldiers of the Greek-Syrian empire and rededicated the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. That victory, and the miracle of the menorah that followed, is celebrated every year by Jews around the world at Chanukah. But if the same thing had happened today, would contemporary Jews hail the Maccabees as heroes?
    The place in Jewish history of the Maccabees — a nickname for the first members of the Hasmonean dynasty that ruled an autonomous Jewish kingdom — is much more complex than their popular image might suggest. “Historically it was much more complicated, as there were Jews on both sides,” Jeffrey Rubenstein, professor of Talmud and rabbinics at New York University, said of the Maccabee uprising. “Nowadays, historians look at the conflict more in terms of a civil war than a revolt.”… – JTA, 12-10-09
  • Improving on the Latke: Joan Nathan, a well respected cookbook author and expert in Jewish foods, said she’s not surprised at the widespread resistance to making a traditional treat more healthful. When once asked to come up with baked latkes that tasted as good as fried, she tried. “But I ended up throwing all the recipes in the garbage,” she said.
    Another reason for the fried latke’s persistence: oil isn’t just a cooking ingredient, it’s central to the eight- day celebration of Hanukkah. After winning back their land in battle, the Jews needed to light a menorah as part of a rededication of their Temple. Although they only had enough oil for one day, the oil, miraculously, lasted for eight… – NYT, 12-10-09
  • At Hanukkah, Chefs Make Kitchen Conversions: On holidays like Hanukkah, which begins this year on the night of Dec. 11, gentile chefs with Jewish spouses bring epicurean interpretations to simple dishes, but also enjoy culinary traditions they’ve taken to heart.
    Even since their divorce, the Austrian chef Wolfgang Puck, a Roman Catholic, continues to hold a charity Seder at his restaurant Spago in Los Angeles with his business partner and ex-wife, Barbara Lazaroff, who is Jewish. “The food is so similar,” Mr. Puck said. “My grandmother made potato pancakes, but they were rösti with cooked potatoes and then fried with onions. We had semolina dumplings like matzo balls.”… = NYT, 12-9-09

HISTORIANS’ COMMENTS

  • Tevi Troy “Washington Fuss Over White House Hanukkah Party”: In an opinion article published by JTA, the Jewish news agency, Tevi Troy, a former Bush administration liaison to Jewish groups, warned that the Obama White House had given Jewish Americans “a number of reasons to fear that it takes its votes for granted.” Mr. Troy cited as examples the administration’s call for a freeze on Jewish settlements in the West Bank and the decision to honor Mary Robinson, the former president of Ireland, who has been accused by some Democratic lawmakers of anti-Israel bias. Mr. Troy said the reduced guest list created “a nagging sense that there may be a studied callousness at work here.” – NYT, 12-11-09
  • Aaron Zelinsky: Judah the Maccabee’s Five Lessons for Barack Obama: Tonight is the first night of Chanukah. Modern celebrants (including Senator Hatch) focus on the miracle of the Menorah, which tradition tells us stayed lit for eight days on a single day’s oil. However, Chanukah is also the political story of a few determined Maccabees leading an uprising against the much stronger Seleucid Empire.
    Though the events Chanukah commemorates took place over 2,000 years ago, the historical story of the Maccabees provides useful lessons for our modern era. From the Seleucids, we see how not to fight a guerilla insurgency. From the Maccabees, we learn how to rally a people and a nation.
    Here are Chanukah’s five geopolitical lessons…. Huffington Post (12-11-09)
  • Gil Troy: This Hannukkah, Let’s Teach Our Children How to Give: For the last few years I have lamented that Jews were preparing to celebrate Hanukkah, our festival of lights, during a particularly dark period. I am happy to say that this year was actually pretty good. Yes, the Iranian nuclear threat – to the United States not just to Israel – still looms. Yes, the crash, recession, and Madoff scheme crushed many individuals – and charitable foundations that do holy work. Yes, the high unemployment rate in the United States is a reminder of the misery many individuals are experiencing even during this holiday season. Yes, Islamic extremists declare war on the West, yet many Westerners, deny and dither, afraid to respond too assertively. And yes, Palestinian rejectionists get a free pass in the world court of public opinion while Israel is condemned for engaging in self-defense…. – 12-11-09
  • Tevi Troy: Op-Ed: Obama must beware of the Chanukah snub: Officials in the Obama administration have decided that they will be cutting the guest list in half for this year’s Chanukah party at the White House. The Jerusalem Post, which first reported this development, suggested that this will be politically harder for Obama the Democrat than it would have been for Bush the Republican. As one of President Bush’s advisers for many of his Chanukah parties, I can assure you that it would not have been easy in the previous White House, either… – JTA, 11-23-09

Posted on Monday, December 14, 2009 at 6:52 AM

December 2009: New Jefferson Letter Found & 2009 in Review

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES: 2009 IN REVIEW

  • 100 Notable Books of 2009: The New York Times Book Review selects outstanding works from the last year – NYT, 11-09
  • The 10 Best Books of 2009 By THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW NYT, 12-09
  • The ’00s: Goodbye (at Last) to the Decade From Hell Time, 11-24-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History….

  • Historian Finds John Brown’s Link To Vermont: To some – 19th century abolitionist John Brown was a folk hero. To others he was a violent terrorist. To this day Brown is considered one of the more controversial figures of the 1800s. December 2, marks the 150th anniversary of Brown’s execution following his failed raid at Harper’s Ferry Virginia…. – Vermont Public Radio (12-1-09)

IN THE NEWS:

  • Student finds letter ‘a link to Jefferson’: An 1808 letter from Thomas Jefferson turns up during archiving by a University of Delaware graduate student. Student uncovers letter among archives of mementos of elite Delaware family… Thomas Jefferson’s 1808 letter part of archives gift to University of Delaware… “This letter was like a link to Jefferson himself,” student says Library official says, “To hold it in your hands is really quite thrilling”
    In a nondescript conference room tucked inside the library at the University of Delaware, a graduate student found a historian’s equivalent to a needle in a haystack. Amanda Daddona said she discovered a personal letter from Thomas Jefferson amid one of 200 boxes of legal documents, minutes from meetings and day-to-day correspondence of a prominent Delaware family…. – CNN, 12-4-09
  • Residents, historians work for landmarks in Harlem: Michael Henry Adams, a local historian and graduate of Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, agreed, saying, “Harlem is grossly under-landmarked, and so is every black neighborhood in the city.” He added, “If you look at the Upper East Side and Upper West Side, all the places where the richest people live, there’s the most landmarking.”…. – Columbia Spectator (12-3-09)
  • Joy Damousi: Historian examines the lives of war generation (Australia): A prominent Melbourne academic is researching the impact of memories of WWII in Greece and the Civil War on Greek-Australians…. – Greek Reporter (11-30-09)
  • Historians seeks to capture and preserve 100-year farm heritage: For 100 years Henry Armstrong’s family has farmed the same patch of central Montana land, hanging on through the Depression, low wheat prices and the ever-present risk that the next generation would move on… – Google News (11-27-09)
  • Historians are at war over ‘old-fashioned’ flagship series: TELEVISION historian Neil Oliver has been likened to a “pygmy on a giant’s territory” by a leading academic as the bitter row over the BBC’s flagship A History of Scotland series intensifies…. – The Herald Scotland (11-26-09)

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Historian David Reynolds says Obama should pardon John Brown: IT’S important for Americans to recognize our national heroes, even those who have been despised by history. Take John Brown. Today is the 150th anniversary of Brown’s hanging — the grim punishment for his raid weeks earlier on Harpers Ferry, Va. With a small band of abolitionists, Brown had seized the federal arsenal there and freed slaves in the area. His plan was to flee with them to nearby mountains and provoke rebellions in the South. But he stalled too long in the arsenal and was captured. He was brought to trial in a Virginia court, convicted of treason, murder and inciting an insurrection, and hanged on Dec. 2, 1859…. – NYT (12-1-09)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Beth Bailey: Historian’s new book considers America’s all-volunteer Army America’s Army: Making the All-Volunteer ForceTemple University (12-3-09)
  • We join a movement in progress: a review of Cynthia Griggs Fleming’s “Yes We Did?’ If Barack Obama’s 2008 election is history’s answer to Martin Luther King’s 46-year-old “I Have a Dream” speech, then African Americans must be on the cusp of . . . what, exactly? In “Yes We Did?” historian Cynthia Griggs Fleming offers an academic overview of the civil rights movement’s triumphant past and uncertain future…. – The Washington Post (12-4-09)
  • Historian’s says Hudson’s ‘did not discover anything’: Four-hundred years ago, Henry Hudson set sail from Europe in an attempt to discover a new route to Asia by heading east. His mission was not successful, but he traveled along what has become the Hudson River between New York and New Jersey. River Edge resident and local historian Kevin Wright explores the quadricentennial of Hudson’s voyage in his new book, “1609: A Country That Was Never Lost: 400th Anniversary of Henry Hudson’s Visit with North Americans of the Middle Atlantic Coast.”… – North Jersey (11-26-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • Horse racing was best before British, says historian: Dr Natalie Zacek, from The University of Manchester says the 1861–1865 Civil War changed American racing forever, by forcing it to modernise using the English model… – The University of Manchester (12-1-09)
  • Historian unearthes Civil War war criminal: Her breath quickened as she caught sight of a name engraved in stone. Could it possibly be him? As Carolyn Stier Ferrell stepped closer, she could see that, yes, she had found her man! At the Odd Fellows Home Cemetery atop Boot Hill in New Providence, Ferrell found the final resting place of Thomas Pratt Turner…. – The Leaf Chronicle (11-29-09)

QUOTED:

  • Ivan the Terrible film ‘slanders Russia’ and should be banned, historian says: Vyacheslav Manyagin has asked Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to outlaw the film, which he claims is an insult to Russian statehood. … “Imagine that they made a film in America about George Washington in which the first US president was portrayed as a bloodthirsty maniac,” Mr Manyagin said. “This film slanders the Russian people and state.”… – Telegraph (UK) (11-28-09)

INTERVIEWED:

  • Interview with D.N.Jha, eminent historian: “Historians who come in proximity to power change their secular lines” DWIJENDRA NARAYAN JHA, an eminent historian, has campaigned extensively against the communalisation of history. His book Myth of the Holy Cow,wherein he dispelled popular misconceptions that Muslims introduced beef-eating in India, created ripples in political circles. – Frontline (Volume 26) (12-1-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Mihailo Pantic, Srdjan Pirivatric: Bulgarian president awards Serbian writer and historian: At the awarding ceremony in the Bulgarian Presidency, Pantic was presented with the Holly Brothers Cyril and Methodius award for his contribution to the popularization of the Bulgarian culture in Serbia and promotion of relation between the Bulgarian and Serbian people. Bsanna News (12-4-09)
  • Historian one of 10 human rights award winners (Toronto): Most Torontonians are not familiar with the black experience in Canada, but for Adrienne Shadd, African-Canadian history is in her blood. Shadd is the great-great-grandniece of Mary Ann Shadd Cary, the first black women to publish and edit a newspaper in North America…. – The Toronto Observer (11-26-09)
  • UK diplomat questions post of Jews on Iraq panel: A British diplomat has criticized the appointment of two leading Jewish academics to the UK’s Iraq Inquiry panel, stating it may upset the balance of the inquiry. Sir Oliver Miles, a former British ambassador to Libya, told The Independent newspaper this week that the appointment of Sir Martin Gilbert, the renowned Holocaust historian and Winston Churchill biographer, and Sir Lawrence Freedman, professor of war studies and vice-principal of King’s College London, would be seen as “ammunition” that could be used to call the inquiry a “whitewash.”… – The Jerusalem Post (via OpEdNews) (11-25-09)
  • The re-emergence of historian Richard Hofstadter: Hofstadter, who died in 1970, was at one time amongst America’s pre-eminent historians. He documented the evolution of the country’s political culture and its populist underpinnings from the Revolution to the post- Kennedy-assassination era. It’s no surprise that his work is still generally relevant, but his landmark 1964 essay, The Paranoid Style in American Politics, is Cassandra-like in its prescience. – John Moore in the National Post (11-26-09)

SPOTTED:

  • Rebuttal of Decade-Old Accusations Against Researchers Roils Anthropology Meeting Anew: The annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association opened here on Wednesday, and its official theme is “The End/s of Anthropology.” But people here might suspect that one thing will never end: the controversy surrounding Darkness in El Dorado, a 2000 book that accused two prominent scholars of misdeeds in their work with an indigenous community in South America Darkness in El Dorado: How Scientists and Journalists Devastated the Amazon (W.W. Norton), was written by Patrick Tierney… – The Chronicle of Higher Education (12-3-09)
  • Carpentersville students chat with renowned historian Howard Zinn (Illinois): Between preparing for the premiere of his documentary and promoting it with the likes of Matt Damon and Viggo Mortensen, historian and activist Howard Zinn found some time to speak with students at Dundee-Crown High School on Tuesday…. – The Daily Herald (12-2-09)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Royal Society papers provide science, history resources: The 350th anniversary of Britain’s Royal Society (making it the world’s oldest scientific institution) will be marked by the release of a vast library of papers online from the likes of Sir Isacc Newton and Benjamin Franklin. This isn’t just science nerd stuff, though. This is a treasure trove of history that is easily connected to modern scientific thought. The library itself can be found at trailblazing.royalsociety.org and is remarkable in its extensiveness… – ZD Net, 11-29-09

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009
  • Len Colodny: The Forty Years War: The Rise and Fall of the Neocons, from Nixon to Obama, December 8, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times, (Paperback), December 18, 2009
  • C. S. Manegold: Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, December 21, 2009
  • A. N. Wilson: Our Times: The Age of Elizabeth II, December 22, 2009
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2009
  • Alison Weir: The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn, January 5, 2010

DEPARTED:

  • Remembering Jean-François Bergier: Swiss historian: “You have to be responsible for your past,” the Swiss historian Jean-François Bergier once said. And he knew exactly how challenging that could be for his country… – Times Online (11-30-09)
  • Studs Terkel: Democracy Now! Tribute – Democracy Now (11-27-09)

Posted on Sunday, December 6, 2009 at 6:56 AM

History Buzz: November 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

November 2009 Buzz Roundup: The National Book Award Winner is… T. J. Stiles ‘The First Tycoon’

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • 2009 AHA Election ResultsAHA Blog (11-24-09)
  • Berlin Wall Anniversary Sparks Look At History: November 9 marks the 20th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall. We spoke with British historian Frederick Taylor, an expert on the Berlin Wall, author of the book The Berlin Wall – A World Divided 1961-1989, about what prompted East German authorities to build the wall in the first place… – Voice of America (11-2-09)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Tim Miller: Presidential Historian Time to Release JFK’s Files – PR News Channel (11-18-09)
  • Robert Proctor: Historian Can Keep His Manuscript on Tobacco Studies out of the hands of tobacco company R.J. Reynolds, which had subpoenaed it as evidence for an upcoming suit, Judge Rules – Science Insider (11-11-09)
  • Antony Beevor: D-Day historian: ‘Ryan’ not best war film – CNN (11-11-09)
  • Pulling hair and calling names, historians disagree about Scotland: According to Professor Tom Devine the scripts of A History of Scotland are “lame, boring and flaccid” and its “hapless, long-haired presenter”, Neil Oliver, suffers from “a sad lack of personal authority or presence”. – Times Online (11-9-09)
  • For Canada’s war historians, every day is Remembrance Day – The Star (11-7-09)
  • The Future of the Former Rosemont Manor in Weirton is About to be Uncovered (PA) – WTRF Channel 7 (11-3-09)
  • Stanford Historian Robert Proctor vs. R.J. Reynolds – PR Watch.org (11-2-09)
  • National Archives is under-resourced -historian: Historian Dr Melissa Ifill says important archival materials are no longer being presented to the National Archives due to a lack of confidence in the institution’s ability to preserve records, and that a lack of funding and adequate staffing has affected the res-toration work of the archives…. – Stabroek News (11-1-09)
  • Humanities, Smithsonian, Library of Congress and Park Service budgets hold steady – Lee White at the website of the National Coalition for History (NCH) (10-30-09)

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • 100 Notable Books of 2009: The New York Times Book Review selects outstanding works from the last year – NYT, 11-09
  • JAY WINIK on Gordon Wood: A New Nation EMPIRE OF LIBERTY A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815NYT, 11-29-09
  • From Footnote to Fame in Civil Rights History – NYT, 11-26-09
  • Shlomo Sand: Israeli historian calls Jewish people an invention–and reaps controversy The Invention of the Jewish PeopleNYT, 11-24-09
  • Sean Wilentz on ROBERT W. MERRY: Into the West: ‘A Country of Vast Designs: James K. Polk, the Mexican War, and the Conquest of the American Continent’NYT, 11-22-09
  • Conservatives go after Bruce Cumings new book on the American empire – Arthur Herman in the WSJ (11-19-09)
  • Sarah Palin: Books of The Times Memoir Is Palin’s Payback to McCain Campaign GOING ROGUE An American LifeNYT, 11-15-09
  • D.M. Giangreco: Author re-examines Truman’s controversial decision to drop atomic bombs on Japan “The Soldier from Independence: A Military Biography of Harry Truman” and “Hell to Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947.” – Kansas City Star (11-7-09)
  • U.Va. historian Jennifer Burns examines Ayn Rand’s life, philosophy – NewLeader.com (11-5-09)
  • David Plouffe, Hendrik Hertzberg: Books of The Times The Obama the Campaign Knew: THE AUDACITY TO WIN The Inside Story and Lessons of Barack Obama’s Historic Victory, ¡OBÁMANOS! The Birth of a New Political EraNYT, 11-3-09

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • Barbara Frale: Historian adds fuel to Turin Shroud debate: A Vatican researcher rekindled the age-old debate over the Shroud of Turin, saying that faint writing on the linen proves it was the burial cloth of Jesus…. – Times of Malta (11-21-09)
  • Historian Adam Schor dives into Christianity’s early days – USA Today (11-20-09)
  • Eric Flack: Historian investigates the ‘lost village’ of Garscadden (Scotland)… – STV (11-18-09)
  • Matthew Kaminski: From Solidarity to Democracy (on Adam Michnik and the end of the Cold War) – WSJ (11-7-09)
  • Edwin Black’s scrutiny of the powerful is a career pattern – Cleveland Jewish News (11-6-09)
  • William B. Styple: Uncovering an Abraham Lincoln not often seen – The Philadelphia Inquirer (10-25-09)
  • Historian Carleton Mabee chronicles Father Divine – Chronogram (10-29-09)

QUOTED:

  • What Niall Ferguson thinks now: “I don’t think it’s possible to infer from the stock market rally anything resembling a sustained recovery,” the peripatetic professor says in an e-mail exchange. He rightly notes that at least half (and probably much more) of the third-quarter U.S. economic growth of 3.5 per cent stemmed from one-off government measures and that the consumer remains tapped out. “The stock market rally has been largely due to near-zero interest rates and a weaker dollar. In foreign currency terms there’s been no rally.” – Globe Investor (11-23-09)
  • McGovern: Get Out of Afghanistan: George McGovern has some advice for President Barack Obama: Get U.S. troops out of Afghanistan. I’m convinced that war is going to turn sour. I’m convinced we’re not going to prevail there,” McGovern, the 1972 Democratic presidential nominee, said Sunday at a Truthdig event in West Los Angeles…. – Truthdig (11-4-09)

INTERVIEWED:

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Balzan Prize 2009 for the History of Science Awarded – PR&D – Public Relations für Forschung & Bildung (11-20-09)
  • Teachers, Paul Gross win Canadian history awards: Gov. Gen. Michaëlle Jean presented awards on Friday to seven Canadian history teachers as well as to actor Paul Gross and to writer Ian McKay for their efforts in promoting Canadian history. The annual Governor General’s Awards for Excellence in Teaching Canadian History was held at Rideau Hall in Ottawa…. – CBC News (11-20-09)
  • 2009 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction: T. J. Stiles’s ‘The First Tycoon’ – National Book Foundation (11-19-09)
  • Ferriero Confirmed by Senate as Archivist of the United States: On November 6, the United States Senate voted unanimously to confirm David Ferriero as the 10th Archivist of the United States… – Lee White at the website of the National Coalition for History (NCH) (11-6-09
  • Web site clicks with historical group in N.H.: The Pelham Historical Society has earned special recognition for having the most modernized and informational historical Web site in the state. – TMC News (11-7-09)
  • Lisa Jardine “British historian lands major prize”: Lisa Jardine, author of Going Dutch: How England Plundered Holland’s Glory, has been awarded the Cundill International Prize in History, described as the world’s largest historical literature award for non-fiction. – Montreal Gazette (11-3-09)

SPOTTED:

  • Scholars Honored John Hope Franklin: Professor Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham Delivered the keynote address at the John Hope Franklin Memorial Conference on Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2009…. – Brooklyn College (11-23-09)
  • Gordon Johnson: Indian democracy unique, it thrives in every state: Cambridge historian: Describing India as a fascinating federal system, Dr. Gordon Johnson, president, Wolfson College, Cambridge and the deputy vice–chancellor of the University gave an insightful peek into Indian history on Thursday on The Study of India: Half a century of intellectual enquiry and Universities and Society at Pune University….. – Indian Express (11-21-09)
  • Leonard Marcus: Jones lecture features children’s book historian: Children’s book historian Leonard Marcus presented his lecture, “A New Deal for the Nursery: Golden Books and the Democratization of American Children’s Book Publishing,” yesterday as a part of the Jones Distinguished Lecture series. The lecture was sponsored by the Jones Institute for Educational Excellence and the Emporia State Archives…. – The Bulletin (Emporia State University) (11-19-09)
  • Niall Ferguson: Harvard historian sees banks, China dragging down U.S. – Boston Herald (11-12-09)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & EVENTS CALENDAR:

ON TV:

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • William Garrett Piston (Editor): Portraits of Conflict: A Photographic History of Missouri in the Civil War (New), November 28, 2009
  • Holger H. Herwig: The Marne, 1914: The Opening of World War I and the Battle That Changed the World, December 1, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009
  • Len Colodny: The Forty Years War: The Rise and Fall of the Neocons, from Nixon to Obama, December 8, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times, (Paperback), December 18, 2009
  • C. S. Manegold: Ten Hills Farm: The Forgotten History of Slavery in the North, December 21, 2009
  • A. N. Wilson: Our Times: The Age of Elizabeth II, December 22, 2009
  • Rudy Tomedi: General Matthew Ridgway, December 30, 2009
  • Alison Weir: The Lady in the Tower: The Fall of Anne Boleyn, January 5, 2010

DEPARTED:

Posted on Friday, November 27, 2009 at 1:32 AM

History Buzz: September 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

September 14-27 , 2009: Dan Brown “The Last Symbol” and Taylor Branch’s “The Clinton Tapes”

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Taylor Branch: Author, historian gives material for new Clinton book to UNC library – MyFox8.com (9-23-09)
  • A Q&A with Taylor Branch, author of ‘The Clinton Tapes’ – GQ (9-16-09)
  • Taylor Branch’s secret interviews add insight to Clinton presidency – USA Today (9-21-09)
  • Taylor Branch about to publish secret project: The Clinton Tapes – Taegan Goddard’s Political Wire (9-19-09)
  • Taylor Branch’s oral history with Clinton comes under attack – Ralph Luker at HNN blog, Cliopatria (9-30-09)
  • Rosh Hashana, Circa 1919: Mrs. Shapiro is actually Barbara Ann Paster, one of the actors here at the Strawbery Banke restoration, a living museum in which over 350 years of Portsmouth homes, stores, churches and history have been preserved. It is in Puddle Dock, which was a decrepit neighborhood destined to be razed under urban renewal until a campaign in the 1950s and ’60s led by the town librarian saved 42 houses on 10 acres to create the museum…. – NYT, 9-17-09
  • Dan Brown: Da Vinci author’s ‘uproar’ warning: The Lost Symbol is expected to make claims about the influence of secret organisation the freemasons on US leaders. And it is tipped to brand first President George Washington a TRAITOR.
    British historian and Masonic expert Ashley Cowie: “Dan Brown is about to make a huge controversy because he knows it sells. He’s going to create uproar in America. But it’s fiction, not fact.”
    But fellow historian David Shugarts said: “It’s true that some of the founding fathers were powerful Masons.”… – The Sun (9-15-09)
  • The Economic Freeze on History: More than two-thirds of history departments are experiencing budget cuts that have “required real reductions in resources, faculty and staff,” according to a survey released Friday by the American Historical Association…. – Inside Higher Ed (9-14-09)
  • Historian Rebecca Solnit talks about how 9-11 should be remembered – Free Speech Radio News (9-11-09)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Morris Dickstein: When Grave Years Fueled Grand Art DANCING IN THE DARK A Cultural History of the Great DepressionNYT, 9-16-09
  • Nicholas Thompson: Friends, Not Allies THE HAWK AND THE DOVE Paul Nitze, George Kennan, and the History of the Cold War – NYT, 9-13-09
  • Norman Podhoretz: Because They Believe WHY ARE JEWS LIBERALS?NYT, 9-13-09
  • Alan Simons examines how Republic of Turkey saved Jewish lives Shoah: Turkey, the US and the UKJewish Info News (9-2-09)
  • Philip Smallwood: The Life of R. G. CollingwoodTimes Higher Education (UK), (9-3-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • Richard Baker, Don Ritchie, Bette Koed,: Chronicling the Story of the Upper Chamber… – Politico (9-30-09)
  • Michael Oren: Israeli Ambassador Draws on American Roots – NYT (9-25-09)
  • Michael Oren still ‘enjoying every minute’ as Israel’s envoy to U.S. – Haaretz (9-27-09)
  • David Norwood: Artist-historian wants to shed light on Florida rebellion – 2theadvocate.com (9-20-09)
  • D. Bradford Hunt’s new book on the Chicago Housing Authority Blueprint for DisasterChicago Reader (9-24-09)
  • Nicholas Thompson’s trump card in writing about Nitze and Kennan – NYT (9-11-09)

QUOTED:

  • Richard Norton Smith, Russell Riley: Historians weigh in: Historical parallels: Afghanistan, Vietnam, Iraq: “It’s a test on multiple levels of what kind of leader and what kind of politician and what kind of historian he is,” says Richard Norton Smith, a historian who has run four presidential libraries and is currently a scholar at George Mason University. “This is a defining moment, and not only for the president, but for the country.”…
    “It’s hard not just because the generals are his, but it’s hard because he’s a Democrat,” says Russell Riley, who leads the William J. Clinton Presidential History Project at the University of Virginia’s Miller Center of Public Affairs. “He’s a Democrat who to a large part of the public is still suspect on foreign policy credentials, because he doesn’t have a lot of demonstrated experience in this arena.”… – NPR (9-29-09)
  • John Hafnor: Historian Predicts Dan Brown Theme, Reveals New Lost Symbols: “The Da Vinci Code’s overarching premise was an Old World clash of religion and science, while the fresh theme for The Lost Symbol is likely to be a uniquely American power struggle between secret societies and the experiment known as democracy.” – USPRWire (9-10-09)

INTERVIEWED:

  • Q&A with author and historian Marcus Rediker The Slave Ship: A Human HistoryDenisonian.com (Denison University) (9-29-09)
  • An interview with Greg Robinson, author of A Tragedy of Democracy: Japanese Confinement in North America Columbia University Press website (7-1-09)
  • In Conversation with David Starkey: The historian with an opinion on everything explains to Iain Dale why he was joking when he called Scotland a feeble little nation, his theory on the Californisation of the world and how Aneurin Bevan was deranged… – Total Politics (9-20-09)
  • Anthony J. Badger: British historian says FDR has some complex lessons for Obama: Badger is a University of Cambridge historian and the author of several accessible and well-reviewed books about the South and the Depression, among them “North Carolina and the New Deal,” “FDR: The First Hundred Days” and “The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940.” Given the current economic situation, it seems especially appropriate that the University of South Alabama’s Department of History has selected Badger as this year’s N. Jack Stallworth lecturer (his topic: “The New Deal and the Creation of the Modern American South”)…. – al.com (9-14-09)
  • Peter Bance Sikh author short listed for historian award: A renowned Sikh author has been short listed for the annual EDP-Jarrold East Anglian Book Awards, for his book on Maharajah Duleep Singh… – The Sikh Times (9-14-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

  • Dipesh Chakrabarty: Bengali historian speaks of ‘legacy’ of India as a civilization “Whether India was industrialized or not, workers should get all their rights,” Chakrabarty said. “People in India, the poor, want to vote, making it difficult to change the democracy of India.”… – University of Rhode Island (9-30-09)
  • Richard Norton Smith, Presidential Historian: The Clinton School invited Presidential Historian Richard Norton Smith to come speak on “Lincoln 200″. It has been 200 years since Abraham Lincoln was born…. – TodaysTHV.com, 9-16-09

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Beyond The Da Vinci Code” – Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels & Demons Decoded” – Saturday, September 19, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Holy Grail in America” – Sunday, September 19, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Templar Code ” – Monday, September 20, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Stalin’s Secret Lair” – Monday, September 20, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: 09 – Freemason Underground” – Monday, September 20, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secrets of the Founding Fathers” – Monday, September 20, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Dark Age” – Wednesday, September 23, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus Effect” Marathon – Saturday, September 26, 2009 at 2-5pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • Gil Troy, Vincent J. Cannato, eds.: Living in the Eighties, October 23, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Friday, September 18, 2009 at 4:43 AM

September 7, 2009: 9/11 8th Anniversary & Health Care Reform

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Betsy McCaughey: NYT says historian’s profile has risen sharply as a result of her involvement in Obama health care debate “Resurfacing, a Critic Stirs Up Debate Over Health Care” – NYT (9-4-09)
  • Betsy McCaughey Addresses New York Times: Charges of Falsehoods But No Evidence – Reuters, 9-5-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Steven F. Hayward: Another One for the Gipper THE AGE OF REAGAN The Conservative Counterrevolution, 1980-1989NYT, 9-6-09
  • Veronica Buckley: Undercover Queen THE SECRET WIFE OF LOUIS XIV Françoise d’Aubigné, Madame de MaintenonNYT, 9-6-09
  • Janet Soskice: Two of a Kind THE SISTERS OF SINAI How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden GospelsNYT, 9-6-09
  • Fred Kaplan: Planting the Seeds of the Sixties: 1959 The Year Everything ChangedWaPo, 9-4-09
  • Fred Kaplan: 1959 The Year Everything Changed, Excerpt – WaPo, 9-4-09
  • Norman Podhoretz: RELIGION Speaking in Generalities WHY ARE JEWS LIBERALS? WaPo, 9-4-09
  • Marina Belozerskaya: HISTORY Getting Attached to the Past TO WAKE THE DEAD A Renaissance Merchant and the Birth of ArchaeologyWaPo, 9-4-09
  • Edward M. Kennedy: Books of The Times Kennedy’s Rough Waters and Still Harbors TRUE COMPASS A MemoirNYT, 9-4-09
  • Kennedy Memoir Doesn’t Ignore Lows – NYT, 9-3-09
  • Sam Tanenhaus: History of conservatism shown in Tanenhaus new book – SF Gate (9-1-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

INTERVIEWED:

  • A conversation with Jill Lepore – Humanities (9-1-09)
  • Interview with Rodney Stark: The Crusades were “a justified war waged against Muslim terror and aggression” – http://www.medievalists.net (9-3-09)
  • Historians Helen Rappaport and Lisa Hilton: are women guilty of “feminising” their subject?
    BBC (Radio 4) (9-2-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

  • NASA historian Andrew Chaikin: “Space historian” talks up lunar exploration at the OMNIMAX Theater at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) – The Bee (9-2-09)

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus” – Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300″ – Tuesday, September 8, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Maya Underground” – Tuesday, September 8, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 2012″ – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus” – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Mayan Doomsday Prophecy” – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The World Trade Center: Rise and Fall of an American Icon” – Friday, September 11, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Countdown to Ground Zero” – Friday, September 11, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: Zero Hour: The Last Hour of Flight”” – Friday, September 11, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Day the Towers Fell” – Friday, September 11, 2009 at 7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “102 Minutes that Changed America / Witness to 9/11″ – Friday, September 11, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Crumbling of America” – Saturday, September 12, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Manson” – Sunday, September 13, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Templar Code” – Monday, September 14, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

    NYT Non-Fiction Best Sellers List – September 13, 2009

  • #1 – Michelle Malkin: CULTURE OF CORRUPTION
  • #3 – Ronald Kessler: IN THE PRESIDENT’S SECRET SERVICE
  • #11 – J. Randy Taraborrelli: THE SECRET LIFE OF MARILYN MONROE
  • #16 – Douglas Brinkley: THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR
  • #17 – Peter S. Canellos: LAST LION
  • #20 – C. David Heymann: BOBBY AND JACKIE
  • #32 – Doug Stanton: HORSE SOLDIERS

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • Gil Troy, Vincent J. Cannato, eds.: Living in the Eighties, October 23, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Tuesday, September 8, 2009 at 5:52 AM

August 24 & 30, 2009: Historians Involved in the Health Care Reform Debate

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • It was Huckabee vs. Doug Brinkley on O’Reilly Show about Health Care Reform: Well, it’s never a mistake for a Democratic president to raise the specter of FDR and Kennedy for his base. I think the Lyndon Johnson comments gets more to the crux of the difficulty the president’s having.
    As you know, the Great Society is what Ronald Reagan warned against. In fact, I edited “Reagan’s Diaries,” and he wrote one passage that said I voted four times for FDR and the New Deal, but I’m trying to roll back the Great Society. Medicaid and Medicare came through Lyndon Johnson, but so did a lot of other government programs that people, particularly conservatives, have been trying to role back some of the wealthier state programs. So there’s a suspicion on the American people that’s been really part of entire history, but we’ve — since 1980 in the Reagan revolution, of too much government.
    And so I think the problem this summer for President Obama is that he’s pushing health care after all that economic stimulus money, and there’s kind of a woe factor going on, saying this might be too much, too fast, too expensive…. – Fox News rush transcript (8-24-09)
  • Historian Betsy McCaughey battles with Jon Stewart over the Obama Health Care bill – Jon Stewart The Daily Show (8-17-09)
  • Betsy McCaughey: The historian behind the claim that Obama’s in favor of death panels –
  • Historian Joshua Brown, illustrator, at his website, Life During Wartime (8-15-09)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Edward M. Kennedy: Books of The Times Kennedy’s Rough Waters and Still Harbors TRUE COMPASS A MemoirNYT, 9-4-09
  • Kennedy Memoir Doesn’t Ignore Lows – NYT, 9-3-09
  • Richard Slotkin: Treacherous Ground NO QUARTER The Battle of the Crater, 1864NYT, 8-30-09
  • Richard Slotkin: NO QUARTER The Battle of the Crater, 1864, Excerpt – NYT, 8-30-09
  • J. Randy Taraborrelli: Such a Sad, Sad Story THE SECRET LIFE OF MARILYN MONROEWaPo, 8-30-09
  • Arthur Goldwag: POPULAR CULTURE Hearsay, You Say? CULTS, CONSPIRACIES AND SECRET SOCIETIES The Straight Scoop on Freemasons, The Illuminati, Skull and Bones, Black Helicopters, The New World Order, and many, many more – WaPo, 8-30-09
  • Erin Arvedlund, Andrew Kirtzman, Jerry Oppenheimer: Was Bernie Madoff an Evil Genius? That’s Just Half Right. TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE The Rise and Fall of Bernie Madoff, BETRAYAL The Life and Lies of Bernie Madoff, MADOFF WITH THE MONEYWaPo, 8-30-09
  • Rich Cohen: An Imagined Nation ISRAEL IS REALWaPo, 8-30-09
  • Janet Soskice: RELIGION A Sister Act of Perseverance THE SISTERS OF SINAI How Two Lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden GospelsWaPo, 8-30-09
  • Josh Neufeld: Graphic Memories of Katrina’s Ordeal A.D.: New Orleans After the DelugeNYT, 8-23-09
  • Josh Neufeld: A.D.: New Orleans After the DelugeNYT, 8-23-09
  • Tristram Hunt: Fox Hunter, Party Animal, Leftist Warrior MARX’S GENERAL The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich EngelsNYT, 8-19-09
  • Tristram Hunt: MARX’S GENERAL The Revolutionary Life of Friedrich Engels, Excerpt – NYT, 8-19-09
  • Adrian Goldsworthy: HISTORY Rome Wasn’t Destroyed in a Day Either HOW ROME FELL Death of a SuperpowerWaPo, 8-23-09
  • Adrian Goldsworthy: HOW ROME FELL Death of a Superpower, Excerpt – WaPo, 8-23-09
  • Ilaria Dagnini Brey: WORLD WAR II Guardians of History THE VENUS FIXERS The Remarkable Story of the Allied Soldiers Who Saved Italy’s Art During World War II – WaPo, 8-23-09
  • Peter C. Mancall: EXPLORATION Mutiny on the Hudson FATAL JOURNEY The Final Expedition of Henry Hudson — A Tale of Mutiny and Murder in the Arctic – WaPo, 8-23-09
  • Marc Wortman: CIVIL WAR The Work of Sherman THE BONFIRE The Siege and Burning of Atlanta WaPo, 8-23-09
  • Historian Bonnie J. Morris celebrates women’s studies in her latest book Revenge of the Women’s Studies ProfessorMichelle Finn writing at the website of H-Women (8-1-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

QUOTED:

  • CBS Historian Douglas Brinkley calls Ted Kennedy A ‘Martyr’ for ObamaCare: During the 2:00AM ET hour of CBS’s Up to the Minute on Wednesday, shortly after news broke of Senator Ted Kenney’s death, historian Douglas Brinkley exclaimed the Massachusetts Democrat was: “…going to be a – a martyr because of all that he’s done and he very well might help, in death, Obama get his health care plan.” MRC Newsbusters (Conservative Media Watchdog) (8-26-09)

INTERVIEWED:

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces” – Friday, September 4, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Underground Apocalypse” – Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 500 Years Later” – Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Doomsday 2012: The End of Days” – Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus” – Saturday, September 5, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 2012″ – Sunday, September 6, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Manson” – Monday, September 7, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300″ – Tuesday, September 8, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 2012″ – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus” – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Mayan Doomsday Prophecy” – Wednesday, September 9, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

    NYT Non-Fiction Best Sellers List – September 6, 2009

  • #1 – Michelle Malkin: CULTURE OF CORRUPTION
  • #2 – Ronald Kessler: IN THE PRESIDENT’S SECRET SERVICE
  • #9 – Douglas Brinkley: THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR
  • #18 – C. David Heymann: BOBBY AND JACKIE
  • #22 – Dan Balz and Haynes Johnson: THE BATTLE FOR AMERICA, 2008
  • #33 – Doug Stanton: HORSE SOLDIERS

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Richard C. Hoagland: Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA (Revised), September 1, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Noah Andre Trudeau: Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • Gil Troy, Vincent J. Cannato, eds.: Living in the Eighties, October 23, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Friday, September 4, 2009 at 4:35 AM

History Buzz: August 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

August 17, 2009: Woodstock 1969 40th Anniversary Special

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

This Week’s Political Highlights 

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Woodstock: 40 years later: BABY BOOMERS won’t let go of the Woodstock Festival. Why should we? It’s one of the few defining events of the late 1960s that had a clear happy ending. On Aug. 15-17, 1969, hundreds of thousands of people, me among them, gathered in a lovely natural amphitheater in Bethel (not Woodstock), N.Y. We listened to some of the best rock musicians of the era, enjoyed other legal and illegal pleasures, endured rain and mud and exhaustion and hunger pangs, felt like a giant community and dispersed, all without catastrophe…. – NYT, 8-16-09
  • Woodstock Nation, Part 1: The Woodstock Music & Art Fair began 40 years ago this Friday afternoon at Max Yasgur’s dairy farm in Bethel, N.Y. I had seen an advertisement in the July 27, 1969 Sunday New York Times Arts section, and ordered tickets — $18 for all three days, Aug. 15, 16 & 17, 1969…. – Projo.com, 8-14-09
  • Woodstock Nation, Part 2: The music went for 24 hours: BY THE TIME CARLOS Santana finished playing Soul Sacrifice Saturday afternoon at Woodstock, he was a major star. “Every band changed the vibes,” recalls Dena Quilici, one of the many there from southeastern New England. And the crowd came alive for Santana. The by-now broiling sun, the hunger and thirst and mud, the Army helicopters intermittently turning fire hoses on us full-force to cool us off – “all those troubles kind of went away once you just settled down and started listening to the music,” says Ty Davis…. – Projo.com, 8-14-09
  • Woodstock Nation, Part 3: We had pulled it off: Despite two days of uncomfortable conditions, peace and music are both holding out. Sunday is the acid test. The storm bore down on us, all hard rain and whipping wind, just after Joe Cocker ended the set that opened Woodstock, Day 3. “The ground was slippery red clay, and then it really looked like Baghdad,” remembers Dottie Clark, one of the many from southeastern New England who were there. “People selling the junk of the time were packing up, my friends were crying, and I was laughing. I thought it was funny. I said, ‘Someday you’ll see that this was something.’ ” Cocker had finished his set with what may have been the best live performance ever given: With a Little Help From My Friends…. – Projo.com, 8-14-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

On This Day in History….This Week in History…. August 17-23, 2009

  • LIFE Classic: Woodstock: LIFE’s Best PhotosLife Magazine, 8-09
  • Music and Memories – NYT, 8-16-09
  • Re-’Taking Woodstock’ – the complete 1969 concert setlists and playlists, in order: The book, Taking Woodstock, by Elliot Tiber with Tom Monte, has been adapted to a film with the same name directed by Ang Lee, and the picture will be released on August 28, 2009. However, this upcoming weekend marks the actual 40th anniversary of the summer outdoor festival of “peace and music,” that changed popular culture in the United States and around the world from that moment on. The original concert took place starting Friday evening, August 15, and ran through Monday, August 18, 1969. Over 400,000 people showed up, nearly 1/2 million…. – Examiner, 8-12-09

IN THE NEWS:

  • Winfield Myers: Brandeis professor accuses Yale University Press of gag order Jytte Klausen The Cartoons that Shook the World? - Campus Watch (8-14-09)
  • Helen Rappaport: Women historians ‘too timid’ to write about men – Telegraph.co.uk (8-13-09)

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Alistair Horne: When Henry Was in Control: KISSINGER 1973, The Crucial YearWaPo, 8-16-09
  • Alistair Horne: KISSINGER 1973, The Crucial Year, Excerpt – WaPo, 8-16-09
  • Elie Wiesel: RELIGION On Solomon RASHIWaPo, 8-16-09
  • Kate Cambor: HISTORY The New Age GILDED YOUTH Three Lives in France’s Belle Epoque – WaPo, 8-16-09
  • Pete Fornatale, Michael Lang with Holly George-Warren: Three Days in August BACK TO THE GARDEN The Story of Woodstock, THE ROAD TO WOODSTOCKNYT, 8-9-09
  • Pete Fornatale: BACK TO THE GARDEN The Story of Woodstock, Excerpt – NYT, 8-9-09
  • Michael Lang with Holly George-Warren: THE ROAD TO WOODSTOCK, Excerpt – NYT, 8-9-09

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • Patrick Allit: Emory University Professor Tells Part of the History of “The Conservatives”: In his recently published sixth book, The Conservatives, Emory University professor Patrick Allitt undertakes his most comprehensive effort to date in writing the history of the modern conservative movement…. – The New American, 8-17-09
  • Adam Zerta “Stunning Ancient Find From the Holy Land”: Archaeologists from Israel’s University of Haifa, who were exploring in the Jordan Valley near Jericho, have made a stunning find: an artificial underground cave filled with various engravings, including markings of crosses. The cave, which is the largest in Israel, was originally a large quarry during the Roman and Byzantine era and really is one of a kind, according to archaeology professor Adam Zerta, who led the dig. Zerta thinks the cave, which is about one acre in size, was used as an early monastery. – Netscape, 8-09

QUOTED:

  • Niall Ferguson: Not Only Do I Dislike the President’s Budget Policies, He’s Also Black!” – Matthew Yglesias at his blog (8-11-09)
  • Tracy Borman: BBC period show, The Tudors, is ‘historically inaccurate’, leading historian says: “Yes, the scriptwriters may have taken liberties with the facts, but they have also succeeded in re-creating the drama and atmosphere of Henry VIII’s court, with its intrigues, scandals and betrayals.” – Telegraph (UK) (8-10-09)

INTERVIEWED:

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Woodstock: Now & Then” – Monday, August 17, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “God vs. Satan” – Wednesday, August 18, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “First Apocalypse” – Thurdsay, August 20, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “More Extreme Marksmen” – Friday, August 21, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

NYT Non-Fiction Best Sellers List – August 23, 2009

  • #1 – Michelle Malkin: CULTURE OF CORRUPTION
  • #3 – Ronald Kessler: IN THE PRESIDENT’S SECRET SERVICE
  • #9 – Douglas Brinkley: THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR
  • #10 – J. Randy Taraborrelli: MICHAEL JACKSON (THE MAGIC, THE MADNESS, THE WHOLE STORY, 1958-2009)
  • #13 – C. David Heymann: BOBBY AND JACKIE
  • #21 – Doug Stanton: HORSE SOLDIERS

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Brooks D. Simpson: The Reconstruction Presidents (Paperback), August 18, 2009
  • Richard C. Hoagland: Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA (Revised), September 1, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Noah Andre Trudeau: Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, August 17, 2009 at 11:11 PM

August 10, 2009: Douglas Brinkley on Roosevelt… Remembering Woodstock 1969′s 40th Anniversary

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

This Week’s Political Highlights 

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Tomb search could end riddle of Shakespeare’s true identity: A sarcophagus in an English parish church could solve the centuries-old literary debate over who really wrote the plays of William Shakespeare…. – Telegraph UK, 8-9-09
  • Amelia Earhart Mystery Solved? ‘Investigation Junkies’ to Launch New Expedition DNA Evidence on a Remote Island May Reveal the Truth About Earhart’s Disappearance – ABC News, 8-5-09
  • Britain says goodbye to Harry Patch, the last of its World War I soldiers: The tribute to Patch, who died two weeks ago at age 111, reflects the emotional grip that the ‘war to end all wars’ still holds on the nation…. – LAT, 8-6-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

On This Day in History….This Week in History…. August 10-16, 2009

  • Woodstock: A Moment of Muddy Grace: BABY boomers won’t let go of the Woodstock Festival. Why should we? It’s one of the few defining events of the late 1960s that had a clear happy ending…. – NYT, 8-9-09

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Douglas Brinkley: Natural Man THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for AmericaNYT, 8-9-09
  • Douglas Brinkley: THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, Excerpt – NYT, 8-9-09
  • Pete Fornatale, Michael Lang with Holly George-Warren: Three Days in August BACK TO THE GARDEN The Story of Woodstock, THE ROAD TO WOODSTOCKNYT, 8-9-09
  • Pete Fornatale: BACK TO THE GARDEN The Story of Woodstock, Excerpt – NYT, 8-9-09
  • Michael Lang with Holly George-Warren: THE ROAD TO WOODSTOCK, Excerpt – NYT, 8-9-09
  • Andrew Roberts: HISTORY Band of Bickering Brothers MASTERS AND COMMANDERS How Four Titans Won the War in the West, 1941-1945WaPo, 8-9-09
  • James Gavin: Cabaret Queen STORMY WEATHER The Life of Lena HorneWaPo, 8-9-09
  • Timothy R. Pauketat: HISTORY Down by the Riverside CAHOKIA Ancient America’s Great City on the MississippiWaPo, 8-9-09
  • William T. Vollmann: HISTORY On the Border IMPERIAL – WaPo, 8-9-09
  • Christopher Caldwell: RELIGION Make Way For the New Europeans REFLECTIONS ON THE REVOLUTION IN EUROPE Immigration, Islam, and the WestWaPo, 8-9-09
  • John R. Hale: Rowing to DemocracyNYT (8-6-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

QUOTED:

  • Lawrence Powell “Katrina anniversary visit by President Barack Obama appears unlikely”: “Nationally, Katrina is old news, ” said Tulane University historian Lawrence Powell. “I think right now the president is more focused on the economy and health care.”… – Times-Piscayne 8-10-09
  • Allan Meltzer “Morning in America Means a ‘Long Slog’ as Phelps Eyes Recovery”: “It is worrisome how we can finance the deficit without having inflation,” said Allan Meltzer, a Fed historian and economics professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh…. – Bloomberg, 8-3-09

INTERVIEWED:

  • An Interview with Charles Geisst: How Americans Got Into a Credit Card Mess – Time (8-8-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

  • Historian Douglas Brinkley on Theodore Roosevelt Seattle Central Library – KUOW, 8-6-09

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Life After People” – Tuesday, August 11, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest” – Wednesday, August 12, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hillbilly: The Real Story” – Thurdsay, August 13, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels & Demons Decoded” – Friday, August 14, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Behind The Da Vinci Code ” – Friday, August 14, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Ink” – Saturday, August 15, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Woodstock: Now & Then” – Monday, August 17, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

NYT Non-Fiction Best Sellers List – August 16, 2009

  • #1 – Michelle Malkin: CULTURE OF CORRUPTION
  • #7 – Douglas Brinkley: THE WILDERNESS WARRIOR
  • #11 – J. Randy Taraborrelli: MICHAEL JACKSON (THE MAGIC, THE MADNESS, THE WHOLE STORY, 1958-2009)
  • #12 – C. David Heymann: BOBBY AND JACKIE
  • #14 – Doug Stanton: HORSE SOLDIERS
  • #13 – Craig Nelson: ROCKET MEN
  • #27 – Richard Wolffe: RENEGADE
  • #35 – Larry Tye: SATCHEL

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Brooks D. Simpson: The Reconstruction Presidents (Paperback), August 18, 2009
  • Richard C. Hoagland: Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA (Revised), September 1, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Noah Andre Trudeau: Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2009 at 1:17 AM | Top

August 3, 2009: Henry Louis Gates, Jr. & FDR / Obama Parallels

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

This Week’s Political Highlights 

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

On This Day in History….This Week in History…. August 3-10, 2009

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Kevin Mattson: No We Can’t “WHAT THE HECK ARE YOU UP TO, MR. PRESIDENT?” Jimmy Carter, America’s “Malaise,” and the Speech That Should Have Changed the CountryNYT, 8-2-09
  • Richard Brookhiser: MEMOIR Conservatively Speaking RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE Coming of Age with William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative MovementWaPo, 8-2-09
  • Bradley Graham: MILITARY HISTORY A Warrior Fighting the Wrong War BY HIS OWN RULES The Ambitions, Successes and Ultimate Failures of Donald RumsfeldWaPo, 8-2-09
  • Tracy E. K’Meyer: Civil-rights history lesson Professor’s book examines Louisville’s experience Civil Rights in the Gateway to the SouthLouisville Courier-Journal, 7-19-09

PROFILED & FEATURED:

  • King’s tower of ‘bling’ recreated: The opulent interiors of King Henry II’s Dover Castle have been recreated by English Heritage in a £2.45m project lasting two years. – BBC, 7-31-09
  • Douglas Brinkley: Takes a long, fond look at Theodore Roosevelt Times-Picayune (7-29-09)
  • Andrew Roberts: The history man who loves to party – U.tv.news (7-26-09)
  • Civil War Museum sounds alarm on leaving Philadelphia – Philadelphia Inquirer, 7-24-09

QUOTED:

  • Jonathan Alter “‘Nice’ Wasn’t Part of the Deal”: Still, by the mid-1930s, according to the Newsweek columnist (and F.D.R. historian) Jonathan Alter, Roosevelt was openly complaining that the nation’s bankers seemed to have forgotten how much the government had done for them. “In 1936,” Mr. Alter said, “F.D.R. compared them to a drowning man who is saved by a lifeguard and four years later returns to ask the lifeguard angrily: ‘Where’s my silk hat? You lost my silk hat!’” – NYT, 8-1-09

INTERVIEWED:

  • Doris Kearns Goodwin: FDR had people over for drinks, too – Huffington Post (7-27-09)
  • Juan Cole interviewed about Afghanistan, Iran and other hot spots – www.roozonline.com (8-1-09)
  • Reinhard Siegmund-Schultze: Historian discusses new book on an academic exodus that saved lives and changed mathematics Mathematicians Fleeing from Nazi Germany: Individual Fates and Global Impact Inside Higher Ed, 7-27-09

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire” – Monday, August 3, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Dark Ages” – Monday, August 3, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Underground Apocalypse” – Monday, August 3, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “How The Earth Was Made” – Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People & That’s Impossible: Eternal Life” – Tuesday, July 28, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Aliens ” – Wednesday, August 5, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Hitler Conspiracy” – Thurdsay, August 7, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nazi America: A Secret History” – Thursday, August 6, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds: Secret U.S. Bunkers” – Thursday, August 6, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Tora, Tora, Tora: The Real Story of Pearl Harbor” – Friday, August 7, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

NYT Non-Fiction Best Sellers List – August 9, 2009

  • #5 – C. David Heymann: BOBBY AND JACKIE
  • #11 – Doug Stanton: HORSE SOLDIERS
  • #13 – Craig Nelson: ROCKET MEN
  • #18 – J. Randy Taraborrelli: MICHAEL JACKSON (THE MAGIC, THE MADNESS, THE WHOLE STORY, 1958-2009)
  • #23 – Larry Tye: SATCHEL
  • #32 – Richard Wolffe: RENEGADE

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Brooks D. Simpson: The Reconstruction Presidents (Paperback), August 18, 2009
  • Richard C. Hoagland: Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA (Revised), September 1, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Noah Andre Trudeau: Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • STUART I. ROCHESTER, 63: Co-Wrote Influential Book on POWs – WaPo, 8-1-09
  • Alan C. Hall taught technology and history at Gateway Community and Technical College and pushed for the onetime vocational school to offer more for its students – Chronicle of Higher Ed (7-27-09)

Posted on Tuesday, August 4, 2009 at 5:26 AM

History Buzz: July 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

July 27, 2009: Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s Arrest, President Obama and Race in America

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Henry L. Gates,Jr. 911 call: Witness not sure she sees crime: - AP, 7-27-09
  • Obama Tries to Move Past Gates Furor: - WSJ, 7-26-09
  • Obama, Gates and the American Black Man: NYT, 7-25-09
  • Gates Says ‘Yes’ to Beer With Crowley: It was very kind of the President to phone me today. Vernon Jordan is absolutely correct: my unfortunate experience will only have a larger meaning if we can all use this to diminish racial profiling and to enhance fairness and equity in the criminal justice system for poor people and for people of color…. – Henry Louis Gates in The Root (edited by Henry Louis Gates) (7-24-09)
  • Black males’ fear of racial profiling very real, regardless of class- LAT, 7-24-09
  • Case Recalls Tightrope Blacks Walk With PoliceNYT, 7-23-09
  • Obama doesn’t regret ‘acted stupidly’ remark about Henry Gates Jr. arrest- NY Daily News, 7-23-09
  • Cop who arrested black scholar is profiling expert- AP, 7-23-09
  • Police Chief Responds to Obama’s RemarksWSJ, 7-23-09
  • “The good news about the Henry Louis Gates fiasco”James Hannaham at Salon.com, 7-22-09
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and the Police in “Post-Racial” AmericaBrandon M. Terry at the Huffington Post, 7-22-09
  • If it can happen to Skip Gates….- Inside Higher Ed, 7-22-09
  • Skip Gates and the Post-Racial Project: - Melissa Harris-Lacewell in The Nation, 7-21-09
  • The Root Editor-in-Chief Henry Louis Gates Jr. talks about his arrest and the outrage of racial profiling in America: I’m saying ‘You need to send someone to fix my lock.’ All of a sudden, there was a policeman on my porch. And I thought, ‘This is strange.’ So I went over to the front porch still holding the phone, and I said ‘Officer, can I help you?’ And he said, ‘Would you step outside onto the porch.’ And the way he said it, I knew he wasn’t canvassing for the police benevolent association. All the hairs stood up on the back of my neck, and I realized that I was in danger. And I said to him no, out of instinct. I said, ‘No, I will not.’…. – Henry Louis Gates Jr. in The Root, 7-21-09
  • Police Drop Charges Against Black Scholar- WSJ, 7-21-09
  • Gates chastises officer after authorities agree to drop criminal charge: “I believe the police officer should apologize to me for what he knows he did that was wrong,” Gates said in a phone interview from his other home in Martha’s Vineyard. “If he apologizes sincerely, I am willing to forgive him. And if he admits his error, I am willing to educate him about the history of racism in America and the issue of racial profiling … That’s what I do for a living.”… – Boston Globe, 7-21-09
  • Henry Louis Gates Jr. ArrestedNYT, 7-21-09
  • Black scholar’s arrest raises profiling questionsAP, 7-21-09
  • Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. arrested outside his home, calls Cambridge police ‘racist’NY Daily News, 7-21-09
  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: Harvard professor arrested, racism accusationsAFP, 7-20-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History…. July 27-August 2, 2009

  • 10 Reasons Why Apollo 11 Moon Landing Was Awesome: Yesterday marked the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Forty years ago mission commander Neil A. Armstrong and lunar module pilot Edwin Eugene ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, Jr. walked on the moon while command module pilot Michael Collins orbited above. Today however, marks the 40th anniversary of the day people really reacted to what just happened. As with all major events in time, there is always a day of reflection…. – Wired, 7-21-09

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • James MacGregor Burns: Judicial Roulette PACKING THE COURT The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court - NYT, 7-26-09
  • James MacGregor Burns: PACKING THE COURT The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court , Excerpt – NYT, 7-26-09
  • Rich Cohen: A Land and a People ISRAEL IS REAL An Obsessive Quest to Understand the Jewish Nation and Its HistoryNYT, 7-26-09
  • Allis Radosh and Ronald Radosh: Zionist in the White House A SAFE HAVEN Harry S. Truman and the Founding of Israel – NYT, 7-26-09
  • Richard Brookhiser: MEMOIR Conservatively Speaking RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE Coming of Age with William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative MovementWaPo, 7-26-09
  • Bradley Graham: MILITARY HISTORY A Warrior Fighting the Wrong War BY HIS OWN RULES The Ambitions, Successes and Ultimate Failures of Donald RumsfeldWaPo, 7-26-09
  • Art Historian Anthony Blunt: Memoirs of British Spy Offer No Apology – NYT (7-23-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

QUOTED:

INTERVIEWED:

  • Reinhard Siegmund-Schultze: Historian discusses new book on an academic exodus that saved lives and changed mathematics Mathematicians Fleeing from Nazi Germany: Individual Fates and Global Impact Inside Higher Ed (7-27-09)
  • Robin Hood Discovery: An Interview with Julian Luxford – www.medievalists.net, 3-25-09

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Marvin Dunn: Historian digs for stories of black settlement and its massacre (Rosewood) – Miami Herald (7-24-09)

SPOTTED:

ANNOUNCEMENTS:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • Woodrow Wilson Center Holding Summer Institutes for High School Teachers: U.S. and the Cold War: THE UNITED STATES AND THE COLD WAR July 26-July 31, 2009 – Press Release (7-25-09)
  • Woodrow Wilson Center Holding Summer Institutes for High School Teachers: U.S.-China Relations U.S.-China Relations July 26-July 31, 2009 – Press Release (7-25-09)
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09
  • Inaugural Semester-long seminar on Constitutional History offered at N-Y Historical Society this fall: Lincoln’s Constitution will be taught at the New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, on Thursday afternoons from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. The seminar will be held on September 17 and 24 and on October 1, 15, 22, and 29, 2009. NYHS Press Release (7-20-09)

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Hippies” – Monday, July 27, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Sex in ’69: Sexual Revolution in America” – Monday, July 27, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Return of the Pirates” – Tuesday, July 28, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People & That’s Impossible: Eternal Life” – Tuesday, July 28, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Moonshot” – Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Art of War” – Saturday, August 1, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Gil Troy: Reagan Revolution : A Very Short Introduction, July 30, 2009
  • Constance Rosenblum: Boulevard of Dreams: Heady Times, Heartbreak, and Hope along the Grand Concourse in the Bronx, August 1, 2009
  • David Freeland: Automats, Taxi Dances, and Vaudeville: Excavating Manhattans Lost Places of Leisure, August 1, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Brooks D. Simpson: The Reconstruction Presidents (Paperback), August 18, 2009
  • Richard C. Hoagland: Dark Mission: The Secret History of NASA (Revised), September 1, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Noah Andre Trudeau: Robert E. Lee: Lessons in Leadership, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009
  • Dean C. Jessee (Editor): The Joseph Smith Papers: Revelations and Translations, Volume 1: Manuscript Revelation Books, September 2009
  • James Patterson: The Murder of King Tut: The Plot to Kill the Child King – A Nonfiction Thriller, September 28, 2009
  • Timothy Egan: The Big Burn: Teddy Roosevelt and the Fire That Saved America, October 19, 2009
  • Gil Troy, Vincent J. Cannato, eds.: Living in the Eighties, October 23, 2009
  • L. Fletcher Prouty: JFK: The CIA, Vietnam, and the Plot to Assassinate John F. Kennedy, (Paperback), November 1, 2009
  • Edward Kritzler: Jewish Pirates of the Caribbean: How a Generation of Swashbuckling Jews Carved Out an Empire in the New World in Their Quest for Treasure, Religious Freedom–and Revenge, (Paperback), November 3, 2009
  • Anthony Haden-guest: Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night (Paperback), December 8, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • Lionel Casson: Who Wrote of Ancient Maritime History, Dies at 94 – NYT (7-24-09)

Posted on Tuesday, July 28, 2009 at 1:08 AM

July 20, 2009: 40th Anniversary of Apollo 11 & the 1st Moon Landing

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Julian E. Zelizer: What Jimmy Carter had right: On July 15, 1979, President Jimmy Carter delivered one of the more controversial speeches in recent presidential history. When Carter delivered what would come to be known as the “malaise” speech America was in bad condition. Inflation was devastating the economy. Unemployment rates were high. OPEC had increased oil prices several times within a few months. With his re-election on the horizon, Carter watched his approval ratings plummet to below 30 percent…. – Politico, 7-15-09

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Craig Nelson: Apollo 11′s Bright Glare ROCKET MEN The Epic Story Of the First Men On the MoonWaPo, 7-19-09
  • Hobson Woodward: Shakespeare’s Storm A BRAVE VESSEL The True Tale of the Castaways Who Rescued Jamestown . . .WaPo, 7-19-09
  • Lynn Hudson Parsons: Power to (Some of) the People THE BIRTH OF MODERN POLITICS Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams and the Election of 1828WaPo, 7-19-09
  • Thomas Levenson: HISTORY A New Newton NEWTON AND THE COUNTERFEITER The Unknown Detective Career of the World’s Greatest ScientistWaPo, 7-19-09
  • Martha A. Sandweiss on W. Ralph Eubanks: The Family That Rejected Jim Crow THE HOUSE AT THE END OF THE ROAD The Story of Three Generations of An Interracial Family in the American SouthWaPo, 7-19-09
  • Greg Grandin: UTOPIAS Welcome to the Jungle FORDLANDIA The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle CityWaPo, 7-19-09
  • Richard Holmes: Science and the Sublime THE AGE OF WONDER How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of ScienceNYT, 7-19-09
  • Richard Holmes: THE AGE OF WONDER How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science, Excerpt – NYT, 7-19-09
  • David Kennedy on Margaret MacMillan: What History Is Good For DANGEROUS GAMES The Uses and Abuses of HistoryNYT, 7-19-09
  • Margaret MacMillan: DANGEROUS GAMES The Uses and Abuses of History, Excerpt – NYT, 7-19-09
  • Greg Grandin: Dearborn-on-Amazon FORDLANDIA The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle CityNYT, 7-19-09
  • Greg Grandin: FORDLANDIA The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City, Excerpt – 7-19-09
  • Alistair Horne: Got Your Back KISSINGER 1973, the Crucial YearNYT, 7-19-09
  • Alistair Horne: KISSINGER 1973, the Crucial YearNYT, 7-19-09
  • Larry Tye: A Fastball Wrapped in a Riddle SATCHEL The Life and Times of an American LegendNYT, 7-19-09
  • Larry Tye: SATCHEL The Life and Times of an American LegendNYT, 7-19-09
  • James Gavin: No Prisoner of Love STORMY WEATHER The Life of Lena HorneNYT, 7-19-09
  • James Gavin: STORMY WEATHER The Life of Lena Horne, Excerpt – NYT, 7-19-09
  • Jackson Lears continues his search for the origin of our times – John Summers in Book Forum (7-17-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

QUOTED:

  • David Garrow “At 100, NAACP debates its role”: David Garrow, a civil rights historian, says there has been a shift from the traditional notion of black civil rights because of steady growth in black civic participation and decline of civil-rights-era protest groups…. – Chicago Tribune, 7-13-09
  • One Step Was Plenty First Man to Walk on the Moon Stoically Backpedals on Earth: Forty years ago today, Neil Armstrong became the most famous man on the planet by taking a short walk off of it. Since then he’s tried to live with that fact, and also live it down. – WaPo, 7-19-09

INTERVIEWED:

  • Charles W. Eagles: Author discusses new book on James Meredith and his battle to enroll at the University of Mississippi The Price of Defiance: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole MissInside Higher Ed (7-14-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Jonathan Brent: Former editorial director of Yale University Press and general editor of its celebrated Annals of Communism series is now in charge of one of the world’s most important archives of Jewish life – Chronicle of Higher Ed (7-15-09)

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Beyond the Moon: Failure Is Not an Option 2″ – Monday, July 20, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: Apollo 11 Specials – Monday, July 20, 2009 at 4-11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Live from ’69: Moon Landing” – Monday, July 20, 2009 at 8:30pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Moonshot” – Monday, July 20, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Days on Earth” – Tuesday, July 21, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Journey to 10,000 BC” – Wednesday, July 22, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: New York City Hurricane” – Wednesday, July 22, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake” – Friday, July 24, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld” Marathon – Friday, July 24, 2009 at 4-6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Stealing Lincoln’s Body” – Friday, July 24, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Aliens” – Saturday, July 25, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • Civil War historian Kenneth Stampp dies at 96 – HNN, 7-13-09

Posted on Monday, July 20, 2009 at 5:10 AM

July 13, 2009: Obama Discusses the Presidency with Beschloss, Brands, Brinkley, Dallek, & Kearns Goodwin

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Obama’s Secret Meeting With Historians: The president held a dinner at the White House for leading presidential scholars
    Obama held a dinner at the White House residence with nine such scholars on June 30, and it turned out to be what one participant described as a “history book club, with the president as the inquisitor.” Among those attending were Michael Beschloss, H. W. Brands, Douglas Brinkley, Robert Dallek, and Doris Kearns Goodwin. Obama asked the guests to discuss the presidencies that they were most familiar with and to give him insights into what remains relevant to the problems of today. – Kenneth T. Walsh in US News & World Report (7-10-09)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Kevin Mattson: Thirty Years Later, in Praise of Malaise WHAT THE HECK ARE YOU UP TO, MR. PRESIDENT? Jimmy Carter, America’s “Malaise,” and the Speech That Should Have Changed the CountryWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Shaun A. Casey: RELIGION AND POLITICS Faith in the Electorate THE MAKING OF A CATHOLIC PRESIDENT Kennedy vs. Nixon 1960 WaPo, 7-12-09
  • Richard Wrangham & Tom Standage: Cooking Up a Pot of Civilization CATCHING FIRE How Cooking Made Us Human, AN EDIBLE HISTORY OF HUMANITYWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Tom Standage: AN EDIBLE HISTORY OF HUMANITY Chapter One THE INVENTION OF FARMINGWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Margaret MacMillan: Getting History Right DANGEROUS GAMES The Uses and Abuses of HistoryWaPo, 7-12-09
  • James Scott: HISTORY Misguided Missiles THE ATTACK ON THE LIBERTY The Untold Story of Israel’s Deadly 1967 Assault on a U.S. Spy ShipWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Larry Tye: BIOGRAPHY ‘No Man Got to Be Common’ SATCHEL The Life and Times of an American LegendWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Larry Tye: SATCHEL The Life and Times of an American Legend Chapter One Coming Alive – WaPo, 7-12-09
  • Gavin Mortimer: HISTORY The Wright Stuff CHASING ICARUS The Seventeen Days in 1910 That Forever Changed American AviationWaPo, 7-12-09
  • Craig Nelson, Andrew Chaikin with Victoria Kohl: Giant Step, Full Stop ROCKET MEN The Epic Story of the First Men on the Moon, VOICES FROM THE MOON Apollo Astronauts Describe Their Lunar ExperiencesNYT, 7-8-09
  • Craig Nelson: ROCKET MEN The Epic Story of the First Men on the Moon, Chapter Seven A Way to Talk to God – NYT, 7-8-09
  • Elijah Wald: Roll Over, John Lennon HOW THE BEATLES DESTROYED ROCK ‘N’ ROLL An Alternative History of American Popular MusicNYT, 7-10-09
  • James MacGregor Burns: New Book on Supreme Court by Historian Packing the Court: The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Courtiberkshires.com (7-6-09)
  • James MacGregor Burns says Supremes Really Govern America Packing the Court: The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme CourtMICHIKO KAKUTANI in the NYT (7-6-09)

PROFILED & FEATURED:

QUOTED:

INTERVIEWED:

  • Immanuel Ness: You Say You Want a Reference Book About Revolution? The International Encyclopedia of Revolution and Protest, 1500 to the PresentInside Higher Ed (7-8-09)
  • Michael Oren: Israeli Ambassador in conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg (video) -
    youtube.com (7-2-09)

SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • Niall Ferguson: The Ascent of Money Brings The Economic Crisis Down to Earth on PBS each Wednesday in July – About.com, 6-29-09
  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “The Exodus Decoded” – Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake” – Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: New York: Secret Societies” – Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Antichrist” – Wednesday, July 15, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels: Good or Evil” – Wednesday, July 15, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Lost Worlds: The Real Dracula” – Wednesday, July 15, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “True Story of the Bridge on the River Kwai” – Thursday, July 16, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Lost Pyramid” – Friday, July 17, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Files: The Pacific Bermuda Triangle” – Friday, July 17, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Kennedys: The Curse of Power” – Saturday, July 18, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy” – Saturday, July 18, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Roger S. Bagnall: Oxford Handbook of Papyrology, July 14, 2009
  • David Maraniss: Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World (Reprint), July 14, 2009
  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 3:33 AM

History Buzz July 6, 2009: Drew Gilpin Faust, Harvard President’s Tough Choices & July 4th Myths

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Drew Gilpin Faust “Harvard President School has tough choices in decline”: Drew Gilpin Faust started as Harvard’s president when the university’s prosperity seemed limitless. With its ballooning wealth, Harvard planned almost frenzied growth, from a building boom into Boston to vast increases in student financial aid. Billions of lost endowment dollars later, though, Faust faces a much different reality. “We can’t have chocolate and vanilla and strawberry. We have to decide which one,” she said… – AP, 7-5-09
  • Peter de Bolla “Expert: Fourth of July lore not accurate”: Cultural history Professor Peter de Bolla of King’s College at Britain’s Cambridge University said in a Los Angeles Times story published Saturday that while the Fourth of July is commonly tabbed as Independence Day, July 2 would actually be a more accurate day to celebrate. July 2, 1776, was the day colony delegates voted at the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia to seek independence from Britain, de Bolla said. The history professor said July 4, 1776, was simply the day officials from the 13 colonies chose to make their July 2 ruling public…. – Times of the Internet, 7-5-09
  • Ken Davis “Fun Fourth of July Facts: A Pop Quiz!”: Author Ken Davis Tests “The Early Show” Anchors’ Knowledge of Independence Day – CBS News, 7-3-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Harold James: Who is to Blame?: Now that the economic crisis looks less threatening (at least for the moment), and forecasters are spying “green shoots” of recovery, an ever more encompassing blame game is unfolding. The financial crisis provides an apparently endless opportunity for unmasking deceit, malfeasance, and corruption. But we are not sure quite who and what should be unmasked…. – IBTimes, 7-2-09
  • SARAH VOWELL: A Plantation to Be Proud Of – NYT, 7-5-09

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • John Ferling: First in War, First in Peace, First in Hogging the Credit THE ASCENT OF GEORGE WASHINGTON The Hidden Political Genius of an American IconWaPo, 7-5-09
  • Raymond Arsenault: CIVIL RIGHTS Let Freedom Ring Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened AmericaWaPo, 7-5-09
  • Raymond Arsenault: Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened America, First Chapter – WaPo, 7-5-09
  • Jeffrey Rosen on James MacGregor Burns: THE LAW Black Robe Politics PACKING THE COURT The Rise of Judicial Power and the Coming Crisis of the Supreme Court WaPo, 7-5-09
  • Alan Brinkley on Richard Brookhiser: God and Man at National Review RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE Coming of Age With William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative MovementNYT, 7-5-09
  • Richard Brookhiser: RIGHT TIME, RIGHT PLACE Coming of Age With William F. Buckley Jr. and the Conservative Movement, Excerpt – richardbrookhiser.com
  • Jackson Lears on D. D. Guttenplan: Paper Trail AMERICAN RADICAL The Life and Times of I. F. StoneNYT, 7-5-09
  • Henry Waxman with Joshua Green: POLITICS Moustache of Justice THE WAXMAN REPORT How Congress Really WorksWaPo, 7-5-09
  • Vladislav Zubok: HISTORY Breaking the Bloc ZHIVAGO’S CHILDRENWaPo, 7-5-09

QUOTED:

  • Doris Kearns Goodwin “Barack Obama’s Martha’s Vineyard days to come”: The Obamas face a similar situation that the Clintons did: Neither have their own vacation home or estate. “Unlike FDR, who had Hyde Park, or Lyndon Johnson or George W. Bush who had their own ranches, they need to find a place where they can relax, which the others did by going to their own homes,” said author and historian Doris Kearns Goodwin. The presidential getaway is no small matter: The off-hours have given shape to the imagery of the presidency. Ronald Reagan cultivated a sun-baked masculinity by spending time at Rancho del Cielo, his California ranch. “Once, when an aide told President Reagan that it might be better if he didn’t go to his ranch so much, he said: ‘You can tell me a lot of things, but you can’t tell me that,’” said Goodwin…. Politico, 7-5-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Peggy Noonan calls David McCullough our greatest living historian: On David McCullough: … He is America’s greatest living historian. He has often written about great men and the reason may be a certain law of similarity: He is one also…. – WSJ (7-3-09)

INTERVIEWED:

  • Greg Grandin “Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford’s Forgotten Jungle City”: The book tells the story of Henry Ford, the richest man in the world in the 1920s, a nd his attempt to build a rubber plantation and a miniature Midwest factory town deep in the heart of the Brazilian Amazon. Democracy Now, 7-2-09
  • Johann N. Neem: A nation of joiners, an interview – Boston Globe (6-28-09)

HONORED, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • John W. Hall in place as the first Ambrose-Hesseltine Professor in U.S. Military History: University of Wisconsin at Madison hires military historian – Inside Higher Ed (7-2-09)

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • W.Va. Civil War group debuts at Harpers Ferry Sesquicentennial of John Brown’s Raid kicks off – Journal News, 6-26-09
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • History Channel:
  • Niall Ferguson: The Ascent of Money Brings The Economic Crisis Down to Earth on PBS each Wednesday in July – About.com, 6-29-09
  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest” Marathon – Monday, July 6, 2009 at 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crime Wave: 18 Months of Mayhem” – Monday, July 6, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Crumbling of America ” – Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mega Disasters: San Francisco Earthquake” – Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Aliens” – Tuesday, July 7, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crime Wave: 18 Months of Mayhem” – Wednesday, July 8, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: 13 – Underground Bootleggers” – Wednesday, July 8, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Art of War” – Thursday, July 9, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secrets of the Founding Fathers” – Friday, July 10, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1977-Present” – Friday, July 10, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Rumrunners, Moonshiners and Bootleggers” – Friday, July 10, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa” Marathon – Saturday, July 11, 2009 at 8-12pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Mike Evans (Editor): Woodstock: Three Days That Rocked the World, July 7, 2009
  • Roger S. Bagnall: Oxford Handbook of Papyrology, July 14, 2009
  • David Maraniss: Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World (Reprint), July 14, 2009
  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • Togo W. Tanaka dies at 93; journalist documented life at Manzanar internment camp: In 1942, Togo W. Tanaka and his family were evacuated to Manzanar internment camp, where his “rich daily accounts of everyday life” and his unflinching support of the United States “got him into a lot of trouble,” historians say. Many of his reports were critical of camp administrators and the policy that led to the internment of 10,000 people of Japanese descent, most of whom were U.S. citizens from Los Angeles County. – LAT, 7-5-09
  • Alice L. Cochran: historian and professor at Webster University, dies – www.stltoday.com, (7-2-09)

Posted on Monday, July 6, 2009 at 10:02 PM

History Buzz: June 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

June 29, 2009: Historian’s Remember Michael Jackson’s Historical Impact

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Rock, Pop Historian John Covach Assesses Michael Jackson’s Impact: “Michael Jackson is arguably the most important figure in 1980s popular music…. Younger fans of pop music may have to be reminded how incredibly powerful Michael Jackson’s music was in the 1980s. More than that, Jackson defined “cool” during those years. The single glove, his patented moonwalk step, that slightly rebellious yet gentle demeanor—all this youthful charm slipped away over time, as it does for all of us. But at the height of his powers, Michael Jackson was one of the world’s great entertainers and a pivotal figure in the history of American music. That’s how he should be remembered.” – Rochester University, 6-25-09
  • John Covach “Outpouring over Michael Jackson unlike anything since Princess Di”: “One reason Michael Jackson’s death is having such a wide impact is because his music had such a wide, and even sustained impact,” says John Covach, a music historian at the University of Rochester. “Few artists have so completely saturated the market as Jackson did during the 1980s. It’s comparable to the Beatles in the 60s or Elvis in the 50s. When an artist or performer is so well known and loved, the reaction to his or her passing is bound to be strong and widespread.” “One important difference between Jackson’s career and those of many others is that he was a child star who became an adult star – a very difficult transition to pull off,” says Professor Covach. “Even those who were too young to be fans of Jackson when he was a child have seen the clips of him performing with a mastery far beyond his years. The adult Michael Jackson that fans loved in the 1980s thus already had a bit of history – people felt like they knew him already.” – CS Monitor, 6-29-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Niall Ferguson: Economic historian partnering on sequel to best selling strategy game ‘Making History’ – Gamezone.com (6-25-09)
  • Ed Ayers teaching high school teachers about the South: While summer is often believed to be a time of rest and relaxation for K-12 teachers, more than two dozen high school teachers from 20 states will spend next week as students of “The South in American History,” a course taught by University of Richmond president Edward L. Ayers. The course is part of the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History…. – Press Release–University of Richmond (6-26-09)
  • American Historical Association: AHA protests Russian attempt to suppress history – AHA website, (6-17-09)
  • National Coalition for History: “Ask Congress to Increase Funding for the Office of Museum Services” Lee White at the website of the National Coalition for History (NCH) (6-24-09)

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Sean Wilentz takes on the new Lincoln establishment: Sean Wilentz in a long article reviewing books about Lincoln – The New Republic, 7-15-09

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Gavin Weightman: The Modernizers THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONARIES The Making of the Modern World 1776-1914NYT, 6-28-09
  • Gavin Weightman: THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTIONARIES The Making of the Modern World 1776-1914, Ecerpt- NYT, 6-28-09
  • Christopher Bigsby: Liked but Not Well Liked ARTHUR MILLER 1915-1962NYT, 6-28-09
  • Christopher Bigsby: ARTHUR MILLER 1915-1962, First Chapter – NYT, 6-28-09
  • Stephan Talty: HISTORY A Silent Killer THE ILLUSTRIOUS DEAD The Terrifying Story of How Typhus Killed Napoleon’s Greatest ArmyWaPo, 6-28-09
  • Jackson Lears: Bursting into the Modern Age REBIRTH OF A NATION The Making of Modern America, 1877-1920 WaPo, 6-28-09
  • Nelson Lichtenstein: New Book by UCSB History Scholar Examines Wal-Mart as a Business Model The Retail Revolution: How Wal-Mart Created a Brave New World of Business (Metropolitan Books) – News announcement at the website of USC (6-24-09)

QUOTES:

  • Jeremi Suri “UW-Madison Makes An Unlikely Ally: The Military”: “It really is a group effort to reach out to the military in a way we never have before, at least not in the last 20 to 30 years,” UW-Madison history professor Jeremi Suri said. “We’ve actually in the last few months, out of circumstance, made enormous headway. … We’re getting beyond this really silly notion people have that we’re antimilitary.” – AP, 6-28-09
  • David Eisenbach and David J. Garrow “Why the Gay Rights Movement Has No National Leader”: “The issues of gay rights are mainly state issues, so the focus for activism is going to be on the local level,” said David Eisenbach, a lecturer in history at Columbia University and the author of “Gay Power: An American Revolution.”
    “They see dispersal as a great thing, that it’s better not to have a concentration or too much attention overinvested in one individual,” said David J. Garrow, a Pulitzer Prize-winning historian who has written about the civil rights and women’s rights movements. “The speed and breadth of change has been just breathtaking,” he added. “But it’s happened without a Martin Luther King.” – NYT, 6-21-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Kira Gale: Lewis and Clark in murder mystery 200 years after their final expedition: Meriwether Lewis, one half of the Lewis and Clark explorer duo who first reached the Pacific by land, may have been murdered, say descendants who want his body exhumed.
    Historian Kira Gale, co-author of a new book The Death of Meriwether Lewis, with Professor James Starrs, a forensic pathologist at George Washington University, said: “It’s a tangled web of politics, conspiracies and expansionism.” – Telegraph, UK, 6-29-09
  • Historians’ Advice for Dick Cheney on Writing His Memoirs: Former Vice President Dick Cheney has just signed a deal for his memoirs, reportedly worth around $2 million. President Bush, Laura Bush, Donald Rumsfeld, Karl Rove, Condoleezza Rice and Henry Paulson are also busy writing their takes on their roles in history. The political memoir, either as a summation of the author’s importance or payback to antagonists, has long been seen as a transition back to private life. – NYT (6-27-09)
  • Meet Britain’s young new historians: …They have been an actor, an artist and a TV presenter, are aged between 25 and 35 and they all have book contracts. One wrote his account of the year 1381 in a corner of the trendy London members’ club, Soho House, during leave from his day job at a men’s magazine. And rather than being looked down upon by the old guard, they are highly regarded by the academic establishment: David Starkey is considered a mentor by two of them; Simon Sebag Montefiore by others…. – Oliver Marre in the Guardian (6-28-09)

INTERVIEWS:

  • Wright’s Legacy at Dartmouth College: “No one in my family had gone to college,” Wright said. “And I had never taken it seriously… going into the Marines after high school was one way of delaying going into the mines or working for John Deere or the Kraft cheese plant.”… “I’m a student of history… American history,” Wright said. “I think I’ve had a fascination with history even when I was in elementary school. I recall loving history and reading history texts and there was a story which I found fascinating and enjoyable and I just liked to read history.”… – WCAX, 6-29-09
  • Simon Schama: My Secret Life: Simon Schama, historian, 64 Interview in the Independent (UK) (6-27-09)

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Mark Weiner: Legal Historian Is Named 2009-2010 Chancellor’s Distinguished Research Scholar: Will be honored in February 2010 at Rutgers University in Newark – Rutgers, 6-23-09
  • Historian Gerhard Weinberg: To Receive 2009 Pritzker Military Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement – PRnewswire (6-22-09)
  • Felix V. Matos Rodriguez: Historian Will Lead a Community College in the Bronx Chronicle of Higher Ed (6-26-09)
  • Kemal Karpat: Turkish Parliament bestows historian with award – http://www.hurriyet.com.tr (6-27-09)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • W.Va. Civil War group debuts at Harpers Ferry Sesquicentennial of John Brown’s Raid kicks off – Journal News, 6-26-09
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • Niall Ferguson: The Ascent of Money Brings The Economic Crisis Down to Earth on PBS each Wednesday in July – About.com, 6-29-09
  • ‘History Detectives’ focus on Oak Ridge: Oak Ridge and Knoxville will be in the television spotlight over the next two weeks as PBS’ “History Detectives” investigate the historical significance of two mysterious letters contributed by area residents. Cast members of the television show, “History Detectives,” delve into the “Manhattan Project Patent.” – Oak Ridger, 6-29-09
  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS History Detectives: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Secrets of the Founding Fathers” – Monday, June 29, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “How Bruce Lee Changed the World” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked ” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People” Marathon – Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at 8-10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Underwater Universe” – Wednesday, June 24, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Band Of Brothers” Marathon – Wednesday, July 1, 2009 at 3-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ben Franklin” – Thursday, July 2, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Stealing Lincoln’s Body” – Thursday, July 2, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Kennedy Assassination: Beyond Conspiracy” – Friday, July 3, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Lincoln Assassination” – Friday, July 3, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secrets of the Founding Fathers” – Friday, July 3, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secret Societies” – Friday, July 3, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Seven Signs of the Apocalypse” – Saturday, June 27, 2009 at 12pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents” Marathon – Saturday, July 4, 2009 at 8-12pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Revolution” Marathon – Saturday, July 4, 2009 at 8am-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Mysteries of the Freemasons” – Saturday, July 4, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents” Marathon – Saturday, July 4, 2009 at 8-12pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Crime Wave: 18 Months of Mayhem” – Monday, July 6, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • Michael McMenamin: Becoming Winston Churchill: The Untold Story of Young Winston and His American Mentor, July 1, 2009
  • Elinor Burkett: Golda (Reprint), July 1, 2009
  • Mike Evans (Editor): Woodstock: Three Days That Rocked the World, July 7, 2009
  • Roger S. Bagnall: Oxford Handbook of Papyrology, July 14, 2009
  • David Maraniss: Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World (Reprint), July 14, 2009
  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at 2:29 AM

June 22, 2009: The State Department Improves the Office of the Historian

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Thomas Sugrue: Responds to criticism of his book, citing the myth of the white backlash Sweet Land of LibertyDemocracy (6-15-09)
  • John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr respond to their critics: While we were writing Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in America, based on Alexander Vassiliev’s notebooks, we anticipated a hostile reaction from battered but still rancorous remnants of the pro-Communist left in the academic world and partisan pundits. Together they have denied for more than fifty years that Soviet espionage in the United States in the 1930s and 1940s had much significance, denounced claims linking the Communist Party of the USA (CPUSA) with Soviet espionage, and proclaimed the innocence of many of those identified as Soviet agents…. – Washington Decoded (6-10-09)
  • Martin Kramer: Khalidi’s impact on Obama – Sandbox (6-13-09)
  • Deborah Lipstadt was at Holocaust Museum when shooting took place: I write this from my office in the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum where I have been privileged to have had a fellowship for the past semester. Up until Wednesday at 12:50 p.m., it had been a perfect visit. Everything a scholar could hope for: exceptional scholarly resources and a magnificent museum staff…. – Deborah Lipstadt in a commentary at CNN.com (6-12-09)
  • Garry Wills has nice things to say about Bill Buckley – Atlantic (7-1-09)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Gillian Gill: Married With Children WE TWO Victoria and Albert: Rulers, Partners, RivalsNYT, 6-21-09
  • Gillian Gill: WE TWO Victoria and Albert: Rulers, Partners, Rivals, Excerpt – NYT, 6-21-09
  • Donald McRae: Darrow for the Defense THE LAST TRIALS OF CLARENCE DARROWWaPo, 6-21-09
  • Clay Risen: HISTORY A Country Shaken A NATION ON FIRE America in the Wake of the King Assassination WaPo, 6-21-09
  • Karen Greenberg: Before Guantanamo Was Above the Law THE LEAST WORST PLACE Guantanamo’s First 100 Days WaPo, 6-21-09
  • Frank Gannon on Kevin Mattson: Days of ‘Malaise’ Ah, the Jimmy Carter era: presidential scolding, gas lines, Studio 54 and the ‘killer rabbit’ WSJ, 6-20-09
  • David Beito, Linda Royster Beito: Say bias has excluded civil rights leader T.R.M. Howard from pantheon Black Maverick: T.R.M. Howard’s Fight for Civil Rights and Economic PowerHarper’s (6-11-09)

QUOTES:

  • Allan Brandt talks about the decline of big tobacco: “My own view is that in many ways, the tobacco industry invented the kind of special-interest lobbying that has become so characteristic of the late 20th- and earlier 21st-century American politics,” said Allan Brandt, dean of Harvard’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. “Today obviously, that lobby is much less powerful and successful than it was a generation ago,” said Brandt, author of “The Cigarette Century: The Rise, Fall, and Deadly Persistence of the Product That Defined America.”… – CNN (6-19-09)
  • Jeffrey Wasserstrom “Debunking the Shanghai myth”: Thus says noted historian Jeffrey Wasserstrom, who debunks the “East meets West” image of Shanghai. This label fails to capture the multitude of Western voices and Chinese viewpoints facing off and converging there, argues the author of Global Shanghai 1850-2010: A History In Fragments, published this year. “Global” Shanghai today is as much a hotpot for East-meets-East as West-meets-West. Yet, Professor Wasserstrom, who teaches history at the University of California, Irvine, himself was once victim to what he calls the “fairy tale versions of Shanghai”. He confesses to having felt “let down” during his first two visits to Shanghai in the 1980s, when he was confronted with “the contrast between the drab city I found…and the exciting one I had conjured up in my imagination”. Malaysian Insider, 6-21-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Bradley R. Simpson “Historian Claims West Backed Post-Coup Mass Killings in ’65″: Speaking on the opening day of an international conference in Singapore to discuss arguably the darkest chapter in Indonesia’s history, Bradley R. Simpson, an assistant professor at Princeton University and an expert on Indonesia, said that the US and British governments did everything in their power to ensure that the Indonesian army would carry out the mass killings…. – http://thejakartaglobe.com (6-17-09)
  • Kathryn Olmsted: UC Davis historian catalogs US secrets, lies and conspiracies Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11Press Release (6-17-09)

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Henry Louis Gates, Jr. “Historian says Golden Horseshoe started path to success”: Henry Louis Gates, Jr., began his ascent as a renowned historian by winning what he would later call the “the Nobel Prize of eighth graders in West Virginia,” the Golden Horseshoe…. – Charleston Daily Mail, 6-19-09
  • Patricia McMahon Houser: An assistant professor of geography at Central Connecticut State University, is Putnam’s new county historian…. – The Journal News, 6-4-09

ANNOUNCEMENTS & SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 2009: National Archives Continues Year-Long 75th Anniversary Celebration in June with H.W. Brands, Donald Ritchie, Robert Remini – Press Newswire, 5-28-09
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • BBC to launch new series on history of Christianity – Religious Intelligence, 6-19-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Violent Earth: Nature’s Fury: New England’s Killer Hurricane” – Monday, June 22, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: Heavy Metal” – Monday, June 22, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Crumbling of America” – Monday, June 22, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “How Bruce Lee Changed the World” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Comic Book Superheroes Unmasked ” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Next Nostradamus” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: Waters of Death” – Tuesday, June 23, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Underwater Universe” – Wednesday, June 24, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Mysteries of the Bermuda Triangle” – Wednesday, June 24, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Rome: Engineering an Empire” – Thursday, June 18, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hippies ” – Friday, June 19, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: 60′s, 70′s, 80′s, 90′s Tech” Marathon- Friday, June 19, 2009 at 4-8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battle 360″ Marathon – Friday, June 26, 2009 at 3-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People” Marathon – Friday, June 26, 2009 at 8-11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Seven Signs of the Apocalypse” – Saturday, June 27, 2009 at 12pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People” Marathon- Saturday, June 27, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • Michael McMenamin: Becoming Winston Churchill: The Untold Story of Young Winston and His American Mentor, July 1, 2009
  • Elinor Burkett: Golda (Reprint), July 1, 2009
  • Mike Evans (Editor): Woodstock: Three Days That Rocked the World, July 7, 2009
  • Roger S. Bagnall: Oxford Handbook of Papyrology, July 14, 2009
  • David Maraniss: Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World (Reprint), July 14, 2009
  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, June 22, 2009 at 12:38 AM

June 15, 2009: The Future of Diplomatic History & The Holocaust Museum Shooting

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Avinoam Patt: University Of Hartford Professor Says Holocaust Museum Shooting Is Evidence Anti-Semitism Still Exists: “The museum is very threatening to deniers. It is not just a memorial but a museum that makes a statement to nearly 2 million visitors a year, educating people about the cancer of genocide,” said Avinoam Patt, who teaches American and European Jewish history…. – Hartford Courant, 6-11-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

    On This Day in History….

    This Week in History…. June , 2009

  • John Lewis Gaddis “June 1979, the Nine Days of John Paul II”: Thirty years ago, the Bishop of Rome returned to Poland for the first time since his recent election to the papacy. America’s premier Cold War historian, John Lewis Gaddis of Yale, is not ambiguous in his judgment of what happened next: “When John Paul II kissed the ground at the Warsaw airport on June 2, 1979, he began the process by which communism in Poland—and ultimately everywhere—would come to an end.” Professor Gaddis is right: the Nine Days of John Paul II, June 2-10, 1979, were an epic moment on which the history of the 20th century pivoted, and in a more humane direction…. – Catholic Star Herald, 6-11-09

IN THE NEWS:

  • Great Caesar’s Ghost! Are Traditional History Courses Vanishing?: To the pessimists evidence that the field of diplomatic history is on the decline is everywhere. Job openings on the nation’s college campuses are scarce, while bread-and-butter courses like the Origins of War and American Foreign Policy are dropping from history department postings. And now, in what seems an almost gratuitous insult, Diplomatic History, the sole journal devoted to the subject, has proposed changing its title…. – NYT, 6-10-09
  • Australian National University professor David Horner: Professor to write ASIO history: ASIO has commissioned an historian to write an unclassified history of the spy agency as its new headquarters take shape…. – The Age, Australia, 6-12-09
  • John Hope Franklin: Brooklyn College Celebrates Historian and Announces Award and Conference in His Name – Brooklyn College, 6-8-09
  • Randolph-Macon Woman’s College Professor and Historian Margaret Pertzoff: Wintergreen Farm owner leaves $1.4M bequest to Randolph College – Nelson County Times, 6-

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Paul Krugman vs. Neill Ferguson: Letting the Data Speak – NYT, 6-16-09
  • Derek J. Penslar: Contested Space Maps in Teaching About Israel – Shma, 6-12-09

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Michael Kazin on Simon Schama: What So Proudly He Hails THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryWaPo, 6-14-09
  • Simon Schama: THE AMERICAN FUTURE A History, Chapter One – WaPo, 6-14-09
  • Simon Schama: Despite the Crises, Seeing a Star-Spangled Destiny in the Mirror of Time THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryNYT, 6-9-09
  • Simon Schama: The American Future: A History Historian Simon Schama offers a portrait of America with its complexities and contradictions. – CS Monitor, 6-15-09
  • Vincent J. Cannato: American Passage: The History of Ellis Island ‘American Passage’: It’s Ellis Island’s history, and ours, too – USA Today, 6-15-09
  • BEVERLY GAGE on Jackson Lears: American Macho REBIRTH OF A NATION The Making of Modern America, 1877-1920NYT, 6-14-09
  • Gillian Tett: Rewriting the Rules FOOL’S GOLD How the Bold Dream of a Small Tribe at J. P. Morgan Was Corrupted by Wall Street Greed and Unleashed a CatastropheNYT, 6-14-09
  • Gillian Tett: FOOL’S GOLD How the Bold Dream of a Small Tribe at J. P. Morgan Was Corrupted by Wall Street Greed and Unleashed a Catastrophe, First Chapter – NYT, 6-14-09
  • Chris Bray on Doug Stanton: The Stuff of Which Movies Are Made HORSE SOLDIERS The Extraordinary Story of a Band of U.S. Soldiers Who Rode to Victory in AfghanistanWaPo, 6-14-09
  • Robert Fulford on D.D. Guttenplan, John Earl Haynes: Two views on I.F. Stone American Radical: The Life and Times of I.F. Stone, Spies: The Rise and Fall of the KGB in AmericaNational Post, 6-14-09

QUOTES:

  • Bill Clinton: Historian John Hope Franklin was ‘angry, happy man’: The late historian John Hope Franklin was “an angry, happy man” whose work as the head of a commission on race helped pull the country together, former President Bill Clinton said Thursday. Clinton was one of a dozen speakers at a service at Duke Chapel to honor Franklin and his wife, Aurelia, who would have celebrated their 69th wedding anniversary Thursday….
    “Now, we’re laughing,” Clinton said. “But the man was 80 years old. He was perhaps the most distinguished living American historian. He did write this in a funny way. And he wrote it in a way that you knew he didn’t think it was funny. He was a genius at being a passionate rationalist. An angry, happy man. A happy, angry man.”…
    In 1997, Clinton appointed Franklin to lead his Initiative on Race. Because of that report and Franklin’s work on it, “we are a different country,” Clinton said. “For 10 years, we’ve been working to become a communitarian country. After being known as a country know by our divisions from 1968 to 2008, people know us as a country known by our unity. His life and work in no small measure helped to produce that.” – AP
  • Michal Belknap “Get a Life? Not If You Want to Be One of the Nine The debate building up to the Sonia Sotomayor confirmation hearings suggests that real-world experiences are of suspect value in administering the law. Really?”: Michal Belknap, a historian and law professor at California Western School of Law, is writing a biography of Justice Tom Clark, who was appointed to the court in 1949 after practicing oil and gas law. “As far as I’m aware,” Belknap said, “nobody ever asked him whether his background as an oil and gas lawyer would influence his thinking in oil and gas cases. The reason they gave them to him was that he was the only person who could understand those cases.”… – MillerMcCune.com

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Alex Roland: After four decades, is America over the moon?: Four decades after the first lunar landing, a series of new missions revives debate over their value – The Arizona Republic, 6-14-09
  • Christopher Howse “Why Queen Mary wanted to burn: Queen Mary’s abbreviated reign can now be, if not forgiven, at least understood, says Howse…. – Telegraph, UK, 6-12-09
  • Divided We Stand: What would California look like broken in three? Or a Republic of New England? With the federal government reaching for ever more power, redrawing the map is enticing, says Paul Starobin… – WSJ, 6-13-09
  • Jean Libby: John Brown’s legacy hasn’t changed; America has – AP, 6-13-09

INTERVIEWS:

  • For Timothy Garton Ash, Europe Means Shared History: What does it mean to be European, and what is Europe’s future? For answers, RFE/RL correspondent Ahto Lobjakas spoke to the British historian and essayist Timothy Garton Ash in the Estonian capital Tallinn after attending “Rethinking Enemies of Open Society,” a forum organized by the Open Estonia Foundation…. – RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty, 6-7-09

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Dr. William Anthony Hay: Elected as a Fellow of Britain’s Royal Historical Society after writing about a historical period that had yet to receive much scholarly attention, “The Whig Revival: 1808 – 1830″…. – Starkville Daily News, 6-15-09
  • Historian Stephen B. Oates was honored recently with a lifetime achievement award from the Abraham Lincoln Group of New York: “I was ecstatic,” Oates said. “It wasn’t anything I expected.” Oates who has received numerous awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Book Award said, “This probably tops them all.” – MassLive.com, 6-14-09
  • Peter Bol, Vincent Brown, Ann Harrington: Six faculty named Walter Channing Cabot Fellows Chosen for accomplishments in literature, history, or art – Harvard University Gazette, 6-11-09
  • Susan Cahan: Art historian selected for newly created deanship: Yale College Dean Mary Miller announced Thursday the appointment of Susan Cahan, the associate dean for academic affairs of the College of Fine Arts and Communication at the University of Missouri-St. Louis, the newly created position of associate dean for the arts in Yale College…. – Yale Daily News, 6-11-09
  • The historian and scholar and principal of Aberdeen University, Professor C Duncan Rice, receives a knighthood: Three university vice-chancellors and a head teacher have received knighthoods in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list…. – BBC, 6-12-09

ANNOUNCEMENTS & SPOTTED:

  • Harvey Kaye: UW-Green Bay professor discussed Thomas Paine on PBS program “Bill Moyers’ Journal” – UW-Green Bay, 6-9-09

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 2009: National Archives Continues Year-Long 75th Anniversary Celebration in June with H.W. Brands, Donald Ritchie, Robert Remini – Press Newswire, 5-28-09
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Clash of the Cavemen” – Monday, June 15, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Universe: Beyond the Big Bang” – Monday, June 15, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People” – Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Underwater Universe” – Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: The Road to Nowhere” – Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Real Tomb Hunters: Snakes, Curses, and Booby Traps” – Wednesday, June 17, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Discoveries: Ancient New York” – Wednesday, June 17, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Rome: Engineering an Empire” – Thursday, June 18, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hippies ” – Friday, June 19, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: 60′s, 70′s, 80′s, 90′s Tech” Marathon- Friday, June 19, 2009 at 4-8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 03 – Hunters Become The Hunted” – Friday, June 19, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Hunters” Marathon – Saturday, June 13, 2009 at 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Band of Brothers” Marathon – Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 1:30-8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Secret Access: Air Force One ” – Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Presidents: 1885-1913″ – Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Andrew Jackson” – Saturday, June 20, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 04 – African Monsoon” – Sunday, June 21, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • Michael McMenamin: Becoming Winston Churchill: The Untold Story of Young Winston and His American Mentor, July 1, 2009
  • Elinor Burkett: Golda (Reprint), July 1, 2009
  • Mike Evans (Editor): Woodstock: Three Days That Rocked the World, July 7, 2009
  • Roger S. Bagnall: Oxford Handbook of Papyrology, July 14, 2009
  • David Maraniss: Rome 1960: The Summer Olympics That Stirred the World (Reprint), July 14, 2009
  • Buzz Aldrin: Magnificent Desolation: The Long Journey Home from the Moon, July 23, 2009
  • Alice Morse Earle: Child Life in Colonial Times (Paperback), July 23, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family (Paperback), September 8, 2009
  • Jon Krakauer: Where Men Win Glory: The Odyssey of Pat Tillman, September 15, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • Philip D. Curtin: Longtime Johns Hopkins University professor reshaped the history of the African slave trade – WaPk, 6-14-09
  • Him Mark Lai: Dies at 83; scholar was called dean of Chinese American studies – LAT, 6-14-09
  • PATRICIA MARCIA CRAWFORD, HISTORIAN: Inquisitive woman for the ages – The Age, Australia, 6-12-09
  • Professor Perez Zagorin: Who has died on April 26 aged 88, was an American historian who specialised in the English Civil War but was shunned by the academic establishment in his own country during the McCarthy era… – Telegraph, UK, 6-9-09

Posted on Tuesday, June 16, 2009 at 12:57 AM

June 8, 2009: Remembering D-Day’s 65th Anniversary

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Emmanuel Thiebot “D-Day+ 65 years: Obama set to make Normandy landing”: Emmanuel Thiebot, historian at Memorial Center for History museum near Caen, says Allies did not expect the kind of resistance offered by the Germans. “The Allies weren’t expecting such resistance. There was a large difference between the Allied plans and what happened,” Mr. Thiebot says. “War crimes would mean a targeting of the city or civilians,” says Thiebot. “The bombing was a side-effect of the war strategy, not a targeting.” Nonetheless, he adds, “Asking new questions is always a good thing in history … for many years these were taboo subjects.”… – CS Monitor, 6-6-09
  • Antony Beevor: ‘History has not emphasised enough the suffering of French civilians during the War’ – Independent UK, 6-6-09
  • Terry Copp “D-Day’s bloody toll unclear 65 years later 5,000 Canadians died as Normandy campaign continued until August”: “No one could possibly have kept track of who was killed or missing that day,” says Wilfrid Laurier University historian Terry Copp. “Landing craft were emerging from the mist, these kids were scrambling across the beach under fire. All they could do was run, dodge bullets, pray and get to the beach wall.” But with scholarly “world-class research,” Canadians have tried to get the numbers right, says Copp, author of the 2003 book Fields of Fire: The Canadians in Normandy. “There’s been no similar effort by the British or Americans. Various estimates have been put forward, but I’ve never seen a breakdown as thorough as that provided by Stacey.”… – Toronto Star, 6-6-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Col. Sergei Kovalyov “Russian military historian blames Poland for WWII”: “Everyone who has studied the history of World War II without bias knows that the war began because of Poland’s refusal to satisfy Germany’s claims,” he writes. Kovalyov called the demands “quite reasonable.” He observed: “The overwhelming majority of residents of Danzig, cut off from Germany by the Treaty of Versailles, were Germans who sincerely wished for reunification with their historical homeland.”… – AP, 6-5-09

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • MAX BOOT on Andrew Roberts: Gang of Four MASTERS AND COMMANDERS How Four Titans Won the War in the West, 1941-1945: A joint biography of Winston Churchill, Franklin Roosevelt and their senior military advisers Alan Brooke and George C. Marshall…. – NYT, 6-7-09
  • Vincent J. Cannato: Weeding Out the Weak AMERICAN PASSAGE The History of Ellis IslandWaPo, 6-7-09

QUOTES:

  • Andrew Roberts “‘World war three? That’s already happened’ Why don’t our children know our history?”: “It just takes your breath away,” said acclaimed historian Andrew Roberts, author of The Storm Of War, a new history of the second world war, which is published in August. “How can people not be interested in what their family did in the war? It seems to fly against human nature to not show at least some curiosity about something like that. “Families sharing stories is vital. It is not always objective when it comes to history, you’ll find a lot of grandfathers saying they won the second world war single-handedly, but what it does is spark a general interest. A healthy interest in the greatest events of our times is an absolute prerequisite to make informed decisions today.”… – Sunday Herald, 6-7-09
  • Judy Yung “Budget cuts threaten ‘Ellis Island of the West’”: “Can you imagine recommending Ellis Island be closed? That was our Plymouth rock, for our history as an ethnic American group,” said historian Judy Yung. “It would mean a part of our past is being closed to us.” Yung picnicked on Angel Island as a high school student, unaware her father had been detained there for a month in 1921. Like many others, after his release he never discussed Angel Island, said Yung…. – AP, 6-7-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Andrew S. Dolkart “A Starter Sanctuary”: CHAPTER 1 Robert Henderson Robertson designed what is today St. John the Martyr Church, built in 1887. It was the first phase of a larger church never completed… – NYT, 6-7-09
  • Margaret A. Weitekamp: A Star Is Reborn: Smithsonian Gets Piece of Astroland History – WaPo, 6-5-09
  • Simon Rawidowicz: Historian is the subject of a book about Israel – Jerry Haber at The Magnes Zionist (blog) (6-2-09)

INTERVIEWS:

  • For Timothy Garton Ash, Europe Means Shared History: What does it mean to be European, and what is Europe’s future? For answers, RFE/RL correspondent Ahto Lobjakas spoke to the British historian and essayist Timothy Garton Ash in the Estonian capital Tallinn after attending “Rethinking Enemies of Open Society,” a forum organized by the Open Estonia Foundation…. – RadioFreeEurope/RadioLiberty, 6-7-09
  • Father Marvin O’Connell Looking to the past: Father Marvin O’Connell, professor emeritus of history at the University of Notre Dame and a priest of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis, recently sat down with a Catholic Spirit reporter to discuss his new book, “Pilgrims to the Northland: The Archdiocese of St. Paul, 1840-1962.” – Catholic Spirit, 6-4-09
  • Olivia Remie Constable: Interview with the Director of Notre Dame’s Medieval Institute – http://medievalnews.blogspot.com (6-1-09)
  • Anthony Grafton: Deception as a Way of Knowing: A Conversation with Anthony Grafton – Cabinet (Spring) (5-1-09)

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Light T. Cummins: Austin College Professor Named Texas State Historian – KTEN News, 6-6-09
  • Jonathan Reed Winkler “Author to receive Roosevelt Naval History prize”: The 2009 Theodore and Franklin D. Roosevelt Naval History Prize will be awarded to Jonathan Reed Winkler for his book “Nexus: Strategic Communications and American Security in World War I” (Harvard University Press, 2008). – Poughkeepsie Journal, 6-5-09
  • Daniel W. Barefoot: Heritage Award Ceremony: On Sunday, June 14, 2009, at 3:00 pm in the Lincoln Cultural Center Timken Performance Hall, the Lincoln County Historical Association and Lincoln County Historic Properties Commission will honor Dan Barefoot with the 2009 Heritage Award. – Lincoln Tribune, 6-7-09

ANNOUNCEMENTS & SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 2009: National Archives Continues Year-Long 75th Anniversary Celebration in June with H.W. Brands, Donald Ritchie, Robert Remini – Press Newswire, 5-28-09
  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Egypt: Engineering an Empire” – Monday, June 8, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Underground Apocalypse” – Monday, June 8, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: 10 – Beneath Vesuvius”, “Cities Of The Underworld: Maya Underground” – Monday, June 8, 2009 at 5-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Hillbilly: The Real Story” – Monday, June 8, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 02 – First Victim” – Monday, June 8, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Dark Ages” – Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Barbarians II: Saxons” – Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Viking Underground” – Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Seven Signs of the Apocalypse” – Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: Armed & Defenseless” – Tuesday, June 9, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Beltway Unbuckled” – Wednesday, June 10, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The White House: Behind Closed Doors ” – Wednesday, June 10, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Making a Buck” – Thursday, June 11, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces” – Friday, June 12, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Alcatraz Down Under” – Friday, June 12, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Patton 360: Siege Warfare” – Friday, June 12, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 02 – First Victim” – Friday, June 12, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “UFO Hunters” Marathon – Saturday, June 13, 2009 at 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Underwater Universe” – Saturday, June 13, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Modern Marvels: Walt Disney World.” – Saturday, June 13, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 03 – Hunters Become The Hunted” – Sunday, June 14, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Vincent J. Cannato: American Passage: The History of Ellis Island, June 9, 2009
  • Larry Tye: Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend, June 9, 2009
  • Matthew Aid: The Secret Sentry: The Untold History of the National Security Agency, June 9, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, June 8, 2009 at 2:46 AM

June 1, 2009: Annette Gordon-Reed wins the George Washington Book Prize

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Annette Gordon-Reed: $50,000 George Washington Book Prize Awarded to Reed for The Hemingses of Monticello – Press Release–Washington College (5-29-09)
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: Add Washington Book Prize to the ‘Hemingses’ Haul The Hemingses of Monticello: An American FamilyWaPo (5-29-09)

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Edmund S. Morgan: Celebrating Quiet Heroism AMERICAN HEROES Profiles of Men and Women Who Shaped Early America Herein a collection of 17 essays written over a span of some 70 years, three previously unpublished and 14 previously uncollected in book form, by one of the most distinguished and influential historians of Colonial America. It is the 18th book Edmund S. Morgan has published in his 93 years (he also has edited five others) and further evidence of the depth and breadth of his research, the nimbleness of his mind and his willingness to dissent from received wisdom…. – WaPo, 5-31-09
  • Jill Jonnes: Lightning Rods and Sideshows EIFFEL’S TOWER And the World’s Fair Where Buffalo Bill Beguiled Paris, the Artists Quarreled, and Thomas Edison Became a CountNYT, 5-31-09
  • Michael Shapiro: Squeeze Play BOTTOM OF THE NINTH Branch Rickey, Casey Stengel, and the Daring Scheme to Save Baseball From ItselfNYT, 5-31-09
  • Simon Schama: Writer Simon Schama envisions The American Future’ by studying the past THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryCleveland Plain-Dealer, 5-31-09
  • Iain Fenlon: History and function of Venice’s great piazza excavated: be there or be square Piazza San MarcoIrish Times, 6-1-09
  • Michael Novak: George Washington Urged American Governors to Imitate Christ Washington’s God: Religion, Liberty, and the Father of Our CountryCNSnews.com (5-31-09)
  • Steven Hahn: A new book by historian takes up the hidden history of African American politics and the politics of writing history The Political Worlds of Slavery and FreedomU. of Penn. website (Click here to watch video.), (5-1-09)

QUOTES:

  • Nelson Lichtenstein “GM boom years full of big-time success”: Nelson Lichtenstein — a labor history professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and author of “The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit,” a 1995 biography of Reuther — noted constant change is characteristic of the economy that produced GM. “Capitalism is an unstable system,” he said. “Just ask the ox cart builders of England or the radio assemblers of Camden.” But Lichtenstein added: “As one who has studied how the UAW battled GM for decades and decades, I never emotionally thought it would go into bankruptcy.” – Detroit Free Press, 5-31-09
  • Robert E. Wright “Real Money Men”: Prof. Robert E. Wright, a financial historian at New York University, suggested changing the definition to real, or inflation-adjusted, dollars. In that case, one can make an argument for John Jacob Astor (1763-1848), the fur trader and Manhattan real estate magnate. “Undoubtedly a New Yorker, Astor was worth about $20 million nominal upon his death,” Professor Wright said in an e-mail message. Depending on the method of calculation used, that was the equivalent of $421 million to $119 billion today. The results vary widely depending on the goods and services one compares from different eras, but if one chooses the method that produces the highest figure, some 18th-century New Yorker might have hit one billion even earlier, Professor Wright said. – NYT, 5-29-09
  • Tom Segev “Israeli historian praises German democracy”: “The most important reason for the success of democracy is that the majority of Germans – though not always voluntarily – took responsibility for the crimes of the Nazi regime, the war and in particular the Holocaust,” Segev wrote in the left-leaning liberal newspaper Haaretz. “Most Germans have drawn the right lessons from their past, among them the defence of civil rights and the limits on the army.” – www.thelocal.de, (5-24-09)

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • >Andrew Roberts, Richard Overy: How will history judge this decade? While journalists write about ‘the moment,’ historians,who write about longer trends, say it is too early to tellhow far-reaching the effects of the noughties may be… – Guardian UK, 5-29-09
  • LSU’s T. Harry Williams Oral History Center: Center goes to the source to collect area histories – The Advocate, 5-31-09
  • Stan Sandler: “Stan the History Man” – Fay Observer, 5-30-09
  • Alan Houston: UCSD professor finds a collection of Franklin letters in the British Library – Del Mar Times, 5-29-09
  • Zachary Martin: Passsion for history and Kennedy intrigue leads to new book for Fairhaven native The Mindless Menace of Violence: Robert F. Kennedy’s Vision and the Fierce Urgency of NowSouth Coast Today, 5-28-09
  • New York State’s hidden treasure- town historians – www.examiner.com, (5-24-09)

INTERVIEWS:

  • Annette Gordon-Reed: Add Washington Book Prize to the ‘Hemingses’ Haul Interview The Hemingses of Monticello: An American FamilyWaPo (5-29-09)
  • Niall Ferguson “Ireland set to go bust”: “The idea that countries don’t go bust is a joke,” said Niall Ferguson, Harvard professor and author of The Ascent of Money. “The debt trap may be about to spring” he said, “for countries that have created large stimulus packages in order to stimulate their economies.” His chosen prime candidate to go bust is “Ireland, followed by Italy and Belgium, and UK is not too far behind”…. – Belfast Telegraph, 5-29-09
  • Ric Burns: Interviewed about new PBS Indian history documentary – Mother Jones (5-29-09)

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Annette Gordon-Reed: $50,000 George Washington Book Prize Awarded to Reed for The Hemingses of Monticello – Press Release–Washington College (5-29-09)
  • Annette Gordon-Reed: Add Washington Book Prize to the ‘Hemingses’ Haul The Hemingses of Monticello: An American FamilyWaPo (5-29-09)
  • Ann Blair, Henry Charles Lea Professor of History: One of four faculty to join FAS’s teaching elite – Named Harvard College Professors in five-year appointment – Harvard University, 5-28-09
  • Ronald W. Walker, Richard E. Turley and Glen M. Leonard: A long-awaited book on the infamous Mountain Meadows Massacre has received the Best Book Award from the Mormon History Association Massacre at Mountain MeadowsMormon Times, (5-23-09)

ANNOUNCEMENTS & SPOTTED:

  • Steven T. Usdin: The Rosenberg Archive, fascinating electronic archive of primary source documents about the Rosenberg case now online – Rosenberg Archive (Wilson Center) (5-28-09)
  • Mary Rubin “Historian says Virgin Mary made into ‘normal mum’ to widen Christianity’s appeal”: Speaking at the Hay Festival in Wales, Mary Rubin, the author of Mother of God – A History of the Virgin Mary, said the transformation took place in the 11th and 12th century, with images of her knitting and cooking…. – Source: Telegraph (UK) (5-27-09)

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 2009: National Archives Continues Year-Long 75th Anniversary Celebration in June with H.W. Brands, Donald Ritchie, Robert Remini – Press Newswire, 5-28-09
  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “The Universe: Beyond the Big Bang” – Monday, June 1, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Underwater Universe” – Monday, June 1, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 01 – Lost in Africa” – Monday, June 1, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Alaska: Dangerous Territory” – Tuesday, June 2, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “How the Earth Was Made” – Tuesday, June 2, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: Sin City Meltdown” – Tuesday, June 2, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Aliens” – Wednesday, June 3, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “A Global Warning?” – Thursday, June 4, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “American Eats: History on a Bun” – Friday, June 5, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Patton 360: On Hitler’s Doorstep” – Friday, June 5, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 01 – Lost in Africa” – Friday, June 5, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “10 Days to D-Day ” – Saturday, June 6, 2009 at 1pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Einstein” – Saturday, June 6, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “D-Day: The Lost Evidence” – Saturday, June 6, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Expedition Africa: 02 – First Victim ” – Sunday, June 7, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Robert Jacobs: Apollo: Through the Eyes of the Astronauts, June 1, 2009
  • Vincent J. Cannato: American Passage: The History of Ellis Island, June 9, 2009
  • Larry Tye: Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend, June 9, 2009
  • Matthew Aid: The Secret Sentry: The Untold History of the National Security Agency, June 9, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2009 at 3:52 AM

History Buzz: May 2009

History Buzz

By Bonnie K. Goodman

Ms. Goodman is the Editor/Features Editor at HNN. She has a Masters in Library and Information Studies from McGill University, and has done graduate work in history at Concordia University.

May 25, 2009

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Caroline E. Janney: Historian remembers Memorial Day holiday’s beginnings: “Credit really goes to thousands of Southern white women who were honoring Confederate soldiers a year after the Civil War ended,” says Caroline E. Janney, an assistant professor of history. “The women led these celebrations because if Confederate men would have organized memorials in 1866, just after the war ended, their actions would have been considered treason.” “Instead, women planned each event, and the men were figuratively hiding behind the skirts of these women. What many people didn’t realize is that these women, who are often portrayed as politically indifferent, were keeping politics in mind while planning these events.” – KPCnews.com, 5-21-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

  • Antony Beevor: Historian has been accused of trying to get publicity for his new book, D-Day: The Battle for Normandy Allies bombing on D-Day ‘close to war crime’, claims historian The Allied bombing of the French city of Caen on D-Day was “close to a war crime”, according to leading historian Antony Beevor – Telegraph UK, 5-24-09
  • Russian President Dmitry Medvedev: Creates History Commission – WSJ, 5-21-09
  • Professor Marco Maiorino, a Vatican historian of papal diplomacy: Vatican discloses Henry VIII’s annulment appeal “The schism came later,” he said. “They were loyal to the sovereign, but at this point the spiritual supremacy of Rome was not in question.” – Times UK Online, 5-22-09
  • Oklahoma History Center to close two days of week – Source: http://www.newsok.com (5-21-09)
  • National Security Archive Testifies to House Oversight Committee About Challenges Facing National Archives: At a hearing today focusing on the National Archives and Records Administration and the selection of a new Archivist, National Security Archive General Counsel Meredith Fuchs said: “[The new Archivist] should have a vision for an Archives 2.0.”… – Source: Press Release (5-21-09)
  • James Lowen, James McPherson: Scholars Ask Obama Not to Send a Wreath to Confederate Memorial – Source: Press Release by James Loewen (5-19-09)
  • Frederick Clarkson: Will Obama Honor the Confederacy This Year?: Presidents since Woodrow Wilson have annually sent a commemorative wreath to the Confederate Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. Up until the presidency of George H.W. Bush, the wreath was sent on or near the birthday of Confederate president, Jefferson Davis. Since then, the wreath has been sent on Memorial Day. One might think that this is a practice birthed in a generosity of spirit and healing of the war that had so deeply divided the nation. Unfortunately the truth is that the monument commemorates not the dead so much as the cause of the confederacy, and stands to this day as a rallying point for white supremacy. This is why scholars Edward Sebestaco-editor of “Neo-Confederacy: A Critical Introduction,” University of Texas Press, and James Loewen, Professor Emeritus of Sociology, University of Vermont, joined by some 65 others (including me) sent a letter to president Obama asking him to end the practice…. – Daily Kos, 5-22-09

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

  • Daniel Pipes: A History of Muslim Terrorism against Jews in the United States: The arrest yesterday of four would-be jihadis before they could attack two synagogues in New York City brings to mind a long list of terrorist assaults in the United States by Muslims on Jews. These began in 1977 and have continued regularly since, as suggested by the following list of major incidents (ignoring lesser ones that did damage only to property, such a series of attacks on Chicago-area synagogues)… – Source: Daniel Pipes website (5-21-09)
  • Julian E. Zelizer: Democrats play defense on security – Source: CNN (5-20-09)
  • John Steele Gordon: Why Government Can’t Run a Business – Source: WSJ (5-20-09)

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Simon Schama: Mirror on America THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryNYT, 5-22-09
  • Simon Schama: THE AMERICAN FUTURE A History, First Chapter – NYT, 5-22-09
  • Simon Schama: Looking to America’s past to find a path for the future THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryBoston Globe, 5-24-09
  • Simon Schama: Schama Looks At History For ‘American Future’ THE AMERICAN FUTURE A HistoryNPR, 5-20-09
  • Benny Morris: No Common Ground ONE STATE, TWO STATES Resolving the Israel/Palestine ConflictNYT, 5-24-09
  • Benny Morris: ONE STATE, TWO STATES Resolving the Israel/Palestine Conflict, First Chapter – NYT, 5-24-09
  • T.J. Stiles: The Man Who Owned America THE FIRST TYCOON The Epic Life of Cornelius VanderbiltWaPo, 5-24-09
  • T.J. Stiles: THE FIRST TYCOON The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, Excerpt – WaPo, 5-24-09
  • Edith B. Gelles: Abigail & John Portrait of a Marriage: Gelles’ “Abigail & John” does something different, bringing the two strands together in a dual biography that shows how their lives connected, diverged and reconnected over time…. – San Francisco Chronicle, 5-24-09
  • Dr. Richard Hull: Historian Publishes latest book on Jews in African history Jews and Judaism in African HistoryStraus News, 5-22-09
  • Paramour of Kennedy Is Writing a Book – Mimi Beardsley Alford, a retired New York church administrator who had an affair with John F. Kennedy while she was an intern in the White House, is breaking a silence of more than 40 years to tell her story in a memoir to be published by Random House. NYT, 5-22-09
  • Eugene D. Genovese: In a new book, Genovese describes a devoted and intellectually stimulating partnership with his late wife, also a historian of note Miss Betsey: A Memoir of MarriageSource: Chronicle of Higher Ed (5-22-09)
  • Ronald C. White Jr.: BOOKS: A. Lincoln - Valdosta Daily Times, 5-18-09
  • Elliott West: ‘As big as the land’ UA professor writes book on Nez Perce war of 1877 The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce StoryNorthwest Arkansas Times, 5-10-09

QUOTES:

  • John Allswang “California voters exercise their power — and that’s the problem Residents relish their role in the lawmaking process, but they share the blame for the state’s severe dysfunction”: Together, voters’ piecemeal decisions since the 1970s have effectively “emasculated the Legislature,” said John Allswang, a retired Cal State L.A. history professor. “They’re looking for cheap answers — throw the guys out of power and put somebody else in, or just blame the politicians and pretend you don’t have to raise taxes when you need money,” he said. “This is what the public wants, and they deceive themselves constantly. They’re not realistic.”… – LAT, 5-22-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Rodney Davis: In Civil War, Woman Fought Like A Man For Freedom – NPR, 5-23-09
  • Mary Witkowski: In the Region, Connecticut A Crumbling Piece of History: Historians are concerned about the fate of structures on Main Street in Bridgeport that are said to be the only remnants of an antebellum community of free blacks and runaway slaves. – NYT, 5-24-09
  • Max Boot, Paul Collier, Simon Schama: Civil Wars: The Fights That Do Not Want to End – NYT, 5-24-09
  • Annette Gordon-Reed for the US Supreme Court?: Is New York Law School’s Annette Gordon-Reed, the Pulitzer Prize-winning law professor/historian, on President Obama’s Supreme Court “short list”?… Probably not. But they appear on the short lists of more than a dozen constitutional law and Supreme Court scholars asked by The National Law Journal to step into Obama’s shoes to pick a nominee to succeed retiring Justice David Souter…. Source: National Law Journal (5-18-09)

INTERVIEWS:

  • Robert Hinton: The Story Of The Plantation That Moved Away, Midway Plantation – NPR, 5-23-09
  • Interview: Simon Schama celebrates John Donne: The historian Simon Schama talks about why the death of arts programming is a national disaster…. – Telegraph UK, 5-22-09
  • Romila Thapar: Kluge Prizewinner Discusses Perceptions of India’s Past – Source: Pillarisetti Sudhir at the AHA Blog (5-19-09)
  • James M. Banner Jr. and John R. Gillis: New book asks historians how they became historians Becoming Historians Editor responded to questions about the book – Source: Inside Higher Ed (5-18-09)
  • James Cuno: Treaty on antiquities hinders access for museums, says past president of the Association of Art Museum Directors – Source: Science News (3-28-09)

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Historian Jack Greene Honored by National Humanities Center: Jack P. Greene, the Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus in the Humanities in the Department of History at Johns Hopkins, has been selected as one of 33 fellows at the National Humanities Center for the 2009-2010 academic year. – The JHU Gazette, 5-18-09

SPOTTED:

  • The Mormon History Association’s annual conference: MHA opening session: A religious backdrop to the Civil War – Mormon Times, 5-22-09
  • Ken Burns tells Boston College grads to revisit history: “History is not a fixed thing, a collection of precise dates, facts, and events that add up to a quantifiable, certain, confidently known truth,” Burns said. “It is an inscrutable and mysterious and malleable thing. Each generation rediscovers and reexamines that part of its past that gives its present – and, most important, its future – new meaning and new possibilities.”… – Source: Boston Globe (5-19-09)

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)
  • August 1, 2009: An Evening with Ken Burns: Kens Burns has been making documentary films for more than 30 years. Since the Academy Award-nominated Brooklyn Bridge in 1981, he has gone on to direct and produce some of the most acclaimed historical documentaries ever made. The late historian Stephen Ambrose said of Burns’ films, “More Americans get their history from Ken Burns than any other source.” This evening will afford Chautauqua an opportunity to hear one of the most influential documentary makers of all time. Chautauqua Institutition. For more info 716-357-6200. – Jamestown Post-Journal, 5-21-09

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest” Marathon – Sunday, May 24, 2009 at 8-11pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest” Marathon – Monday, May 25, 2009 at 2-8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Decoding The Past: Mayan Doomsday Prophecy” – Monday, May 25, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Link” – Monday, May 25, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People” Marathon – Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels & Demons Decoded” – Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: Bound and Buried” – Tuesday, May 26, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “MonsterQuest” Marathon – Wednesday, May 27, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Beyond The Da Vinci Code” – Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels & Demons Decoded” – Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Behind The Da Vinci Code” – Thursday, May 28, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Battles BC” Marathon – Friday, May 22, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Link ” – Friday, May 29, 2009 at 9pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ice Road Truckers” Marathon – Saturday, May 23, 2009 at 12-11pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Geoffrey Blainey, Sea of Dangers: Captain Cook and His Rivals in the South Pacific, May 25, 2009
  • Richard Ben-Veniste: Emperor’s New Clothes: Exposing the Truth from Watergate To 9/11, May 26, 2009
  • Robert Jacobs: Apollo: Through the Eyes of the Astronauts, June 1, 2009
  • Vincent J. Cannato: American Passage: The History of Ellis Island, June 9, 2009
  • Larry Tye: Satchel: The Life and Times of an American Legend, June 9, 2009
  • Matthew Aid: The Secret Sentry: The Untold History of the National Security Agency, June 9, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009
  • Caroline Moorehead: Dancing to the Precipice: The Life of Lucie de la Tour du Pin, Eyewitness to an Era, June 30, 2009
  • William A. DeGregorio: The Complete Book of U.S. Presidents, Seventh Edition, August 15, 2009
  • Douglas Hunter: Half Moon: Henry Hudson and the Voyage That Redrew the Map of the New World, September 1, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • David Herbert Donald: Famed Lincoln Scholar David Herbert Donald Dies: “He was not only one of the best historians of our era but he was also one of the classiest and most generous scholars I have ever met,” said Doris Kearns Goodwin, author of Team of Rivals, a best-selling Lincoln biography. – NPR, 5-19-09
  • David Herbert Donald: Writer on Lincoln, Dies at 88 – NYT, 5-19-09

Posted on Sunday, May 24, 2009 at 1:19 AM

May 18, 2009: Phillip Zelikow Testifies on Torture

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Richard J. Evans: ‘We Are All Guilty’ THE THIRD REICH AT WARSource: NYT, 5-17-09
  • Bruce Kuklick: America’s First Legal Coup IMPEACHED The Trial of President Andrew Johnson and the Fight for Lincoln’s LegacySource: WaPo, 5-15-09
  • David C. Frederick: LAW SCOTUS Seizes Power THE GREAT DECISION Jefferson, Adams, Marshall, and the Battle for the Supreme CourtSource: WaPo, 5-15-09
  • Philipp Freiherr von Boeselager: WORLD WAR II Targeting Hitler VALKYRIE Source: WaPo, 5-15-09
  • Ronald Hutton: Blood and Mistletoe: The History of the Druids in Britain By Ronald Hutton: review As Ronald Hutton’s Blood and Mistletoe makes clear, we like the idea of the Druids so much that we’ve made up almost everything we know about them, says Noel Malcolm – Source: Telegraph, UK, 5-14-09

QUOTES:

  • William R. Pinch “No Food for Thought: The Way of the Warrior”: You have to marvel at how Lt. Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, a former Special Operations commander and the newly appointed leader of American forces in Afghanistan, does it….
    “The Christians grafted notions of piety and reverence onto asceticism, but the Greeks saw it as about power,” said William R. Pinch, a history professor at Wesleyan University. “They believed you could create power by disciplining the body.” – Source: NYT, 5-16-09

PROFILES & FEATURES:

INTERVIEWS:

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)

ON TV:

  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “The Hitler Conspiracy ” – Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Nostradamus: 2012″ – Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Life After People: The Invaders” – Tuesday, May 19, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “God vs. Satan” – Wednesday, May 20, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ku Klux Klan: A Secret History” – Thursday, May 21, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “he True Story of Charlie Wilson” – Friday, May 22, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Cities Of The Underworld: Alcatraz Down Under” – Friday, May 22, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Band Of Brothers” Marathon – Saturday, May 23, 2009 at 12-11pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Simon Schama, American Future: A History, May 19, 2009
  • Geoffrey Blainey, Sea of Dangers: Captain Cook and His Rivals in the South Pacific, May 25, 2009
  • Richard Ben-Veniste: Emperor’s New Clothes: Exposing the Truth from Watergate To 9/11, May 26, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009

DEPARTED:

  • Professor Norman Gash: Gash, who died on May 1 aged 97, was one of the foremost scholars of 19th–century Britain and an acknowledged authority on Sir Robert Peel – Source: Telegraph, UK, 5-17-09

Posted on Monday, May 18, 2009 at 1:36 AM

May 11, 2009: Professor Runs for President of Sudan & Obama’s History Budget

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Jeff Guinn, Paul Schneider: Outlaws in Love GO DOWN TOGETHER The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde, BONNIE AND CLYDE The Lives Behind the LegendNYT, 5-10-09
  • Jeff Guinn: GO DOWN TOGETHER The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde, First Chapter – NYT, 5-10-09
  • MICHAEL KAZIN on T. J. Stiles: Ruthless in Manhattan THE FIRST TYCOON The Epic Life of Cornelius VanderbiltNYT, 5-10-09
  • T. J. Stiles: THE FIRST TYCOON The Epic Life of Cornelius Vanderbilt, Excerpts – NYT, 4-29-09
  • Susan Jacoby: A Clash of Symbols ALGER HISS AND THE BATTLE FOR HISTORYNYT, 5-10-09
  • Susan Jacoby: ALGER HISS AND THE BATTLE FOR HISTORY, First Chapter – NYT, 5-10-09
  • John Dittmer: Bancroft Prize Recipient Prof. Publishes The Good DoctorsDePauw University, 5-9-09
  • Juan Cole: Islamophobia ENGAGING THE MUSLIM WORLDNYT, 5-7-09
  • Peter W. Rodman: The Deciders and How They Decided PRESIDENTIAL COMMAND Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy From Richard Nixon to George W. BushNYT, 5-8-09
  • Peter W. Rodman: PRESIDENTIAL COMMAND Power, Leadership, and the Making of Foreign Policy From Richard Nixon to George W. Bush, First Chapter – NYT
  • Benjamin Carter Hett on Richard J. Evans: HISTORY Brutally Violent and Destined for Defeat THE THIRD REICH AT WARWaPo, 5-10-09
  • Leslie H. Gelb: A Wonky Witness to History POWER RULES How Common Sense Can Rescue American Foreign Policy WaPo, 5-10-09
  • Diana Butler Bass: RELIGION Christian Conundrums A People’s History of ChristianityWaPo, 5-10-09
  • Kathleen Burk: Professor looks at relationship between Britain and USA Swindon Advertiser, 5-6-09
  • Allan M. Winkler: History professor writes book on Pete Seeger To Everything There is a Season: Pete Seeger and the Power of SongSource: Press Release–Miami University (Ohio) (4-30-09)

QUOTES:

  • Alan Sked “Inbreeding May Have Doomed Spain’s Habsburg Dynasty” Enfeebled and sterile, Charles II’s genes made him the last of his line, researchers say: The family faced a challenge because they needed to marry Catholic spouses of equal rank — a rarity — and because dynastic marriages were used to keep territories within the family’s grasp, explained Alan Sked, a historian at the London School of Economics and Political Science. What would have happened if the Habsburgs hadn’t married each other? Sked, the historian, said “there would have been changes in alliances, boundaries and policies. Most of all, the Habsburgs would have produced more capable and intelligent rulers.” – Forbes, 5-8-09
  • William Loren Katz: Historian notes that Reagan wanted torturers put on trial – Source: William Loren Katz in an email circulating on the Internet (5-2-09)

PROFILES & FEATURES:

INTERVIEWS:

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

  • Bruce Moran: Named Outstanding Researcher of the Year at the University of Nevada, Reno – UNR NevadaNews, 5-6-09
  • Ken Heineman: Ohio University Lancaster veteran leaving Lancaster to head up history department in Texas – Lancaster Eagle Gazette, 5-3-09
  • Ken Coates, Whitney Lackenbauer, William Morrison: Arctic Front sweeps the Donner Three historians and one political scientist share $35,000 prize for best book on Canadian public policy Arctic Front: Defending Canada in the Far NorthGlobe and Mail, 4-30-09

SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)

ON TV:

  • PBS, Monday April 20, at 9pm: Seeing History Through Indians’ Eyes: “We Shall Remain” NYT, 4-12-09 (pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain)
  • Donald Fixico: History professor advises new PBS documentary “We Shall Remain” – ASU Web Devil, 4-21-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Art of War” – Sunday, May 3, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Plague” – Tuesday, May 12, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Lost Pyramid” – Wednesday, May 13, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Patton 360″ Marathon – Friday, May 15, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The Templar Code” – Friday, May 15, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Last Stand of The 300″ – Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Angels & Demons Decoded” – Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Beyond The Da Vinci Code” – Saturday, May 16, 2009 at 10pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Thomas Childers: Soldier from the War Returning: The Greatest Generation’s Troubled Homecoming from World War II, May 13, 2009
  • Simon Schama, American Future: A History, May 19, 2009
  • Geoffrey Blainey, Sea of Dangers: Captain Cook and His Rivals in the South Pacific, May 25, 2009
  • Richard Ben-Veniste: Emperor’s New Clothes: Exposing the Truth from Watergate To 9/11, May 26, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009

Posted on Monday, May 11, 2009 at 2:02 AM

May 4, 2009: Historian Michael Oren Named Israel Ambassador to US

HISTORY BUZZ:

POLITICAL HIGHLIGHTS:

BIGGEST NEWS STORIES:

  • Michael Oren: Appointed to US envoy role from Israel – Jerusalem Post, 5-2-09
  • New book says FDR tried to save Jewish refugees: A new book disputes widely held assumptions that President Franklin D. Roosevelt was insensitive to the plight of European Jews under the Nazis, and instead concludes that he tried to arrange resettlement for thousands of refugees in the late 1930s, only to be thwarted by his own State Department. The book, “Refugees and Rescue,” claims FDR developed plans in 1938 for the United States to fill its immigration quota with 27,000 Jews from Germany and Austria and to send others to British-held Palestine and friendly nations in Africa and Latin America…. – AP, 5-1-09

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY:

IN THE NEWS:

OP-EDs & BLOGS:

REVIEWS & FIRST CHAPTERS:

  • Mark Rudd: Years of Rage UNDERGROUND My Life With SDS and the WeathermenNYT, 5-3-09
  • Mark Rudd: UNDERGROUND My Life With SDS and the Weathermen, First Chapter – NYT, 5-3-09
  • Raymond Arsenault: Voice of America THE SOUND OF FREEDOM Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened AmericaNYT, 5-3-09
  • Raymond Arsenault: THE SOUND OF FREEDOM Marian Anderson, the Lincoln Memorial, and the Concert That Awakened America, From Chapter 5, “Sweet Land of Liberty” – NYT, 5-3-09
  • Thomas Parrish: Inside Lend-Lease TO KEEP THE BRITISH ISLES AFLOAT FDR’s Men in Churchill’s London, 1941NYT, 5-3-09
  • James Mann, William Kleinknecht: Books About Ronald Reagan The Great Enigma THE REBELLION OF RONALD REAGAN A History of the End of the Cold War, THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD Ronald Reagan and the Betrayal of Main Street AmericaNYT, 5-3-09
  • Ernest B. Furgurson on Winston Groom: HISTORY The Key in Lincoln’s Pocket VICKSBURG, 1863WaPo, 5-3-09
  • Winston Groom: VICKSBURG, 1863, First Chapter – WaPo, 5-3-09
  • Alec Wilkinson, Allan M. Winkler: Two compelling new Pete Seeger books are timed to the folk singer reaching age 90 The Protest Singer, To Everything There is a SeasonThe Plain Dealer, 5-2-09
  • Richard Breitman, Barbara McDonald Stewart and Severin Hochberg: Roosevelt and the Jews: A Debate Rekindled Refugees and Rescue: The Diaries and Papers of James G. McDonald, 1935-1945 “It is a book that will change the consensus about the role of President Roosevelt,” said Deborah Lipstadt, a leading expert on the Holocaust, who has read some sections. It “compels historians — both those who have vilified F.D.R. and those who have sanctified him — to rethink their conclusions.” – NYT, 4-30-09
  • Daniel James Brown: Desperate Journey THE INDIFFERENT STARS ABOVE The Harrowing Saga of a Donner Party BrideNYT, 5-1-09
  • Jon A. Shields: New study claims Christian right leaders teach careful moral reasoning and civics The Democratic Virtues of the Christian RightSource: NYT (4-24-09)

QUOTES:

  • David McCullough: Historian warns against ‘instant history’ of Obama’s first 100 days during Drew U. speech: “I think we have an extraordinary president. He has the makings of one of the most remarkable presidents ever,” said McCullough, 75, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner for his books on American history. “The man is amazing… He has the capability to move people with words.” – Source: NJ Star-Ledger (4-29-09)

PROFILES & FEATURES:

  • Sheryl Cohn: UCF Professor: Revise Holocaust Education, Nazis’ persecution of Jews should be taught as standalone course: “One of my messages is the Holocaust is a standalone event,” she said. “It needs to be taught separately from World War II.” – The Ledger, 5-3-09
  • Norton Mezvinsky: Professor called brilliant, inspiring, biased, dangerous: The controversial Central Connecticut State University icon, in his final lecture last week, found pathos in his life story and struck an American Gothic aura in his championing of radical causes. – Bristol Press, 5-2-09
  • James J. Lorence: Retired UWMC history professor a forever student, teacher – Wausau Daily Herald, 5-1-09
  • Museums: In Berlin, Teaching Germany’s Jewish History – NYT, 5-2-09
  • Michael Burleigh: In his new book Burleigh’s NOT writing about the Third Reich – Source: NYT (4-24-09)

INTERVIEWS:

HONORS, AWARDED &APPOINTED:

SPOTTED:

EVENTS CALENDAR:

  • June 11-14, 2009: The ninth annual “Reacting to the Past” Institute at Barnard College (New York), Annual summer history institute at Barnard College – Source: Press Release (4-21-09)

ON TV:

  • PBS, Monday April 20, at 9pm: Seeing History Through Indians’ Eyes: “We Shall Remain” NYT, 4-12-09 (pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain)
  • Donald Fixico: History professor advises new PBS documentary “We Shall Remain” – ASU Web Devil, 4-21-09
  • C-SPAN2: BOOK TV Weekend Schedule
  • PBS American Experience: Mondays at 9pm
  • History Channel: Weekly Schedule
  • History Channel: “Art of War” – Sunday, May 3, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “How the Earth Was Made” Marathon – Tuesday, May 5, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “The States” Marathon – Thursday, May 5, 2009 at 2-7pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “USS Constellation: Battling for Freedom” – Friday, May 8, 2009 at 2pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Titanic’s Final Moments: Missing Pieces” – Friday, May 8, 2009 at 4pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Deep Sea Detectives: Slave Ship Uncovered!” – Friday, May 8, 2009 at 6pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Patton 360″ Marathon – Saturday, May 9, 2009 at 2-5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Art of War” – Sunday, May 9, 2009 at 5pm ET/PT
  • History Channel: “Ancient Aliens ” – Saturday, May 9, 2009 at 8pm ET/PT

BEST SELLERS (NYT):

COMING SOON BOOKS:

  • Thomas Childers: Soldier from the War Returning: The Greatest Generation’s Troubled Homecoming from World War II, May 13, 2009
  • Simon Schama, American Future: A History, May 19, 2009
  • Geoffrey Blainey, Sea of Dangers: Captain Cook and His Rivals in the South Pacific, May 25, 2009
  • Richard Ben-Veniste: Emperor’s New Clothes: Exposing the Truth from Watergate To 9/11, May 26, 2009
  • Douglas Brinkley, Wilderness Warrior: Theodore Roosevelt and the Crusade for America, 1858-1919, June 30, 2009

DEPARTED:

Posted on Sunday, May 3, 2009 at 4:36 PM

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